Cultural Issues that canAffect Interface Design        Dr. Blessing F. Adeoye       University of Lagos Nigeria           ...
Cultural Issues that can    Affect Interface Design   As the use of ICT, digital devices, LMS, & other    educational tec...
User-interface components   Metaphors: Essential concepts in words,    images, sounds, touch   Mental Models: Organizati...
Observations   In a global economy, should every    Website look the same?   Are mobile devices and services in Asia    ...
Facts   Directional placement of images, icons,    graphics, color, and white space are    frequently used in textual    ...
Communication Features   For applications, such as web board,    discussion forums, email, chat rooms, some    cultures h...
Communication Features   Because of their cultural orientations,    individual students may only speak up    during a dis...
Visual elements   Do not generally transfer across cultures   Navigational images/text groupings intended to indicate   ...
Colours and symbols   Mitchell Harper claims that the five most    used colour combinations on the web are:   - red, yel...
Colours   White in many Asian cultures is associated with    death, vs. black in many European cultures.   Green and saf...
In Australia, the UK, Canada and UScolours have multiple connotations, e.g.   orange - harvest, autumn, creativity, cheap...
Color for Visually Challenged     Individual   Much of the literature about colour on the web assumes    that all users a...
Navigation   Design principles regarding navigation    have a cross-cultural application.       It is worth noting, howe...
Navigation   For the people from the Middle East,    information should support both text    directionalities.   Also, t...
Recommendations   Plan: Include global issues in all steps   Research: Investigate global sets of users,    issues   An...
Hofstede’s 5 Dimensions ofCulture   1. Power-distance   2. Collectivism vs. individualism   3. Femininity vs. masculini...
Culture vs. UI : Power      Distance, 1/2   Metaphors      High: Institutions, buildings with clear hierarchy:       sch...
Culture vs. UI: Power    Distance, 2/2   Interaction      High: Severe error messages: “Entry       Forbidden,” “You are...
Culture vs. UI: Individualism    vs. Collectivism, 1/2   Metaphors      Individualist: Action-oriented, tools      Coll...
Culture vs. UI: Individualism    vs. Collectivism, 2/2   Interaction      Individualist: Keyword searches; active-orient...
Culture vs. UI: Masculinity vs.     Femininity, 1/2   Metaphors      Masculine: Sports-oriented; competition-oriented;  ...
Culture vs. UI: Masculinity vs.Femininity, 2/2   Interaction      Masculine: Game-oriented; mastery-oriented;       indi...
References   Global Graphics: Color (Gloucester: Rockport 2000) by Cheryl Cullen and Global    Graphics: Symbols (Glouces...
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Lecture on usability of an e-learning System

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Lecture on usability of an e-learning System

