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Global Partnering in Mission concept

Global Partnering in Mission concept

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G pi m project concept 2008 rvsd G pi m project concept 2008 rvsd Presentation Transcript

  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issionsProject Concept for Global Partnering in Missions Sowing the Vision Rev. Dale Talsma 2008
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issionsMembers of the Body of Christ throughout the world working together to bring the Gospel to the whole world.
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issionsMembers of the Body of Christ throughout the world working together to bring the Gospel to the whole world.
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issionsOutline of this presentation 1. The overarching vision 2. Motivations driving the 3. vision The contexts of the vision 4. Historical background 5. From vision to realization
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions1. The overarching vision In view of modern developments,we see that God has opened doors for the Church – now found in all nations andlanguages –to join together in new global partnershipsto advance God’s mission into all the worldwhere most people are still lost.
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions1. The overarching visionToday presents us with an exciting opportunity!An opportunity to resourcefully engage the diverse gifts of global Lutheran Christians,to coordinate efforts so that called servants originating from churches around the world can be sent anywhere in the world in collaborative mission endeavors guided and empowered by the Holy Spirit!
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions1. The overarching vision The first phase of the project seeks to clarifythe potential for – and the determinative factorsinvolved in – international mission cooperation,and to explore how it could be best facilitatedacross national, institutional, and culturalboundaries among confessional Lutheranchurches worldwide.
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions2. Motivations driving the vision Why?
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions2. Motivations driving the vision • Motivations arising from Gods Word • Current global realities propelling the vision • New realities in the global Church
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions2. Motivations driving the vision • Motivations arising from Gods Word • Current global realities propelling the vision • New realities in the global Church
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions2. Motivations driving the vision • Motivations arising from Gods Word First… What do we learn from the Word of God? • Current global realities propelling the vision • New realities in the global Church
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions2. Motivations driving the vision • Motivations arising from Gods Word – “Body of Christ” with many “members” (1 Cor. 12; Rom. 12) • Current global realities propelling the vision • New realities in the global Church
  • One unified body of diverse composition ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1 Corinthians 12:12-18“The body is a unit, though it is made up of manyparts; … For we were all baptized by one Spirit intoone body—whether Jews or Greeks, slave or free—and we were all given the one Spirit to drink. … Ifthe whole body were an eye, where would the senseof hearing be? If the whole body were an ear, wherewould the sense of smell be? But in fact God hasarranged the parts in the body, every one of them,just as he wanted them to be. If they were all onepart, where would the body be?”
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions2. Motivations driving the vision • Motivations arising from Gods Word – “Body of Christ” with many “members” (1 Cor. 12; Rom. 12) – Universal character of the Gospel and the Church (Gen. 3:15; 12:1-4; Is. 42, 49; Acts 2; Phil. 2; Rev. 7; etc.) • Current global realities propelling the vision • New realities in the global Church
  • God’s global promise in his call to Abraham ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Genesis 12:3“... and all peoples on earth will be blessedthrough you.”
  • God’s promise to his chosen Servant -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Isaiah 49:6 (and quoted in Acts 13:47 as fulfilled in Jesus)“... I will also make you a light for theGentiles, that you may bring my salvation tothe ends of the earth.”
  • The Holy Spirit poured out on the Church ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Acts 2:8-12“Then how is it that each of us hears them in his ownnative language? Parthians, Medes and Elamites;residents of Mesopotamia, Judea and Cappadocia,Pontus and Asia, Phrygia and Pamphylia, Egypt andthe parts of Libya near Cyrene; visitors from Rome(both Jews and converts to Judaism); Cretans andArabs—we hear them declaring the wonders of Godin our own tongues!” Amazed and perplexed, theyasked one another, “What does this mean?”
  • The universal scope of Christ’s dominion------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Philippians 2:10-11 “that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, in heaven and on earth and under the earth, and every tongue confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.”
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions2. Motivations driving the vision • Motivations arising from Gods Word – “Body of Christ” with many “members” (1 Cor. 12; Rom. 12) – Universal character of the Gospel and the Church (Gen. 3:15; 12:1-4; Is. 42, 49; Acts 2; Phil. 2; Rev. 7; etc.) – The witness of oneness; unity in diversity (John 17; Eph. 4) • Current global realities propelling the vision • New realities in the global Church
  • Jesus’ prayer for his disciples ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ John 17:23“I in them and you in me. May they bebrought to complete unity to let the worldknow that you sent me and have loved themeven as you have loved me.”
  • The true unity of the global Church --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Ephesians 4:1-8“I urge you to live a life worthy of the calling youhave received. Be completely humble and gentle; bepatient, bearing with one another in love. Makeevery effort to keep the unity of the Spirit throughthe bond of peace. There is one body and one Spirit— just as you were called to one hope when youwere called—one Lord, one faith, one baptism; oneGod and Father of all, who is over all and through alland in all. But to each one of us grace has beengiven as Christ apportioned it.”
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions2. Motivations driving the vision • Motivations arising from Gods Word – “Body of Christ” with many “members” (1 Cor. 12; Rom. 12) – Universal character of the Gospel and the Church (Gen. 3:15; 12:1-4; Is. 42, 49; Acts 2; Phil. 2; Rev. 7; etc.) – The witness of oneness; unity in diversity (John 17; Eph. 4) – Ministry from a position of human weakness (Luke 10:2-3; 22:27; Jn 20:20-21; 1 Cor. 2:2-5; 2 Cor. 4:7; 12:9-10) • Current global realities propelling the vision • New realities in the global Church
  • Jesus’ example --- the way of the cross ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Luke 22:27 John 20:20-21 “But I am among you as one who serves.” “he showed them his hands and side. … Jesus saidto them again, “Peace be with you! As the Fathersent me, so I send you.”
  • Jesus’ metaphor for mission workers ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Luke 10:2-4 “The harvest is plentiful, but the workers are few.Ask the Lord of the harvest, therefore, to send outworkers into his harvest field. Go! I am sendingyou out like lambs among wolves. Do not take apurse or bag or sandals…”
  • Missionary Paul regarding his ministry ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 2 Corinthians 4:7 “But we have this treasure in jars of clay to showthat this all-surpassing power is from God and notfrom us.”
