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Beginning of the year writing unit grades 3 6

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Grade 3-6 launching units for writing workshop (getting started with the writing notebook)

Grade 3-6 launching units for writing workshop (getting started with the writing notebook)

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  • Hi D B,

    I've been reading about Notebook. Is there anyway to download this or you can email this to me. I'm starting a new job as a 4th/5th grade multiage teacher. I'm swamped, but having this would help and I can add as the year goes on.
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Beginning of the year writing unit grades 3 6 Beginning of the year writing unit grades 3 6 Document Transcript

  • Possible Beginning of the Year Writing Unit Schedule (grades 3-6) Modify as needed (this is a starting place/ideas only)Tables of ContentsPossible unit objectives: ................................................................................................................................. 3About this document ....................................................................................................................................... 3Thinking about notebooks .............................................................................................................................. 4 What goes in/out of the writing notebook according to Notebook Know-How by Aimee Buckner (p. 14) ................................................................................................................................................................. 4 What might be in the writing folder: ........................................................................................................... 4Unit Schedule .................................................................................................................................................. 5 Day 1: Launch Writer’s Workshop Using 10 steps for independence - Assessment .......................... 6 Day 2: Launching- Assessment ................................................................................................................ 7 Day 3: Create a Heart Map ........................................................................................................................ 7 Day 4: Notebook Expectations................................................................................................................ 10 Day 5: personalize/decorate the writing notebooks. .............................................................................. 11 Day 6: Introduce Plan Boxes .................................................................................................................... 11 Day 6: History of a Name or Writing from a Word ................................................................................ 12 Day 7: Time Writing or Free Writing ........................................................................................................ 15 Day 8/9: Strategy: Writing From a list...................................................................................................... 16 Day 10: Strategy – Observation ............................................................................................................... 17 Day 11: Strategy – Question/Wonder or Prompt.................................................................................... 18 Day 11: Strategy – Question/Wonder or Prompt.................................................................................... 19 Day 12: Strategy – Writing off Literature ................................................................................................. 20 Day 13/14: Strategy – Rereading/Highlighting ....................................................................................... 22 Day 13/14: Strategy: Lifting a Line .......................................................................................................... 23 Day 15: Choice or reteaching or teaching of a missed strategy ........................................................... 24Some addition strategy lessons ................................................................................................................... 24 Strategy: Use Materials from your Life (Fletcher) .................................................................................. 24 Strategy: Record Conversations (Fletcher) ............................................................................................ 24 Strategy: Write down your dreams .......................................................................................................... 24 Strategy: Write a letter to someone ......................................................................................................... 24 Strategy: Find the poem in your writing................................................................................................... 24 Strategy: Read the Room ......................................................................................................................... 25Some additional ideas for mini-lessons on rituals and routines ............................................................... 25 Day 16: Finding Patterns .......................................................................................................................... 26 Day 17-20................................................................................................................................................... 26Expanding on a Topic Strategies................................................................................................................. 27 Strategy: Listing the Possibilities ............................................................................................................. 27 1
  • Strategy: Writing from Another Point of View, ........................................................................................ 28 Strategy: 3 word phrases in 3 minutes .................................................................................................... 29More Expanding The Topic Strategies… .................................................................................................... 30 Strategy: Favorite collection ..................................................................................................................... 30 Strategy: Interviews ................................................................................................................................... 30 Strategy: K-N-T.......................................................................................................................................... 30 Strategy: Talk to Me .................................................................................................................................. 30 Strategy: Make it visual............................................................................................................................ 30 Go to College ............................................................................................................................................. 30 Strategy: Circle of Light ............................................................................................................................ 31Revising Strategies (done after drafting) .................................................................................................... 32 Grabber Leads ........................................................................................................................................... 32 Strategy: Try 10 ......................................................................................................................................... 33 Strategy: Genre Switch (NF to Fiction) ................................................................................................... 33 Strategy: Genre Switch ............................................................................................................................. 33 Strategy: Slowing down the hot spot ....................................................................................................... 34 Strategy: Crack Open Words ................................................................................................................... 