  1. 1. Cultural Issues that canAffect Interface Design Dr. Blessing F. Adeoye University of Lagos Nigeria Presented at Robert Morris University, PA. USA Feb, 2013
  2. 2. Cultural Issues that can Affect Interface Design As the use of ICT, digital devices, LMS, & other educational technology rise, the concerns of users, esp. people of difference culture continue to rise (del Galdo & Nielsen, 1996). Why? Cultural differences in perceptions of technology, names and usage of technological terms, and the level of technological literacy across various cultures.
  3. 3. User-interface components Metaphors: Essential concepts in words, images, sounds, touch Mental Models: Organization of data, functions, tasks, roles, or people at work or play, static or mobile Navigation: Movement through mental models via windows, dialogue boxes, buttons, links, etc. Interaction: Input/output techniques, feedback Appearance: Visual, verbal, acoustic, tactile
  4. 4. Observations In a global economy, should every Website look the same? Are mobile devices and services in Asia right for the rest of the world? Which Website for Saudi Arabia is Appropriate? Is African Continent a forgotten world? Usability and user experience differ among cultures
  5. 5. Facts Directional placement of images, icons, graphics, color, and white space are frequently used in textual communication. Depending on the context, non-verbal communication can account for up to 90% of communication, conveyed through images, symbols, and icons (Hall & Hall, 1990).
  6. 6. Communication Features For applications, such as web board, discussion forums, email, chat rooms, some cultures have higher expectation to communicate, which may impose burdens on other users (Boriarsky, 1995; del Galdo, 1996). Many Chinese Internet users have higher expectation than American counterparts in the amount of things to communicate.
  7. 7. Communication Features Because of their cultural orientations, individual students may only speak up during a discussion when called upon personally by the teacher; some will not speak up in large groups (Hofstede, 1986). In the case of online communication, individual users may not become involved until they are either prompted or signaled to do so (Boriarsky, 1995).
  8. 8. Visual elements Do not generally transfer across cultures Navigational images/text groupings intended to indicate the directional flow of information for users in Western culture may confuse non-Western users. Asian users-whose written languages traditionally appear vertically and read from right to left-may find it difficult to have a directional arrow placed at the bottom right of the page and the arrow pointing right for the next page. People in Eastern cultures may not recognize placing “important information” in the top left-hand section of a page.
  9. 9. Colours and symbols Mitchell Harper claims that the five most used colour combinations on the web are: - red, yellow and white - blue and white - red, gray and white - blue, orange and white - yellow, gray and whiteIf you are aiming at global audiences it is worth remembering that colours have significant associations.
  10. 10. Colours White in many Asian cultures is associated with death, vs. black in many European cultures. Green and saffron yellow have particular associations in Islam and among Buddhist demographics.
  11. 11. In Australia, the UK, Canada and UScolours have multiple connotations, e.g. orange - harvest, autumn, creativity, cheap products purple - luxury, royalty red - power, energy, danger blue - solidity, conservatism, competence green - environmentalism, spring, safety yellow - hope, hazard, cowardice, happiness pink - vibrancy, energy, radicalism, cheapness
  12. 12. Color for Visually Challenged Individual Much of the literature about colour on the web assumes that all users are young and visually unimpaired. Research on aging suggests restraint in use of blue, green and violet to provide information, as yellowing of the cornea can cause confusion between some shades of those colours. Some suggest that display of red text on a green background (or green on red) should be avoided, given problems experienced by people with colour impairment). Others note that in practice those colours can be used, provided saturation levels are sufficiently different to allow differentiation.
  13. 13. Navigation Design principles regarding navigation have a cross-cultural application.  It is worth noting, however, that there are differences in how people from different cultures read a page. Many read:  from left to right,  top to bottom.  right to left.  from bottom to top.  
  14. 14. Navigation For the people from the Middle East, information should support both text directionalities. Also, the ideographic witting systems used by Chinese, Japanese, and Koreans recognize vertical text directionality, but mathematical expressions are generally written horizontally.
  15. 15. Recommendations Plan: Include global issues in all steps Research: Investigate global sets of users, issues Analyze: Determine global criteria, targets Design: Visualize global alternatives Implement: Use tools that facilitate global variations Evaluate: Test prototypes with global user sets Document: Include global guidelines, specs
  16. 16. Hofstede’s 5 Dimensions ofCulture 1. Power-distance 2. Collectivism vs. individualism 3. Femininity vs. masculinity 4. Uncertainty avoidance 5. Long- vs. short-term time orientation
  17. 17. Culture vs. UI : Power Distance, 1/2 Metaphors  High: Institutions, buildings with clear hierarchy: schools, government, monuments, etc.  Low: Institutions, buildings with equality, options: Summerhill, play/games, public spaces, etc. Mental Models  High: Reference data with no relevancy ranking  Low: Less structured data with relevancy Navigation  High: Restricted access, choices; authentication; passwords  Low: Open access, multiple options, sharable paths
  18. 18. Culture vs. UI: Power Distance, 2/2 Interaction  High: Severe error messages: “Entry Forbidden,” “You are wrong;” wizards or guides lead usage  Low: Supportive error messages, cue cards Appearance  High: Images of leaders, nations; official music, anthems; formal speech  Low: Images of people, daily activities; popular music; informal speech
  19. 19. Culture vs. UI: Individualism vs. Collectivism, 1/2 Metaphors  Individualist: Action-oriented, tools  Collectivist: Relationship-oriented Mental Models  Individualist: Product- or task-oriented  Collectivist: Role-oriented Navigation  Individualist: Individual paths; popular choices, celebrity choices; stable across roles; customizable  Collectivist: Group-oriented, official choices; changes per role
  20. 20. Culture vs. UI: Individualism vs. Collectivism, 2/2 Interaction  Individualist: Keyword searches; active-oriented; multiple devices; customizable;  Collectivist: Limited, official devices; role driven Appearance  Individualist: Images of products, people; low context; hyperbolic, dynamic speech; market-driven topics, imagery, language; customizable; direct, active verbs  Collectivist: Images of groups, organizations; images of roles; high context; official, static terminology; institution-driven topics, imagery, language; passive verbs
  21. 21. Culture vs. UI: Masculinity vs. Femininity, 1/2 Metaphors  Masculine: Sports-oriented; competition-oriented; work-oriented  Feminine:Shopping carts; family-oriented Mental Models  Masculine: Work/business structures; high-level, “executive views;” goal-oriented  Feminine: Social structures; detailed views; relationship-oriented Navigation  Masculine: Limited choices, synchronic  Feminine: Multiple choices; multi-tasking,
  22. 22. Culture vs. UI: Masculinity vs.Femininity, 2/2 Interaction  Masculine: Game-oriented; mastery-oriented; individual-oriented  Feminine: Practical, function-oriented; co- operation-oriented; team oriented Appearance  Masculine: “Masculine” colors, shapes, sounds  Feminine: “Feminine” colors, shapes, sounds; acceptance of cuteness
  23. 23. References Global Graphics: Color (Gloucester: Rockport 2000) by Cheryl Cullen and Global Graphics: Symbols (Gloucester: Rockport 2000) by Jared Brown & Anistatia Miller. Henry Dreyfuss Symbol Sourcebook: An Authoritative Guide to International Graphic Symbols (New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold 1984). William Hortons The Icon Book: Visual Symbols for Computer Systems & Documentation (New York: Wiley 1994) is more directly relevant. Hofstede, Cultures and Organizations, 1991, 97 Trompenaars, Riding the Waves of Culture, 1998 Marcus, "Internat. and Intercult. User Interfaces," in Stephanidis, ed.,, User Interfaces for All, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2000. Marcus and Gould, "Cultural Dimensions and Global Web UI Design," Interactions, Vol. 7, No. 4, July/August 2000, pp. 32-46.

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