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The Demographics of Metropolitan Detroit - Presentation to New Faculty The Demographics of Metropolitan Detroit - Presentation to New Faculty Presentation Transcript

  • The Demographics of Metropolitan Detroit presentation to Detroit Orientation Institute for New WSU Faculty Kurt Metzger Director Data Driven Detroit (D3) August 20, 2010
  • The national media are telling a half-century story as if it unfolded over a few years, and, in the process, they're missing important explanations and underpinnings. The truth is, we've struggled with leadership around here for at least the last half-century, if not longer. And that's where we half- should be embarrassed by the similarities between the 1961 Time story and today's coverage. How can we have learned so little over so long? What does it say about leadership -- or our ability to choose leaders -- that we're facing the same issues today that confronted us before men walked on the moon?
  • The Transformation of Detroit “No one social program or policy, A number of historical and no single force, whether housing contemporary policies and segregation, social welfare structural factors created programs or deindustrialization, today’s conditions in Detroit could have driven Detroit and other cities like it from their position of economic and political dominance; there is no simple explanation for the inequality and marginality that beset the urban poor. It is only through the complex and interwoven histories of race, residence and work in the postwar era that the state of today’s cities and their impoverished residents can be fully understood and confronted.” – Thomas J. Sugrue, The Origins of the Urban Crisis: Race and Inequality in Postwar Detroit. Page 5
  • Detroit’s Population History 2,000,000 1,849,568 1,800,000 1,670,144 1,623,452 1,600,000 1,568,662 1,511,482 1,400,000 1,203,339 1,200,000 1,027,974 993,078 1,000,000 951,270 912,633 910,920 772,419 800,000 600,000 465,766 400,000 285,704 205,876 200,000 116,340 0 1880 1890 1900 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2008 2009 2010 Source: Census Bureau and SEMCOG (2010)
  • Growth of Detroit Suburbs Post World War II 3,500,000 TRI-COUNTY TOTALS 3,160,050 1950 3,016,197 3,092,197 3,051,863 1960 3,762,390 3,000,000 2,884,705 1970 4,203,743 2,840,897 1980 4,044,236 2,692,261 1990 3,912,679 2000 4,043,467 2,500,000 2009 3,962,783 2010 3,932,469 2,092,246 2,000,000 1,849,568 1,670,144 1,511,482 1,500,000 1,166,629 1,203,339 1,027,974 1,000,000 951,270 910,920 772,419 500,000 0 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2009 2010 Source: Census Bureau and SEMCOG (2010)
  • I-75 M-10 M-39 I-94 M-8 M-10 I-94 M-39 I-96 I-96 I-75 M-10 I-96 I-94 I-75 M-39 I-375 I-94 M-10 I-75 Persons Per Square Mile 40,000 - 64,910 30,000 - 39,999 20,000 - 29,999 10,000 - 19,999 5,000 - 9,999 50 - 4,999 No Population I-75 Population Density, by Census Tract 0 0.45 0.9 1.8 1930 Miles Sources: Data Driven Detroit, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan Claritas, Demographics Now, US Census Bureau 7/30/2010
  • I-75 M-10 M-39 I-94 M-8 M-10 I-94 M-39 I-96 I-96 I-75 M-10 I-96 I-94 I-75 M-39 I-375 I-94 M-10 I-75 Persons Per Square Mile 40,000 - 78,566 30,000 - 39,999 20,000 - 29,999 10,000 - 19,999 5,000 - 9,999 27 - 4,999 I-75 Population Density, by Census Tract 0 0.45 0.9 1.8 1940 Miles Sources: Data Driven Detroit, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan Claritas, Demographics Now, US Census Bureau 7/30/2010
  • I-75 M-10 M-39 I-94 M-8 M-10 I-94 M-39 I-96 I-96 I-75 M-10 I-96 I-94 I-75 M-39 I-375 I-94 M-10 I-75 Persons Per Square Mile 40,000 - 80,150 30,000 - 39,999 20,000 - 29,999 10,000 - 19,999 5,000 - 9,999 8 - 4,999 I-75 Population Density, by Census Tract 0 0.45 0.9 1.8 1950 Miles Sources: Data Driven Detroit, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan Claritas, Demographics Now, US Census Bureau 7/30/2010
  • I-75 M-10 M-39 I-94 M-8 M-10 I-94 M-39 I-96 I-96 I-75 M-10 I-96 I-94 I-75 M-39 I-375 I-94 M-10 I-75 Persons Per Square Mile 40,000 - 56,275 30,000 - 39,999 20,000 - 29,999 10,000 - 19,999 5,000 - 9,999 1,410 - 4,999 No Population I-75 Population Density, by Census Tract 0 0.45 0.9 1.8 1960 Miles Sources: Data Driven Detroit, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan Claritas, Demographics Now, US Census Bureau 7/30/2010
