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Managing media with metrics

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Community Journalism Executive Training / Investigative News Network - October 2012

Community Journalism Executive Training / Investigative News Network - October 2012

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Managing media with metrics Managing media with metrics Presentation Transcript

  • Managing media with metrics Community Journalism Executive Training Investigative News Network October 2012 Dana Chinn
  • Everything you collect should be useful fordecision-making !!! So how are people making decisions?
  • Decision-making without data HIghest Paid Person’s Opinion -- Avinash Kaushik, Google Decision-making with too much useless data 3
  • Objective:Convert you to a“Raving Data Lunatic” Voices in Urban Reform …someone “who will do anything to get their hands on data before making their next decision” -- Avinash Kaushik, Google
  • “Analytics will be thebackbone….“….not only to trackprogress, but to develop…performance-enhancingrecommendationsthat will guide andcontinually optimize ourstrategies along the way. 5
  • Defining success starts with asking the right question How can we grow site traffic? How can we serve the audiences that will support us? 6
  • Ratings Circulation Impressions 7
  • Ratings Circulation Impressions More =Success! 8
  • Moreisjust… …more. 9
  • Traditional mass media business model Spray… Content ….and pray!
  • Traditional mass media business model Everyone is equally important, right? 11
  • ExampleTraditionalmass mediaaudience“segmentation”“Let’s target women!” 12
  • “Should we develop an iPhone app targeted toward college students?”
  • Useful demographics… …or stereotypes? 14
  • Type Click Touch 15
  • ©Wellington Grey 16
  • Zettabytes!AssignmentsQuizzesOnline modules: Excel, PowerPointFinal:
  • Big Data ©TechCrunch 18
  • Big Data is audience behavior data 19
  • Our site has 5,000 monthly uniquevisitors. Last Tuesday that story got 20,000 page views. Get an A in Analytics 101 response #1: The average time spent on our site So what? last week was 24 minutes. Our iPhone app was downloaded 10,000 times. We have 2,000 likes on our Facebook page. We have 5,000 Twitter followers. 20
  • What actions indicate engagement? Visit , regularly Read/view content, a lotInteract, often -- rate, print, vote, take a poll, click on an ad -- share, e-mail, comment, contribute 21
  • Two types of analytics dataBehavioral research What people did when they came to your site, as captured by an action taken on a keyboard or mouseAttitudinal research What people say they did what they think and why as captured by surveys, focus groups, social media, usability studies 22
  • Unique visitors visit a site and generate page views 23
  • Strong vs. weak metrics Strong metrics are useful tools that give clear indications of what’s successful or notc. Kyle Taylor Weak metrics… -- are conceptually flawed “so what?” counts -- are technically flawed c. Kyle Taylor due to the way Google Analytics collects the data …give mixed signals and can lead to bad decisions 24
  • A person visiting a web site is just one computer asking another to send them a page web server Rebekah Rebekah’s PC 25
  • 1 actual person with 5 devices… web server Rebekah’s work PC Rebekah’s tablet Rebekah’s personal phone …is counted as5 unique Rebekah’s work phone visitors Rebekah’s home computer 26
  • “More than half of all media interactions involving onescreen coincided with the use of another.”