  • Missionary Paul regarding his ministry ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 2 Corinthians 12:9-10 “But he said to me, “My grace is sufficient foryou, for my power is made perfect in weakness.”Therefore I will boast all the more gladly about myweaknesses, so that Christ’s power may rest onme. That is why, for Christ’s sake, I delight inweaknesses, in insults, in hardships, inpersecutions, in difficulties…”
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions2. Motivations driving the vision • Motivations arising from Gods Word – “Body of Christ” with many “members” (1 Cor. 12; Rom. 12) – Universal character of the Gospel and the Church (Gen. 3:15; 12:1-4; Is. 42, 49; Acts 2; Phil. 2; Rev. 7; etc.) – The witness of oneness; unity in diversity (John 17; Eph. 4) – Ministry from a position of human weakness (Luke 10:2-3; 22:27; Jn 20:20-21; 1 Cor. 2:2-5; 2 Cor. 4:7; 12:9-10) • Current global realities propelling the vision • New realities in the global Church
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions2. Motivations driving the vision • Motivations arising from Gods Word • Current global realities propelling the vision What in the world is happening? • New realities in the global Church
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions2. Motivations driving the vision • Motivations arising from Gods Word • Current global realities propelling the vision – post-colonial, nationalistic realities – globalization: the ‘global village’ – pluralism: multi-cultural, multi-ethnic interfacing – the growing global gap between rich & poor • New realities in the global Church
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions2. Motivations driving the vision • Motivations arising from Gods Word • Current global realities propelling the vision – post-colonial, nationalistic realities – globalization: the ‘global village’ – pluralism: multi-cultural, multi-ethnic interfacing – the growing global gap between rich & poor • New realities in the global Church
  • – post-colonial, nationalistic realitiesThe great mission advance of the last couplecenturies to a large degree was stamped by itsconnections to European (and American) colonialism,sometimes called ‘imperialism’.Christian mission in modern history has typically been from churches in more-developed (oftencolonizing) countries to less-developed (often colonized) countries.
  • – post-colonial, nationalistic realitiesAs the age of colonialism has passedand independent nations affirm evermore vigorously their nationalism, the global church has had to adapt in order to continue her mission to the world.
  • Samuel Escobar (from Peru), speaking of ‘post-imperial mission’, says it includes… “…the visualization of the future of mission as a global task inwhich the churches of the North Atlantic world enter intocreative patterns of partnership with churches in the ThirdWorld. …What is distinctive of the partnership proposed by thismissiology is that the Third World churches are seen asagents and originators of a missionary effort and amissiological reflection that is valid in its own right. They arenot simply being asked to join the missionary enterprise devisedin a mission center of North America or Europe.” (Samuel Escobar, “Evangelical Missiology: Peering into the Future”, in Taylor, Global Missiology for the 21st Century, 2000, p. 108)
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in2. Motivations driving thevision M issions • Motivations arising from Gods Word • Current global realities propelling the vision – post-colonial, nationalistic realities – globalization: the ‘global village’ – pluralism: multi-cultural, multi-ethnic interfacing – the growing global gap between rich & poor • New realities in the global Church
  • – globalization: the ‘global village’ “Globalization” is much more than just an economic phenomenon.
  • – globalization: the ‘global village’The world has become “smaller” and more interconnected.“Smaller” in that the physical distances are less limiting, the cost of travel is relatively more accessible, and mutual awareness and understanding of other parts of the world is greater than ever before.Interconnected in the sense that—with the global spread of the internet—far greater opportunities exist now than ever before for more equal access to information and a more level opportunity for using it and collaborating globally. true… Yes, it’s …most individuals in the world remain unconnected, but at an incredible pace, people from every part of the world have begun to tap into the new electronic opportunities of interconnectivity.
  • – globalization: the ‘global village’ Growing global interconnectivity appears to beone of those era-altering dynamics (“paradigmshifts”) in world history that irrevocably reshapes societies, cultures, governments, business, education and even individuals in profound ways.
  • – globalization: the ‘global village’ How will we in Christ’s timeless, multi-national Church, entrusted with the changeless Gospel, carry forward the mission into today’s world as it changes in these profound ways?
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions2. Motivations driving the vision • Motivations arising from Gods Word • Current global realities propelling the vision – post-colonial, nationalistic realities – globalization: the ‘global village’ – pluralism: multi-cultural, multi-ethnic interfacing – the growing global gap between rich & poor • New realities in the global Church
  • – pluralism: multi-cultural, multi-ethnic interfacing The world today presents us with much greater inter-ethnic interaction than ever before. People everywhere are confronted with the necessity — and more importantly, the opportunity — of relating to people of different cultures, languages, worldviews, and religions.
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions2. Motivations driving the vision • Motivations arising from Gods Word • Current global realities propelling the vision – post-colonial, nationalistic realities – globalization: the ‘global village’ – pluralism: multi-cultural, multi-ethnic interfacing – the growing global gap between rich & poor • New realities in the global Church
  • – the growing global gap between rich & poor A regrettable characteristic of recent history, with the advance of the forces of globalization, is the ever-growing inequalities in terms of wealth and opportunity around the world between the “connected” and the “unconnected”. The rich get richer while the poor, in relative terms, fall further behind.
  • – the growing global gap between rich & poor In 1960: the richest 20% of the world’s people had incomes 30 times greater than the incomes of the poorest 20%; by 1997: it was 74 times as much! (1999 Human Development Report, United Nations Development Programme)
  • – the growing global gap between rich & poor An analysis of long-term trends shows the distance between the richest and poorest countries was about: • 3 to 1 in 1820 • 11 to 1 in 1913 • 35 to 1 in 1950 • 44 to 1 in 1973 • 72 to 1 in 1992 (1999 Human Development Report, United Nations Development Programme)
  • – the growing global gap between rich & poor In 2005, the wealthiest 20% of the world accounted for 76.6% of total private consumption. The poorest 20% just 1.5%: (Slide from www.globalissues.org)
  • – the growing global gap between rich & poor How can we in Christ’s global, multi-national Church, as ambassadors of the God of mercy and witnesses to the compassionate Savior, proclaim the Gospel amidst today’s realities, • attentive to the poor and marginalized, and • countering the perceived link between Christian missions and the wealthy West?