  • I-75 M-10 M-39 I-94 M-8 M-10 I-94 M-39 I-96 I-96 I-75 M-10 I-96 I-94 I-75 M-39 I-375 I-94 M-10 I-75 Persons Per Square Mile 30,000 - 39,582 20,000 - 29,999 10,000 - 19,999 5,000 - 9,999 405 - 4,999 I-75 Population Density, by Census Tract 0 0.45 0.9 1.8 1970 Miles Sources: Data Driven Detroit, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan Claritas, Demographics Now, US Census Bureau 7/30/2010
  • I-75 M-10 M-39 I-94 M-8 M-10 I-94 M-39 I-96 I-96 I-75 M-10 I-96 I-94 I-75 M-39 I-375 I-94 M-10 I-75 Persons Per Square Mile 30,000 - 32,710 20,000 - 29,999 10,000 - 19,999 5,000 - 9,999 29 - 4,999 No Population I-75 Population Density, by Census Tract 0 0.45 0.9 1.8 1980 Miles Sources: Data Driven Detroit, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan Claritas, Demographics Now, US Census Bureau 7/30/2010
  • I-75 M-10 M-39 I-94 M-8 M-10 I-94 M-39 I-96 I-96 I-75 M-10 I-96 I-94 I-75 M-39 I-375 I-94 M-10 I-75 Persons Per Square Mile 10,000 - 16,901 5,000 - 9,999 115 - 4,999 No Population I-75 Population Density, by Census Tract 0 0.45 0.9 1.8 1990 Miles Sources: Data Driven Detroit, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan Claritas, Demographics Now, US Census Bureau 7/30/2010
  • I-75 M-10 M-39 I-94 M-8 M-10 I-94 M-39 I-96 I-96 I-75 M-10 I-96 I-94 I-75 M-39 I-375 I-94 M-10 I-75 Persons Per Square Mile 8 - 4,999 5,000 - 9,999 10,000 - 17,090 No Population I-75 Population Density, by Census Tract 0 0.45 0.9 1.8 2000 Miles Sources: Data Driven Detroit, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan Claritas, Demographics Now, US Census Bureau 7/30/2010
  • I-75 M-10 M-39 I-94 M-8 M-10 I-94 M-39 I-96 I-96 I-75 M-10 I-96 I-94 I-75 M-39 I-375 I-94 M-10 I-75 Persons Per Square Mile 6 - 4,999 5,000 - 9,999 10,000 - 16,051 No Population I-75 Population Density, by Census Tract 0 0.45 0.9 1.8 2010 Miles Sources: Data Driven Detroit, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan Claritas, Demographics Now, US Census Bureau 7/30/2010
  • Metropolitan Detroit MCD's 1990 - 2000 Population Change Memphis Richmond Twp Brandon Twp Oxford Twp Addison Twp Groveland Twp Bruce Twp Armada Twp Holly Twp Richmond Washington Twp Ray Twp Independence Twp Orion Twp Oakland Twp Lenox Twp Springfield Twp Rose Twp Clarkston Lake Auburn Hills Chesterfield New Baltimore Angelus Rochester Twp Shelby Twp Macomb Twp Highland Twp White Lake Twp Waterford Twp Pontiac Rochester Hills Macomb Macomb Utica Oakland Keego Oakland Harbor Sylvan Lake Mount Harrison Twp Clemens Orchard Clinton Twp Lake Commerce Twp Village Bloomfield Hills Troy Sterling Heights Milford Twp West Bloomfield Bloomfield Twp Birmingham Walled Twp Clawson Fraser Wixom Lake Southfield Twp Madison Royal Oak Heights Warren Roseville St. Clair Berkley Farmington Hills Lathrup Pleasant Shores Village Ridge Lyon Twp Huntington Woods Center Line Novi Southfield South Novi Twp Grosse Farmington Oak Park Hazel Eastpointe Lyon Royal Oak Pointe Park Twp Ferndale Shores Northville Grosse Harper Pointe Woods Lake Woods Northville Twp Livonia Highland Park Grosse Pointe Grosse Pointe Farms St. Clair Ha mtra Redford mck Twp Plymouth Grosse Detroit Twp Plymouth Wayne Wayne Pointe Park Dearborn Heights Westland Garden er it Riv Detro City Dearborn Canton Twp. Inkster Melvindale Wayne River Canada Percent Change Rouge Allen Park Lincoln Park Ecorse C a 60% d 123% n a to a Van Buren Twp Taylor Belleville Romulus Southgate Wyandotte 40% to 59.9% 20% to 39.9% Riverview 1% to 19.9% -4.9% to -1% Huron Twp Sumpter Twp Woodhaven Trenton Grosse Ile Twp -17% to -5% Flat Rock Gibraltar Rockwood Brownstown Twp Lake Erie Wayne State Univesity/Center for Urban Studies May 2001
  • Figure 6 Net Flow of Domestic Migration Southeast Michigan, 1995-2000 5,000 35,000 15,000 St. Clair 4,000 2,000 7,000 7,000 Oakland Macomb Livingston 16,000 5,000 6,000 10,000 15,000 1,000 4,000 Detroit Balance Washtenaw of Wayne 18,000 7,000 18,000 1,500 100 32,000 3,000 Arrows extending beyond the Southeast Michigan Monroe boundary represent the net flow of domestic migration between the specific county/area and U.S. counties outside the region. In net terms, 32,000 more persons moved from the Balance of Wayne County to U.S. counties outside the region, from 1995–2000. 500 Note: Numbers shown represent the net flow of persons age five and older. Net flows between non-adjacent counties areas in Southeast Michigan are less than 2,000. For purposes of map clarity, these net flows are not shown. Source: U.S. Census Bureau. ?? - Migration and its Impact on Southeast Michigan, 1990-2003