34 Strategy: Make a Metaphor ...................................................................................................................... 34 Make a list poem ....................................................................................................................................... 34 Strategy: Mapping the Text ...................................................................................................................... 35 Mapping the Text Example ....................................................................................................................... 36 Strategy: Genre Anchor charts ................................................................................................................ 37 Anchor Chart for Plot ................................................................................................................................ 38 S-W-B-S Story Summaries....................................................................................................................... 39 Venn Diagram Summaries ....................................................................................................................... 39 Strategy: Rule of 3..................................................................................................................................... 40 Strategy: Add a closer............................................................................................................................... 40 Strategy: Add an interrupter or compound descriptor or both ............................................................... 40 Strategy: Add introductory elements to sentences followed by comma .............................................. 41Editing Strategies .......................................................................................................................................... 42 Strategy: Reading backwards .................................................................................................................. 42 Strategy: Color Coding Paragraph Structure .......................................................................................... 42 Strategy: Ending Punctuation................................................................................................................... 43 Strategy: Punctuating Compound Sentences ........................................................................................ 44Editing Checklist Example: ........................................................................................................................... 45Steps in Writing Conference ........................................................................................................................ 46Draft Personal Narrative Unit Schedule ...................................................................................................... 48 2
  • Possible unit objectives:  Build my writing stamina  Create a community of writers (see themselves as writers, willing to share writing, safe place, see value in their writing and their ideas, see their strengths as writers, focus on content not conventions)  Establish classroom routines and procedures for the writing workshop (writing notebooks, writing folders, coming to the carpet, read alouds, sharing, conferring, plan boxes)  Build a repertoire of writing strategies and writing topics  Read great books by great writers and discuss writing genres  Learn to type (During these first weeks, you may elect to complete Type to Learn/Media Lessons during Writers Workshop. If you do that, utilize a portion of your reading block to begin writing lessons.)  Experience the writing process planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishingAbout this document  Dana created this document based on the information she had from several books and websites. It is not the end all be all. It is a starting point based on what teacher’s knowledge and work during summer break.   Below (page 4) is a possible schedule for the beginning of the year unit. These are just suggestions/ideas and do not need to be followed in order, you do not need to all of them, etc. Do what makes sense for your students and your teaching style.  Toward the end of this document are many strategies for revision and editing. You will probably use very few of these in the first unit but they may be helpful throughout the year!  Remember, it is important to read aloud to students throughout the year, especially at the beginning of the year to create a list of literature that you can refer back to in lessons. You may need to do read alouds that you can reference in WW during other times of the day (transitions, breakfast, reading workshop, etc.)  Once students have built community and fluency, begin the Launching Unit (Calkins ideas). A draft schedule for the first Calkins units is at the end of this document. 3
  • Thinking about notebooks  Do you have a time in the day that students could write (daily journal writing) for 5-10 minutes (bell ringer)? Daily journal writing is a good task to do outside of the writing workshop.  Where do you want to store their notebooks?  Do you want students to skip lines? Write on all lines? Skip pages? Use all pages?  Where to start new entries? (first blank space – separate with a line, new page, etc.)  Number pages? Where?  Date pages? Where?  Will notebooks go home? What can they use if they wish to write at home?  Will you have a table of contents for the writing notebook?  What writing utensils do you want students to use?  Will students have a writing folder for storing tools (personal dictionaries), etc.?  Do you want students to decorate/personalize notebooks?  Will notebooks have a table of contents where students record entry topics or strategies tried?What goes in/out of the writing notebook according to Notebook Know-How by Aimee Buckner (p. 14) In the Notebook Out of the Notebook Daily Entries (strategies for launching the Drafts (whole piece is written out on yellow legal notebook) pad or other paper) Finding Patterns (rereading and marking patterns Revisions (Revisions the author wants to use are in writing) added/deleted from the piece) Collecting around a topic (strategies for thinking Editing (Editing the actual piece before writing the about a topic – expanding/narrowing) final copy is done on the draft) Revisions (trying differing things for a draft) Final Copy (white paper or another published format) Editing Grammar Notes (class notes on grammar and editing skills may possibly be stored in the back of the notebook) Many things work – what works for you and your students? There is no one right answer. Try something – start somewhere - and find out what works for you. What might be in the writing folder:  Personal dictionary or personal or class word wall  Rubrics  Drafts of writing pieces  Editing checklists  Strategy notes or tips (these could also be at the back of the writing notebook)  List of writing pieces students have taken through drafting/publishing and genres  Notes on various aspects of genres (these could also be at the back of the writing notebook) 4
