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Technophobia
 

Technophobia

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    Technophobia Technophobia Presentation Transcript

    • Techno phobia Techno Stress &
    • WARNING
      • IF YOU ARE OF A NERVOUS DISPOSITION, HAVE A PRE-EXISTING HEART CONDITION OR ARE UNDER THE LEGAL AGE LIMIT TO VIEW SPOOKY LECTURES, DO NOT CONTINUE ... YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED.
      • OTHERWISE ... ENJOY THE RIDE.
    • Contents
      • Technostress
      • Managing Technostress
      • -------------------------------------------------------
      • Technophobia
      • Technology Acceptance Model (TAM)
      • The Design of
      • Everyday Things
      • by Donald Norman
      • “ The human mind is exquisitely tailored to make sense of the world. Give it the slightest clue and off it goes, providing explanation, rationalization, understanding. Consider the objects – nooks, radios, kitchen, appliances, office machines, and light switches – that make up our everyday lives. Well- designed objects are easy to interpret and understand. They contain visible clues to their operation.
      Poorly designed objects can be difficult and frustrating to use. They provide no clues – or sometimes false clues. They trap the user and thwart the normal processing interpretation and understanding…The result is a world filled with frustration.”
    • Computer Phobia Techono Stress Computer Stress Computer Aneixty Techono Phobia
    • Computer Phobia Techono Stress Computer Stress Computer Aneixty Techono Phobia
    • At least 30% of all groups irrespective of gender or age Computer Phobia Techono Stress Computer Stress Computer Aneixty Techono Phobia
    • At least 30% of all groups irrespective of gender or age Hesitant Resistant Frustrated Computer Phobia Techono Phobia Techono Stress Computer Aneixty Computer Stress
    • 10-15% 50-60% 30-40% Early Adaptors Hesitant "Prove its" Resisters “ Technostress” by Michelle M. Weil and Larry D. Rosen
    • Frankenstein and Computers
    •  
    •  
    •  
    • Switzerland, 1816
    • 1818 Switzerland, 1816
    • 1818
    • 1818 1815
    • 1818 1815 Anti-Technology Polemic World's First Computer Programmer
    • TECHNOSTRESS
    • Stress
      • Stress is a complex term to define. It's simplest definition might be that it is an event or situation that forces a person to adapt to the event. Stress is the event itself and the reaction to that event within the person experiencing it. Thus stress is completely subjective. What may be stressful to one person might be pleasant or fun to another.
    •  
    • Human tendency to resist change
    • Human tendency to resist change Unfriendly nature of technology
    • Human tendency to resist change
    • Human tendency to resist change The tendency to resist change is a result of how we process information, it comes in from an infinite number of sources, but is bottlenecked by the short-term memory.
    • Environment ∞
    • Environment ∞ Five Senses ∞
    • Sensory Memory ∞ Environment ∞ Five Senses ∞
    • Sensory Memory ∞ Short-term Memory 5-9 chunks 20 secs Environment ∞ Five Senses ∞
    • Sensory Memory ∞ Short-term Memory 5-9 chunks 20 secs Environment ∞ Five Senses ∞ Long-term Memory Long time ∞
    • A Typical Day
    • A Typical Day Wake up
    • A Typical Day Wake up
    • A Typical Day Wake up Shower
    • A Typical Day Wake up Shower Microwave
    • A Typical Day Wake up Shower Microwave Car
    • A Typical Day Wake up Shower Microwave Car ATM
    • A Typical Day Wake up Shower Microwave Car ATM Work
    • A Typical Day Wake up Shower Microwave Car ATM Work
    • A Typical Day Wake up Shower Microwave Car ATM Work
    • A Typical Day Wake up Shower Microwave Car ATM Work Home
    • A Typical Day Wake up Shower Microwave Car ATM Work Home
    • A Typical Day Wake up Shower Microwave Car ATM Work Home
    • A Typical Day Wake up Shower Microwave Car ATM Work Home
    • A Typical Day Wake up Shower Microwave Car ATM Work Home Individually Designed To make Life easier -but- Collectively It’s stressful
    •  
    • Technologically Captive Moments
      • Increments of time spent waiting for some machine-driven event to happen
      • e.g.
