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Weather Shield AIA Course

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Hurricane Windows

Hurricane Windows

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    Weather Shield AIA Course Weather Shield AIA Course Presentation Transcript

    • WELCOME! CES Course 000104 Designing for Impact
    • 104 Designing for Impact “Designing for Impact” Weather Shield’s Continuing Education Program for Architects AIA Course Reference: WS101 This course qualifies for 1.0 LU AIA/CES credits
    • 104 Designing for Impact Weather Shield was founded in 1955 and is family owned. Weather Shield Windows and Doors is one of the nation’s leading window and door manufacturers. LifeGuard® is a complete line of code-approved impact- resistant windows and doors providing lasting beauty, superior energy performance and sound control while reducing the likelihood of wind-borne damage
    • 104 Designing for Impact Weather Shield Mfg., Inc. is a Registered Provider with The American Institute of Architects Continuing Education Systems. Credit earned on completion of this program will be reported to CES Records for AIA members. Certificates of Completion for non-AIA members available on request. This program is registered with the AIA/CES for continuing professional education. As such, it does not include content that may be deemed or construed to be an approval or endorsement by the AIA of any material of construction or any method or manner of handling, using, distributing, or dealing in any material or product. Questions related to specific materials, methods, and services will be addressed at the conclusion of this presentation. Thank you!
    • 104 Designing for Impact Our Learning Objectives Today 1. You will have a basic understanding of wind load requirements and Design Pressure (DP) ratings for windows and doors 2. You will understand the basic wind-borne debris code requirements for impact-resistant windows and doors 3. You will learn about the various applications and specifications for impact-resistant windows and doors
    • 104 Designing for Impact Top Ten Most Destructive Hurricanes (Atlantic) Note: damages are listed in U.S. Dollars and are not adjusted for inflation Source: www.mthhurricane.com
    • 104 Designing for Impact The Dynamics of a Hurricane • High velocity winds create flying debris acting as shooting missiles • Flying debris breaks through windows or doors allowing pressure to build up inside the structure • Rapid changes in both negative and positive wind pressures can cause severe structural damage
    • 104 Designing for Impact The Ongoing Threat of Destructive Hurricanes Causes Code Change • High Design Pressure (DP Rating) required for windows and doors • Wind-borne debris protection becomes mandated in specific regions for all openings (windows and doors) • Cyclical pressure test to simulate the negative and positive pressures of a hurricane • Energy efficiency requirements as wind-borne debris codes move north
    • 104 Designing for Impact SECTION ONE Understanding wind load requirements and Design Pressure ratings for windows and doors This section will review the basic wind load requirements and Design Pressure (DP) ratings for windows and doors in hurricane-prone regions
    • 104 Designing for Impact Wind Loads • The first item that must be established is the wind load rating of the building or structure • The basic wind speed maps from ASCE-7 can help determine the proper wind speed delineation zones for a specific area • There are special requirements for buildings sited in areas called “wind-borne debris regions,” defined as areas along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts where the design wind speed is 120 mph or above
    • 104 Designing for Impact U.S. Wind Speed Map
    • 104 Designing for Impact Florida Wind Speed Map www.floridabuilding.org
    • 104 Designing for Impact Design Loads • Represents wind load pressure for which the product is designed • Incorporates a safety factor; testing 150% of design pressure (DP50 is tested at 75 PSF) • Positive and negative design pressure requirements for wind-borne debris regions • Water performance must meet the positive pressure required for structural design
    • 104 Designing for Impact Determining Design Loads 1. Wind Speed Zone 2. Exposure Classification 3. Building Importance 4. Mean Roof Height 5. Unit Size 6. Wall Location
    • 104 Designing for Impact Wind-Borne Debris Requirements • After determining the design load, the next requirement for the coastal area is to determine the proper wind-borne debris protection • Windows and doors designed for wind-borne debris regions will have the following characteristics – High design loads – Missile impact approval – Cyclical pressure test for specific design pressures
    • 104 Designing for Impact SECTION TWO Understanding the different wind-borne debris code requirements for impact- resistant windows and doors This section will review the basic wind-borne debris codes and performance requirements for windows and doors in wind-borne debris regions
    • 104 Designing for Impact Key Building Codes • International Building Code (IBC) for commercial construction • International Residential Code (IRC) for residential construction • Florida Building Code (FBC) for all construction in the state of Florida www.iccsafe.com www.floridabuilding.org
    • 104 Designing for Impact Wind-Borne Debris Standards • The IRC and IBC have provisions for wind-borne debris standards • The standard test method and specifications reference ASTM E 1886 and ASTM E 1996 for large missile impact and cyclic pressure loading • Various approval and state agencies have adopted the wind-borne debris standards such as Texas Department of Insurance, Miami-Dade, State of Florida, WDMA and AAMA TDI
    • 104 Designing for Impact Wind-Borne Debris Standards • Wind-borne debris requirements are defined by missile level and wind zone (building height and location) • Wind-borne debris requirements are only applicable where mandated by local or regional building codes • It is up to the architect to determine the right product performance and code approval for the project
    • 104 Designing for Impact Wind-Borne Debris Options Glazed openings must be protected 1. Impact-resistant panels 2. Impact-resistant shutters 3. Impact-resistant glazing system
    • 104 Designing for Impact Wind Zones and Missile Types
    • 104 Designing for Impact Impact Missile Requirements Missile Missile Impact Speed Typical Use Level feet/sec (mph) A 2 gram steel ball 130 (89) Above 30 ft. Wind Zone 1 through 4 B 2 lb. Lumber 50 (34) Skylights < 30 ft. Wind Zone 2 (Basic) C 4.5 lb. Lumber 40 (27) Less than 30 ft. Wind Zone 1 and 2 (Basic) D 9 lb. Lumber 50 (34) Less than 30 ft. Wind Zone 3 and 4 (Basic) Wind Zone 1 and 2 (Enhanced) E 9 lb. Lumber 80 (55) Less than 30 ft. Wind Zone 3 and 4 (Enhanced) Wind Zone 1 – 110mph Wind Zone 2 – 120mph Wind Zone 3 – 130mph Wind Zone 4 – 140mph
