Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Plagiarism

1,118

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,118
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
21
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. PLAGIARISM 228/4 Projects Damian Gordon
  • 2. Plagiarism <ul><li>&quot; regarded as either intentionally or unintentionally the ‘passing off’ of others’ work as one’s own. This includes the using of others’ ideas, information presented or accessed in either visual or audio formats and asking or paying another to produce work. &quot; [1] </li></ul>
  • 3. Plagiarism <ul><li>That is not to say students shouldn't use the work of others, most learning involves engaging with other people's ideas; reading about them in books or on the web, or hearing about them in lectures, but it is very important to give credit where it is due in accordance with the scholarly method. </li></ul>
  • 4. Plagiarism <ul><li>The purpose of the School's policy on plagiarism is not to catch students out; it is to teach you correct academic behaviour and conventions of referencing. For more details on the DIT's policy on plagiarism please refer to the General Assessment Regulations. </li></ul>
  • 5. Plagiarism <ul><li>Which of these is plagiarism? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1. Copying and pasting text without acknowledging its source </li></ul></ul>
  • 6. Plagiarism <ul><li>Which of these is plagiarism? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>2. Copying and pasting text with a citation at the end, e.g. (Smith, 2006) </li></ul></ul>
  • 7. Plagiarism <ul><li>Which of these is plagiarism? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>3. Copying and pasting text, and putting it in italics, with a citation at the end, e.g. (Smith, 2006) </li></ul></ul>
  • 8. Plagiarism <ul><li>Which of these is plagiarism? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>4. Copying and pasting text, and putting it in italics, with quotes (“ ” inverted commas), with a citation at the end, e.g. (Smith, 2006) </li></ul></ul>
  • 9. Plagiarism <ul><li>Which of these is plagiarism? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>5. Half-coping the author’s sentence - either by mixing the author’s phrases with your own without using quotation marks or by plugging your synonyms into the author’s sentence structure without acknowledging its source </li></ul></ul>
  • 10. Plagiarism <ul><li>Which of these is plagiarism? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>6. Half-coping the author’s sentence - either by mixing the author’s phrases with your own without using quotation marks or by plugging your synonyms into the author’s sentence structure with a citation at the end, e.g. (Smith, 2006) </li></ul></ul>
  • 11. Plagiarism <ul><li>Which of these is plagiarism? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>7. Restating the authors views in your own words without acknowledging its source </li></ul></ul>
  • 12. Plagiarism <ul><li>Which of these is plagiarism? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>8. Restating the authors views in your own words with a citation at the end, e.g. (Smith, 2006) </li></ul></ul>
  • 13. Plagiarism <ul><li>If a student wishes to copy text verbatim from another source (usually no more than about ten lines) it is important that they do three things; first that they enclose the text in quotes (inverted commas “ ”), second they italicize the text, and third they place a reference directly after quote to a citation that will uniquely identify the source of that quote. </li></ul>
  • 14. Plagiarism <ul><li>It is usually more preferable that the student summarises and interprets material read from another source, opening their summary with something like “ According to Smith [2009] …” thus citing the reference at the start of the summary. </li></ul><ul><li>Ultimately it is vital that students include references to all materials read in the course of their research, it serves to show the degree of research effort that they have undertaken and shows their academic integrity. </li></ul>
  • 15. Plagiarism- What it’s a waste <ul><li>When you copy you cheat yourself. You limit your own learning </li></ul><ul><li>It is only right to give credit to authors whose ideas you use </li></ul><ul><li>Citing gives authority to the information you present </li></ul><ul><li>Citing makes it possible for your readers to locate your source </li></ul><ul><li>Education is not “us vs. them” - it’s about learning </li></ul><ul><li>Cheating is unethical behaviour </li></ul><ul><li>The consequences are not worth the risks! </li></ul>
  • 16. Excuses for Plagiarism and Why they Don’t Work
  • 17. Excuses for Plagiarism and Why they Don’t Work <ul><li>I didn't realise I was doing it. </li></ul><ul><li>The student is responsible for the work that they submit for marking in this course; it is their responsibility to fully understand what plagiarism is and to ensure that they do not commit plagiarism (intentionally or unintentionally). </li></ul>
  • 18. Excuses for Plagiarism and Why they Don’t Work <ul><li>We were doing a group project. </li></ul><ul><li>Students are not allowed to submit work jointly unless they have first received permission from the lecturer in question that this is permissible; it is not acceptable to come to the lecturer after submission and indicate that they worked with others.  </li></ul>
  • 19. Excuses for Plagiarism and Why they Don’t Work <ul><li>They said it so much better. Shouldn't I use their words? </li></ul><ul><li>The problem with copying is that the examiner cannot be sure if the student really understands the material or is just cutting-and-pasting, it is better for students to express something poorly in their own words than steal somebody else's work. </li></ul>
  • 20. Excuses for Plagiarism and Why they Don’t Work <ul><li>I meant to include citations, but I forgot/ran out of time. </li></ul><ul><li>It is important that students get into the habit of inserting citations, even in their rough drafts. If they have difficulties remembering their references, there is a range of citation software on the market now. Good citing is part of good project management. </li></ul>
  • 21. Excuses for Plagiarism and Why they Don’t Work <ul><li>I showed this work to my examiner before I submitted it and s/he didn't comment on it. </li></ul><ul><li>Again it is the student's responsibility to ensure that they do not commit plagiarism (intentionally or unintentionally) when they submit a piece of examinable work – no one else’s. </li></ul>
  • 22. Excuses for Plagiarism and Why they Don’t Work <ul><li>I didn't think I would get caught. </li></ul><ul><li>Not only is there a range of software available to detect plagiarism, but also most of the lecturers are familiar with a broad range of text books and have been using the Web for a lot longer than the students. </li></ul>
  • 23. What will happen a student plagiarises?
  • 24. What will happen a student plagiarises? <ul><li>If an examiner suspects that plagiarism has occurred they will inform the appropriate individuals as per the D.I.T. General Assessment Regulations, this may result in a Faculty level Panel of Enquiry (as per section 10.1.2 of the D.I.T. General Assessment Regulations). Penalties for plagiarism include failure of the entire year, suspension and expulsion. </li></ul>
  • 25. References <ul><li>[1] D.I.T. General Assessment Regulations, http://www.dit.ie/services/academicregistrar/student-assessment-regulations/general/ Date Accessed: 4 February 2010. </li></ul>

×