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Design Thinking Method Cards

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  • 1. DTHSG.COMEstablished in 2005. Prototyping since back then.
  • 2. DESIGN THINKING UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN DESIGN THINKING UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLENThe Design Thinking division affiliated to the Institute of Information Management of theUniversity of St. Gallen (HSG) is successfully increasing innovation within companies of globalacting firms since 2008. Experienced professors and method coaches ensure the competentapproach of the Design Thinking methodology during the projects of the HSG Master course,the Embedded Design Thinking projects and executive workshops. Our mission is to enablenew perspectives for sustainable business development by applying Stanford‟s pioneeredME310 human-centered innovation process based on customer needs and rapid prototyping.
  • 3. WHERE THE MAGIC HAPPENS - HUMAN CENTERED INNOVATIONsource: IDEO DESIGN THINKING│UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN
  • 4. DESIGN THINKING UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN HUMAN - CENTERED INNOVATIONInnovating at the intersection of business, technology and people enables to develop radicalnew products, service and business models. In order to generate the best possible solution forthe end user, the design teams strive to understand human needs from the very beginning ofthe Design Thinking process. Experiencing tangible prototypes allows end customers toparticipate early in the innovation process. The direct user feedback helps the team to improveprototypes, refine ideas and continuously gain higher expertise in the field of human behaviorand needs.
  • 5. THE ITERATIVE DESIGN PROCESS - DT MICROCYCLE BY STANFORD UNIVERSITY DESIGN THINKING│UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN
  • 6. DESIGN THINKING UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN ITERATIVE DESIGN PROCESSDuring a Design Thinking project, the design team follows the stages of the iterative DesignThinking Microcycle: (re)Defining the problem, Needfinding andBenchmarking, Ideation, Prototyping and Testing. The process of rapid iteration assures theteam not being stuck on one idea for too long. This approach leads to a high variety of ideas.Through rapid low-resolution prototyping ideas are continuously being tested with the user.“Fail early in order to succeed sooner” is a Design Thinking principle that helps to maximizelearnings and insights, crucial for human-centered innovation.
  • 7. INSIGHTS BEGIN WITH OBSERVATIONS - IDENTIFYING HIDDEN USER NEEDS DESIGN THINKING│UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN
  • 8. DESIGN THINKING UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN NEEDFINDING & INSTANT EXPERTISEAsk, listen, observe and engage! Understanding the people you are designing for is thefoundation of human-centered innovation. By observing and directly engaging with users thedesign team learns about the way people think and the values they hold. Gaining empathyenables to discover the emotions that guide peoples behavior and helps to capture physicalmanifestations of experiences. This allows the design team to interpret intangible meanings ofuser experiences and define hidden needs and insights that will inspire them for innovativeprototyping ideas.
  • 9. WHY LIMIT TO A TOOTHBRUSH? – LET‟S INNOVATE DENTAL CARE EXPERIENCE DENTAL CARE DESIGN THINKING│UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN
  • 10. DESIGN THINKING UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN (RE)DEFINE THE PROBLEM(Re)-Defining the problem aims to redefine the visionary challenge into a more differentiatedproblem statement based on the user needs and insights the design team has uncovered. Thedefine mode is seen as a „narrowing‟ part of the Design Thinking microcycle. By iteratively re-defining the problem statement from the user perspective the team is able to unify the volumeof user information in order to generate more profound ideas for the purpose of developingthoroughly human-centered prototypes.
  • 11. BRAINSTORMING - A QUINTESSENTIAL DESIGN THINKING IDEATION ACTIVITY DESIGN THINKING│UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN
  • 12. DESIGN THINKING UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN IDEATEIdeation is the mode of generating a large quantity of diverse ideas. Mentally it represents theprocess of “going wide” which enables to explore a broad solution space. Brainstorming is arenowned method to come up with a lot of ideas. It leverages the collective thinking of theinnovation team by engaging with each other, listening, and building on each others ideas.Generating ideas based on user needs and insights provides the fuel and source material forbuilding rapid prototypes in order to get relevant innovations into the hands of your users.
  • 13. CREATING TANGIBLE REPRESENTATIONS OF IDEAS - SERVICE PROTOTYPING DESIGN THINKING│UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN
  • 14. DESIGN THINKING UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN RAPID PROTOTYPINGBuild to think! A prototype is an artifact to have a conversation around. Prototyping is gettingthe ideas and explorations out of your head in the physical world. A prototype can be anythingthat takes physical form – be it a wall of post-it notes, a role-playing activity, a space, an object,a paper wireframe or even a storyboard. Creating quick low-resolution prototypes allows thedesign team to test a number of ideas and to learn quickly without investing a lot of time andmoney up front. Prototypes enable to test and refine solutions together with the user in orderto gain deeper empathy and inspire others by showing a tangible version of your vision.