  • Detroit Residential Parcel Survey – 2/2010
  • Detroit Residential Parcel Survey – 2/2010
  • Predominant Race, 1950 Tri-County Area MACOMB MACOMB OAKLAND OAKLAND Detroit Detroit WAYNE WAYNE Legend COUNTY COUNTY City City Census Tract Predominant Race White Black No Data No Population Source: Minnesota Population Center. HNGIS, 2004 December 2008/jcb
  • Predominant Race, 1960 Tri-County Area MACOMB MACOMB OAKLAND OAKLAND Detroit Detroit WAYNE WAYNE Legend COUNTY COUNTY City City Census Tract Predominant Race White Black No Data No Population Source: Minnesota Population Center. HNGIS, 2004 December 2008/jcb
  • Predominant Race, 1970 Tri-County Area MACOMB MACOMB OAKLAND OAKLAND Detroit Detroit WAYNE WAYNE Legend COUNTY COUNTY City City Census Tract Predominant Race White Black Source: US Census Bureau, 1970 December 2008/jcb
  • Predominant Race, 1980 Tri-County Area MACOMB MACOMB OAKLAND OAKLAND Detroit Detroit WAYNE WAYNE Legend COUNTY COUNTY City City Census Tract Predominant Race White Black Hispanic No Population Source: US Census Bureau, 1980 December 2008/jcb
  • Predominant Race, 1990 Tri-County Area MACOMB MACOMB OAKLAND OAKLAND Detroit Detroit WAYNE WAYNE Legend COUNTY COUNTY City City Census Tract Predominant Race White Black Hispanic No Population Source: US Census Bureau, 1990 December 2008/jcb
  • Predominant Race, 2000 Tri-County Area MACOMB MACOMB OAKLAND OAKLAND Detroit Detroit WAYNE WAYNE Legend COUNTY COUNTY City City Census Tract Predominant Race White Black Hispanic No Population Source: US Census Bureau, 2000 December 2008/jcb
  • Van Dyke Van Dyke Van Dyke Van Dyke Van Dyke Van Dyke Van Dyke 39 75 10 94 Telegraph Telegraph Telegraph Telegraph Telegraph Telegraph Highland Park ottt o ot atttiio a io tio Grra 10 Gra Grr Gr G Gr Grra Grra Gra and and n nd nd R dRRiv Riiiv Riv Hamtramck ve r verr e er er e Wo Wo Wo Woo Wo Wo ood ood oo d od odw dwa 96 75 wa 94 warr wa wa ard rrd rrd rdd d 96 39 10 75 e e Isl 94 96 75 Bell 375 Michigan Michigan Michigan Michigan Michigan Michigan 75 tR iver De troi Predominant Race by Census Tract White Black Source: US Census Bureau, 1950 Predominant Race by 1950 CensusTract 75 Detroit, Michigan  2001 Wayne State University CULMA/Center for Urban Studies/jcb
  • Van Dyke Van Dyke Van Dyke Van Dyke Van Dyke Van Dyke Van Dyke 39 75 10 94 Telegraph Telegraph Telegraph Telegraph Telegraph Telegraph Highland Park ottt o ot atttiio a io tio Grra 10 Gra Grr Gr G Gr Grra Grra Gra and and n nd nd R dRRiv Riiiv Riv Hamtramck ve r verr e er er e Wo Wo Wo Woo Wo Wo ood ood oo d od odw dwa 96 75 wa 94 warr wa wa ard rrd rrd rdd d 96 39 10 75 e e Isl 94 96 75 Bell 375 Michigan Michigan Michigan Michigan Michigan Michigan 75 tR iver De troi Predominant Race by Census Tract Hispanic Black White Predominant Race by No Population No Predominant Race 75 2000 Census Tract Source: US Census Bureau 2000 Detroit, Michigan  2001 Wayne State University CULMA/Center for Urban Studies/jcb
  • Predominant Race by 2000 Census Tract* Metropolitan Detroit Area Memphis Richmond Twp Brandon Twp Oxford Twp Addison Twp Groveland Twp Bruce Twp Armada Twp Holly Twp Richmond Washington Twp Ray Twp Independence Twp Orion Twp Oakland Twp Lenox Twp Springfield Twp Rose Twp Clarkston Lake Auburn Hills New Angelus Chesterfield Baltimore Rochester Twp Shelby Twp Macomb Twp Highland Twp White Lake Twp Pontiac Rochester Hills Macomb Macomb Waterford Twp Oakland Oakland Keego Harbor Utica Harrison Sylvan Twp Lake Mount Clemens Orchard Clinton Twp Lake Commerce Twp Village Bloomfield Hills Troy Sterling Heights Milford Twp West Bloomfield Bloomfield Twp Birmingham Walled Twp Clawson Fraser Wixom Lake Southfield Twp Madison Royal Oak Heights Warren Roseville St. Clair Berkley Farmington Hills Lathrup Pleasant Shores Village Ridge Lyon Twp Huntington Center Line Novi Southfield Woods South Novi Twp Grosse Farmington Oak Park Hazel Eastpointe Lyon Royal Oak Pointe Park Twp Ferndale Shores Northville Grosse Harper Pointe Woods Lake Woods Northville Twp Livonia Highland Park Grosse Pointe Grosse Pointe Farms St. Clair Ha mtra Redford mck Twp Plymouth Twp Plymouth Wayne Wayne Detroit Grosse Pointe Park Dearborn Heights Westland Garden er it Riv Detro City Dearborn Canton Twp. Inkster Melvindale Wayne River Canada Rouge Allen Park Lincoln Park Ecorse C a Predominant Race nada Van Buren Twp Taylor Romulus Wyandotte by Census Tract Belleville Southgate No Population Riverview White Huron Twp Black Trenton Hispanic Woodhaven Grosse Ile Sumpter Twp Twp No Predominant Race Flat Rock Gibraltar Rockwood Source: US Census Bureau Brownstown Twp Lake Erie Wayne State Univesity/Center for Urban Studies
