370_October 26_Presentation and TV

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  • 1. PUBLIC RELATIONS 370 October 26, 2011
  • 2. Why think tv and radio
    • Radio reaches about 94% of adults daily
    • Local television news reaches 150 million viewers daily
    • The average American family spends 7 hours watching TV
  • 3. Radio and tv writing vernacular
    • Reader: Anchor reading a story on camera.
    • VO: Anchor reading a story with video rolling over as the anchor reads
    • SOT: Sound On Tape. This is a person saying something.
    • VO/SOT: Anchor reading over video, with a soundbite from a newsmaker
    • Package: What reporters usually do. Preproduced segment with voice track, video and sound
    • Natural Sound: Sound from the scene. This is critical to have in anything you send.
  • 4. Radio writing nuances
    • All caps,
    • Give time,
    • More conversational…use the word “You.”
    • You don ’t have to use AP Style.
      • Spell out numbers. It ’s fifty-four…not 54
      • Don ’t use a comma….use ellipses to allow the reader to breathe.
    • Make sure you indent properly between sentences. Leave enough space.
  • 5. Radio writing nuances
    • Audio news releases (ANRs)
      • Ready to play with script and audio provided.
      • Many local radio stations are desperate for content.
    • Public service announcements (PSAs)
      • Unpaid announcement for government or nonprofit organizations.
      • As short as five seconds, thirty seconds max.
    • Radio media tours
      • Telephone interviews around the country from one location.
      • Morning shows are even more desperate for content.
  • 6. Television news writing
    • Write to your video.
    • Don ’t hit it with a sledgehammer.
    • It ’s OK to use first, second or third person. Write the way you would speak to your friends.
  • 7. Writing to video think about video
    • There ’s a lot of crappy bad video.
      • Pans
      • Zooms
      • Hollow Audio
      • Shaky Video
  • 8. Writing to video think about video
    • Video should mirror the human eye
      • Shoot and move
      • Wide, medium, tight, super tight.
      • Quick pacing.
    • Storytelling matters
      • Capture the moment
      • Find characters
      • Use Natural Sound
      • Your writing should serve as bridges between emotional soundbites.
      • Commitment statement. Commitment statement. Commitment statement. Commitment statement. Commitment statement.
  • 9. Think about good video
    • ID Characters
    • ID Moments
    • ID Natural Sound
    • ID Surprises
    • Think about shot composition.
    • Think about audio
    • Think about writing to video
    • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DvfaCuVveVw
  • 10. Video news release
    • VNR packages include
    • News report with voiceover narration
    • Extra soundbites and B-roll
    • Clear identification of the video source
    • Script, spokesperson information, media contacts, background information
    • Give editors flexibility…make your video and soundbites longer than you normally would
  • 11. Personal appearances and product placement
    • Talk shows
      • Analyze format, p
      • Provide guest ’s expertise and personality,
      • Prepare guest
    • Magazine shows
      • Human interest,
      • In-depth
  • 12. Product placement
    • Identifiable product in programming
    • Issue placement: Getting issues integrated into scripts
    • Radio promotions: Sponsorship of nonprofit or community events
    • Community calendars: Listing of upcoming events
    • Documentary videos: Especially useful for cable systems
  • 13. LET ’S TALK SPEECHWRITING
  • 14. SPEECHWRITING AUDIENCE RESEARCH
    • WHO
    • WHAT
    • WHEN
    • WHERE
    • HOW MANY PEOPLE
    • WHAT TIME OF DAY
    • LENGTH
    • WHAT IS THE PURPOSE
    • WHO ELSE IS TALKING
  • 15. SPEECHWRITING LAYING THE FOUNDATION
    • OBJECTIVE
    • APPROACH
    • STRATEGY
    • NONE OF THIS CAN BE DONE IF YOU DON ’T KNOW THE SPEAKER’S STYLE
    • PODIUM
    • POWERPOINT
    • HOW GOOD ARE THEY IN FRONT OF A GROUP?
  • 16. SPEECHWRITING
    • NONE OF THIS CAN BE DONE IF YOU DON ’T KNOW THE SPEAKER’S STYLE
    • PODIUM
    • POWERPOINT
    • HOW GOOD ARE THEY IN FRONT OF A GROUP?