        • Being on hold, listening to hold music, waiting for someone to respond
        • Skipping to a song you want to hear on CD
        • Waiting for the microwave to finish
        • Waiting for you PC to boot
        • Waiting for a download
    • Beating Technostress
      • How to you beat technostress?
      • How do you take back you life from the technology?
    • Beating Technostress
      • Look around in you life, identify what parts of you life that technology plays a part in
      • Now look at where this technology is causing stress.
      • FIGHT IT
    • Beating Technostress: SUGGESTION 1 of 4
      • If you are studying, are watching the clock as well?
      • The clock is in charge and you are captive. Instead turn the clock away and set the alarm instead.
    • Beating Technostress: SUGGESTION 2 of 4
      • Do you check your e-mail all the time at work?
      • Decide to only check it three times a day, once in the morning when you get in, after lunch, and before you go home.
    • Beating Technostress: SUGGESTION 3 of 4
      • Do you get phone calls at all kinds of unexpected times?
      • Leave a message on your phone “I don’t take calls from 6pm to 8pm, I’m spending time with my family, please call me before or after that time” – people will respect you for it.
    • Beating Technostress: SUGGESTION 4 of 4
      • Write a letter
      • It’s good for you, and it’s great to receive one
    • Designing Better Interfaces
      • Make them easy-to-use
      • Follow design guidelines
      • Maybe had configurable interfaces
        • Beginner
        • Intermediate
        • Expert
    • Inventories
      • Computer Anxiety Scale (CARS)
      • Internet Attitudes Scale (IAS)
      • Computer Self-Efficacy Scale (CSE)
    • Moving to TechnoPhobia
    • Question
      • Is Technostress the same thing as Technophobia, or is there any reality behind the idea of have an actual phobia to computers and technology ?
    • Answer
      • This paper…
      • Thorpe, S. J., & Brosnan, M. J. (2007). Does computer anxiety reach levels which conform to DSM-IV criteria for specific phobia? Computers in Human Behavior Vol 23(3) May 2007, 1258-1272.
      • says
    • Answer
      • This paper…
      • Thorpe, S. J., & Brosnan, M. J. (2007). Does computer anxiety reach levels which conform to DSM-IV criteria for specific phobia? Computers in Human Behavior Vol 23(3) May 2007, 1258-1272.
      • says
      YES
    • Real Fear !!! Let’s look at some classic horror characters
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    • Scary people
    • 1914-1918
    • 1645-1646
    • 1348-1350
    • 1483-1498
    • -phobia Techno
    • -phobia Techno
    • -phobia Techno tekhne is a "art, skill, craft, method, or system" phobos is a "fear, panic, flight"
    •  
    • Fear of Technology
      • People who live in the past
      • Luddites
      • Saboteurs
      • The Lead Pencil Club
      • Neo-Luddites
    • People who live in the past
      • Nutcases
    • Luddites
      • Mechanical Looms and spinners replacing skilled craftsman
    • Working Conditions in the Mills
    • Who were the luddites
      • 19 th Century English Handicraftsmen
      • Ned Ludd – apprentice who smashed his bosses shearing frame with a hammer
    • Ned Ludd
      • Ned Ludd was a weaver, believed to be from Anstey, who in 1779, by some accounts, either after being whipped for idleness, or after being taunted by local youths, smashed two knitting frames in what was described as a "fit of passion".
      • Ludd took a hammer and "beat them into a heap".
      • This is the type of instrument destroyed by Ludd
      • A Stocking frame was a machine that knitted stocking or socks.
      • 1812 – Frame-Breaking Act (capital crime)
      The cause of it all?
    • Riots and battles of the luddite rebellion
      • Riots
        • Nottinghamshire – Nov 1811
        • West Riding of Yorkshire – Jan 1812
        • Lancashire – March 1813
      Luddites smashing looms in a factory during the riots of 1811–16.