  • Unit Schedule Read Aloud stories in Readers Workshop and other times of the day and reference those texts in WW. Incorporate SHARING time at the end of lessons. Implement a Bell Ringer (breakfast, after recess, etc.) for short daily journaling. Day 1 Day 2 Day 3 Day 4 Day 5Lesson: Launch Writing Workshop Strategy: Prompt Writing – Routine: Transitioning to/from the Routine: Notebook Expectations Review & practice Using 10 steps for Independence Revision/Editing (assessment) Meeting area routines/rules Strategy: heart map (select Strategy: Prompt Writing Strategy: Create heart maps something/someone from your Personalize writers notebook (assessment) Share heart maps heart map to write about) Routines for SharingSuggested Read Alouds: Books you love and authors you love, Chrysanthemum, The Name Jar, My Name is Yoon, My name is Sangoel, Rene Has Two Last Names, House onMango Street: My Name, The Relatives Came by Rylant, Owl Moon by Yolen, The Borning Room by Fleishman, Nothing Ever Happens on 90th Street by Roni Schotter, You Haveto Write by Janet S. Wong, The Best Story by Eileen Spinelli, Amelia Writes Again by Marissa Moss, Library Mouse by Daniel Kirk, The Mystery of Harris Burdick by ChristopherVan Allsburg, Ish by Peter H Reynolds Day 6 Day 7 Day 8 Day 9 Day 10 Strategy: History of a Name Routine: Review Plan Boxes Routine: Review Plan Boxes Routine: Review Plan Boxes Routine: Review Plan Boxes and/or Writing from a Word Strategy: Timed Writing Strategy: Writing from a List Strategy: Writing From a List Strategy: Observation Routine: Introduce Plan Boxes (continued) (Best things that happened to me list and select 1 thing to write an (Worst Things list and select one entry) thing to write more about)Suggested Read Alouds: books by Donald Crews, Fire Flies! - Julie Brinckloe, Fly Away Home -Eve Bunting and Ronald Himler, The Sweetest Fig-Chris Van Allsburg, Peter’s Chair-Ezra Jack Keats, The Paper Boy-Dav Pilkey, Our Tree Named Steve-Alan ZweibelKeepers by Alice Schertle (poetry), Twilight Comes Twice (Fletcher), The Great Frog Race(O’Connell George), I’m In charge of Celebrations (Baylor) Day 11 Day 12 Day 13 Day 14 Day 15 Strategy: Question/Wonder Writing off Literature Strategy: Rereading/Highlighting Strategy: Lifting a Line Strategy: Choice (select from taught Or Or and Rereading/Highlighting strategies) or teach a strategy Strategy: Prompt Choice from taught strategies Strategy: Lifting a Line listed that you have not yet had time for Day 16 Day 17 Day 18 Day 19 Day 20 Strategy: Rereading & Finding Writers develop the piece of Writers Revise Writers Edit Writers publish pieces for an Patterns writing audience to read. Students select one topic (from See revising strategies See editing strategies Additional strategies for expanding patterns) and expand (see CELEBRATE on topics, revision, editing are at expanding strategies) or close the end of packet the notebook and draftRead Alouds: Before I was Your Mother-Kathryn Lasky, Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day- Judith Viorst, Alexander Who Used to Be Rich Last Sunday-Judith Viorst, Maniac Mage- Jerry Spinelli, Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing-J. Blume, The Pain and The Great One by Judy Bloom, Hey, Little Ant by Phillip Hoose and HannahHoose, and The True Story of the Three Little Pigs by Jon Scieszka 5
  • Day 1: Launch Writer’s Workshop Using 10 steps for independence - Assessmentfrom The CAFÉ Book by Boushey and Moser 1. Identify what will be taught (Writing – write on i-chart) 2. Create a sense of urgency – why is it important? (write on i-chart) 3. Identify Student behaviors / Teacher behaviors (guided class brainstorm – write on i-chart) 4. Student models desirable behaviors - what it looks like. Ask, ―Will ___ become a better writer when he/she does these things?‖ 5. Student models least desirable behaviors. Ask, ―Will ___ become a better writer if he/she does this?‖ Then have student model correctly and ask that question again. 6. Provide a writing prompt/choices agreed upon by your grade level (so you can compare student writing across the grade) and place students around the room to practice (objective is to have students try different spots for the first week to see what spots are best for them – they eventually will select their spot). a. Be sure to model for students HOW to begin writing in their notebooks (Date? Page #, Indent? Skip lines? Etc.) b. It can be OKAY for kids to be on their stomachs writing and it’s actually good for kids with fine motor issues. Kids do NOT need to be at a desk to write. 7. Practice 8. Stay out of the way 9. Quiet signal 10. Quiet check in, review i-chart, reflect – self evaluate Work on Writing Independence Helps us become better readers and writers It’s fun Students Teachers Write the whole time Work with students Stay in one spot Work quietly Get started quickly Underline words we’re not sure how to spell and move on. Work on stamina Homework: Find out why you were given your name (first) or what your last name means, etc. 6
  • Day 2: Launching- AssessmentRevisit the student’s writing prompt from the previous day. You could ask students to go back and rereadtheir writing to improve upon it (add to, fix, change, etc.). Give students a pen to do so (allows you to seethe changes) and few other directions as you want to see what they do without instruction at this point. Thismay be a good way for you to assess what students already know about revising/editing/conventions.Homework: Find out why you were given your name (first) or what your last name means, etc.Day 3: Create a Heart Map(could be taped inside the writing notebook – use it as a strategy for writing topic ideas)http://twowritingteachers.wordpress.com/2011/07/14/updating-your-maphttp://www2.scholastic.com/browse/article.jsp?id=3750092Heart mapping was developed by Georgia Heard(idea: for boys who don’t want to do a heart, do “what’s close to your bones and draw a bone for the template) 7
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  • Day 4: Notebook Expectations1. Discuss what the notebook is / isn’t (anchor chart)―The purpose of a notebook is to provide a place for students to practice writing. It’s a place for them togenerate text, find ideas, and practice what they know about spelling and grammar‖ (Buckner, p. 5) What it is… It’s a place to Write down what makes you angry, sad, amazed… Write down what you noticed and don’t want to forget. Record your reactions Live like a writer. Reread to generate more writing and ideas Record short ideas, words, sentences that help you remember (ideas – seeds – not all will germinate) What it isn’t… A reading response journal (typical done in a different notebook) Not a diary Not a journal(What time of the day will students do daily journaling? Not for the daily mundane – I walked to school, Ipicked up my book bag, I put it in my locker, etc. Will this be kept in the writers notebook or elsewhere? Noone right answer.)2. Expectations of the Writers NotebookWhat are your classroom expectations for the writers notebook? Write them on an anchor chart.Possible starting ideas to work off of: date and page number (right hand side) each new entry Find topics to write about from your life, curiosities, reading, etc. Write every day Try strategies from lessons If you do not want me to read it, do not write it in your notebook. This is not a diary. (some teachers tell students to fold over a page if they don’t want an adult to read it and that they’ll respect that sign) Practice what you know about spelling and grammar. Respect your notebook. Take care of it. Do not tear pages out. Have it in class every day. Make up missed work. Respect other notebooks by only reading entries you are invited to read by the author. Skip lines? Write on every line? (how will your class use page space) Grading (suggested you not grade the content of the notebook but only finished/published pieces of writing, however you may elect to grade students writing fluently etc. as a portion of a grade) Some teachers state the notebook can only have writing (others encourages sketches, photos, etc. when appropriate) 3. Model first…. Then students select a topic from your heart map and write an entry in their notebook(model for students how to setup the notebook with the class requirements of date, spacing on the page,etc.). Some teachers allow students to decorate margins of pages, etc. too.4. Time to Share entries (either ideas or read) in small groups. 10
  • “When students love their journals, they have a positive place to look for the next topic theyll take through thewriting process.” (The Writing Fix)Day 5: personalize/decorate the writing notebooks.Ideas:  Use magazine pictures, real photos from home, fun paper, poetry, quotations, words, etc.  Glue items to the covers.  Possibly cover them with clear contact paper so they last longer.  Some teachers do this decorating as homework.  Provide a time in class for students to share their notebook decorations.  Write entries on why students decorated their notebooks the way they didDay 6: Introduce Plan Boxesidea and photos from: http://twowritingteachers.wordpress.com/2008/09/14/teaching-kids-how-to-create-plan-boxes/  Plan Boxes are a tool that helps students self-manage their independent writing time.  Students think of their plan, they tell it to a partner, they write it down in a box on their writing notebook page.  Teachers can then scan these plans and check them off with a smiley face or verbal cue to tell students they are ready to go to work after a mini-lesson.  Plan boxes can be a good transition from a mini-lesson to work time.  Plan boxes take students SEVERAL weeks to write with real good content so be patient in the first several weeks. 11