  • Stan Nussbaum on the challenge of globalization for Christians and the mission of the Gospel:“God did not put us into this time in order to curse thewind, but to sail the ship. We will not stop the gathering storm of globalization. We will, with God’s help, harness the forces of globalization so that those very forces take us in the direction God wants, not the direction they are trying to blow us.” (Stan Nussbaum, 2003, “Goads on Globalization”, Connections (June): p. 31.)
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions2. Motivations driving the vision • Motivations arising from Gods Word • Current global realities propelling the vision – post-colonial, nationalistic realities – globalization; the ‘global village’ – pluralism: multi-cultural, multi-ethnic interfacing – the growing global gap between rich & poor • New realities in the global Church
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions2. Motivations driving the vision • Motivations arising from Gods Word • Current global realities propelling the vision • New realities in the global Church What in the world is happening in the Church?
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions2. Motivations driving the vision • Motivations arising from Gods Word • Current global realities propelling the vision • New realities in the global Church – dynamic growth of the Church in the ‘global south’ (for example, in Africa, Latin America and Asia) • in the number of believers • in strength of conviction and commitment • in spiritual maturity and vitality
  • Philip Jenkins, having researched the history andtrends of Christianity around the world, observes: “Over the last five centuries, the story of Christianity has been inextricably bound up with that of Europe and European-derived civilizations overseas… Many of us share the stereotype of Christianity as the religion of the West or, to use another popular metaphor, the global North. It is self-evidently the religion of the haves. …”
  • Philip Jenkins, having researched the history andtrends of Christianity around the world, observes: “Over the last century, however, the center of gravity in the Christian world has shifted inexorably southward, to Africa and Latin America. Today, the largest Christian communities on the planet are to be found in those regions. … In parts of Asia too, churches are growing rapidly, in numbers and self-confidence.”
  • Philip Jenkins, having researched the history andtrends of Christianity around the world, observes: “Christianity should enjoy a worldwide boom in the new century, but the vast majority of believers will be neither white nor Europeans, nor Euro-Americans.” (Philip Jenkins, The Next Christendom: The coming of global Christianity, revised, 2007, Oxford Univ. Press, p. 1-2.)
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions2. Motivations driving the vision • Motivations arising from Gods Word • Current global realities propelling the vision • New realities in the global Church – dynamic growth of the Church in the ‘global south’ (for example, in Africa, Latin America and Asia) • in the number of believers • in strength of conviction and commitment • in spiritual maturity and vitality
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions2. Motivations driving the vision • Motivations arising from Gods Word • Current global realities propelling the vision • New realities in the global Church – dynamic growth of the Church in the ‘global south’ (for example, in Africa, Latin America and Asia) – revising traditional conceptions of ‘sending church’, ‘mission field’, ‘missionary’, etc.
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions2. Motivations driving the vision • Motivations arising from Gods Word • Current global realities propelling the vision • New realities in the global Church – dynamic growth of the Church in the ‘global south’ (for example, in Africa, Latin America and Asia) – revising traditional conceptions of ‘sending church’, ‘mission field’, ‘missionary’, etc.
  • – revising traditional conceptions of ‘sending church’, ‘mission field’, ‘missionary’, etc. It is long overdue to dispel outdated notions that churches in the West are the ‘sending churches’ who send western ‘missionaries’ through western ‘mission agencies’ to ‘mission fields’ in Africa, Asia or other non- western lands.
  • – revising traditional conceptions of ‘sending church’, ‘mission field’, ‘missionary’, etc. How can we in Christ’s global, multi-national Church, guided by the Holy Spirit, break free of old paradigms and creatively develop and utilize the distinctive gifts that God has given Christians in all parts of the world for carrying out his mission to all nations?
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions2. Motivations driving the vision • Motivations arising from Gods Word • Current global realities propelling the vision • New realities in the global Church – dynamic growth of the Church in the ‘global south’ (for example, in Africa, Latin America and Asia) – revising traditional conceptions of ‘sending church’, ‘mission field’, ‘missionary’, etc. – ‘mission from below’
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions2. Motivations driving the vision • Motivations arising from Gods Word • Current global realities propelling the vision • New realities in the global Church – dynamic growth of the Church in the ‘global south’ (for example, in Africa, Latin America and Asia) – revising traditional conceptions of ‘sending church’, ‘mission field’, ‘missionary’, etc. – ‘mission from below’
  • – ‘mission from below’ Some have characterized traditional mission activity in recent centuries as ‘mission from above’, that is, from centers of power and wealth to the less powerful of the world. As the center of gravity of Christianity shifts southward, the Church finds itself more and more at the margins of the power of this world. Poor-to-poor and poor-to-rich mission has been designated ‘mission from below’ — from a position of this-worldly weakness.
  • – ‘mission from below’ One quick but illustrative comparison:Roughly speaking, an average pastor in the U.S.receives about 30 times as much support as anaverage pastor in Africa.Consider the contrast — and how it changes globalmission dynamics! — when missionary salaries areset based on salaries of pastors in their home church.
  • – ‘mission from below’ Christ’s mission, as is clearly revealed in the New Testament, has always been a ministry that does NOT find its strength in earthly resources or power, but in the spiritual resources of the Word of God and the power of the Holy Spirit. However, sometimes the Church forgets this and is tempted to rely more on the material resources it can gather. Could it be that the challenge of ‘mission from below’ might prove to be beneficial for the advance of the Gospel in the world today?