  • Whites have moved throughout the region since 1970, while African Americans have moved primarily to concentrated areas adjacent to the City of Detroit. Prepared by: Kirwan Institute White Population Change Prepared by: Kirwan Institute African American Population Change Date: September 30, 2005 1970 to 2000 Date: September 30, 2005 1970 to 2000 Projection: State Plane 83 Michigan South Source: Detroit and Projection: State Plane 83 Michigan South Detroit and Source: Neighborhood Change Database; Geography Network; Surrounding Counties Neighborhood Change Database; Geography Network; Surrounding Counties U.S. Census Bureau U.S. Census Bureau Notes: Notes: Lapeer Lapeer St. Clair St. Clair Macomb Oakland Macomb Oakland Wayne Wayne County Boundaries Water Bodies County Boundaries Census Tracts Water Bodies Population Loss Census Tracts 0 - 500 Population Loss Monroe 500 - 1000 Monroe 0 - 500 1000 - 5000 500 - 1000 1000 - 5000 Above 5000 Persons Above 5000 Persons
  • The Growth and Movement of Persons of Color Has Increased Across the Region Since 2000 200% 194.8% Macomb Oakland Wayne 150% 100% 46.1% 50% 39.3% 40.0% 31.6% 30.5% 28.6% 23.9% 27.6% 13.5% 13.2% 4.4% -8.9% -1.7%-10.9% 0% African American Native American Asian Multi-Race Hispanic -50% Source: Census Bureau – Population Estimates Program - 2008
  • Top Countries of Origin for Immigrants Coming to Metropolitan Detroit, 2003 - 2008 12,000 10,000 8,000 6,000 10,485 7,531 4,000 4,902 4,172 4,064 3,447 2,000 3,259 2,839 2,779 2,375 2,090 1,741 0 Source: US Dept. Of Homeland Security / Immigration
  • The Racial/Ethnic Composition of Detroit and Its Suburbs Are Nearly Mirror Opposites 100% 3.1% 6.9% 2.0% 1.2% 4.1% 90% 0.8% 0.3% 0.2% Hispanic / Latino 10.9% 80% Other / Multi-Race 70% Asian/Pacific Islander 60% Native American 50% 82.3% Black /African 40% 79.7% American 30% White 20% 10% 8.4% 0% Detroit Suburbs Source: Census Bureau – ACS 2008
  • Asian Population by 2000 Census Tract Metropolitan Detroit Area Memphis Richmond Twp Brandon Twp Oxford Twp Addison Twp Groveland Twp Bruce Twp Armada Twp Holly Twp Richmond Washington Twp Ray Twp Independence Twp Orion Twp Oakland Twp Lenox Twp Springfield Twp Rose Twp Clarkston Lake Auburn Hills New Angelus Chesterfield Baltimore Rochester Twp Shelby Twp Macomb Twp Highland Twp White Lake Twp Pontiac Rochester Hills Macomb Macomb Waterford Twp Oakland Oakland Keego Harbor Utica Harrison Sylvan Twp Lake Mount Clemens Orchard Clinton Twp Lake Commerce Twp Village Bloomfield Hills Troy Sterling Heights Milford Twp West Bloomfield Bloomfield Twp Birmingham Walled Twp Clawson Fraser Wixom Lake Southfield Twp Madison Royal Oak Heights Warren Roseville St. Clair Berkley Farmington Hills Lathrup Pleasant Shores Village Ridge Lyon Twp Huntington Center Line Novi Southfield Woods South Novi Twp Grosse Farmington Oak Park Hazel Eastpointe Lyon Royal Oak Pointe Park Twp Ferndale Shores Northville Grosse Harper Pointe Woods Lake Woods Northville Twp Livonia Highland Park Grosse Pointe Grosse Pointe Farms St. Clair Ha mtra Redford mck Twp Plymouth Twp Plymouth Wayne Wayne Detroit Grosse Pointe Park Dearborn Heights Westland Garden er it Riv Detro City Dearborn Canton Twp. Inkster Melvindale Wayne River Canada Rouge Allen Park Lincoln Park Ecorse C aPercent Asian, nada Van Buren Twp Taylor Romulus Wyandotte Non-Hispanic Belleville Southgate No Population Riverview 24% to 31% Huron Twp 18% to 23.9% Woodhaven Trenton 12% to 17.9% Grosse Ile Sumpter Twp Twp 6% to 11.9% Flat Rock Gibraltar 0% to 5.9% Rockwood Brownstown Twp Source: US Census Bureau Lake Erie Wayne State Univesity/Center for Urban Studies