  • Day 6: History of a Name or Writing from a Word(Buckner, Notebook Know-How, p. 16) 1. Teach History of a Name strategy (post name of strategies on a chart as you teach them so students have a list to reference when they are stuck)Time for Sharing. Extension: Write about other parts of your name (middle, last, etc.). This strategy can be used in the future by students towrite from any name (not just the history of the name but how they feel about that person/pet/place, a memory, etc.) 12
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  • *You can also do a similar strategy to History of a Name called Writing From a Word (Buckner, p. 27-28). Rather than write about a name,you write about any word (self selected or given to students. Fluency Strategy: Writing from a Word Teaching Point/ Connection Teach Active Involvement Link Writing Time Extension 14
  • Day 7: Time Writing or Free Writing . Fluency Strategy: Timed Writing Teaching Sometimes writers feel like they have nothing to write about. Today I’m going to teach you a strategy Point/ to write even when you feel very stuck. Connection Teach When writers feel like they have nothing to write about, they have strategies for getting and keeping their pencils moving. Sometimes writers just sit and write. It doesn’t matter what they write, they just have to keep their pencil moving. Sometimes writers might start by writing things like, ―I don’t know what to write…‖ and ―Maybe…‖ Active As a class you could do a timed writing interactively. Involvement Link Today, when you go back to your desks, I am going to ask you to write. I’m not going to give you a topic. I want you to write the entire time and keep your pencil moving. If you get stuck, write things like ―I’m not sure what to write‖ or ―I feel stuck because…‖. The goal is to keep your pencil moving the entire time. Sometimes we get so worried that what we write won’t be good enough and if we let go of that, we can come up with some really great ideas. Sometimes this strategy can help us do that, and sometimes it won’t. It’s always worth a try. When the time is up you may stop with the entry and begin writing using a strategy we’ve learned or something of your choice, or you may continue with the writing entry. Before we begin, I want you to turn and tell a partner what your job is today and then create a plan box for what you are going to do when you get back to your desk and what you are going to do during choice writing time. Writing Time Be sure to add Timed Writing / Free flow writing to the list of strategies. Extension Timed writings can also be used with prompts, etc. 15
  • Day 8/9: Strategy: Writing From a list– generate lists and then select items from list and write entries. (Buckner, Notebook Know-How, p. 19). Also, could make a list with students ofother lists they may want to make that could generate topic ideas (ex: favorite places, people, things to do, etc.) 16
  • Day 10: Strategy – Observation(Buckner, Notebook Know-How, p. 27) . 17
  • Day 11: Strategy – Question/Wonder or Prompt 1. Question/Wonder (Buckner, Notebook Know-How, p. 20-22): take one question or wondering and think it through and write what might be the answer to that or what led them to think of the question/wonder in the first place. . Fluency Strategy: Question/Wonder Teaching Point/ I’ve noticed that this class is really good about asking good questions or wondering about how things Connection work, are made, etc. Writing down our questions and wonderings is a strategy writers do to get ideas for writing. Teach Model a question/wonder you have or make a list of question wonders. Then select one of those questions/wonderings and write an entry about what you think the answer is. Most questions don’t have easy answers but this strategy can allow us to think of the possibilities or lead us to researching something in more detail to find the answers. I could look up answers later on, read a book about the topic, and then come back to my notebook to record what I learned. Active As a class make a list of some questions/wonderings. Involvement Link When you go back to your desk today, I want you to try to write a list of questions/wonderings or an entry of an answer that you think is possible to one of the questions/wonderings we created on the board. In your plan box write a plan for your work time today. Writing Time Extension Students can research answers to questions or create interview questions to find the answer, etc. 18
  • Day 11: Strategy – Question/Wonder or Prompt 2. Prompt: Give students a list of 3 prompts and they select one prompt as a starter. Create a class anchor chart of writing prompt ideas to use as starters when students are stuck. ‘One Time I’ Prompts from http://twowritingteachers.wordpress.com/2010/09/06/one-time-stories/ Often when writers are stuck, they use a prompt to help them write and open up their ideas/possibilities. The important thing is to write! ONE TIME I . . . 1. One time I was afraid/happy/sad 2. The first time I did something 3. One time a change happened in my life (like moving or a new baby) 4. One time I had a problem with another person 5. One time I got hurt 6. One time I was naughty 7. One time at recess 8. One time with my family (or friends) Or Create a Chart ―Things We Can Write About‖ Some ideas (from Jo Driscoll – WW trainer)  Something I know about  Something that is important to me  Something that I want to know more about  An important time in my life  Something that happened to my family  Something that made me happy/sad  Something I know how to do/want to learn how to do  Something I read in a book, or a book reminded me of  A story about friendship/family/sports  My favorite food/tv show/music/vacation/place to go/book/move  Something fun that I have done  Something that I hate to do Other prompts:  Describe a moment in your life that you consider special and why (narrative)  What if….  Home is where…  I sometimes wonder….  When I’m alone  When I was little  I’m not the person people think I am  I write because…  If I could write…  If I could not write… 19
  • Day 12: Strategy – Writing off Literature(some possible poems are on the next page) (Buckner, Notebook Know-How, p. 25) 20
  • A Writer’s Advice A Writer’s Advice or or First the Worst First the Worst by Brod Bagert by Brod BagertPlease, Mr. Poet, you seem very nice, Please, Mr. Poet, you seem very nice,So please, would you give me a little advice? So please, would you give me a little advice?When I pick up my pencil I feel so uptight, When I pick up my pencil I feel so uptight,My stomach starts churning, I tremble with fright, My stomach starts churning, I tremble with fright,My brain is a dungeon without any light, My brain is a dungeon without any light,Could you tell me a secret to help me to write? Could you tell me a secret to help me to write?My secret is simply the thing I do first— My secret is simply the thing I do first—I always start writing by writing my worst, I always start writing by writing my worst,Writing is fun, it isn’t a test, Writing is fun, it isn’t a test,So I start with my worst and never my best. So I start with my worst and never my best.―You start with your worst? But what happens then?‖ ―You start with your worst? But what happens then?‖I simply sit down and I write it again. I simply sit down and I write it again.Changing a word, fixing a letter, Changing a word, fixing a letter,Making it better and better and better. Making it better and better and better.I write, then I rewrite, then I stop for a rest, I write, then I rewrite, then I stop for a rest,Then I rewrite like crazy until it’s my best. Then I rewrite like crazy until it’s my best.It’s a powerful secret I’m happy to tell— It’s a powerful secret I’m happy to tell—ALWAYS WRITE BADLY BEFORE YOU WRITE WELL. ALWAYS WRITE BADLY BEFORE YOU WRITE WELL.So now my whole brain is all-flashing with light, So now my whole brain is all-flashing with light,My body is pulsing with power to write, My body is pulsing with power to write,As I sit down and do it the way that I should — As I sit down and do it the way that I should —I start with the bad stuff and then make it good. I start with the bad stuff and then make it good. My Writer’s Notebook by Brod Bagert My Writer’s Notebook by Brod BagertIt’s a black and white composition notebook, A hundred It’s a black and white composition notebook, A hundredpages with blue line that await my words: pages with blue line that await my words:Diamond Search Diamond SearchMy life lies before me My life lies before meLike the bed of a shallow river. Like the bed of a shallow river.My fingers sift sand and gravel My fingers sift sand and gravelFor the rough diamonds that lie hidden. For the rough diamonds that lie hidden.And as I find them I put them in this notebook. And as I find them I put them in this notebook. I write… I cut… I polish… And they shine. I write… I cut… I polish… And they shine.My words on an empty page My words on an empty pageIn an ordinary notebook, In an ordinary notebook,The silver setting for the jewels of my life. The silver setting for the jewels of my life. . 21