    • 104 Designing for Impact Wind Zones
    • 104 Designing for Impact Cyclical Pressure Testing • Designed to simulate the positive and negative pressures caused by a hurricane • Determines the maximum positive and negative design pressures of each approved window and door system • 9,000 total cycles with 3 seconds per cycle of design pressure • Cycling occurs after impact
    • 104 Designing for Impact Cyclic Static Air Pressure Loading 9,000 total
    • 104 Designing for Impact Product Approvals APPROVAL CHECKLIST • Request a copy of the approval • Make sure the product is approved for impact • Check size and design pressures • Make sure it meets the proper impact requirement (large versus small)
    • 104 Designing for Impact Example Design Pressure Calculation 1. Unit installed in Zone 5 of structure 2. Mean roof height of 30’ 3. Window product is 3’ x 4’ = 12 square feet 4. Home located in wind zone of 140 mph Positive and negative design pressures of +33.7/–36.7 based on Table R301.2(2) calculated for Exposure B 5. Home located in exposure “C” requires adjustment coefficient of 1.40 in accordance with Table R301.2(2) +33.7 x 1.40 = +47.18 (positive design pressure) -36.7 x 1.40 = -51.38 (negative design pressure) Design Pressure required is +47.2/-51.4
    • 104 Designing for Impact SECTION THREE Understanding the various applications and specifications for impact-resistant windows and doors This section will review the design options and specifications for impact windows and doors based on building codes, applications and installation
    • 104 Designing for Impact Product Options Active Glazing Options • Plywood that meets code specifications • Code-approved screens • Code-approved storm panels • Code-approved shutters Passive Glazing Options • Code-approved impact-resistant windows and doors – Wood – Aluminum Clad – Aluminum – Vinyl – Fiberglass
    • 104 Designing for Impact Product Limitations Aluminum and aluminum clad (wood) impact-resistant windows typically give designers the greatest selection in size, options and design pressures offering the largest glazed openings and the highest design pressures
    • 104 Designing for Impact Window and Door Sizing Example: Manufacturer’s Sizing Charts
    • 104 Designing for Impact Product Selection Example: Manufacturer’s Specification Sheet
    • 104 Designing for Impact Critical Design Elements • Physical location of structure • Type of windows/doors (wood, aluminum, vinyl) • Overall window/door size • Missile approval (large or small) • Design pressures (to meet local requirements) • Product code approval meets project specifications
    • 104 Designing for Impact Proper Installation is Critical High DP ratings and impact-resistant products may require specific installation (often more in-depth than standard product installation) • 1/4” maximum shim space • Additional anchoring through nailing fins • Different anchoring method (i.e., screws instead of nails) • Longer anchors • Use of installation brackets • Installing anchors through sash/frame into the openings
    • 104 Designing for Impact Certified Installation Methods Products tested in accordance with American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA) have certified methods of installation noted in body of test reports Installation which differs from the certified details will not assure similar product performance and will not be accepted in areas requiring specific design pressure ratings
    • 104 Designing for Impact Example of Installation for High Performance Product
    • 104 Designing for Impact Installation for Impact-Resistant Window Example: Manufacturer’s Installation Specifications
    • 104 Designing for Impact Energy Efficiency • As mandated codes for wind-borne debris requirements moves north, the demand for energy-efficient impact-resistant windows and doors will increase • Most impact-resistant windows and doors use monolithic laminated glass offering great impact-resistance but poor insulation or energy efficiency • There are code-approved products that use insulated Low E glass offering energy efficiency – look for impact-resistant windows and doors with the Energy Star seal
    • 104 Designing for Impact Energy-Efficient Windows
    • 104 Designing for Impact SUMMARY – SECTION ONE Understanding the wind load requirements and DP ratings for windows and doors • Wind loads are critical and are determined from wind speed maps (ASCE-7) • Design loads represent wind load pressures for window and door products • Design loads take in consideration six critical elements Wind speed, exposure classification, building importance, roof height, window/door unit size and location on the building
    • 104 Designing for Impact SUMMARY – SECTION TWO Understanding the different code requirements for impact-resistant windows and doors • The IBC and IRC are national building codes that provide standards for wind-borne debris regions • Various governing bodies and agencies adopt the recognized standards and enforce the approval process • There are various impact requirements depending on geography, window/door placement and building type
    • 104 Designing for Impact SUMMARY – SECTION THREE Understanding the various applications and specifications for impact-resistant windows and doors • There are two general categories of glazing protection: Active systems and Passive systems • It is critical to make sure the code-approved products specified meet the required wind-borne debris specifications • Proper installation of code-approved windows and doors is a must to provide the level of performance the systems have been tested to
    • 104 Designing for Impact Review of Learning Objectives 1. You will have a basic understanding of wind load requirements and Design Pressure (DP) ratings for windows and doors 2. You will understand the basic wind-borne debris code requirements for impact-resistant windows and doors 3. You will learn about the various applications and specifications for impact-resistant windows and doors
    • 104 Designing for Impact Copyright Materials This presentation is protected by U.S. and International copyright laws. Reproduction, distribution, display and use of the presentation without written permission of the speaker is prohibited. © Weather Shield Mfg., Inc. 2007
    • THANK YOU! This concludes the American Institute of Architects Continuing Education System Program Please contact your Weather Shield representative for additional information www.weathershield.com