  • 14 actual people using 1 computer… …is counted as 1 unique visitor Schools Libraries Stores Public Internet access spots 28
  • Over-counted?Under-counted? You will never know! 29
  • Ratings Circulation Unique visitors More =Success! 30
  • Visit duration, or time on site:Flawed conceptually… …flawed technically…. …the weakest metric EVER! 31
  • Visit duration = first timestamp – last timestamp First timestamp: KPCC web 1:00 p.m. server1:10 p.m. (no last timestampon the KPCC server) Actual time spent on KPCC site: 10 minutes Google Analytics time spent: 0 minutes 32
  • Visit duration = first timestamp – last timestamp KPCC web server First timestamp: 1:00 p.m. Last timestamp: 1:10 p.m.1:20 p.m. The time spent on the last page isn’t captured Actual time spent on KPCC site: 20 minutes Google Analytics time spent: 10 minutes 33
  • Is more time on site good? People spend lots of time on our site so they must like our content. People spend lots of time on our site but they don’t find what they want. Is less time on site bad? People can find what they want really quickly. People come to our site for only a few minutes in each visit but they come three times a day for the latest news. A lot of people don’t stay on our site very long because they come through search engines looking for something we don’t have. 34
  • “Over the pastweek, how much timedid you spend readingthe [name ofnewspaper]?” study, 1987 Newspaper market 35
  • Are more page views good? People go to lots of pages so they must like our content. People go to lots of pages but they don’t find what they want. Are fewer page views bad? After our site was redesigned people found what they wanted much more quickly. After we added dynamic content we saw a drop in page views. People come to our site but only go to one page. 36
  • Counts givefew actionableinsights 37
  • Big Data is audience behavior data 38
  • Start with an overall viewof visits by week 39
  • “You can think of a visit as a container for all of the actions a visitor takes on your site….” View pages Interact -- rate, print, vote, take a poll, click on an ad -- share, e-mail, comment, contributeGoogle Analytics: How Visits are Calculated in Analytics 40
  • Google “Analytics measures both visits and visitors in your account. “Visits represent the number of individual sessions initiated by all the visitors to your site.” 15 visits or sessions 41Google Analytics: The Difference Between Clicks, Visits, Visitors, Pageviews, and Unique Pageviews
  • Are more visits good? Always. More people are visiting our site. The same number of people are visiting our site, but some of them are visiting more often. More people are visiting our site, but some of them are visiting more often. 42
  • Are fewer visits bad? Always. Fewer people are visiting our site. The same number of people are visiting our site, but some of them are visiting less often. Fewer people are visiting, and some of them are visiting less often. 43
  • A strong metric like visitsgives actionable insightswhen segmented 44
  • Visits by location Is this good? Get an A in Analytics 101 response #2: It depends. 20% Alhambra 80% Los Angeles 45
  • 20%Alhambra 80% Los Angeles 46
  • Visits: mobile vs. PC Should we use a mobile-optimized, responsive design for our site? 20% of visits DID use a 20% mobile device 80% 80% of visits did NOT use a mobile device 20% 47
  • Do you reallyneed data todecide that yoursite should beoptimized for themobile web? 48
  • Bounce rate The percent of visits with only one page view “I came. I saw. I puked.” -- Avinash Kaushik on bounce rateA bounce: a visit with only one page view 49
  • Site bounce rate “Forty-six percent of the 11.1 million visits that came to our site in the last 12 months bounced. In other words, there were five million times someone came to the site, looked at one page, and left.” 50
  • Site bounce rate: Interesting… …but ultimately not actionable 51
  • Traffic source data: Do you know what your audience is looking for when Start here… they come to your…not here! site? 52
  • Visits by traffic source Search Visits from search engines Referring sites Visits from blogs and other sites, including Facebook, Twitter Direct Visits from people typing in a URL Campaigns Visits from e-mail newsletters and other custom coded internal actions 53
  • Landing page bounce rates by traffic sourcegive actionable insights How many people came to the site directly…. …and landed on the home page… …and bounced? These are people who know you or who are responding to YOUR campaign or event. What’s interesting: -- landing pages other than home page -- bounce rates -- new vs. returning 54
  • Search: keywords give insight on what people are looking for Branded keywords – used by people who know you HASC HASC branded programs HASC staff Misspellings Generic words for “hospital association” + “California” Unbranded keywords – used by people who think you have what they’re looking for Hospital codes List of hospitals in California Healthcare 55