  • Day 13/14: Strategy – Rereading/Highlighting(Buckner, Notebook Know-How, p. 30) 22
  • Day 13/14: Strategy: Lifting a Line(Buckner, Notebook Know-How, p. 31): 23
  • Day 15: Choice or reteaching or teaching of a missed strategy Some addition strategy lessonsStrategy: Use Materials from your Life (Fletcher)  Use drawings/doodles  Artifacts – objects, photographs (often the best ones are the ones that make you uncomfortable)  Articles that struck you as you read them  Paste these items into your notebook and write about them  Question to think about a picture: o Study the photograph. o Who or what is pictured? o Where was the picture taken? o When was the picture taken? o Why did you choose this photo to bring in today? o Write about the small moment related to the photograph.  Questions to think about an object/artifact o When did you get it? o Where did you buy or acquire it from? o Who gave it to you? o Why is it important? o List everything! o Write a small moment entry related to this object.Strategy: Record Conversations (Fletcher)  have an ear for dialogue  record snatches of dialogue  things people say, how they say it, words they repeat, pronunciation,  go to a public place, sit quietly, listen, write down any memorable lines, can be used to begin a piece of writing  sharpens your perceptionsStrategy: Write down your dreams(Fletcher p. 52-53)  Dreams contain unexpected twists/surprises that can provide invaluable material for writingStrategy: Write a letter to someone  Can be a good way to get out your emotions and feel less scary.Strategy: Find the poem in your writingStudents do a quick write in response to something you are learning in class or a possible prompt, etc. then youask them to find the poem hidden in their writing by only using the most important words and phrases from theoriginal piece of writing. This strategy would give me a quick formative assessment of students’ knowledge of apiece of learning and would also help students focus on important or interesting words (words with impact) whichwould help their reading. It would be a good summarizing thinking skill for students too as they have to take alarger piece of information and scale it down but still make meaning with the words. 24
  • Strategy: Read the RoomWrite a quick entry about what you’re noticing, how you feel about being back at school today, an overheardconversation or anything else you wish to record about what’s happening in here this morning. Some additional ideas for mini-lessons on rituals and routinesRituals and Routines Mini-Lessons  What is Writers Workshop  How to come to/leave the common/gathering area and why  How we act in the gathering area: what the different terms mean, language of Mini-lesson and Share/practice – Anchor Chart  Structure of a Writing conference- a conversation – Anchor chart o My job/Your job  What it means to think of ourselves as writers  How to use and take care of our writing materials/practice  Getting help during writing time in WW  Developing good writing habits-Anchor Chart  Developing good listening habits – Anchor Chart  What is a writers Notebook  Why writers keep a writers notebook  Sitting with a partner (EEK)  What to do when you aren’t sure how to spell a word, what tools are available in the room  Routines for bringing writers workshop to a start/end, where to gather, how to sit in gathering space, etc.Writing Folders Introduction of Writing Folders How to use/organize your writing folders What to do when you are finished writing – Anchor ChartGenerating Topics to Write About – Creating an Anchor Chart for each of these Things we can write about – Anchor Chart Read Alouds as a way for writers to think about generating their own topics – Anchor Chart Brainstorm the word ―moment‖ by letting students visualize the word. Create an anchor chart of their brainstorming ideas in words, phrases and illustrations This idea can be used for any writing appropriate word Look at Anchor Chart List of what writers write about and create another chart off of that, ―Thinking with a new set of eyes‖ Practice telling oral storiesSharing Rituals and Routines of Sharing Class jobs during sharing- writers job, listeners job, teachers job What publically shared work should look like- Anchor Chart 25
  • Day 16: Finding Patterns(Buckner, Notebook Know-How, p. 37-42):Day 17-20Day 17: Developing: Making the move from the notebook to draft paper (teach students how to set up draft paper—box at the top that says what they are making (box with seed idea/what they are making/name/date)Day 18: Writers revise the piece of writing, select 1-2 revision techniques to teach,Day 19: Writers edit (focus on 1-3 editing points such as spelling, complete sentences, punctuation)Day 20: Writers publish their piece in order to make it public, Celebration 26
  • Expanding on a Topic Strategies(done prior to drafting to expand/narrow topic)Strategy: Listing the Possibilities(Buckner, p. 51-52)This strategy is similar to Writing a List. The purpose is different. The purpose is to narrow down a larger topicor to think more deeply about a focused topic. Students take a topic they found during ―patterns‖ and the make alist of specific writing ideas for that topic (to narrow it down).For example: Softball Memories (Buckner, 51): 1. Playing first base 2. Playing pitcher 3. Playing on the All-Star Team 4. Playing on the same team as Caroline 5. Having to switch teams because I moved 6. Having the same coaches for basketball and softball 7. Dreaming to play on the Georgia Bulldogs one day 8. The time I hit a homerun four times in one game 9. When I sprained my arm 10. When my team won 18 to 9 27
  • Strategy: Writing from Another Point of View,(Buckner, p. 48) 28
  • Strategy: 3 word phrases in 3 minutes(Buckner, p. 46-47) 29
  • More Expanding The Topic Strategies…Strategy: Favorite collection What items might you put on display in a museum for the topic you’ve selected? Make a list of these items and then reasons why you’ve selected them. It helps students focus on the topic in more detail and put in details of what is important about the topic. (Buckner, p. 49) Expanding: This could also be used for thinking about a character in a story (narrative) or in content areas (for example what would be on display if the topic was WWII)Strategy: InterviewsWrite a list of interview questions that you might ask about the topic or about the character in the story. This canhelp to develop the character further (ex: what does he look like, how old, worst habit, best habit, what wouldmake him upset, favorite food, best friend, something naughty they did, prized possession, etc.?) Students couldask a family member about a place, event, etc. to get more information for their story. Sometimes interviewquestions lead to research. This can be really helpful in fictional stories or stories where the character is a muchdifferent age than you are - helps to get in touch with your character. (Buckner, p. 50)Strategy: K-N-TCreate a chart (K-N-T) and fill it in as you read about the topic or brainstorm. Look at the notes to highlight ideasor thoughts to include in their writing. This can be a good way to get students to think deeper about their topicprior to drafting. (Buckner, p. 50-51) Know Need to Know My ThinkingStrategy: Talk to MeStudents work with a partner or a small group and say, ―What I’m writing about is….‖ Students orally discusstheir topic. The audience then gives comments/questions. It helps students elaborate on their topic by talkingabout it and answering questions. Students take notes as they discuss, or there is a delegated notetaker. After thesession, students go back and draft again or add to their draft. (Katherine Bomer, conference at Hamline, summer2011)Strategy: Make it visualUse drawing as a thinking/organizing tool. Draw, sculpt, paint, web page layout create a collage, etc. about a thetopic, moment, feeling, person, place, idea. We often get more information out of art work than out of words.What is in your art that isn’t yet in your words that you can add? (Katherine Bomer, conference at Hamline,summer 2011)Go to CollegeResearch your topic (mentally take a course). What’s the history? What’s the science (geology, geography,biology)? What’s happening socially/politically/culturally (the setting)? Ask others about your topic. (KatherineBomer, conference at Hamline, summer 2011) 30