    • Frame Breaking Act
    • Lord Byron’s speech against the Frame-Breaking Act
      • During the short time I recently passed in Nottingham, not twelve hours elapsed without some fresh act of violence; and on that day I left the county I was informed that forty Frames had been broken the preceding evening, as usual, without resistance and without detection.
      • Such was the state of that county, and such I have reason to believe it to be at this moment. But whilst these outrages must be admitted to exist to an alarming extent, it cannot be denied that they have arisen from circumstances of the most unparalleled distress: the perseverance of these miserable men in their proceedings, tends to prove that nothing but absolute want could have driven a large, and once honest and industrious, body of the people, into the commission of excesses so hazardous to themselves, their families, and the community.
      • They were not ashamed to beg, but there was none to relieve them: their own means of subsistence were cut off, all other employment preoccupied; and their excesses, however to be deplored and condemned, can hardly be subject to surprise.
      • As the sword is the worst argument than can be used, so should it be the last. In this instance it has been the first; but providentially as yet only in the scabbard. The present measure will, indeed, pluck it from the sheath; yet had proper meetings been held in the earlier stages of these riots, had the grievances of these men and their masters (for they also had their grievances) been fairly weighed and justly examined, I do think that means might have been devised to restore these workmen to their avocations, and tranquillity to the country.
      1812
    • The End of Luddism
      • Male workers gained the right to vote
      • Trade unions became legal
      • 49 luddites killed in riots by government forces
      • 24 were executed
      • 34 transported to Australia
      • More than 20 others given long term prison sentences
    • Saboteurs
      • The term might derive from the Netherlands in the 15th century when workers would throw their sabots (wooden shoes) into the gears of the textile looms to break the cogs, feeling the automated machines would render the human workers obsolete.
    • The Lead Pencil Club
      • Publisher-editor Bill Henderson named his whimsically conceived Lead Pencil Club after the trade of Thoreau's father, a pencil maker.
      • The club quickly won a following for its outspoken anti-technology stance.
      • The members, mostly in a spirit of desperate fun, rebel against much modern gadgetry designed for speed and comfort, but which, they say, is actually depersonalizing human life: voice mail, e-mail, the proliferation of worthless TV, word processors, and most especially, anything to do with the Internet.
    • Neo-Luddites
      • Neo-Luddism is a personal philosophy against modern technology
      • Neo-luddism is based on the historical legacy of the British Luddites
      • Neo-luddism does not equate necessarily to outright technophobia and includes the critical examination of the effects technology has on individuals and communities.
    • Neo-Luddites Aldous Huxley
    • On the other hand…
    •  
    • Topless Meetings
    • Communications Overload
    • Worker’s Technology Bill of Rights
      • Technology puts independent workers in the driver's seat
      • To keep technology in it's proper perspective, declare your independence.
    • Worker’s Technology Bill of Rights
      • I am the boss, not my technology.
      • Technology is available to help me express my creativity.
      • I decide when to use the tools technology provides.
      • I have the right to choose what technology to use and what to put aside.
      • I can use technology to stay connected, informed, and productive – my way.
      • Technology offers a world of information. I get to choose what information is important to me.
      • Technology will have problems, but I will be prepared to handle them.
      • Technology can work 24-hour days, but I can choose when to begin and when to stop working.
      • Technology never needs to rest, but I do.
      • I can work successfully by enforcing my boundary needs.
    • Technology Acceptance Model Perceived Ease of Use
    • Technology Acceptance Model Perceived Usefulness Perceived Ease of Use
    • Technology Acceptance Model Perceived Usefulness Perceived Ease of Use Intention to Use
    • Technology Acceptance Model Perceived Usefulness Perceived Ease of Use Intention to Use
    • Technology Acceptance Model Perceived Usefulness Perceived Ease of Use Intention to Use Usage Behaviour
    • In Summary
      • Technostress – bad
      • Technophobia – very bad