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A presentation at PoEM 2008, …

A presentation at PoEM 2008,
The Practice of Enterprise Modeling

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  • [Title of the course] Sep 9, 2010 Copyright © 2004-2005 NameOfTheOrganization. All rights reserved. In previous sections, we have looked at structural patterns that provide the basis, the skeleton, for any business application. These structural patterns will be needed for every business application. But they do not provide everything that is needed for analysing and designing a business application. There may be a need for additional functionality, like serial numbers, accounts, and calendars. Solutions for providing this extra functionality can also be described by means of patterns, and we call them behavioral patterns. In this section, we will discuss a number of such behavioral patterns.
  • [Title of the course] Sep 9, 2010 Copyright © 2004-2005 NameOfTheOrganization. All rights reserved. The book by Hruby introduces more than ten behavioral patterns. In this section, we will only discuss and exemplify a few of these. The Identification pattern is about identifying things by naming or numbering them. Location is about specifying where Economic Events take place. Due Date is a pattern for specifying time points governing when certain actions should be carried out, such as deadlines. Description is about handling unstructured information about entities, in particular Economic Resource Types. Value is a pattern for handling quantitative information about the value of REA entities.
  • [Title of the course] Sep 9, 2010 Copyright © 2004-2005 NameOfTheOrganization. All rights reserved. The book by Hruby introduces more than ten behavioral patterns. In this section, we will only discuss and exemplify a few of these. The Identification pattern is about identifying things by naming or numbering them. Location is about specifying where Economic Events take place. Due Date is a pattern for specifying time points governing when certain actions should be carried out, such as deadlines. Description is about handling unstructured information about entities, in particular Economic Resource Types. Value is a pattern for handling quantitative information about the value of REA entities.
  • [Title of the course] Sep 9, 2010 Copyright © 2004-2005 NameOfTheOrganization. All rights reserved. The book by Hruby introduces more than ten behavioral patterns. In this section, we will only discuss and exemplify a few of these. The Identification pattern is about identifying things by naming or numbering them. Location is about specifying where Economic Events take place. Due Date is a pattern for specifying time points governing when certain actions should be carried out, such as deadlines. Description is about handling unstructured information about entities, in particular Economic Resource Types. Value is a pattern for handling quantitative information about the value of REA entities.
  • [Title of the course] Sep 9, 2010 Copyright © 2004-2005 NameOfTheOrganization. All rights reserved. The book by Hruby introduces more than ten behavioral patterns. In this section, we will only discuss and exemplify a few of these. The Identification pattern is about identifying things by naming or numbering them. Location is about specifying where Economic Events take place. Due Date is a pattern for specifying time points governing when certain actions should be carried out, such as deadlines. Description is about handling unstructured information about entities, in particular Economic Resource Types. Value is a pattern for handling quantitative information about the value of REA entities.
  • [Title of the course] Sep 9, 2010 Copyright © 2004-2005 NameOfTheOrganization. All rights reserved. The book by Hruby introduces more than ten behavioral patterns. In this section, we will only discuss and exemplify a few of these. The Identification pattern is about identifying things by naming or numbering them. Location is about specifying where Economic Events take place. Due Date is a pattern for specifying time points governing when certain actions should be carried out, such as deadlines. Description is about handling unstructured information about entities, in particular Economic Resource Types. Value is a pattern for handling quantitative information about the value of REA entities.
  • [Title of the course] Sep 9, 2010 Copyright © 2004-2005 NameOfTheOrganization. All rights reserved. The book by Hruby introduces more than ten behavioral patterns. In this section, we will only discuss and exemplify a few of these. The Identification pattern is about identifying things by naming or numbering them. Location is about specifying where Economic Events take place. Due Date is a pattern for specifying time points governing when certain actions should be carried out, such as deadlines. Description is about handling unstructured information about entities, in particular Economic Resource Types. Value is a pattern for handling quantitative information about the value of REA entities.
  • [Title of the course] Sep 9, 2010 Copyright © 2004-2005 NameOfTheOrganization. All rights reserved. The book by Hruby introduces more than ten behavioral patterns. In this section, we will only discuss and exemplify a few of these. The Identification pattern is about identifying things by naming or numbering them. Location is about specifying where Economic Events take place. Due Date is a pattern for specifying time points governing when certain actions should be carried out, such as deadlines. Description is about handling unstructured information about entities, in particular Economic Resource Types. Value is a pattern for handling quantitative information about the value of REA entities.
  • [Title of the course] Sep 9, 2010 Copyright © 2004-2005 NameOfTheOrganization. All rights reserved. The book by Hruby introduces more than ten behavioral patterns. In this section, we will only discuss and exemplify a few of these. The Identification pattern is about identifying things by naming or numbering them. Location is about specifying where Economic Events take place. Due Date is a pattern for specifying time points governing when certain actions should be carried out, such as deadlines. Description is about handling unstructured information about entities, in particular Economic Resource Types. Value is a pattern for handling quantitative information about the value of REA entities.