    • ONCE YOU KNOW WHAT YOU ’RE DEALING WITH CREATE AN OUTLINE THAT MEETS THE OBJECTIVES YOU OUTLINED
  • 17. SPEECHWRITING NUANCES
    • USE PERSONAL PRONOUNS
    • AVOID JARGON
    • USE ROUND NUMBERS
    • PUBLIC SPEAKING IS BASED ON THE IDEA OF CONVERSATION. DON ’T BE AFRAID TO BE CONVERSATIONAL
  • 18. SPEECHWRITING NUANCES
    • USE CONTRACTIONS
    • AVOID MODIFIERS… “VERY” IS VERY BAD.
    • AVOID EMPTY PHRASES…IN SPITE OF
    • WE ’VE ALL BEEN IN THE ROOM FOR SPEECHES THAT WENT TOO LONG. STATE YOUR CASE. DON’T OVERSTATE YOUR CASE
  • 19. SPEECHWRITING NUANCES
    • BOLD VERBS
      • THINGS DON ’T GO UP; THEY SKYROCKET
      • YOU DON ’T WIN; YOU LEFT THE COMPETITION IN THE DUST
    • VARY YOUR SENTENCE LENGTH.
    • USE QUESTIONS TO ENGAGE THE AUDIENCE
    • COMPARE AND CONTRAST
  • 20. SPEECHWRITING
    • A DOUBLE SPACED PAGE IS ABOUT TWO MINUTES
    • DON ’T BE AFRAID TO TIME THE SPEAKER.
    • DON ’T BE SURPRISED TO WRITE MUTIPLE DRAFTS.
  • 21. SPEECHWRITING NUANCES
    • THE LEAD ISN ’T AS IMPORTANT.
        • MANY PEOPLE ARE SETTLING DOWN AND WON ’T HERE WHAT YOU SAY.
        • USE THAT FIRST :30 TO THANK PEOPLE OR TALK ABOUT HOW GREAT BREAKFAST IS
      • GIVE SPECIFICS
        • PEOPLE REMEMBER LESS OF WHAT YOU SAY LIVE
        • POP YOUR KEY POINTS
  • 22. SPEECHWRITING NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION
    • 93% OF COMMUNICATION OCCURS THROUGH VOCAL AND NONVERBAL PERFORMANCE.
      • SMILE
      • POSTURE
      • EYE CONTACT
      • ANIMATION
      • KINETICS (MOTION)
  • 23. SPEECHWRITING VISUAL AIDS
    • SIGHT ACCOUNTS FOR 83% OF WHAT WE LEARN.
    • WHEN A VISUAL COMMAND IS COUPLED WITH A VOICE COMMAND, RETENTION INCREASES 50%
    • COLOR INCREAES INFORMATION ACCESS 26%
    • VIDEO CAN INCREASE RETENTION BY 50%
    • THE MORE BELLS AND WHISTLES, THE LESS TIME YOU NEED TO TALK.
  • 24. SPEECHWRITING VISUAL AIDS
    • POWERPOINT SUPPORTS A PRESENTATION. IT ’S NOT THE WHOLE SHOW.
    • DON ’T REGURGIATE EVERYTHING YOU SEE ON A SLIDE.
    • OFFER ADDED ANALYSIS ON SLIDES THAT YOU DON ’T GO OVER IN THE PRESENTATION. LEAVE THEM WANTING MORE.
  • 25. SPEECHWRITING VISUAL AIDS
    • POWERPOINT SUPPORTS A PRESENTATION. IT ’S NOT THE USE SLIDESHARE.NET
    • USE SLIDES AS A CHANCE TO NETWORK.
        • THINK ABOUT HASHTAGS
        • OFFER YOUR CONTACT INFORMATION
  • 26. OTHER FORMS OF SPEAKING
    • PANEL DISCUSSIONS
    • DEBATES
    • EXECUTIVE TRAINING
    • SPEAKER ’S BUREAU
  • 27. OTHER FORMS OF SPEAKING
    • ALL OF THESE CAN:
    • ACCOMPLISH GOALS AND STRATEGIES FOR COMPANY
    • ATTACT MEDIA COVERAGE
    • GET YOU IN FRONT OF DECISION MAKERS
    • CREATE EXTENDED REACH FOR YOUR BRAND