  • Strategy: Circle of Light(Loft class by Katie St. Vincent Vogl at Hennepin Co. Libraries, 5/14/11) –especially useful with fiction.Imagine a spotlight on a table on the character that you are focusing on, then…. • Identify the type of table the character would have and 5 important things that you’d find there with the character. • How would the character enter the room (come to the table, come through the door) • How does the character pick up/handle each of the 5 things on the table • Send the character to sit on a chair – what does the chair look like, how would she/he sit on it • Put a window in the room - how does the character react, what is it like outside, what kind of light is there • Who matters to the character most? Have them enter the room. How does the character react? How does that person handle the 5 objects.---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Now DRAFT – close the notebook for a few days – write on a separate piece of paper. 31
  • Revising Strategies (done after drafting)Once students have drafted, you go back to the notebook and begin to practice revision strategies. Aimee Bucker.groups her revision strategies into 2 categories: a) Read to Write which is focused on word choice and b)Understanding Genre (chapters 4 and 5 of the book). These strategies are practiced in the notebook and thenthose revisions that students wish to add to their draft are added to a draft copy that is written outside of thenotebook.Grabber LeadsOne revision strategy is to use mentor text to help students think about effective story leads. Basically you take abunch of texts, look at leads, and discuss what about it made it a good lead. Make a chart similar to the one belowwith your class and then use the Try 10 strategy to develop grabber leads. (Buckner, p.59) 32
  • Strategy: Try 10(Buckner, p. 62)Strategy: Genre Switch (NF to Fiction)(Loft class at Henn Co Library, Spring 2011)Could just use letter C below on a draft if you are trying to change genres with a student. a) Give prompts (something you ate for breakfast, something you heard this morning, something you said, a color you saw, something about the sky, something you are worried about) b) Write about your morning and include the details from your brainstorm in A c) Change what you wrote to 3rd person (give characters names, change the pronouns). Don’t rewrite, just cross out words and put in fake name and correct pronouns d) Write a story of a few pages where someone wants something, doesn’t get it, but it ends up happilyStrategy: Genre SwitchStudents open of their notebooks. They write about the topic of the piece they are working on, but in a differentway. Begin writing and every few minutes the teacher names a new genre. Begin writing the topic in the genreuntil a new switch is called. Sometimes the genre will be difficult to write in and sometimes it will be really easy.Stick with it. (Use realistic fiction, fairy tale, spooky story, newspaper article, poem, fantasy, encyclopedia, etc.).Ask students what genre they had the most energy to write? Which seemed easiest for their topic? Sometimesour topics need to choose the genre, not us. (Buckner p. 84) 33
  • Strategy: Slowing down the hot spot(Fletcher)Find a critical point in the writing that you want the reader to slow down their reading. Put one action in eachsentence. This will cause the reader to slow down rather than cramming all the action into one sentence.Strategy: Crack Open Words(Fletcher, A Writers Notebook, p. 26-27) • Reread writing and circle words like good, cool, nice, fun • Ask: what are the details underneath these words? What little things bring to life what I’m talking about? • Write those details (doesn’t have to be complete sentences) • Think about hands, gestures, speech, objects, smells, etc.Strategy: Make a Metaphor(Katherine Bomer, conference at Hamline, summer 2011)Come up with a metaphor for your topic and then research the thing that you used as the metaphor and writedown facts about it. You may then be able to use some of the language from that topic in your writing to makethe verbiage of the piece better. ―This topic is like that‖ Example: My feelings about vacation are like a geyser.Make a list poem(Linda Hoyt, conference at Hamline, summer 2011) • Collect words in an alphabox related to the topic • Take words from alphabox and put into a list (list poem) • Ex: Bubbles Floating Shimmering Small 3d, rainbow, sparkling Beautiful bubbles Pop! • Write a list poem together as a class • Read it together • Students write their own -Can be helpful for getting students in touch with sensory language about their topic to add to their writing. -Modification: do a list poem focused on alliteration (-ing words with similar sounds about the topic) Example: Potato Bug creepy, crawly, crunching sneaky, snippy, shuddering dingy, dank, digger Potato Bughttp://www.rcowen.com/PDFs/Franco%20Ch%2020%20for%20web.pdfhttp://www.poetryteachers.com/poetclass/lessons/bugsme.htmlhttp://www.educationworld.com/a_tsl/archives/02-1/lesson026.shtml 34
  • Strategy: Mapping the Text(Buckner, p. 67)Used to think about word choice, sentence structure, etc. • give students a piece of text (an excerpt from a book you’ve read to them) and glue it into notebooks. Show that text on the overhead. • “Today we are going to practice reading like a writer. You all have a copy of one of my favorite passages from the book ____. I am going to read it to you twice. The first time, I just want you to listen. Try to picture what is happening. The second time I read it, I want you to pay attention to how _____ (the author) created these images. How do you do that? When you notice a word, phrase, or sentence that you think is well written or that sounds good when I read it, I want you to circle it. Off to the side jot down your thoughts about it and what you think Lester was trying to do.” Aren’t sure what the author was trying to do? Take a guess. We may have some questions. That’s okay. This is called Mapping the Text – we’re going to mark it so we can look at how the author did what he did in his writing. It’s like we’re making a map.” • Give students some time to finish their notes. Then ask, “What did you notice?” • As students give you their answers- map the text on the overhead (circle the words they note, etc. and write notes about good word choice, similes, varying sentence length, etc. • Ask students to go back and use one of the techniques talked about today in their writing – in notebooks – • The next day, go back to the mentor text piece “There are about 100 words here. How many do you think are adjectives?” kids might guess many because descriptions usually have a lot of adjectives. In fact it’s probably less than 10% in a good text. “Let’s go back and make a list of words we love in this piece. We’ll put them into 3 lists – adjectives, nouns, and verbs.” Looking at the lists, you’ll see mostly verbs. – powerful image creators (this list of words could go in the grammar lesson portion in the back of the notebooks) • This is a good lesson for setting up the purpose for revising word choice and understanding the difference between active and passive voice (even if those labels aren’t yet discussed). Helps students to read like writers. • Reflection – have students reread their writing and see what words/phrases sound good – help them visualize. 35