  • [Title of the course] Sep 9, 2010 Copyright © 2004-2005 NameOfTheOrganization. All rights reserved. The book by Hruby introduces more than ten behavioral patterns. In this section, we will only discuss and exemplify a few of these. The Identification pattern is about identifying things by naming or numbering them. Location is about specifying where Economic Events take place. Due Date is a pattern for specifying time points governing when certain actions should be carried out, such as deadlines. Description is about handling unstructured information about entities, in particular Economic Resource Types. Value is a pattern for handling quantitative information about the value of REA entities.
  • [Title of the course] Sep 9, 2010 Copyright © 2004-2005 NameOfTheOrganization. All rights reserved. Let us look at a very simple exchange process where a reader buys a book – she gets the book and she pays for it. There are two economic agents, the reader and the bookstore that sells the book. The first economic event is Receive, where the reader receives the book, i.e. she gets ownership rights on the book. The second economic event is Pay, where the reader pays for the book, i.e. she gives up the right on some money. So, now we have two economic events in this exchange process, one increment and one decrement event. Finally, we connect these events by means of a duality association.
  • [Title of the course] Sep 9, 2010 Copyright © 2004-2005 NameOfTheOrganization. All rights reserved. Here is an example of a conversion process. There is a production of the economic resource Marzipan, so we introduce an increment event Marzipan production and a produce stockflow relationship to Marzipan. Two resources are consumed, sugar and almonds, so we introduce two decrement events. Finally, we connect the increment event and the decrement events through a duality association.
  • [Title of the course] Sep 9, 2010 Copyright © 2004-2005 NameOfTheOrganization. All rights reserved. Here is an example of a conversion process. There is a production of the economic resource Marzipan, so we introduce an increment event Marzipan production and a produce stockflow relationship to Marzipan. Two resources are consumed, sugar and almonds, so we introduce two decrement events. Finally, we connect the increment event and the decrement events through a duality association.
  • [Title of the course] Sep 9, 2010 Copyright © 2004-2005 NameOfTheOrganization. All rights reserved. Here is an example of a conversion process. There is a production of the economic resource Marzipan, so we introduce an increment event Marzipan production and a produce stockflow relationship to Marzipan. Two resources are consumed, sugar and almonds, so we introduce two decrement events. Finally, we connect the increment event and the decrement events through a duality association.
  • [Title of the course] Sep 9, 2010 Copyright © 2004-2005 NameOfTheOrganization. All rights reserved. Here is an example of a conversion process. There is a production of the economic resource Marzipan, so we introduce an increment event Marzipan production and a produce stockflow relationship to Marzipan. Two resources are consumed, sugar and almonds, so we introduce two decrement events. Finally, we connect the increment event and the decrement events through a duality association.
  • [Title of the course] Sep 9, 2010 Copyright © 2004-2005 NameOfTheOrganization. All rights reserved. Here is an example of a conversion process. There is a production of the economic resource Marzipan, so we introduce an increment event Marzipan production and a produce stockflow relationship to Marzipan. Two resources are consumed, sugar and almonds, so we introduce two decrement events. Finally, we connect the increment event and the decrement events through a duality association.
  • [Title of the course] Sep 9, 2010 Copyright © 2004-2005 NameOfTheOrganization. All rights reserved. Here is an example of a conversion process. There is a production of the economic resource Marzipan, so we introduce an increment event Marzipan production and a produce stockflow relationship to Marzipan. Two resources are consumed, sugar and almonds, so we introduce two decrement events. Finally, we connect the increment event and the decrement events through a duality association.
  • [Title of the course] Sep 9, 2010 Copyright © 2004-2005 NameOfTheOrganization. All rights reserved. Here is an example of a conversion process. There is a production of the economic resource Marzipan, so we introduce an increment event Marzipan production and a produce stockflow relationship to Marzipan. Two resources are consumed, sugar and almonds, so we introduce two decrement events. Finally, we connect the increment event and the decrement events through a duality association.
  • [Title of the course] Sep 9, 2010 Copyright © 2004-2005 NameOfTheOrganization. All rights reserved. The book by Hruby introduces more than ten behavioral patterns. In this section, we will only discuss and exemplify a few of these. The Identification pattern is about identifying things by naming or numbering them. Location is about specifying where Economic Events take place. Due Date is a pattern for specifying time points governing when certain actions should be carried out, such as deadlines. Description is about handling unstructured information about entities, in particular Economic Resource Types. Value is a pattern for handling quantitative information about the value of REA entities.
  • [Title of the course] Sep 9, 2010 Copyright © 2004-2005 NameOfTheOrganization. All rights reserved. The book by Hruby introduces more than ten behavioral patterns. In this section, we will only discuss and exemplify a few of these. The Identification pattern is about identifying things by naming or numbering them. Location is about specifying where Economic Events take place. Due Date is a pattern for specifying time points governing when certain actions should be carried out, such as deadlines. Description is about handling unstructured information about entities, in particular Economic Resource Types. Value is a pattern for handling quantitative information about the value of REA entities.
  • [Title of the course] Sep 9, 2010 Copyright © 2004-2005 NameOfTheOrganization. All rights reserved. The book by Hruby introduces more than ten behavioral patterns. In this section, we will only discuss and exemplify a few of these. The Identification pattern is about identifying things by naming or numbering them. Location is about specifying where Economic Events take place. Due Date is a pattern for specifying time points governing when certain actions should be carried out, such as deadlines. Description is about handling unstructured information about entities, in particular Economic Resource Types. Value is a pattern for handling quantitative information about the value of REA entities.