  • Samuel Escobar on “Biblical patterns for mission”: “In the cross, Jesus Christ died for our salvation and also left a pattern for missionary life. … This Christological model that was also the pattern under which Paul and the other apostles placed their own missionary practice could be described as ‘mission from below.’” … [It is] “necessary to consider a new paradigm, because the dynamism for mission is coming now from the periphery of the world, from the churches of the poor, as well as from Christians in the West that have to live as ‘resident aliens’ in a post-modern culture.” (Samuel Escobar, “The Global Scenario at the turn of the century”, in Taylor, Global Missiology for the 21st Century, 2000, p. 43-44)
  • – ‘mission from below’ This, in part, is what Luther — and Lutherans till today — meant by the theology of the cross
  • Philip Jenkins concludes his in-depth study of globalChristianity observing: “Christianity is flourishing wonderfully among the poor and persecuted, while it atrophies among the rich and secure. … And whether we look backward or forward in history, we can see that time and again, Christianity demonstrates a breathtaking ability to transform weakness into strength.” (Philip Jenkins, The Next Christendom: The coming of global Christianity, revised, 2007, Oxford Univ. Press, p. 260-61.)
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions2. Motivations driving the vision • Motivations arising from Gods Word • Current global realities propelling the vision • New realities in the global Church – dynamic growth of the Church in the ‘global south’ (for example, in Africa, Latin America and Asia) – revising traditional conceptions of ‘sending church’, ‘mission field’, ‘missionary’, etc. – ‘mission from below’
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions3. The contexts of the vision Where? What are the contexts demanding such a vision?…and that define the parameters in which this project would be implemented?
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions3. The contexts of the vision CONTEXT 1: Billions of lost people in our 21st century world.
  • More than 4,500,000,000 of themore than 6,700,000,000 people inthe world today are lost -- without Christ and without hope.
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions3. The contexts of the vision CONTEXT 1: Billions of lost people in our 21st century world. CONTEXT 2: Our pluralistic ‘global village’: in which the frontiers of mission are not primarily geographical.
  • The true frontiers of mission have always beendefined by invisible boundaries separating Christiansfrom those who do not believe in Christ ---boundaries which correspond less and less tonational boundaries. Christians are found in every continent, nation, andculture – just as the lost are also in every location.
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions3. The contexts of the vision CONTEXT 1: Billions of lost people in our 21st century world. CONTEXT 2: Our pluralistic ‘global village’: in which the frontiers of mission are not primarily geographical. CONTEXT 3: Confessional and Lutheran
  • CONFESSIONAL and LUTHERAN This vision for global partnering in missions is conceivedas an opportunity to be pursued within the confessionalLutheran global community. It is not motivated by separatism, nor does it seek to beexclusive. It rather rejoices in the clear, Biblical confession of faithproclaimed in the Lutheran Confessions, understandingsuch unashamed confession of divine truth as: fundamental to every mission endeavor, and that which rallies us to full engagement in mission!
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions3. The contexts of the vision CONTEXT 1: Billions of lost people in our 21st century world. CONTEXT 2: Our pluralistic ‘global village’: in which the frontiers of mission are not primarily geographical. CONTEXT 3: Confessional and Lutheran CONTEXT 4: Specifically, partner churches in the International Lutheran Council (ILC)
  • PARTNER CHURCHES OF THE INTERNATIONAL LUTHERAN COUNCILWhat is the ILC? “The ILC is a worldwide association of establishedconfessional Lutheran church bodies which proclaim theGospel of Jesus Christ on the basis of an unconditionalcommitment to the Holy Scriptures as the inspired andinfallible Word of God and to the Lutheran Confessionscontained in the Book of Concord as the true and faithfulexposition of the Word of God. ” [from ILC website: www.ilc-online.org]
  • PARTNER CHURCHES OF THE INTERNATIONAL LUTHERAN COUNCILWhat is the ILC? The vision presented here for global partnering inmissions chooses to focus on partnerships among those “The ILC is a worldwide association of establishedchurch bodiesLutheran church bodies the ILC. confessional united in confession in which proclaim the Gospel ofnot of necessity exclude possible collaboration It would Jesus Christ on the basis of an unconditionalwith other churches Holyexample, confessional Lutheran commitment to the (for Scriptures as the inspired andchurches who are Godin the ILC), Lutheran Confessions infallible Word of not and to the but it would seek to contained in the Book of Concord as the true and faithfulbuild on the cooperation that is already established amongthe 34 ILC member churches. ” exposition of the Word of God. [from ILC website: www.ilc-online.org]
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions3. The contexts of the vision CONTEXT 1: Billions of lost people in our 21st century world. CONTEXT 2: Our pluralistic ‘global village’: in which the frontiers of mission are not primarily geographical. CONTEXT 3: Confessional and Lutheran CONTEXT 4: Specifically, partner churches in the International Lutheran Council (ILC)
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in4. Historical issions M background What can we learn from history?
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in4. Historical issions M background• Historical dynamics of ‘church/mission’ relationships• Historical dynamics of relationships in the ILC• The growth of the ILC• Types of international partnerships
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in4. Historical issions M background• Historical dynamics of ‘church/mission’ relationships• Historical dynamics of relationships in the ILC• The growth of the ILC• Types of international partnerships
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in4. Historical issions M background• Historical dynamics of ‘church/mission’ relationships – traditional models of doing ‘missions’ – paternalism – dependency – redefining church/mission relationships (4 responses)• Historical dynamics of relationships in the ILC• The growth of the ILC• Types of international partnerships
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in4. Historical issions M background• Historical dynamics of ‘church/mission’ relationships – traditional models of doing ‘missions’ – paternalism – dependency – redefining church/mission relationships (4 responses)• Historical dynamics of relationships in the ILC• The growth of the ILC• Types of international partnerships
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in4. Historical issions M background• Historical dynamics of ‘church/mission’ relationships – traditional models of doing ‘missions’ MODEL A: ‘missions’ starting ‘churches’ MODEL B: ‘churches doing missions’• Historical dynamics of relationships in the ILC• The growth of the ILC• Types of international partnerships
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in4. Historical issions M background• Historical dynamics of ‘church/mission’ relationships – traditional models of doing ‘missions’ MODEL A: ‘missions’ starting ‘churches’ MODEL B: ‘churches doing missions’• Historical dynamics of relationships in the ILC• The growth of the ILC• Types of international partnerships
  • M ISSION M ODEL Independent mission agencies starting A: ‘churches’ Mission agencyIndividuals ...to ...supportand evangelize independentcongregations and start new missionof various congregations agency indenominations... & ‘churches’. sending missionaries...