  • Hispanic Population by 2000 Census Tract Metropolitan Detroit Area Memphis Richmond Twp Brandon Twp Oxford Twp Addison Twp Groveland Twp Bruce Twp Armada Twp Holly Twp Richmond Washington Twp Ray Twp Independence Twp Orion Twp Oakland Twp Lenox Twp Springfield Twp Rose Twp Clarkston Lake Auburn Hills New Angelus Chesterfield Baltimore Rochester Twp Shelby Twp Macomb Twp Highland Twp White Lake Twp Pontiac Rochester Hills Macomb Macomb Waterford Twp Oakland Oakland Keego Harbor Utica Harrison Sylvan Twp Lake Mount Clemens Orchard Clinton Twp Lake Commerce Twp Village Bloomfield Hills Troy Sterling Heights Milford Twp West Bloomfield Bloomfield Twp Birmingham Walled Twp Clawson Fraser Wixom Lake Southfield Twp Madison Royal Oak Heights Warren Roseville St. Clair Berkley Farmington Hills Lathrup Pleasant Shores Village Ridge Lyon Twp Huntington Center Line Novi Southfield Woods South Novi Twp Grosse Farmington Oak Park Hazel Eastpointe Lyon Royal Oak Pointe Park Twp Ferndale Shores Northville Grosse Harper Pointe Woods Lake Woods Northville Twp Livonia Highland Park Grosse Pointe Grosse Pointe Farms St. Clair Ha mtra Redford mck Twp Plymouth Twp Plymouth Wayne Wayne Detroit Grosse Pointe Park Dearborn Heights Westland Garden er it Riv Detro City Dearborn Canton Twp. Inkster Melvindale Wayne River Canada Rouge Allen Park Lincoln Park Ecorse C a Percent a n a d Hispanic Van Buren Twp Taylor Romulus Belleville Southgate Wyandotte No Population 9% to 77% Riverview 6% to 8.9% Huron Twp 3% to 5.9% Sumpter Twp Woodhaven Trenton Grosse Ile Twp 0% to 2.9% Flat Rock Gibraltar Source: US Census Bureau Rockwood Brownstown Twp Lake Erie Wayne State Univesity/Center for Urban Studies
  • Persons of Arab Ancestry Tri-County Detroit Area Macomb Macomb Oakland Oakland Wayne Wayne Total Persons 2,500 to 4,905 500 to 2,499 100 to 499 50 to 99 1 to 49 0 Source: US Census Bureau, 2000 Wayne State Univesity/Center for Urban Studies
  • Persons of Assyrian, Chaldean or Syriac Ancestry Tri-County Detroit Area Macomb Macomb Oakland Oakland Wayne Wayne Total Persons 500 to 934 250 to 499 100 to 249 50 to 99 1 to 49 0 Source: US Census Bureau, 2000 Wayne State Univesity/Center for Urban Studies
  • Regional Equity Opportunity Mapping  High opportunity exclusive to suburban areas of greater Detroit  Limited access to opportunity in inner-city inner- Detroit  90% of regional African Americans live in an area of low-opportunity low-
  • Racial Disparity and Opportunity
  • What Has Accompanied These Changes? Suburban Job Concentrated poverty in the City Centers in Detroit Abandonment, disinvestment and vacancy in the City of Detroit Extreme segregation Greater land consumption with declining population Shifting of employment activities to the suburbs – The suburbs have about 85% of the region's retail establishments and 87% of the jobs Impacts on the economic health of the entire Detroit region
  • The Number of Tri-County Residents Reporting Working in Detroit Has Dropped by 391,000 (57%) Over Last 40 Years 750,000 700,000 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 650,000 600,000 550,000 500,000 450,000 400,000 350,000 300,000 250,000 200,000 150,000 100,000 50,000 0 Tri-County Macomb Oakland Out-Wayne Detroit Source: Census Bureau – 1960-2000
  • Detroit is the Most Decentralized (Sprawled) Employment Metro in the U.S. 100% 24.2% 90% 29.4% 33.6% Beyond 10 Miles 45.1% 45.7% 80% 63.2% 3 to 10 65.6% 70% 68.7% Miles 77.4% 60% Within 3 50.0% Miles 46.3% 50% 45.4% 29.1% 40% 38.1% 30% 13.4% 27.5% 26.2% 20% 15.7% 7.0% 25.9% 25.8% 24.3% 21.0% 17.9% 16.2% 10% 9.3% 8.2% 0% Detroit Cleveland Chicago Indianapolis Pittsburgh Atlanta Los Angeles Phoenix Portland 108,000 Jobs lost 1998-06/ / 3.1% growth beyond 10 miles Source: Brookings Institution, 2009 – Job Sprawl Revisited
  • Detroit’s Daytime Population is Slightly Less than Its Residential Population Oklahom a City city, OK 1.4 Portland city, OR 1.5 Fort Worth city, TX 1.3 Charlotte city, NC 1.4 Nashville-Davidson (balance), TN 1.4 Denver city, CO 1.6 Seattle city, WA 1.5 El Paso city, TX 1.0 Washington city, DC 2.6 Boston city, MA 1.9 Milw aukee city, WI 1.1 Mem phis city, TN 1.4 Baltim ore city, MD 1.4 Austin city, TX 1.4 Colum bus city, OH 1.2 Jacksonville city, FL 1.2 San Francisco city, CA 1.4 Indianapolis city (balance), IN 1.3 San Jose city, CA 0.9 Detroit city, MI 1.0 San Antonio city, TX 1.1 Dallas city, TX 1.4 San Diego city, CA 1.2 Phoenix city, AZ 1.2 Philadelphia city, PA 1.2 Houston city, TX 1.5 Chicago city, IL 1.1 Los Angeles city, CA 1.1 New York city, NY 1.2 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3
  • It is often said that Crisis brings Opportunity Detroit is, on many levels, in a crisis but Opportunities and “Green Shoots” are Everywhere!
