Effect of Carbon Dioxide on the Environment DSVS – Spring 2011 7 th  Grade
I. Introduction <ul><li>Explain to students that in today’s experiment they will be studying what happens when carbon diox...
II. Demonstration <ul><li>Pour the contents of the bottle labeled rain water into the first glass. </li></ul><ul><li>Pour ...
II. Demonstration (Cont.) <ul><li>Scientists can use indicators to test if something is acidic, basic, or neutral.  </li><...
III. Experiment <ul><li>NOTE: DSVS members need to put on a pair of gloves when distributing pieces of Dry Ice to the stud...
IIIA. Effect of bubbling carbon dioxide into “ocean” water  <ul><li>Give each group a plate, a 6 oz clear cup 1/3 filled w...
IIIB. How is carbon dioxide removed from the air?  <ul><li>By photosynthesis in plants  </li></ul><ul><li>Removal can also...
IV. Discussion <ul><li>Ask students if they can think of consequences of dissolving increasing amount of carbon dioxide in...
Cleanup <ul><li>All the cups can be emptied into a sink and washed down with water.  </li></ul><ul><li>If there is no sink...
The effect of carbon dioxide on the environment
The effect of carbon dioxide on the environment
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The effect of carbon dioxide on the environment

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The effect of carbon dioxide on the environment

  1. 1. Effect of Carbon Dioxide on the Environment DSVS – Spring 2011 7 th Grade
  2. 2. I. Introduction <ul><li>Explain to students that in today’s experiment they will be studying what happens when carbon dioxide is bubbled into drinking water, rain water, and ocean water. </li></ul><ul><li>Tell them that air contains a small amount of carbon dioxide gas (about 0.03%). </li></ul><ul><li>Ask them the question: Where do they think the carbon dioxide in air comes from? </li></ul>
  3. 3. II. Demonstration <ul><li>Pour the contents of the bottle labeled rain water into the first glass. </li></ul><ul><li>Pour the contents of the bottle labeled drinking water into the second glass. </li></ul><ul><li>Pour the contents of the bottle labeled ocean water into the third glass. </li></ul><ul><li>Hold the cups up so that the students can see them and have them describe them. </li></ul>
  4. 4. II. Demonstration (Cont.) <ul><li>Scientists can use indicators to test if something is acidic, basic, or neutral. </li></ul><ul><li>Write the Bromothymol blue color chart on the board. </li></ul><ul><li>Add a few drops of the Bromothymol blue indicator to the each of the waters (until you get a good color in each one) and show the students the color changes. </li></ul>
  5. 5. III. Experiment <ul><li>NOTE: DSVS members need to put on a pair of gloves when distributing pieces of Dry Ice to the students. </li></ul><ul><li>Tell students that today's activity involves some reactions of carbon dioxide in water. </li></ul><ul><li>Since Dry Ice is at -78 o C, tell the students not to handle the Dry Ice. </li></ul>
  6. 6. IIIA. Effect of bubbling carbon dioxide into “ocean” water <ul><li>Give each group a plate, a 6 oz clear cup 1/3 filled with “ocean water”. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Tell students to describe the liquid. It is clear. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tell the students this is not real ocean water, but is pure water with chemicals added to it to make it similar to ocean water. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>DSVS members should add a squirt of bromothymol blue indicator to each pair’s cup, so that the color is deep blue. </li></ul><ul><li>One DSVS member puts a piece of Dry Ice into each cup of the water/indicator mixture. </li></ul><ul><li>Tell the students to watch for any changes and record observations. </li></ul>
  7. 7. IIIB. How is carbon dioxide removed from the air? <ul><li>By photosynthesis in plants </li></ul><ul><li>Removal can also occur when carbon dioxide dissolves in water. Rainwater can naturally dissolve CO 2 . This makes the rainwater naturally slightly acidic. </li></ul><ul><li>Water in the oceans can also remove CO 2 directly from the air. The oceans contain 50 times more CO 2 than that found in the atmosphere. </li></ul><ul><li>These natural mechanisms can remove 10 billion tons of CO 2 per year. </li></ul>
  8. 8. IV. Discussion <ul><li>Ask students if they can think of consequences of dissolving increasing amount of carbon dioxide in ocean waters? </li></ul><ul><li>It will make the oceans more acidic. </li></ul><ul><li>The change in acidity so far is small, but greater changes are expected. </li></ul><ul><li>Acidification could adversely affect marine life, but scientists are not sure how great the affect will be. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Cleanup <ul><li>All the cups can be emptied into a sink and washed down with water. </li></ul><ul><li>If there is no sink, empty the contents back into the “ocean water” bottles and return to the lab. Make sure the cap is on tightly. </li></ul><ul><li>Put all used cups in the trash bag and return with the kit. </li></ul>Credit: Vanderbilt Students Volunteer for Science
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