  • M ISSION M ODEL Independent mission agencies starting A: ‘churches’ Mission agencyIndividuals ...to ...supportand evangelize independentcongregations and start new missionof various congregations agency indenominations... & ‘churches’. sending missionaries...
  • MODEL A: ‘missions’ starting ‘churches’MODEL B: ‘churches doing missions’
  • M ISSION M ODEL National church forms internal mission B: agency to conduct mission work Mission “board”Churches of ...which ...tosame confession undertakes evangelizejoin to form a mission work to and start newnational church other countries on congregations(synod)... behalf of its & churches of congregations... the same denomination.
  • M ISSION M ODEL National church forms internal mission B: agency to conduct mission workChurches of ...which ...tosame confession undertakes evangelizejoin to form a mission work to and start newnational church other countries on congregations(synod)... behalf of its & churches of congregations... the same confession.
  • M ISSION M ODEL National church forms internal mission B: agency to conduct mission work E XAMPLE (LCMS): Lutheran congregations form a synod, which in turn establishes synodical “Board for Missions” to call and send missionaries,Churches of ...which from which have arisen new ...to nationalsame confession undertakes evangelizejoin to form a Lutheran churches in othernew mission work to and startnational church other countries on countries. congregations(synod)... behalf of its & churches of congregations... the same confession.
  • M ISSION M ODEL National church forms internal mission B: agency to conduct mission work Lutheran understanding of biblical teaching about the Church and the office of the ministry of the Gospel argues for a mission model that regards mission outreach as an essential aspect of the Church and its ministry to the world.Churches of ...which ...to Lutheran churches, therefore have typicallysame confession undertakes evangelizejoin to form a mission worksuch as “MODEL B” in and start new preferred models, to thisnational church other countries on congregations presentation, of its the mission is undertaken byof(synod)... behalf where & churches and through the Church in a direct way. the same congregations... confession.
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in4. Historical issions M background• Historical dynamics of ‘church/mission’ relationships – traditional models of doing ‘missions’ – paternalism – dependency – redefining church/mission relationships (4 responses)• Historical dynamics of relationships in the ILC• The growth of the ILC• Types of international partnerships
  • – paternalism
  • The dominant churches tended to supply not only the theologyPaternalism in missions refers to ways in of materialfor these churches, and not only the great majority which theresources.churches of often brought, with the Gospel, their own“sending” They also the “West” have tended to supervise,direct, and supply the needs of younger “receiving” churchescultures, forms, structures and church governments.in developing (“two-thirds world”) countries. The flow has been typically in one direction: from the wealthy and developed West to the “mission” churches.
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in 4. Historical issions M background • Historical dynamics of ‘church/mission’ relationships – traditional models of doing ‘missions’ – paternalismfosters – dependency – redefining church/mission relationships (4 responses) • Historical dynamics of relationships in the ILC • The growth of the ILC • Types of international partnerships
  • Patterns of dependency have, at times, been theunintended consequence of paternalisticapproaches in church/mission – and subsequentchurch/partner church – relationships. “To keep the mission functioning the way the missionaries did, we need money, and cars, and we need hymn books, and we need...”This has begun to change, but remains a challengein global relationships and collaboration.
  • “Partnership is a wonderful idea ; pity the practice! Truly equal sharing will remainproblematic across the world Churchas long as material resources are sounevenly owned.”(Kirk, J. Andrew. 1999. What is Mission? Theological Explorations. London: Longman & Todd.)
  • What is necessary is to recognize and appreciatethe gifts and resources God has given to eachmember of his body – whether in poorer or richercountries – for carrying out his ministry to the world. “Partnership is a wonderful idea ; pity the practice! Truly equal sharing will remain problematic across the world Church as long as material resources are so unevenly owned.” (Kirk, J. Andrew. 1999. What is Mission? Theological Explorations. London: Longman & Todd.)
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in4. Historical issions M background• Historical dynamics of ‘church/mission’ relationships – traditional models of doing ‘missions’ – paternalism – dependency – redefining church/mission relationships (4 responses)• Historical dynamics of relationships in the ILC• The growth of the ILC• Types of international partnerships
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in4. Historical issions M background• Historical dynamics of ‘church/mission’ relationships – traditional models of doing ‘missions’ – paternalism – dependency – redefining church/mission relationships (4 responses)• Historical dynamics of relationships in the ILC• The growth of the ILC• Types of international partnerships
  • Redefining church/mission relationships We can recognize 4 responses to the need to redefinerelationships between the emerging and maturing nationalchurches and the mission organizations that birthedthem. 1. Departure Some historically have advocated that the mission organization, 2. Subordination after planting a new church, should withdraw completely and 3. Working in parallel permit the church to carry forward the ministry and mission 4. Partnership of Christ in the country independently.
  • Redefining church/mission relationships We can recognize 4 responses to the need to redefinerelationships between the emerging and maturing nationalchurches and the mission organizations that birthedthem. 1. Departure A second option was to continue 2. Subordination to send missionaries to the particular mission field, only now 3. Working in parallel they should function under the new national church rather than under the direction of their 4. Partnership mission organization.
  • Redefining church/mission relationships We can recognize 4 responses to the need to redefinerelationships between the emerging and maturing nationalchurches and the mission organizations that birthedthem. 1. Departure Others argued that the mission 2. Subordination should neither withdraw nor place its work under the new national church, but that it should 3. Working in parallel continue its mission commitment in parallel with the new church, 4. Partnership each working separately and independently of the other.
  • Redefining church/mission relationships We can recognize 4 responses to the need to redefinerelationships between the emerging and maturing nationalchurches and the mission organizations that birthedthem. 1. Departure But a fourth option, partnership, is central to the vision here proposed. 2. Subordination In partnerships, churches and missions — irrespective of national 3. Working in parallel origin — find ways of working together to continue the mission and ministry of the Church. 4. Partnership It is interdependence instead of independence.
