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  • Cost Share Rollout, 8/24 Not for distribution
  • Cost Share Rollout, 8/24 Not for distribution The History of Challenger Center for Space Science Education On January 28, 1986, the seven crew members of the space shuttle Challenger set out on a mission to broaden educational horizons and promote the advance of scientific knowledge. In the aftermath of the Challenger accident, the crew’s families came together, still grieving from loss, but firmly committed to the belief that they must carry on the spirit of their loved ones by continuing the Challenger crew’s educational mission. The organization had modest beginnings. June Scobee Rodgers, wife of Shuttle Commander Dick Scobee, gathered the families of the other Challenger astronauts around her living room coffee table. They were clear on one thing: no brick or mortar monument for these astronauts. In Silver Linings, Dr. Rodgers’ memoir of the Challenger accident and its aftermath, she wrote, "The world knew that seven Challenger astronauts died, but they were more than astronauts. They were our families and friends. The world knew how they died; we wanted the world to know how they lived and for what they were willing to risk their lives. So, you see, we couldn't let them die in vain. Their mission became our mission." The family members resolved to create a living memorial to the Challenger crew—the world’s first interactive space science education center where teachers and their students could use state-of-the-art technology and space-life simulators to explore space themselves. In tribute to the astronauts’ courage and vision, Challenger Center for Space Science Education was founded and incorporated on April 24, 1986. In an interview conducted shortly after the organization’s founding, Dr. Rodgers said, "We just couldn’t let the words ‘Challenger’ or ‘space’ mean something sad for children. So the idea of a living tribute to carry on the educational mission of the crew developed into Challenger Center. This tribute would utilize the excitement of space to inspire and motivate our nation’s schoolchildren to take interest in mathematics, science, and technology." Cheryl McNair, widow of Challenger’s Mission Specialist, Ronald McNair, said, "It was good to be able to focus on something positive and know that something good could come from the tragedy." Jane Smith Wolcott, whose husband Mike Smith piloted the shuttle, agreed: “We did this for ourselves, and for the children. It really seemed the only way to remember them. The space program is very vital to this country. I would want kids to think of Mike in many ways as a role model. He felt the space frontier was our future.”
  • Cost Share Rollout, 8/24 Not for distribution Marsville is a program of 4-H…a special part of the 4-H called Extension Science, Engineering and Technology which is a program to help young people prepare for living in a world with lots of decisions and jobs that will depend on the use of new technology and Science. It is just as important for you to be comfortable with technology and science as a citizen in our country because of the many new ways it be a part of our lives. The Iowa Space Grant Consortium is also a part of Marsville helping young people learn about space and the many opportunities there will be to explore space in your future. You might be the first families to vacation on the Moon instead of at Disneyworld.
  • Cost Share Rollout, 8/24 Not for distribution
  • Cost Share Rollout, 8/24 Not for distribution
  • Cost Share Rollout, 8/24 Not for distribution There are 10 parts to the Habitat which must be decided on prior to arriving on site for Link-UP Day. 4 Walls, Ceiling, Floor, Fan Tunnel, Connecting Tunnel, Fan and Outlet Strip.
  • Cost Share Rollout, 8/24 Not for distribution
  • Cost Share Rollout, 8/24 Not for distribution
  • Cost Share Rollout, 8/24 Not for distribution
  • Cost Share Rollout, 8/24 Not for distribution
  • Cost Share Rollout, 8/24 Not for distribution
  • Cost Share Rollout, 8/24 Not for distribution
  • Cost Share Rollout, 8/24 Not for distribution
  • Cost Share Rollout, 8/24 Not for distribution
  • Cost Share Rollout, 8/24 Not for distribution
  • Cost Share Rollout, 8/24 Not for distribution
  • Cost Share Rollout, 8/24 Not for distribution
  • Cost Share Rollout, 8/24 Not for distribution
  • Cost Share Rollout, 8/24 Not for distribution
  • Cost Share Rollout, 8/24 Not for distribution
  • Cost Share Rollout, 8/24 Not for distribution
  • Cost Share Rollout, 8/24 Not for distribution
  • Cost Share Rollout, 8/24 Not for distribution
  • Cost Share Rollout, 8/24 Not for distribution
  • Cost Share Rollout, 8/24 Not for distribution
  • Transcript

    • 1. Welcome toMarsville: The Cosmic Village
    • 2. Exploration is the Essence of Learning!Challenger Center programs usestudents natural enthusiasm for spaceto create innovative learningexperiences for imaginative youngminds.Were creating a new generation ofexplorers.Inspiring. Exploring. Learning.Its our mission.Challenger Center for Space Science Exploration
    • 3. In Marsville…• We believe that Hands On leads to Minds On• We believe that Space is Cool, Science isFun and that makes the Learning a naturalprocess• We believe that many youth excel in theapplication of technology that may not haveexcelled in traditional academic application• We believe that REAL-WORLD application ofknowledge makes learning more relevant• We believe through Marsville we can trulytouch the future
    • 4. • Students are organized into teams of 4-5students/ 3-4 teams per classroom• Your ultimate mission is to prepare yourteam for Link-Up DayWhat is Marsville?