  • 15. TANGIBLE PROTOTYPES AND USER FEEDBACK INSPIRE HUMAN-CENTERED INNOVATION PROTOTYPING TESTING MAKE YOUR IDEASLEARN TANGIBLE DESIGN THINKING│UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN
  • 16. DESIGN THINKING UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN TESTINGTesting is the chance to refine solutions together with the user. It is another opportunity togain deeper empathy through observation and engagement and often yields unexpectedinsights. Testing is the mode in which the low-resolution artifacts are put into practice byplacing the prototype in the appropriate context. Putting a prototype in the users‟ hands andwatching how they use it, observing how they interact and listen to what they say, allows thedesign team to discover new insights and gain deeper understanding of hidden user needs.
  • 17. VISIONARY CHALLENGES FROM HSG DESIGN THINKING PROJECTS DESIGN THINKING│UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN
  • 18. DESIGN THINKING UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN THE VISIONARY CHALLENGEThe framing of a visionary challenge sets the stage for a design team to explore the problemspace and define stakeholder within a reasonable context of their challenge. Focused 3-5 yearsin the future, visionary challenges are broad enough that the design team is encouraged todefine their actual problem area from the user perspective. This allows the team to iterativelyrefine the problem by specifically addressing discovered needs and insights within the assignedcontext.
  • 19. MILESTONES AND PROTOTYPING PHASES - THE DESIGN THINKING PYRAMID = ITERATIVE DESIGN AMBIGUITY / PROCESS # OF IDEAS DESIGN THINKING MICROCYCLE DIVERGING CONVERGING PHASE PHASE TIMEMILESTONES CRITICAL DARK X-is FUNKY FUNCTIONAL FINAL FUNCTION HORSE FINISHED PROTOTYPE PROTOTYPE PROTOTYPE PROTOTYPE PROTOTYPE PROTOTYPE DESIGN SPACE EXPLORATION DESIGN THINKING│UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN
  • 20. DESIGN THINKING UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN DESIGN THINKING PHASESThe iterative Design Thinking microcycle is integrated in the milestone model which includesseven prototyping phases. The innovation team gets continuously challenged to improve theirideas through prototyping under varying perspectives - e.g. the Critical Function or the DarkHorse prototyping phase. In each prototyping phase the team follows the Design Thinkingmicrocycle which encourages to iterate quickly and test low-resolution prototypes in order tocollect significant learnings that inspire the final prototype.
  • 21. DESIGN THINKING UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN DIVERGING PHASES DESIGN SPACE CRITICAL FUNCTION DARK HORSE EXPLORATION PROTOTYPE PROTOTYPEThe early Design Thinking prototyping phases facilitate divergent thinking. Divergent thinkingaims to „think outside the box‟. The teams are encouraged to explore and generate ideasbeyond their comfort zone. The diverging phase aims to support the development of a broadand inspired understanding of the problem space by building a large number of prototypes.Rapid prototyping and testing of each idea helps the innovation team to harvest user feedbackand further develop prototypes.
  • 22. DESIGN THINKING UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN CONVERGING PHASES FUNKY FUNCTIONAL X-IS FINISHED FINAL PROTOTYPE PROTOTYPE PROTOTYPE PROTOTYPEThe converging prototyping phase combines the most promising learnings of the divergingphase. The prototypes of the converging phase aim to support convergence towards one singlesolution. During the phase, deep reasoning questions are asked to synthesize the userobservations into the final prototype. This method enables to reach a certain state ofknowledge. Within these phases, ideas are elaborated into more specific design concepts. Thismindset helps the innovation team to make decisions and develop a final high-resolutionprototype.
  • 23. THE 360° INNOVATION SPACE MINDSET - DESIGN SPACE EXPLORATION Become an expertin your Design Space… DESIGN SPACE INNOVATION SPACE …AND explore the whole Innovation Space DESIGN THINKING│UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN
  • 24. DESIGN THINKING UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN DESIGN SPACE EXPLORATIONBy exploring and evaluating existing innovations, future technologies and consumer trends, theteam gains instant expertise about the relevant stakeholders, technology competitors andbusinesses within the design space. Cross-industry research helps to gain expertise within theinnovation space. This empowers the design team to uncover hidden user needs and define abroad horizon of possibilities. The 360 innovation mindset allows to get inspiration across theassigned industry sector and encourages the transformation and combination of learnings intoinnovative solutions for breakthrough ideas and prototypes.