  • City of Detroit | Toni L. Griffin | DCDC | CBI | JSA REGIONAL scale Access to Jobs and Job Retention Diversifying the Economy Conversion or Growth of New and Existing Economic Sectors Improving Quality of Life for Economic Sectors Changes to the Lending Environment and Addressing the Loss of Real Estate Valuation Regional Cooperation, in Governance and Investments CITY scale Lack of Quality Retail Insufficient Public Open Space Inadequate Rapid Transit Across the City and to the Region Lack of Sustained Interagency Coordination (“Silos”) Revenue Generation and Service Delivery Images of the City’s “Decay” NEIGHBORHOOD scale Neighborhood Stability Scale of Blight Access to Quality and Safe Education Public Safety Leveraging and Secure Irreplaceable Assets Fiscal Imbalance big needs
  • F17A_04_1D_X#color#broad#single N N SUNDAY, APRIL 4, 2010 WWW.FREEP.COM 17A A DICKERSON: x x Detroit News: NEWS+VIEWS 313-222-6583 letters@freepress.com A TROUBLING AFGHAN ALLY 22A Nolan Finley on changing styles in language. 23A 2020 STEPHEN HENDERSON: Detroit’s future depends on MITCH ALBOM: In my Detroit … a future in VISION attracting middle-class families. 19A which we can all take pride. 19A THE DETROIT THAT COULD BE AEROTROPOLIS CONVERTED FAIRGROUNDS PLANS UNDER WAY URBAN FARMING NOW WOULD CHANGE NEW SCHOOLS THE FACE OF THE CITY BIKE TRAILS LIGHT RAIL DEMOLITIONS DMC INVESTMENT NEW SCHOOLS SPORTS ARENA POLICE HQ RIVERWALK URBAN FARMING COBO EXPANSION FOUNDATION SUPPORT RICK NEASE/ SECOND BRIDGE Detroit Free Press Free Press editorial A MAKE-OR-BREAK YEAR S ix months after Time magazine to more densely populated ones, and — fer of political authority from an elected al economy for most of the 20th Centu- famously described Detroit as above all — the transformation of the school board to an elected mayor. ry. Can the Obama administration pos- “a city on life support,” the ele- Detroit schools. The city and its surrounding coun- sibly be content to have it be a drag for ments of an unprecedented ur- And Detroit’s revitalization would ties will have to agree how to apportion the rest of the 21st? ban rescue operation are tak- facilitate improvements well beyond its the cost of tax breaks for everyone from What everyone from the White ing shape. borders — train service to Ann Arbor DMC’s new owners to tenants of Wayne House to the foundations poised to in- As Mayor Dave Bing and or Lansing, and the mega-development County’s aerotropolis, and then per- vest unprecedented personal and finan- Detroit Public Schools emer- of an aerotropolis to make Metro Air- suade state legislators to sanction the cial resources in Detroit’s rebirth has a gency financial manager Robert Bobb port a hub of international freight and new fiscal arrangements. right to expect in return is that Detroit- attack immediate challenges to solven- new technology. And the Obama administration, ers seeking their help speak as one, or at cy and root out vestiges of corruption, A group of local foundations, com- which has signaled its interest in De- least in harmony. If rival factions con- some of the nation’s largest founda- munity organizations and local leaders troit’s plight by appointing an urban tinue to spar in court over the location tions, private investors and even a wary that calls itself Excellent Schools De- policy czar, will have to go from being a and ownership of a new bridge to Wind- CITY WITH federal government are pursuing more than a dozen initiatives that would, if troit has pledged $200 million to close failing schools and open up to 70 new sympathetic spectator to an active partner. sor, if leaders in Wayne and Oakland can’t seal the deal on their common in- BIG brought to fruition, transform both De- troit’s landscape and its economy by ones by 2020. If its vision is realized, a diverse mix of charter, private and tra- As scholars participating in New De- troit’s recent colloquium reappraising terest in an aerotropolis and high-speed rail line, if voters renounce a school gov- PLANS: 2020. Some of the changes could be eye- ditional public schools would supplant the status quo, leaving a smaller DPS the city’s history noted, Washington’s fingerprints are all over Detroit’s cur- ernance scheme that assures account- ability in favor of one that preserves pa- popping, altering familiar vistas that overseen by Detroit’s mayor and his ap- rent predicament. In the second half of tronage — Detroit’s golden moment A detailed have stagnated for years: an expanded Detroit Medical Center campus sur- pointed superintendent. Detroiters won’t have to wait 10 the 20th Century, federal initiatives to complete an interstate highway system will be lost. Investors will seek a more politically look at what rounded by new residential and retail development, a second bridge linking years to learn how it all comes out. Those betting their capital and reputa- and subsidize suburban home construc- tion contributed mightily to the city’s coherent environment in which to do business. Educational reformers will projects are Detroit and Windsor, a new profession- al sports arena, fresh bands of verdant tions on Detroit’s future agree that what happens in the next 12 months will destabilization. Vigorous federal sup- port for the private and philanthropic decamp to other, less fractious urban laboratories, and philanthropic groups parkland and farms to support the ex- make or break the transformation. revitalization efforts under way here will redeploy their limited resources in in the works ploding market for locally grown food, and a rail line up Woodward Avenue Many pieces must fall into place, and quickly: now is both appropriate and indispen- sible. communities that have a clearer vision of their own potential. for Detroit. moving people comfortably from the river to the New Center and beyond. Voters will have to sanction a trans- Detroit was a mainstay of the nation- But today, a formidable assembly of innovators is massed here — here at the 20-21A Other dramatic changes would be epicenter of America’s urban crisis, less visible but even more critical to De- THOSE BETTING THEIR CAPITAL AND drawn by the sheer enormity of the troit’s economic resurrection: the ex- challenge and impatient to begin build- pansion and rationalization of coordi- ing the Detroit of 2020. nated mass transit and bus service, the REPUTATIONS ON DETROIT’S FUTURE WANT Let it not be said, a decade hence, relocation of residents from abandoned that we Detroiters squandered this mo- neighborhoods marked for demolition TO SEE RESULTS IN 12 MONTHS. ment.