  • Mapping the Text ExampleMentor Text Example (Schreiner): The Legend of the Lady Slipper by Lisa Lunge-Larsen and Margi PreusTrees lashed about in the wind, rattling their branches. Falling snow stung her face. “Mashe-ka-wi-zin,” it hissed, “Be strong.”The girl bent her head and stalked like a bear into the storm. The snow tugged at her, but she charged through it, plunginginto the wind.All day she walked until, at dusk, she stood before the windswept lake. The slick ice lay as if asleep, silent. On the far shorethe wigwams of the other village glowed warmly.The little girl stepped out onto the frozen lake and the ice shuddered and woke. “Da-daa-ta-biin” it rumbled, “Go quickly!”So the girl ran like a rabbit, skittering and slipping.The Legend of the Lady Slipper by Lisa Lunge-Larsen and Margi PreusAdjectives Verbs otherWindswept Lashed Stalked like a bear (simile)slick stung ran like a rabbit (simile)asleep- silent hissed tugged Talking snow (personification) charged talking lake (personification) plunging shuddered rumbled 36
  • Strategy: Genre Anchor charts(Buckner, 78)Keep anchor charts of the features of various text types that students can use to verify if their writing has all theneeded components. 37
  • Anchor Chart for Plot(Buckner, p. 86) 38
  • S-W-B-S Story Summaries(Buckner p89-93)“When you go to write today and work on your drafts, I want you to start by rereading what you’ve written. Then I wantyou to try and summarize your own writing, much like we have been summarizing the books you’ve been reading. In yournotebook, try to write a summary of your story. Make sure though, you base your summary on what you have actuallywritten, not on what you meant to write.” Students answer S-W-B-S (somebody, wanted, but so) about their writingVenn Diagram Summaries(Buckner p89-93)Create venn diagrams to summaries the stories. (Mentor Text: Walk Two Moons by Creech – well written ending)Talk about endings and how often we write them too short and we need to develop better endings. A) Draw a venn diagram with 3 circles for character, problem, ending – basic things you need for a story –without one you don’t have a complete plot. Fill it out for your story and put a check mark in the middle if youhave all three elements.B) Draw 3 circles with character change (how character changes from the beginning to the end of the story),resolution (did the problem get resolved –one sentence), moving on (does the story end and give a sense that thecharacter moves on?) 39
  • Strategy: Rule of 3(Hoyt, Hamline Summer Institute, 2011)―Writers cluster descriptions of action into groups of three to enhance imaging.‖ This happens with words, eventsin stories, etc. Look at mentor texts and give examples of things of 3. 1. Model how to change verbs to ing words (gerunds) (Ex: sit to sitting) 2. Put 3 descriptive gerunds together (ex: sitting, jumping, and plunging the hungry frog…) 3. Kids make lists of things their character can do, etc., change them to ing words, put 3 words together, making a sentenceStrategy: Add a closerAdd information after a complete sentence, using a comma (adds imagery)Ex: Gorillas are gentle, unless threatened. He bides his time, toes twitching. Tornados often surprise victims,except when there’s an early warning system.Strategy: Add an interrupter or compound descriptor or both(Hoyt, Hamline Summer Institute, 2011)Create compound descriptions -two words together, second word is often a gerund (ing word), creates vivid wordchoice.1) make a list of words about the topicEx: Tornados (fast-spinning, havoc-wreaking, tree-uprooting, fear-inducing, life-changing)2) Try to make sentences with appositives (interrupters), things than can be removed from the sentence and thesentence still works. Ex: Tornados, fear-inducing monsters, cause people to crouch in their basements.3) put commas around the interrupter (appositive) 40
  • Strategy: Add introductory elements to sentences followed by comma(Hoyt, Hamline Summer Institute, 2011)Focus on place.1. Make a list of words that show place (ex: in, against, from, on, over, above, out, under around, across, with, farbelow, through, in the ____)2. Give examples (model) Ex: In the green shadows, a frog slept.3. Kids create oral sentences4. Kids write sentences5. Check: if you take away the introductory element, do you still have a complete sentence? (who/what)Focus on time.1. Make a list of time words (just before, as, when, just after, while, in a moment, long ago)2. Give examples (Before bedtime, my dog…..)3. Kids practices orally4. Kids write5. Check: if you take away the introductory element, do you still have a complete sentence? (who/what) 41
  • Editing Strategies  After revising – making the content better, we shift to editing strategies.  Editing includes checking capitalization, ending punctuation, use of commas, subject-verb agreement, paragraph structure, verb tense, editing passive voice, complete sentences (avoiding run-ons), etc.  The editing strategies are tried in the writers notebook first before making changes to the draft (outside of the notebook).Strategy: Reading backwards(Buckner, p. 103)One very quick but effective strategy is to have students read their draft backwards. You could give students apassage with misspelled words to place in their notebooks to try this strategy together. By isolating each wordand starting at the end and reading left to write, students may notice things that look wrong. If something lookswrong, they should circle it. Then they can go over the circled words in more detail. This strategy can also beused to locate specific homophones that you know students have difficulty with, etc.Strategy: Color Coding Paragraph Structure (Buckner, p. 98-100) 1. Do mini-lessons on the “rules for paragraphing”  Paragraphs are generally 3-5 sentences  There are 3 basic parts to a paragraph. You usually need all 3. They are the topic sentence, detail sentences, and ending sentence.  Always always always indent the first sentence of a paragraph. An indent is about the length of the top of your thumb to the first knuckle. 1. Put the above notes in the back of the writing notebook. 2. Paste some sample paragraphs you’ve written in the students notebooks.  Pair students with partners to prove these are really paragraphs. (check for a topic sentence, supporting details, concluding sentence.) 1. Use a green pencil to underline the topic sentence, a yellow pencil to underline detail sentences, and red pencil to underline the ending sentence. 3. Students write their own paragraphs in their notebook on any topic. Switch with a partner and try to color code the paragraph. 4. Then look at drafts – put a paragraph from a student volunteer up for all to see. As a class underline any topic sentence sin green, detail sentence sin yellow, and concluding sentence sin red.  Refer to the notes on paragraphs and check if the student sample has the parts needed. If not, talk about how to fix it and fix it together.  Ask students to try it out in their notebooks with a paragraph from their writing  Ask students to try it out on their draft. 1. Topic Sentence (green-for start): your hook, a bit of attitude. Only one topic sentence per paragraph. Ex: My guinea pig is the best pet in the world. 2. Detail sentences (yellow-slowing down to give information/ or black if using yellow legal pads) : your proof that your topic sentence is true. Giving reasons to support your topic sentence. For example: my guinea pig likes to cuddle. He likes to play with me. He even eats out of my hand. 3. Ending Sentence (red – for stop): your wrap-up. Ends to topic of the paragraph and may lead the reader to the next paragraph. For example: I love my guinea pig. 42