  • Redefining church/mission relationships We can recognize 4 responses to the need to redefinerelationships between the emerging and maturing nationalchurches and the mission organizations that birthedthem. 1. Departure This option seeks to fully appreciate the diversity of the 2. Subordination one global body of Christ, with all members joining together in 3. Working in parallel answering the call to make disciples of all nations. 4. Partnership Each partner brings its unique gifts to the partnership.
  • Redefining church/mission relationships We can recognize 4 responses to the need to redefinerelationships between the emerging and maturing nationalchurches and the mission organizations that birthedthem. 1. Departure Critics of this approach rightly point out the complexities of bridging the economic disparities, 2. Subordination ethno-cultural differences, and organizational diversity brought 3. Working in parallel together in such partnerships. Indeed, how to address such 4. Partnership complexities is one of the central motivations behind the research proposed here.
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in4. Historical issions M background• Historical dynamics of ‘church/mission’ relationships – traditional models of doing ‘missions’ – paternalism – dependency – redefining church/mission relationships (4 responses)• Historical dynamics of relationships in the ILC• The growth of the ILC• Types of international partnerships
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in4. Historical issions M background• Historical dynamics of ‘church/mission’ relationships• Historical dynamics of relationships in the ILC – many of the ILC member churches were former ‘missions’ of the LCMS – often LCMS related in paternalistic ways – often patterns of dependency were unintentionally fostered• The growth of the ILC• Types of international partnerships
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in4. Historical issions M background• Historical dynamics of ‘church/mission’ relationships• Historical dynamics of relationships in the ILC – many of the ILC member churches were former ‘missions’ of the LCMS – often LCMS related in paternalistic ways – often patterns of dependency were unintentionally fostered• The growth of the ILC• Types of international partnerships
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in4. Historical issions M background• Historical dynamics of ‘church/mission’ relationships• Historical dynamics of relationships in the ILC• The growth of the ILC – LCMS is largest partner and has dominated the ILC – but many younger ILC churches are growing• Types of international partnerships
  • Countries in which ILC member churches are located. The countries in blue show where ILC member churches are found.In the following slides we will be portraying each ILC memberchurch (in descending order according to membership).But remember while viewing… Size isn’t everything. Some ofthe churches, for example, are growing rapidly while othersare static. And membership numbers are not precise.Also… Membership figures do not show the varieties of giftsthat each member church — small or large — brings to theglobal body (e.g., material resources, personnel with variousgifts, linguistic and cultural competencies, etc.).
  • Countries in which ILC member churches are located.The largest churches (over 100,000 baptized ( = 100,000 members)members): The LCMS 2,490,000 Luth Church of Nigeria 135,000 Gutnius Luth Ch Papua New Guinea 140,000 IELB (Brazil) 230,000
  • Countries in which ILC member churches are located.ILC Churches with membership of 10,000 – ( = 100,000 members)100,000: Ingria Luth Ch (Russia)Luth Ch - Canada SELK (Germany) 18,00078,000 36,000 AALC (USA) 20,000 India Ev. L. Ch. LC in the 80,000 Philippines L. Ch Ghana 27,000 27,500 Luth Ch of Kenya 85,000 L Ch in S. Africa 20,000 Luth Ch of Australia 75,000 Ev L Ch Argentina 30,000
  • Countries in which ILC member churches are located.ILC Churches with membership of 1,000 – ( = 10,000 members)10,000: LC of England 1,500 Japan LC 2,700 LC in Korea 5,200 Lu Synod China LC of Mexico L Ch Haiti Hong Kong (Taiwan) 1,200 8,300 9,000 2,600LC Guatemala LC Venezuela 3,000 1,000 Sri Lanka LC 5,300 FELSISA (S.Afr.) LC Paraguay 2,650 4,000
  • Countries in which ILC member churches are located. Smallest ILC Churches (under 1,000 baptized members): Lu Free C in Denmark 100 LC in Belgium 120 Synod of France & Belgium 800 LC of Peru 220 LC of Bolivia 700LC Rep of Chile 170
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in4. Historical issions M background• Historical dynamics of ‘church/mission’ relationships• Historical dynamics of relationships in the ILC• The growth of the ILC – LCMS is largest partner and has dominated the ILC – but many younger ILC churches are growing – young ILC churches have matured – a few younger ILC churches have made initial efforts in foreign missions – and some older ILC churches (eg., Brazil, Germany, Argentina) have been sending out missionaries• Types of international partnerships
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in4. Historical issions M background• Historical dynamics of ‘church/mission’ relationships• Historical dynamics of relationships in the ILC• The growth of the ILC – but yet, world missions among ILC churches still remains an undertaking centered largely in the LCMS• Types of international partnerships
  • Why does the LCMS remain dominant in thearea of world missions within the ILC?Various reasons, including: • Much bigger • Much wealthier (in material resources) • Longer history in world mission • Organization already established for mission • More trained people to draw upon (pastors, teachers, etc.)
  • But could it be that we underestimate thegifts that smaller, poorer members of theILC can offer?Do we too easily overlook that the “eye” needs the “ear” and the “hand” needs the “foot”, since God placed every part in the Body for a purpose?
  • Members of smaller, poorer partner churches bring unique gifts that are valuable ini world P ro fi c e n c mission. o example: N For y i n li vi n g as s o c i ati o n s i m p ly w i th a an d w i th pU n iti c al o li q u e li ttle p e rse rp o w es s u p p e c ti ve C o m ateay al f n t (i n w eo m p ri te orn ire s oo rc e se r n u th ) li fe , th e o lo g y, lan g u ag e s an d an d th e o lo g i c alAnd… c u ltu re s …theycshare an equal zeal for Christ’s mission! ap p li ati o n
  • How can wein Christ’s global, multi-national Church,guided by the Holy Spirit,break free of old paradigms and creatively develop and utilize the distinctive gifts that God has given brothers and sisters in all the churches of the ILC for carrying out his mission to all nations?