  • 25. CRITICAL FUNCTION PROTOTYPE „GRIP CAN‟ - ADDRESSED FUNCTION “SKID RESISTANT” DESIGN THINKING│UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN
  • 26. DESIGN THINKING UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN CRITICAL FUNCTION PROTOTYPECritical Function prototypes aim to address one particular critical user issue. Needs andinsights, discovered during the design space exploration, are transferred into critical functions -a verb, noun or action - to define what the prototype should do or include e.g. “to enablegrip”. Critical Function prototypes aim to capture a specific question essential to furtherexplore an interesting part of the design space. These prototypes focus on the tangiblecreation of an experience or physical thing that helps the design team to learn from watchingpeople use and experience it.
  • 27. WHAT IF WE DELETE DIGITAL MEMORIES? - DARKHORSE PROTOTYPE „DIGITAL ERASER DESIGN THINKING│UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN
  • 28. DESIGN THINKING UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN DARK HORSE PROTOTYPEThe Dark Horse prototype challenges previously made assumptions and seems from theoutside perspective, unlikely to develop into the final solution. By exploring rejected ideas thatseemed unacceptable, too risky or impossible, these prototypes allow to broaden the team‟sperspective once more and gives permission to think bigger. Visionary and crazy ideas gettranslated into tangible prototypes and visionary role plays help to visualize future scenarios.Reframing earlier assumptions encourages the team to reach for the impossible and avoidsnarrowing potential solutions too early in the design process. The solution space is kept asbroad as possible, which is essential for coming up with ideas leading to radical innovations.
  • 29. A COMBINATION OF PROMISING PROTOTYPES - FUNKY PROTOTYPE „ELLAS DAY 2020‟ DESIGN THINKING│UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN
  • 30. DESIGN THINKING UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN FUNKY PROTOTYPEThe Funky prototype aims to integrate and combine promising elements of previouslydeveloped prototypes into a holistic concept or vision statement that acts as the point ofreference for the final design process. This prototype phase consolidates customer feedbackfrom previous testing and merges insights from user observations and interviews. Personasensures the most relevant needs, values, behaviors, requirements and critical functions crucialfor the final prototype are kept. All Funky prototypes enable the design team to develop theirvision of where the journey is finally heading.
  • 31. CLICKABLE POWERPOINT MOCKUP - FUNCTIONAL PROTOTYPE „TIMELINE‟ DESIGN THINKING│UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN
  • 32. DESIGN THINKING UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN FUNCTIONAL PROTOTYPEThe Functional prototype elaborates 2-3 significant elements from funky prototypes and gives apreview on how the final prototype may look like. This phase marks the first convergingmilestone where the design team defines the scope of what will be delivered at the end of theproject. Moreover, the functional prototype creates a first feel „looks like / works like‟ feel ofthe final prototype. Core ideas are summarized and presented in an experiencable proof ofconcept prototype. This prototype helps the team to clarify major technical issues andencourages them to develop a specific development plan of the final prototype.
  • 33. ELABORATED iPHONE MOCKUP - X-IS FINISHED MOBILE APPLICATION PROTOTYPE DESIGN THINKING│UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN
  • 34. DESIGN THINKING UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN X-is-FINISHED PROTOTYPEThe X-is-Finished prototype has the goal of developing one key functionality or feature as itwill be experiencable in the final prototype. This milestone helps the design team to betterestimate and manage the required efforts to fully develop the final solution by having onefeature or functionality finalized. By testing this prototype the user feedback helps to identifyand optimize last technical issues in order to optimize the user experience of the finalprototype.
  • 35. FINAL PROTOTYPE „TIMELINE‟ - DESIGN THINKING AT DEUTSCHE BANK 2009 DESIGN THINKING│UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN
  • 36. DESIGN THINKING UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN FINAL PROTOTYPEAt the very end of the Design Thinking process, the design team presents their high-resolutionprototype. The final prototype consists of previous tested prototype functions that are finallycombined together and integrated into the final prototype. This prototype embodies all keyfunctions essential to deliver the full customer experience. It conveys a clear message of theideas behind the prototype and allows interaction without explanation. The individual functionsof the final prototype are elaborated and documented in detail so that the implementationteam which will continue to work on the solution can get started to work on the actualimplementation.