    • 5. Marsville Prep• Each Team Develops Teamwork• Designs a Team Mission Patch• Plans a Team Uniform for Link-Up Day• Plans a lunch including all 5 food groups andmeeting weight restrictions• Each Team Adapts Technology• Learns their Mars ABCs• Designs a system to support life on Mars using currentand future technology built out of recyclables
    • 6. Marsville Prep• Each Team Develops Communication• You must communicate with two other teams thatmake up your Habitat Crew on who is bringing whatparts of the habitat for constructing on Link-Up DayHabitatATeacher: HohbachSchool: ROMSTeam #: 1System: Temp ControlEmail:kerryh@roschools.comHabitatATeacher: SicklesSchool: ROMSTeam #: 1System: Air SupplyEmail:vickis@roschools.comHabitatATeacher: AdamsSchool: ROMSTeam #: 3System: Waste MgtEmail:cadams@roschools.com
    • 7. Marsville Prep• Each Team Develops Communication• You also will prepare a presentation of your systemincluding-– Introductions– 3 Mars Facts used in designing their system– A short narrative on how their system will work– And a Mars Riddle• You divide your team into two sets of presenters forCelestial Questial 1 and Celestial Questial 2
    • 8. Marsville Link-Up Day• Arrive and do Get-Acquainted Mixer• Weigh-in Lunches• Launch to Mars Video• Construct Habitats and Team Evaluation• Celestial Questial 1• Lunch, Weigh-in Waste and Sign Support Banners• Celestial Questial 2• Habitat Challenge—Emergency ConstructionScenario• Walk Through• Clean up and Pack for Home• Recognition—Certificates/M&Ms
    • 9. Teams Checking in on Link Up dayThe science Guys
    • 10. Weighing In Lunches
    • 11. Team Misson Patches
    • 12. Constructing Habitats
    • 13. Walls are 8 ft tall by 10foot longCeiling and floor are 10 ft by 10ftFan Tunnel is 4 ft longby 10 ft around to fitaround fanConnecting tunnel is 12ft long and 10 footaround to create a tunnelbetween habitatsThe door flap is 4 ftwide by 6 ft long tocover inside ofopening cut forentering the habitat
    • 14. Use Lots and Lots of DuctTape
    • 15. Constructing the Fan Tunnel
    • 16. Connecting Tunnel
    • 17. Teamwork
    • 18. More construction
    • 19. Student Constructed Systems
    • 20. Radio and NewspaperInterviews of Mars Travelers
    • 21. Habitats are Up
    • 22. Instructions for CelestialQuestial
    • 23. This is Fun! Living in yourhabitat
    • 24. Signing Sponsor Posters
    • 25. Page County Schedule• May 4 is Marsville Link up DayM T W T F19Prep Week20 21 22 2326Begin MarsvilleCurriculum27 28 29 30March30 1CommunicationEnds2 3 4Marsville Link-UP DayMay2 3 4 5 69 10 11 12 1316 17 18 19BeginCommunication2023 24 25 26 27AprilPrep Week:If needed tomake up for Easter orSpring BreakFirst Week: Team Work—Mission Patches,Uniform,Mars ABCsSecond Week: MarsSurvivor Kits & MarsvilleSystems OverviewBegin ResearchingSystemsThird Week: Plan LunchBuild SystemsFourth Week: Build MiniHabitats, Build Systems,Begin CommunicaitonFifth Week:Communication, SystemPresentation, Weigh lunchPrototypeSixth Week: FinalizeCommunication, FinalizeSystem Presentation, CutPlastic, Decorate Plastic,Pack for Link-Up DayLink-Up Day
    • 26. Marsville BECOMES ACOMMUNITY PROGRAM• Sponsors• School Administrators• Local Media strong support
    • 27. The Success of Marsville• The most important things learned…– Teamwork– Communication– How to Work and Cooperate with Others– All the Facts about Mars• “I know a lot about Mars so now I’m ready to lift off!”– Planning Ahead– All the work that needs to be done before themission
    • 28. Contacts:• David Seilstad, ISU Extension– Phone: 712/644-2105– seilstad@iastate.edu• Debbie Swanson, ISU Extension PageCty.– debra@iastate.edu– Phone: 712/542-5171