  • Strategy: Identifying Passive Voice(Buckner, p. 102)  Refer to a previous lesson in which you read like writers and found an author who used verbs to create mental images more than using adjectives. Discuss the kind of verbs the author uses. They are action verbs. They are things you can do – they create images in your mind. Then list the verbs is, were, was, will, would, should, are, etc. on the board. Ask students if these words create images in their minds. Can you actively do these? Show me is. You can’t. These verbs create a passive voice.  Have students put a notebook entry in the book of their books that says Try NOT to use these words, and list the passive verbs  Give students a paragraph using passive voice to glue into their notebooks. Working together circle the weak verbs and replace them with active verbs.  Have students choose a notebook entry already written and circle the words is, are, and was. Then try and rewrite it using more active verbs.  Look at the draft you’ve written and find these verbs and try to use more active verbs.Strategy: Ending Punctuation(Buckner, p. 105-107)Read the poem “Call the Periods Call the Commas” Call the Periods Call the Commas By Kalli Dakos Call the doctors Call the nurses Give me a breath of air I’ve been reading all your stories but the periods aren’t there Call the policemen Call the traffic guards Give me a STOP sign quick Your sentences are running when they need a walking stick Call the commas Call the question marks Give me a single clue Tell me where to breathe with a punctuation mark or two a. Give kids a copy of this poem to put in their notebooks. b. Kalli Dakos used to be a teacher. Why do you think she wrote this? I know you know about ending punctuation and basic comma usage. I need you to practice hat you know in all of your writing – no matter where it is – in your notebook, social studies, everywhere… c. Next day review with a chart drawn on paper in the Frayer Model format d. Review the four kinds of sentences (declarative- simple sentence, exclamatory -exclamation, interrogative - question, imperative-command) – one in each box of Frayer Model template. e. Ask, what kind of punctuation do you use at the ends of these kinds of sentences? Fill in the chart together (declarative – period, interrogative - ?, exclamatory - ! , imperative- period) f. Students spend time editing their drafts for ending punctuation. 43
  • Strategy: Punctuating Compound Sentences(Buckner, p. 108) Rules for Punctuation of Compound Sentence i. A sentence must always have ending punctuation. ii. A sentence may end with a comma within a compound sentence. iii. A compound sentence must end with standard ending punctuation. iv. Ex: David runs very fast. David likes to paint. David runs very fast, and David like to paint. v. Difference: two sentences, first one can’t end with a period so you use a comma in its place before the word and but so because or vi. Rationale – sometimes a sentence is so long it needs some stops Ex: Ms. Buckner likes to read, because she thinks it is good for the soul. vii. Students practice by writing 3 compound sentences of their own in their notebooks. viii. Try it on their drafts. 44
  • Editing Checklist Example: Fletcher recommends only putting 3-5 things on an editing checklist – things within reach of students but still challenging. (Fletcher, Essentials of the Writing Workshop, P. 93.) 45
  • Steps in Writing Conference (adapted from The CAFÉ book) 1. Check calendar for appointments (appointments are for commitments made with students – you may also confer with students who are not on the calendar 2. Plan – review conferring notes on student 3. Observe/ Interview a. Please read to me what you are writing/working on b. Ask questions, such as: i. What are you working on as a writer? ii. What kind of writing are you making? iii. What are you trying to do as a writer? iv. What are you doing to make this piece of writing work? v. What do you think of what you’ve done so far? vi. What will you do next? Conferring about pictures vii. What is the story you really want to tell about your picture? viii. Can you tell me something about your picture that is not drawn here? ix. Tell me about all the parts of your picture. x. Can you add color to the parts you want to think more about? xi. Say one small thing about this story. Add that detail to your picture so you won’t forget it. xii. Cut out all the things you drew, what is the one thing you’d like to tell me more about? c. Observe if student is using strategies taught (coming up with topics, zooming in on small moments, writing the whole time, etc.). Record observations on conferring sheet. 4. Reinforce and Teach ―I notice…. Today we are going to….‖ a. Explain, model, thinking aloud, advice on how to apply strategy 5. Student practices6.Encourage – have student restate goal/strategy to practiceExample of Conferring Form Example of Small Group Work Form 46
  • What can the student do? What can I teach him/her next?SITUATION CONFERENCE QUESTION(S)The writing is unfocused. • What’s the most important part of your story? • What do you want your reader to know after reading this story?The writing covers several events or • Which of these events/ideas is the mostideas. important to you?The writing lacks depth and • Can you tell me more about _____________?information.The writing contains too much • Can you point to the most important partinformation. of this piece? • Can you underline the most important thing you want your reader to know?The piece just lists information and • Why is this piece important to you?doesn’t contain the writers thoughts • How did you feel when this was happening?and feelings.The lead does not draw the reader • Why did you choose to start your story thisinto the writing effectively. way? • What’s the first image in your mind when you think of this story?The conclusion is too sudden or drags • What feeling did you want the reader toon. share at the end of your story?A narrative piece makes limited use • Was anyone talking when this happened.of dialogue.The writing is poorly organized. • Can you retell the story to me? • Tell me a little bit about the plan you made to get to this point… From powerpoint: launching-ww-shubitz-pd-on-090106-11-am 47
  • Draft Personal Narrative Unit ScheduleStart Calkins Launching the Read Personal Narrative (mentor Read Personal Narratives- Read Personal Narratives- WW Unit text) student samples student samples List (people) Genre Chart – personal narrative Strategy: Write from ListRead Personal Narrative (mentor Writing: Venn Diagram retell Writing: SWBS or Venn Diagram text) Writing: SWBS retell retellGenre Chart – personal narrative List (places) List (objects) Reread and highlight Strategy: Listing the Possibilities Confer with one or two students Strategy: Write from List Strategy: Write from List (p.51-52) in front of the group (with their Select general topic for small (to narrow down -get seed ideas) permission) to show how to moment piece narrow down an idea (from Strategy: Timeline watermelon to seed) Paragraphing Choose seed ideas to develop into finished piece Lesson: sequencing a story Lesson: sequencing a story? Confer in front of students and Paragraphing Time to develop seed idea Time to develop seed idea to ensure students are writing Grabber Leads narratives (reference genre anchor chart) and the roles of teacher/student in conferring Grabber Leads Try 10: Leads Draft Draft Endings Try 10 Elaborating – actions, dialogue, Adding details (3x3) Editing Edit Publish descriptions, thoughts Color Coding Paragraph Structure (p.97-100) p. ___ Reading Backwards (p.103) p. ___ Editing Punctuation (p.104-107) 48
  • Sample Writing Conference Teaching PointsTopic Choice Genre Focus Structure Elaboration Word Choice ConventionsWriters think Writers ask Writers make a Writers Writers add Writers Writers beginof an themselves, timeline of all the describe the more relevant choose words a newimportant what is the main events and setting clearly detail to the that are paragraphperson and heart of my then circle one (without heart of their specific and when someonethe memories story? part of the including story. appropriate. new is talking.connected timeline (and then unnecessary They usewith that stretch out that sensory quotationperson. part). details). marks to show when that person is talking.Writers think Writers write Writers ask Writers Writers show, Writers use Writersof an their stories themselves, “Is stretch out not tell. specific nouns capitalizeimportant in sequential there a clear the most throughout proper nounsplace and list order. beginning, middle important their story. as they write.memories and end to my part of theirconnected story?” story.with thatplace.Writers focus Writers PARTNER Writers start ADVANCED Writers use Writers useon small determine CONFERNECE their stories OPTION: specific verbs appropriatemoments the most OPTION: with the lead Writers push that represent punctuation(seed-sized important Writers that hooks themselves to actions. and the end ofstories) rather event or idea sometimes recruit their reader say more by everythan giant they wish to readers who can (an action, writing twin sentence.watermelon tell about and tell them where surprise or sentences.topics. then write places in their dialogue). about that draft are small confusing. moment. 49