  • [Title of the course] Sep 9, 2010 Copyright © 2004-2005 NameOfTheOrganization. All rights reserved. The book by Hruby introduces more than ten behavioral patterns. In this section, we will only discuss and exemplify a few of these. The Identification pattern is about identifying things by naming or numbering them. Location is about specifying where Economic Events take place. Due Date is a pattern for specifying time points governing when certain actions should be carried out, such as deadlines. Description is about handling unstructured information about entities, in particular Economic Resource Types. Value is a pattern for handling quantitative information about the value of REA entities.
  • [Title of the course] Sep 9, 2010 Copyright © 2004-2005 NameOfTheOrganization. All rights reserved. The book by Hruby introduces more than ten behavioral patterns. In this section, we will only discuss and exemplify a few of these. The Identification pattern is about identifying things by naming or numbering them. Location is about specifying where Economic Events take place. Due Date is a pattern for specifying time points governing when certain actions should be carried out, such as deadlines. Description is about handling unstructured information about entities, in particular Economic Resource Types. Value is a pattern for handling quantitative information about the value of REA entities.
  • [Title of the course] Sep 9, 2010 Copyright © 2004-2005 NameOfTheOrganization. All rights reserved. The book by Hruby introduces more than ten behavioral patterns. In this section, we will only discuss and exemplify a few of these. The Identification pattern is about identifying things by naming or numbering them. Location is about specifying where Economic Events take place. Due Date is a pattern for specifying time points governing when certain actions should be carried out, such as deadlines. Description is about handling unstructured information about entities, in particular Economic Resource Types. Value is a pattern for handling quantitative information about the value of REA entities.

Transcript

  • 1. Enterprise Modelling for Value Based Service Analysis Paul Johannesson, Stockholm Birger Andersson, Stockholm Maria Bergholtz, Stockholm Hans Weigand, Tilburg Paul Johannesson Royal Institute of Technology Presentation at PoEM 2008, The Practice of Enterprise Modeling
  • 2. Agenda
    • What is a service?
    • Value modelling and the REA ontology
    • Explaining services through value modeling
    • An application on service design
    • Concluding remarks
  • 3. What is a Service?
    • “ A service is an abstract resource that represents a capability of performing tasks that represents a coherent functionality from the point of view of provider entities and requester entities. ” (W3C)
    • ” S ervices are heterogeneous outputs produced to order and typically consist of changes in the conditions of the consuming units realized by the activities of producers at the demand of the consumers.“ (United Nations)
    • “ A service is the provision of something of value, in the context of some domain of application, by one party to another.” (Chris Preist)
    • Service properties
      • Intangibility
      • Inseparability
      • Heterogeniety
      • Perishability
  • 4. Strengths of Services A service consumer does not own a service. She does not need to take on typical ownership responsibilities, like infrastructure management, integration, and maintenance. She can focus on how to make use of the service for her specific business. Taxi Service Customer Encapsulated resources
  • 5. Value Modelling and REA REA Ontology: modelling exchanges and conversions of resources Resource – an object viewed as valuable by some agent Event – exchange of resources or conversion of resources Agent – a legal entity that controls resources and performs events
  • 6. Exchanging Resources Agent Agent Resource Resource Events exchanging resources
  • 7. Converting Resources Resource Resource Resource Events converting resources
  • 8. REA Conceptual Model
  • 9. REA Conceptual Model The stockflow tells how an economic event affects a resource
  • 10. REA Conceptual Model The stockflow tells how an economic event affects a resource A process is a set of economic events
  • 11. An Exchange Process A reader buys a book, i.e. he gets the book and pays for it <agent> Bookstore <agent> Reader recipient provider <econ. event> Pay <resource> Money give <econ. event> Receive <resource> Book recipient provider take duality
  • 12. A Conversion Process Marzipan is made from sugar and almonds <econ. event> Sugar consumption <resource> Sugar <econ. event> Almond consumption <resource> Almond consume consume duality <econ. event> Marzipan production <resource> Marzipan produce
  • 13. A Conceptual Service Model
  • 14. Services are Resources A service is a resource – valuabe and transferable
  • 15. Services are Offered to Others A service is provided by one party to another
  • 16. Inseparability of Production and Consumption A service is consumed and produced simultaneously
  • 17. Services are Abstract A service encapsulates a number of resources, which are used in its production
  • 18. Services are Governed by Policies A service is governed by policies regulating the use of the encapsulated resources
  • 19. Marketing Oriented Service Design
    • Need – basic human requirements: drink, eat, sleep, education
    • Want – directed to a type of resource that can fulful a need: have a soft drink
    • Demand – desire for a particular product: have a Coke
  • 20. Marketing Oriented Service Design
  • 21. Marketing Oriented Service Design Speed Reliability Safety Convenience Low cost ...
  • 22. A Care Taking Scenario
  • 23. Zooming in
  • 24. Zooming in