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in4. Historical issions M background• Historical dynamics of ‘church/mission’ relationships• Historical dynamics of relationships in the ILC• The growth of the ILC – but yet, world missions among ILC churches still remains an undertaking centered largely in the LCMS• Types of international partnerships
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in4. Historical issions M background• Historical dynamics of ‘church/mission’ relationships• Historical dynamics of relationships in the ILC• The growth of the ILC• Types of international partnerships – Types of international partnerships in recent history – Some types of international collaboration found in ILC member churches
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in4. Historical issions M background• Historical dynamics of ‘church/mission’ relationships• Historical dynamics of relationships in the ILC• The growth of the ILC• Types of international partnerships
  • • Types of international partnerships In recent history, efforts at international collaboration in missions have been gaining prominence. Entering the 21st century — with globalization and the growth and maturity of churches in non-western and developing countries — churches and missions of various denominations have increasingly been looking for ways to partner internationally in global mission outreach.
  • Types of international partnerships in recent historyOne finds a great variety of recent attempts at internationalcollaboration in missions. Such efforts have included: ♦ National church partnering with other national church(es) ♦ Mission agency with mission agency(ies) in another country ♦ Mission agency with a national church in another country ♦ Independent international mission agency that draws missionaries and support from international churches ♦ Multi-cultural teams that draw support from, and are accountable to, persons, churches, and/or mission agencies all over the globe ♦ Local congregations who send their own missionaries, cooperating with older or newer churches or mission agencies in other countries ♦ Global, multi-lateral cooperative mission endeavors(cf. Charles Van Engen. 2001. “Toward a Theology of Mission Partnerships”. Missiology: An International Review. 29:1 (Jan 2001), p. 13)
  • Types of international partnerships in recent history Some partnerships have functioned better than others. What can be learned from such efforts? How does a Lutheran understanding of mission inform our approach to partnerships?
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in4. Historical issions M background• Historical dynamics of ‘church/mission’ relationships• Historical dynamics of relationships in the ILC• The growth of the ILC• Types of international partnerships – Types of international partnerships in recent history – Some types of international collaboration found in ILC member churches
  • – Some types of international collaboration found in ILC member churches ♦ One ILC partner church sends financial support to another to help that church undertake a mission to a third country.
  • – Some types of international collaboration found in ILC member churches ♦ One ILC partner calls and supports a missionary from another partner church to serve in a third place. (The missionary serves under the calling mission but continues to be a missionary of his home church.)
  • – Some types of international collaboration found in ILC member churches ♦ Two ILC partner churches join together to undertake a mission in a third location, both contributing missionaries and resources.
  • – Some types of international collaboration found in ILC member churches ♦ Congregation(s) and/or mission society(ies) from one partner church form partnership with another national church or congregations in another church to support mission work with material resources and/or volunteers.
  • – Some types of international collaboration found in ILC member churches A good start! Exciting previews of greater possibilities! However, such examples are still few and, in However, such examples are still few and, in most cases, the LCMS remains the dominant partner of such endeavors in the ILC. How can the global Lutheran community more effectively engage all its members in fulfilling Christ’s mission to the ends of the earth, integrating the unique gifts and personnel from every partner?
  • So then… Now what?
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions5. From vision to realization How?
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions5. From vision to realization How? How can the vision for Global Partnering in Missions among sister Lutheran churches around the world come to realization? This presentation has raised a lot of questions for which there are few clear or certain answers. If we want to do it…How can we do it?
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions5. From vision to realizationA three stage process is proposed: Get Ready… Get Set… Go!
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions5. From vision to realizationThe first two steps are to Get Ready Get Ready… 1. Research 2. Development of global participation (awareness  interest  linking  involvement) Get Set… Go!
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions5. From vision to realizationThen, two steps to Get Set for action Get Ready… 1. Research 2. Development of global participation (awareness  interest  linking  involvement) Get Set… 3. Consensus around a model of partnering 4. Development of global networking Go! system
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions5. From vision to realization Go!And then we can Get Ready… 1. Research 2. Development of global participation (awareness  interest  linking  involvement) Get Set… 3. Consensus around a model of partnering 4. Development of global networking Go! Global Partnering in system Missions!
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions5. From vision to realization Get Ready… 1. Research 2. Development of global participation (awareness  interest  linking  involvement) Get Set… 3. Consensus around a model of partnering 4. Development of global networking Go! Global Partnering in system Missions!
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions5. From vision to realization 1. Research The realization of this vision must begin with better understanding. We need to…  Survey & study the topic in greater detail  Explore & imagine the possibilities  Investigate & clarify likely complications
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions5. From vision to realization 1. Research  Survey & study the topic in greater detail I am proposing a research plan that would seek to learn as much as possible from others . . .  Explore & imagine the possibilities  Investigate & clarify likely complications
  • L e arn i n g fro mIn addition to a more careful study of God’s Wordand Christian doctrine, we will seek to learn… o th e rs .with.global- from those already working . collaboration in various fields- from other missionaries and missions involved in global partnerships in other denominations- but especially from church and mission leaders in Lutheran partner churches of the ILC
  • L e arn i n g fro mA central and crucial focus of the research will beto listeno th e rs from . . to and learn . God’sservants in Lutheran churches around the world (including the LCMS, but especially other churches whose voices have not yet been heard as well)- to hear their perspectives on how mission has been and, more importantly, could be done, and- to explore with them their ideas and insightson possibilities for global partnering in mission.
  • L e arn i n g fro mThe last thing we want is a program pro posed, e rs . . . o th com posedand appearing to be im posed from the U.S. or the LCMS,…with other “partner” churches feeling they areonly on the receiving end of something alreadyworked out for them!
  • L e arn i n g fro mSimply put, “global partnering in missions” o th willrs . . . e require genuine and sincerepartnering that is truly global from planning to implementation.