  • F20A_04_1D_X#color#broad#double 20A 21A 2020 VISION N ± VISION WWW.FREEP.COM SUNDAY, APRIL 4, 2010 N N SUNDAY, APRIL 4, 2010 WWW.FREEP.COM 2020 Big plans for the future Detroit x x x x NEW SPORTS ARENA THE PLAN: The Ilitch family, owners of the Red Wings and Tigers, would like to replace 30-year-old Joe Louis Arena with a new home for the Wings and maybe even at- tract the Detroit Pistons. WHAT HAS TO HAPPEN: Find a site — suggestions include behind the Ilitch-owned Fox Theatre and across Grand River from the Ilitch- A CHALLENGING LIST OF PROJECTS CAN RESHAPE CITY IN THE NEXT DECADE owned MotorCity Casino. Then the Ilitches and vari- ous levels of government must figure out how to pay for it. DETROIT SCHOOLS COBO CENTER THE PLAN: A smaller but dramatically better sys- Closing schools creates a smaller, modernized school system The demolition plan to improve neighborhoods THE PLAN: A $280-million retrofit and expansion under a five-member re- tem under control of the mayor, with a Standards In a sweeping 5-year, $1-billion plan, 41 school buildings and 1 support building are slated for closure in June, with another 13 to be closed by 2012. DPS officials Detroit Mayor Dave Bing highlighted his plan to demolish 3,000 dangerous residential structures by year’s end, and 10,000 total gional authority created last year to based this redesign in part on Detroit’s changing neighborhoods, comparing areas of growth with areas of abandonment. Here is a look at how those buildings fit onto by the end of his 4-year term. Bing said demolition is only part of a larger plan to strengthen city neighborhoods and improve and Accountability Commission reviewing every run the convention center. a map of Detroit’s most vacant areas. the use of Detroit’s 140 square miles. school; 54 buildings closed by 2012, 22 new or reno- WHAT HAS TO HAPPEN: Cobo has to vated opening; 70 new schools by be a better facility by the 2011 Auto 2020, 35 of them charters; a 90% Livernois Livernois Livernois 8 Mile 10 Show and state of the art by 2015, when 24 graduation rate by 2020 and 9 in it will host an influential convention of asso- Lo dg 10 graduates going on to ad- 39 ciation executives who have a lot to say about where eF 8 Mile McNichols Telegraph ree vanced education. e e 24 10 94 other conventions are held. w wa w City of Pershing Gra Southfield Freeway nd y Riv High and ghland Highland rren Wo Mumford Wa thfield Free thfield Free er Park Lo Ford Osborn WHAT HAS TO HAPPEN: Educa- ison DETROIT MEDICAL CENTER odw 75 dg 39 Dav City of ck eF Ma tion reform is critical to the Denby ard Hamtramck ree Telegraph 94 THE PLAN: DMC hopes to finalize by June a $1.5-billion city’s ability to attract and retain wa Southfield Alt deal with Vanguard, a for-profit system y families. Basically, the community City of ter t rren 96 that plans to invest $850 million into has to rally around its children. Parents, teachers Highland Park High and ghland Wa and other school employees must be engaged to upgrading and expanding DMC City of Crockett tiot ison Wo become part of the overhaul. Voter and legislative Joy 75 75 facilities. The investment is expect- Dav Hamtramck Freeway odw Gra ck d d a Ma ed to create 5,000 jobs. tiot approval is needed to abolish the school board in Gra 94 10 r rd r nd n rso WHAT HAS TO HAPPEN: DMC must Gra favor of mayoral control. Beyond foundation mon- Riv ffe er E. Je ey, Detroit voters will be asked to pass another 375 secure a state renaissance zone 96 1 mile Alt $500-million bond issue. Michigan designation for 12 years free of local er t and state taxes. The city and Wayne For Mackenzie Central = Residential demolition orders FOUNDATION INVESTMENTS Cody and Brightmoor King Southeastern (emergency and nonemergency) County also have to sign off, and the state attorney general has to approve the sale, based THE PLAN: The philanthropic community is in- Former casino may be = Neighborhood stabilization program on whether DMC will maintain its charitable service 96 vesting tens of millions of dollars in mission. 75 projects for the betterment of Detroit, 75 new police headquarters SECOND BRIDGE including schools, neighborhood revitalization, cultural institutions, Mayor Bing hopes to move Detroit Police rson the riverfront and greenways. effe Department headquarters staff out of the THE PLAN: Detroit-Windsor could, by 2020, be linked WHAT HAS TO HAPPEN: The philan- 1 mile E. J antiquated 1300 Beaubien building that dates to by either one or both of two new bridges over the 94 375 Greening the city with urban farms thropic cooperation must be main- 1923 and into a new or renovated structure. At Detroit River — a privately owned span tained, old issues of distrust between Michigan this writing, the best guess among real estate next to the Ambassador Bridge and a professionals is that Bing will choose the former publicly owned one 2 miles west. Or city and suburbs must be erased for t For The city is studying multiple proposals to expand urban agriculture in Detroit, using some MGM Grand casino site near Third and Michigan ongoing lawsuits and bickering the good of both, and some projects have Western of the city’s vacant land. The three areas on the map show some of the areas suggested as as the new headquarters. That structure has been could stymie both and reduce De- to show results fairly soon to be catalysts for fur- possible locations for larger scale food production in the city. awaiting a new use since MGM Grand opened its ther investment. The nonprofits and nongovern- Sources: Detroit Residential Parcel Survey; Detroit Public Schools Office of the Emergency Financial Manager; Building Safety and Engineering; Planning and Development Department; SCHOOL CLOSINGS 8 Mile new casino a block to the north in 2007. troit to a second-rate border cross- ing. mental organizations willing to put time and money SHAR; Detroit Medical Center and Vanguard Health Systems; Partnership Border Study; 75 7 Mile t 2010 2011 2012 tio behind their commitments