Emile durkheim

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Emile durkheim

  1. 1. Crime and Suicide
  2. 2. <ul><li>David Émile Durkheim   (April 15, 1858 – November 15, 1917) was a French sociologist. He formally established the academic discipline and, with  Karl Marx  and Max Weber, is commonly cited as the principal architect of modern social science. </li></ul><ul><li>Durkheim set up the first European department of sociology at the University of Bordeaux in 1895, publishing his  Rules of the Sociological Method . In 1896, he established the journal  L'Année Sociologique . Durkheim's seminal monograph,  Suicide  (1897), a study of suicide rates amongst Catholic and Protestant populations, pioneered modern social research and served to distinguish social science from psychology or political philosophy. </li></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>Durkheim refined the positivism* originally set forth by Auguste Comte, promoting epistemological** realism and the hypothetico-deductive*** model. For him, sociology was the science of institutions, its aim being to discover structural &quot;social facts&quot;. Durkheim was a major proponent of structural functionalism****, a foundational perspective in both sociology and anthropology. In his view, social science should be purely holistic; that is, sociology should study phenomenas attributed to society at large, rather than being limited to the specific actions of individuals. Durkheim remained a dominant force in French intellectual life until his death in 1917, presenting numerous lectures and published works on a variety of topics, including social stratification, religion, law, education, and deviance. Marcel Mauss, a notable social anthropologist of the pre-war era, was his nephew. Durkheimian terms such as &quot;collective conscience&quot; have since entered the popular discourse. </li></ul>*Positivism  refers to a set of epistemological perspectives and philosophies of science which hold that the scientific method is the best approach to uncovering the processes by which both physical and human events occur. ** Epistemology  or  theory of knowledge  is the branch of philosophy concerned with the nature and scope (limitations) of knowledge. *** A model which describes the way in which all the different branches of science work It describes the process of finding out new information about the world **** Functionalism  is a theory of the mind in contemporary philosophy, developed largely as an alternative to both the identity theory of mind and behaviourism. Its core idea is that mental states (beliefs, desires, being in pain, etc.) are constituted solely by their functional role — that is, they are causal relations to other mental states, sensory inputs, and behavioral outputs (Block, 1996).
  4. 4. Crime <ul><li>Durkheim's views on crime were a departure from conventional notions. He believed that crime is &quot;bound up with the fundamental conditions of all social life&quot; and serves a social function. He stated that crime implies, &quot;not only that the way remains open to necessary change, but that in certain cases it directly proposes these changes... crime [can thus be] a useful prelude to reforms.&quot; In this sense he saw crime as being able to release certain social tensions and so have a cleansing or purging effect in society. He further stated that &quot;the authority which the moral conscience enjoys must not be excessive; otherwise, no-one would dare to criticize it, and it would too easily congeal into an immutable form. To make progress, individual originality must be able to express itself...[even] the originality of the criminal... shall also be possible&quot; (Durkheim, 1895). </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X9DgtZ0fbL0 </li></ul>
  5. 5. Suicide Book <ul><li>In  Suicide  (1897), Durkheim </li></ul><ul><li>explores the differing suicide rates among Protestants and Catholics, </li></ul><ul><li>arguing that stronger social control </li></ul><ul><li>among Catholics results in lower </li></ul><ul><li>suicide rates.  </li></ul><ul><li>Suicide  was one of the groundbreaking books in the field of sociology. Written by French sociologist Émile Durkheim and published in 1897 it was a case study of suicide, a publication unique for its time which provided an example of what the sociological monograph should look like. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Suicide Findings <ul><li>Durkheim established that: </li></ul><ul><li>Suicide rates are higher in men than women (although married women who remained childless for a number of years ended up with a high suicide rate) </li></ul><ul><li>Suicide rates are higher for those who are single than those who are married </li></ul><ul><li>Suicide rates are higher for persons without children than persons with children </li></ul><ul><li>Suicide rates are higher among Protestants than Catholics and Jews </li></ul><ul><li>Suicide rates are higher among soldiers than civilians </li></ul><ul><li>Suicide rates are higher in times of peace than in times of war (the suicide rate in France fell after the  coup d'etat  of Louis Bonaparte, for example. War also reduced the suicide rate, after war broke out in 1866 between Austria and Italy, the suicide rate fell by 14% in both countries.) </li></ul><ul><li>Suicide rates are higher in Scandinavian countries </li></ul><ul><li>the higher the education level, the more likely it was that an individual would commit suicide, however Durkheim established that religion was more important than education; Jewish people were generally highly educated but had a low suicide rate. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Suicide Types <ul><li>Durkheim stated that there are four types of suicide: </li></ul><ul><li>Egoistic suicides  are the result of a weakening of the bonds that normally integrate individuals into the collectivity: in other words a breakdown or decrease of social integration. Durkheim refers to this type of suicide as the result of &quot;excessive individuation&quot;, meaning that the individual becomes increasingly detached from other members of his community. Those individuals who were not sufficiently bound to social groups (and therefore well-defined values, traditions, norms, and goals) were left with little social support or guidance, and therefore tended to commit suicide on an increased basis. An example Durkheim discovered was that of unmarried people, particularly males, who, with less to bind and connect them to stable social norms and goals, committed suicide at higher rates than married people. </li></ul><ul><li>Altruistic suicides  occur in societies with high integration, where individual needs are seen as less important than the society's needs as a whole. They thus occur on the opposite integration scale as egoistic suicide. As individual interest would not be considered important, Durkheim stated that in an altruistic society there would be little reason for people to commit suicide. He stated one exception, namely when the individual is expected to kill themselves on behalf of society – a primary example being the soldier in military service. </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>Anomic suicides  are the product of moral deregulation and a lack of definition of legitimate aspirations through a restraining social ethic, which could impose meaning and order on the individual conscience. This is symptomatic of a failure of economic development and division of labour to produce Durkheim's organic solidarity. People do not know where they fit in within their societies. Durkheim explains that this is a state of moral disorder where man's desires are limitless and, thus, his disappointments are infinite. </li></ul><ul><li>Fatalistic suicides  occur in overly oppressive societies, causing people to prefer to die than to carry on living within their society. This is an extremely rare reason for people to take their own lives, but a good example would be within a prison; people prefer to die than live in a prison with constant abuse and excessive regulation that prohibits them from pursuing their desires. </li></ul><ul><li>These four types of suicide are based on the degrees of imbalance of two social forces: social integration and moral regulation. Durkheim noted the effects of various crises on social aggregates – war, for example, leading to an increase in altruism, economic boom or disaster contributing to anomie. </li></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>http://www.public.iastate.edu/~s2005.soc.401/suicide(jan21).pdf </li></ul><ul><li>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%89mile_Durkheim </li></ul><ul><li>http:// www.sociologyguide.com/thinkers/Durkheim.php </li></ul><ul><li>http://quizlet.com/841334/soc-352-test-2-emile-durkheim-flash-cards/ </li></ul>

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