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions5. From vision to realization 1. Research  Survey & study the topic in greater detail  Explore & imagine the possibilities  Investigate & clarify likely complications
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions5. From vision to realization 1. Research  Survey & study the topic in greater detail  Explore & imagine the possibilities A second part of the preparatory research requires a reassesment of how mission has been done and bold exploration of how it might be done through global partnering.  Investigate & clarify likely complications
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions5. From vision to realization 1. Research  Survey & study the topic in greater detail  Explore & imagine the possibilities It needs to discover and imagine new possibilities of international cooperation . . . new paradigms for partnering. . . . that can unite the diverse gifts of the global Lutheran community for Christ’s mission.  Investigate & clarify likely complications
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions5. From vision to realization 1. Research  Survey & study the topic in greater detail  Explore & imagine the possibilities What would a missionary look like? How might he/she be supported? Under what structure would they serve? Yes , Yes, we need to think . . . . . . . . . . o u ts i d e . .  Investigate & clarify likely complications th e
  • I m ag i n i n g th e For example… p o s s i b i li ti e s !Yes , we need to think o u ts i d e th e
  • I m ag i n i n gI m ag i n e … A team of th e Each sent our by theirmissionaries: national home church toOne family from Nigeria, a country in the Middleone couplep othe s i b i li ti e s ! from s Philippines East, under a cooperative arrangement where all and another from the U.S., share equally from a a man from Guatemala, and common pool of supporta woman from Germany. from all the home Perhaps they enter the country as churches. teachers or engineers and live together in a type of multi-cultural community. Yes , we need to think o u ts i d e th e
  • I m ag i n i n g I m ag i n e … A team of th e How is their mission missionaries: work supervised? One family from Nigeria, Perhaps there is a multi- one couplep othe s i b i li ti e s ! from s Philippines national supervising and another from the U.S., team dividing up the a man from Guatemala, and various responsibilities. Perhaps this team a woman from Germany.Legal/immigration issues? normally meets and collaborates ‘virtually’Perhaps international resource person via the internet.advises on such issues with personsdesignated in each national church. Yes , we need to think o u ts i d e th e
  • I m ag i n i n g th e. . . and a host of questions begin to arise . . .In an example such as this of an “imagined p o their will be li ti e s !possibility”, s s i b i plenty of questionsregarding potentially complicating factors.Which brings us to the third aspect of theresearch… Yes , we need to think o u ts i d e th e
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions5. From vision to realization 1. Research  Survey & study the topic in greater detail  Explore & imagine the possibilities  Investigate & clarify likely complications
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions5. From vision to realization 1. Research  Survey & study the topic in greater detail  Explore & imagine the possibilities  Investigate & clarify likely complications
  • 1. Research  Survey & study the topic in greater detail  Explore & imagine the possibilities  Investigate & clarify likely complicationsThe level of partnering envisioned here, it must be said clearly, is EXTREMELY COMPLICATED!We need to know the obstacles that can get in the way: - The challenge of cultural differences - The challenge of economic disparities - The challenge of organizational differences among partners …to name but a few!
  • 1. Research  Survey & study the topic in greater detail  Explore & imagine the possibilities  Investigate & clarify likely complicationsHow can we work well togetherwhen team members come into the partnership withdifferent cultural ways of relating and working? (for example, in one culture, interpersonal conflict is addressed indirectly while another member’s culture is to confront it directly.)or when they come from unequal economic backgrounds? (for example, for one member, $400 a month is too little to survive on while for another it is more than he would ever dream of earning.)or when they operate in differing organizationalstructures? (for example, policy in one national church requires changing their mission officer every year while for another it is needlessly disruptive.)
  • 1. Research Survey & study the topic in greater detail  Explore & imagine the possibilities  Investigate & clarify likely complications Recognizing likely complications is the first step in designing ways to avoid them, overcome them, or even exploit them.
  • 1. Research Survey & study the topic in greater detail  Explore & imagine the possibilities  Investigate & clarify likely complications The global partnering in missions envisioned here is very rare in actual practice, but NOT for lack of desire. It is mostly because it is so incredibly difficult. Confronted with so many obstacles, churches and mission organizations tend to settle instead for smaller, “do-able” types of cooperation.
  • 1. Research Survey & study the topic in greater detail  Explore & imagine the possibilities  Investigate & clarify likely complications Is it worth the effort? In the end, is it even truly “do-able” at all?
  • 1. Research Survey & study the topic in greater detail  Explore & imagine the possibilities  Investigate & clarify likely complicationsThis proposal is grounded in a conviction that, of all places, it is PRECISELY in THE CHURCH — in CHRIST —where such obstacles CAN be overcome .And our testimony to the Gospel will be all the more clear and powerful for it!
  • 1. Research  Survey & study the topic in greater detail  Explore & imagine the possibilities  Investigate & clarify likely complicationsIndeed, cooperative multicultural, multiethnic,multinational approaches to missions, where many of the divisions so prominent to human experience are bridged for all to see, would demonstrate and substantiate the message “There is neither Jew nor of the Gospel in this Greek, slave nor free, fractured world. For… male nor female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus.” (Gal. 3:28)
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions5. From vision to realization Get Ready… 1. Research 2. Development of global participation (awareness  interest  linking  involvement) Get Set… 3. Consensus around a model of partnering 4. Development of global networking Go! system
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions5. From vision to realization 2. Development of global participation (awareness  interest  linking  involvement) As the research is being carried out, necessaryconnections with churches and leaders from all partsof the ILC will be developed…  Creating awareness about global partnering  Raising interest in the vision for global partnering  Linking individuals and churches in global network  Involving churches and individuals in a project for Global Partnering in Mission
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issions5. From vision to realization Get Ready… 1. Research 2. Development of global participation (awareness  interest  linking  involvement) Get Set… 3. Consensus around a model of partnering 4. Development of global networking Go! system Global Partnering in
  • This presentation has beenprepared in order to begin to create awareness and raise interest among Lutherans regarding the possibility forGlobal Partnering in Mission.
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issionsMembers of the Body of Christ throughout the world working together to bring the Gospel to the whole world.
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issionsMembers of the Body of Christ throughout the world working together to bring the Gospel to the whole world.
  • Gl obal Par t ner ing in M issionsProject Concept for Global Partnering in Missions Sowing the Vision Rev. Dale Talsma 2008