Building houses to withstand storms

on

  • 532 views

www.drmprefab.com

www.drmprefab.com

Statistics

Views

Total Views
532
Views on SlideShare
516
Embed Views
16

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0

1 Embed 16

http://www.drmprefab.com 16

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Building houses to withstand storms Building houses to withstand storms Presentation Transcript

  • Building  Houses  to  Withstand  Storms  
  • When  hurricanes  howl,  the  greatest  danger  to  people  and  property  is  flying  debris.   Researchers  for  the  Wind  Engineering  Research  Center  at  Texas  Tech  University  have   proof  that  concrete  walls  are  strong  enough  to  withstand  flying  debris  from  hurricanes   and  tornadoes.  According  to  their  findings,  homes  made  of  concrete  are  much  more   storm-­‐resistant  than  houses  constructed  of  wood  and  steel.     To  duplicate  hurricane-­‐like  condi2ons  in  the  laboratory,  researchers  shot  wall  sec2ons   with  15-­‐pound  2  x  4  lumber  "missiles"  at  up  to  100  mph,  simula2ng  debris  carried  in  a   250  mph  wind.  These  condi2ons  cover  all  but  the  most  severe  tornadoes.  Hurricane  wind   speeds  are  less  than  the  speeds  modeled  here.  Missile  tests  designed  to  demonstrate   damage  from  hurricanes  use  a  9-­‐pound  missile  traveling  about  34  mph.  Researchers   tested  4  x  4-­‐foot  sec2ons  of  concrete  block,  several  types  of  insula2ng  concrete  forms,   steel  studs,  and  wood  studs  to  rate  performance  in  high  winds.  The  sec2ons  were   finished  as  they  would  be  in  a  completed  home:  drywall,  fiberglass  insula2on,  plywood   sheathing,  and  exterior  finishes  of  vinyl  siding,  clay  brick,  or  stucco.  
  • All  the  concrete  wall  systems  survived  the  tests  with  no  structural  damage.  Lightweight   steel  and  wood  stud  walls,  however,  offered  liNle  or  no  resistance  to  the  "missile."  The  2  x   4  ripped  through  them.     Reinforced  concrete  homes  have  proven  their  wind-­‐resistance  in  the  field  during   tornadoes  and  hurricanes.  In  Urbana,  Illinois,  a  recently  constructed  insula2ng  concrete   form  home  withstood  a  1996  tornado  with  minimal  damage.  In  the  Liberty  City  area  of   Miami,  several  concrete  form  homes  survived  Hurricane  Andrew  in  1992.  In  both  cases,   neighboring  homes  were  destroyed.     Monolithic  Domes,  which  are  made  of  concrete  and  rebar,  have  proved  especially  strong.   The  sturdy  concrete  construc2on  combined  with  the  dome  shape  make  these  innova2ve   homes  nearly  impervious  to  tornadoes,  hurricanes,  and  earthquakes.  
  • Points  to  Remember  in  Building  a  Home  that  can  Withstand  Storms:     •  Architectural  plans  should  be  checked  to  confirm  that  a  two-­‐story  home  has   connec2ons  between  the  first  and  second  story  and  that  everything  above  the  first   floor  is  anchored  securely  to  the  founda2on.     •  Remove  any  metal,  stone  or  large  decora2ons  from  the  exterior  design.  These  will   become  projec2les  in  strong  winds.     •  The  loss  of  the  roof  will  mean  severe  damage  to  the  home.  Money  spent  on   addi2onal  roof  improvements  will  result  in  the  most  safety.  Avoid  long,  heavy   shingles  and  2les  in  roof  construc2on.  Select  flat,  light  shingles  for  roofing  materials.   Secure  fastening  is  essen2al  to  keeping  the  roof  aNached  to  the  walls  of  the  home.  
  •   •  For  the  most  protec2on,  select  impact-­‐resistant  windows  designed  for  hurricanes.     •  Steel  doors  should  be  aNached  to  a  secure  frame  with  at  least  three  hinges.  Commercial   rated  deadbolts  are  the  strongest  against  winds.  Install  an  addi2onal  bolt  to  the  top  door   frame.  Sliding  pa2o  doors  are  not  safe  in  tornado  winds.  Install  one  door  with  plas2c   glazing  and  steel  construc2on  in  place  of  a  large  slider  door.     •  A  garage  door  ripped  from  the  building  will  allow  winds  to  create  damage.  Even  with   metal  s2ffeners,  double  garage  doors  will  be  at  risk  in  tornado  winds.  Two  heavy-­‐duty,   single-­‐car  garage  doors  are  preferable  to  one  large  door.  
  • •  The  founda2on  is  the  key  to  securing  the  house,  and  all  bracing  and  anchoring   should  aNach  to  it.     •  A  home  built  for  tornado  protec2on  offers  a  basement,  shelter,  or  other  room   below  ground.  A  separate  safe  room  is  the  safest  place  in  a  tornado.  It  must  have   at  least  a  tornado  strength  metal  door,  thick  ceiling  and  secure  walls.  Objects   and  debris  may  be  hurled  at  the  room  from  all  sides,  so  all  materials  must  be   rated  as  tornado  safe.