  • So what do I measure? Hint: Get an A in Analytics 101 answer #2 56
  • Analytics Measurement Model – E-commerce Market Motive/Avinash Kaushik
  • A measurement model specifies how you define success – and failure 1. What is your organizational goal? What do you do that no one else does? 2. What do you need to do to achieve the organizational goal? 3. What channels are essential to do what you need to do? 4. Channel goals: What do you expect each channel to do? 5. Key Performance Indicators: Metrics that tell you when to: • Celebrate, and expand • Try harder, or try something else • Stop doing something that’s not working 6. KPI targets: The numbers to shoot for 7. KPI owner: The decision-maker; the person who takes action depending on whether the target was met 8. Segments: Slices of the metric that help you understand what’s making the number go up or down – and take action 9. KPI data sources: Where you get the data
  • Analytics Measurement Model – Nonprofit news site 59
  • Analytics Measurement Model – Weekly e-mail newsletter 60
  • Analytics Measurement Model – Event 61
  • 1. Organizational objective: Why do we exist? Honestly, why?“We know what we do. “We know what we don’t do.” 62
  • 1. Organizational goal Inform people who • Attitudes: like to stay informed about Texas public policy, politics and government • Behavior: are stakeholders in Texas public policy, politics and government so that they • Behavior: engage in civic activities • Attitudes: feel they have a voice 63
  • 1. Organizational goal Inform people who _____________________ • Geography • Behavior • Attitudes so that they___________________________ • Behavior • Attitudes 64
  • Organizational goals don’t change regardless of channels used 65
  • 2. What do we need to do to achieve the organizational goal? 66
  • 3. What channels are essential to do what you need to do? Print Site flyers E-mail Facebook Events Twitter Anything worth doing is worth measuring – every channel needs its own measurement model 67
  • 4. Channel goals: What do you expect each channel to do for each action the org needs to take? 68
  • 4. Channel goals: What do you expect each channel to do for each action the org needs to take? Site 69
  • 4. Channel goals: What do you expect each channel to do for each action the org needs to take? Site 70
  • 4. Channel goals: What do you expect each channel to do for each action the org needs to take? Site 71
  • Each channel will contribute in different ways to the organizational goal.Site E-mail 72
  • 5. Key Performance Indicators: What metrics will indicate whether your actions are succeeding – or failing? Site 73
  • Four attributes of a great KPI1. Simple, a clear indicator2. Relevant to your business3. Timely enough to take action4. Instantly useful! Market Motive/Avinash Kaushik 74
  • 5. Key Performance Indicators: What metrics will indicate whether your actions are succeeding – or failing? Site 75
  • 8. Segments: Slices of the KPI metric that help you understand what’s making the number go up or down – and take action Visitors who… 76
  • 8. Segments: Slices of the KPI metric that help you understand what’s making the number go up or down – and take action Visitors who… 77
  • 8. Segments: Slices of the KPI metric that help you understand what’s making the number go up or down – and take action Visitors who… 78
  • Some KPI data sources 1. Master contact database 2. Event registrations and surveys 3. 4. Online site-level and page-level surveys 79
  • “There are a lot of stupid ways to getlots of likes and more followers.But in the end, you will have an audiencethat is not relevant or will not engagewith you.” -Avinash Kaushik
  • http://searchenginewatch.com/article/2202307/Social-Media-ROI-How-To-Define-a-Strategic-Plan by Angie Schottmuller
  • Facebook Insights Analyze trends in • Posts • People are Talking About This • Weekly Total Reach “Beyond Facebook Insights,” by Thomas Baekdal “Facebook Advertising/Marketing: Best Metrics, ROI, Business Value,” by Avinash Kaushik
  • Understand how to measure Twitter,and you’ll understand how to measure social media Content Followers not demographics or other typical mass media audience metrics 83
  • A so-what Twitter metric “….garnered nearly double the tweets-per- minute than Mitt Romney….”
  • RT - retweet MT – modified tweet Via or HT – heard throughMeasurable tweets have… Favorite Lists 1. A call to action Go here…look…tell me 2. A link that you track with link (e.g., bit.y) and web analytics tools 3. #Hashtags and/or keywords 4. Topic or person-specific handles …120 or fewer characters, not 140! 85
  • Metrics drive actions.When you use thewrong ones, you takethe wrong actions. 86
  • “The challenge is not data. “Its how we think about marketing, the ability of our CEOs and CMOs to imagine a different future.” -Avinash Kaushik©GreenBook 87