  • 37. „MEIN ZUKUNFTSPLANER‟ DEUTSCHE BANK Q110 - DESIGN THINKING SUCCESS STORY DESIGN THINKING│UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN
  • 38. DESIGN THINKING UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN SUCCESS STORY DEUTSCHE BANKIn 2009, the first Embedded Design Thinking team at Deutsche Bank developed a newapproach to create interest and demand for financial advisory. In just one year, Deutsche Bankdeveloped and implemented this service from the original final prototype of this DesignThinking project. Supported by intuitive touch technologies, customers can independently ortogether with an advisor explore and plan their future wishes. „Mein Zukunftsplaner‟ enables amuch more individual discussion and deepens the relationship between the customer and theadvisor. In 2010 this innovative service got introduced at Q110, the Deutsche Bank futurestore in Berlin, and is also available as iPad version since 2011.
  • 39. EMBEDDED DT - CONCEPTIONALIZED AND IMPLEMENTED WITH DEUTSCHE BANK DESIGN THINKING│UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN
  • 40. DESIGN THINKING UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN EMBEDDED DESIGN THINKINGEmbedded DT is a program set up by the University of St. Gallen for corporate partnerslooking to enable human-centered innovation within the enterprise and integrate DesignThinking into the corporate culture. Embedded design teams are staffed with student internsand employees in order to ensure diversity and transfer of knowledge. The teams are heavilysupported by experienced HSG coaches to assure professional method coaching throughoutthe process. As valuable as the new ideas, embedded projects are a great source for companiestrying to get new perspectives. Moreover design teams go beyond the obvious of any givenchallenge in order to increase the probability of breakthrough discoveries and innovationswithin the company.
  • 41. A SPACE DEDICATED TO THE CULTURE OF INNOVATION - DESIG THINKING LOFT ST. GALLEN DESIGN THINKING│UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN
  • 42. DESIGN THINKING UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN DESIGN THINKING UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLENThis unique HSG course allows corporate partners to get an innovation design team of 3-7graduate students working on a visionary challenge for 10 months. Throughout the course theteams follow the Design Thinking process, determine hidden user needs and develop over 100ideas and more than 30 physical prototypes tested with the user. This external idea boostenables companies to get an outside-in perspective that allows to discover breakthroughbusiness model process, products and service innovations in order to boost the companiesinnovation capabilities.
  • 43. DESIGN THINKING PROJECT REFERENCES SINCE 2008 DESIGN THINKING│UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN
  • 44. DESIGN THINKING UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN INNOVATION FOR GLOBAL COMPANIESSince 2008, over 30 successfully finished Design Thinking projects have been developed forsmall and large companies from various industries such asbanking, automotive, telecommunication, software, gambling, packaging, sports, as well aschemical and pharmaceutical companies. The Design Thinking projects at HSG are focusing onservice-, process- and business model innovation. In 2012 more than 700 tangible low- and highresolution prototypes were built, tested and further developed during the HSG DesignThinking Master course, Embedded Design Thinking projects and executive workshops.
  • 45. “Innovations are always the easiest source of differentiation andcompetitive advantage. But how to get started?Design thinking provides an excellent approach to understand andsolve customers‟ needs. For us, it is not only a process – it is amindset to find value innovations for our customers.” Marco Müller, Senior Market Designer Innovation Division Blue Ocean Haufe-Lexware DESIGN THINKING│UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN
  • 46. “Through design thinking we learned how to systematically developinnovations for our customers – a crucial aspect to support thevalues of our brand philosophy.Design thinking has become a fixed part of our innovation process,enabling us to design progressive solutions of tomorrow.” Maximilian Pühler & Hubert Fischer Project Management Advance Development Audi AG DESIGN THINKING│UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN
  • 47. “A very motivated student team, an open target and surprising yetrelevant results that we can build on.Highly recommended!” Robert Jansen Director Business Change Ball Packaging Europe GmbH DESIGN THINKING│UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN
  • 48. “Embedded Design Thinking allows our experts and innovators tointeract with highly dynamic and creative design teams to creategreat solutions for a new customer experience.” Katharina Berger Bridgehead of Design Thinking at DB Deutsche Bank AG DESIGN THINKING│UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN
  • 49. “Design Thinking is very powerful in observing, engaging, and immersingcustomer needs.It helped us to discover unknown needs of the customer and design newsolutions. In addition, we were able to obtain and introduce a new set ofmethods about how we approach idea creation in our company.” Michael Lewrick Senior Strategy Manager SWISSCOM IT Services DESIGN THINKING│UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN
  • 50. “We need to bring Design Thinking into everything that we do,working from the end-user backwards to deliver beautifulexperiences and to enable new ways of thinking and working.” Carlo Bevoli Managing Director, Sustainability Lab SAP DESIGN THINKING│UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN
  • 51. DTHSG.COMEstablished in 2005. Prototyping since back then.

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