to a better Detroit also Detroit Downtown Partnership; Detroit Riverfront Conservancy; City of Detroit McNichols 10 6 Mile MGM WHAT HAS TO HAPPEN: For the Gra Evergreen Van Dyke Lodge Lodge Fwy. 94 DETROIT od Fr od Fr have to engage city residents in their plans at every 75 Gra Grand privately owned Ambassador Bridge k New school district boundaries Wo nd Mac Telegraph Riv o ood step. er 1/8 mile Detroit to build its second span, the company wr war wr Freewa Bagley Southfield needs permits from the U.S. Coast Guard and envi- Con Mt. M. M. e ay e ay d d d Percentage of parcels with vacant houses nne n Alte A A Former MGM REGIONAL TRANSIT SYSTEM, ronmental clearance from Canada. Neither will come Ellio E o E o 96 on Mic r rr casino, r rr Tireman ers hig easily. For the Detroit River International Crossing 5t 5t 5th y t Graphics by MARTHA THIERRY, 0% to 12.5% 12.51% to 60.06% Unsurveyed eff possible site of an RAPID LINES: J 3rd 3rd 3rd Michigan project to become reality, the consortium of four gov- ERIC MILLIKIN, MOSES HARRIS and NOTE: Includes single, duplex and multi-unit houses up to four units. Detroit Police headquarters ernments involved needs to resolve several lawsuits THE PLAN: Light rail on Woodward, from Jefferson DAVID PIERCE/Detroit Free Press Suggested Abbott filed by the Ambassador owners to stop the project, n farm areas erso to 13 Mile. Private interests are already lined up for Jeff persuade the Legislature to authorize money for fur- a total of $120 million to build the first leg — 3.4 Howard ther work, and get the Canadian government to ac- miles from Jefferson to the New Center. Express DETAIL 10 Parking quire land and do preconstruction work on its side of buses on Gratiot, Michigan and to the airport. Com- the river. muter rail from Ann Arbor to Detroit, AEROTROPOLIS possibly from Detroit to Pontiac and even Port Huron and Mt. Clemens. Better basic bus service, with ex- $850 million to be used for capital improvements to DMC WHERE THE MONEY WILL GO Second span to Windsor THE PLAN: An $11-billion investment to Vanguard Health Systems has signed a letter of intent to buy the Detroit Medical Center, assume $639 million in debt Children’s Hospital At this writing, there are two proposals to build new bridges linking Detroit and Windsor. tended routes and increased fre- turn the area around Metro Airport quency. and pension contributions and another $850 million in capital improvements. Here’s how the money would be spent. 1 Pediatric specialty center 2 Children's new tower One would create a second span next to the Ambassador Bridge. The other would create a new publicly owned bridge downriver near Zug Island. Light rail to link downtown into an “airport city” hub of com- WHAT HAS TO HAPPEN: The Legis- 3 Clinic building backfill In an attempt to link the New Center Area with merce and logistics, potentially lature must approve a regional tran- RenCen Midtown and Downtown, a light-rail streetcar is employing 64,000 people and in- 7 Detroit Receiving Hospital DETROIT sit authority as the governing agency Detroit- proposed for Woodward Avenue. cluding a rail line from the airport 4 Patient care unit renovations 75 Cobo into Detroit. for SMART, DDOT and any rapid-line Manuel (Matty) t Windsor For . Blvd operations. Washington won’t help unless the re- 5 6 4 5 Pre/post op space enhancement Center WHAT HAS TO HAPPEN: Zoning and Moroun’s proposed Tunnel 8 9 6 Two additional operating rooms rand 94 DETROIT gion speaks with one voice on its transit needs. An Ambassador Bridge Ambassador E. G planning are actually complete at the B B Bru RTA then will have to win a local financial mecha- Harper/Hutzel/CVI replacement span Bridge local level in a rare example of intergov- sh s s nism to operate the system — most likely some 10 7 Surgical services renovation 1/4 miles ernmental cooperation. Wayne and Oakland counties kind of regional sales tax that would also require an 8 Lobby expansion/renovation also have reached accord on using tax-free renais- 2 WINDSOR n r amendment to the state Constitution. 9 Ground floor redesign 1 mile arre sance zones to help attract businesses to the aerotro- ve 3 E. W Ri 10 Inpatient unit renovations polis district. The Legislature has to complete action. Proposed it LARGE-SCALE DEMOLITION tro 11 Cardiovascular Institute & light-rail k on Mac RIVERWALK, BIKE TRAILS, De Outpatient Specialty Bldg. Proposed public fers route OF VACANT STRUCTURES 13 11 1 Jef bridge given Detroit 10 GREEN SPACE Central Campus environmental DETAIL L g L g Lodg THE PLAN: The city has 78,000 vacant houses, near- 12 Rebuilding Mack parking deck Wo Wo Wo clearance 75 e w e Fw e w THE PLAN: Completing a pedestrian walk- odw ly one in five. With population likely to be down Cultural Detroit Rehab Hospital Zug wr war 12 Windsor rren y. around 700,000 by 2020, they aren’t Island way along the Detroit River from the St. S Center 13 Sixth floor renovation rd Wa Medical Gra Ant A t needed. Mayor Dave Bing hopes Center nd Ambassador Bridge to the MacArthur Wo Wo tiot Sinai-Grace Hospital Riv oine to have 10,000 demolished by er Bridge at Belle Isle; connecting that campus odw Gra Oakland Macomb Emergency dept. expansion n 14 ms Ada war the end of 2013. Huron to many more miles of bike and pe- Cass Valley 15 Facade/front entrance People rd WHAT HAS TO HAPPEN: Devel- d destrian-friendly routes throughout Citywide paths designed for cyclists and walkers s -Sinai fiel 16 Outpatient Ambulatory Bldg. 75 Mover op a realistic land-use plan that Can Michigan the city. Sinai-Grace 17 ICU expansion could help secure money from 1/4 mile 18 Radiology relocation The city plans to put up about 30 miles of bike lanes and more than 12 miles of routes designed WHAT HAS TO HAPPEN: The Detroit Joh o n Washington to do even more. Wayne for cyclists starting in September in southwest Detroit, near Wayne State University and on Hart Plaza RiverFront Conservancy will have the nR k Huron Valley-Sinai Hospital Otherwise, target demolition ef- DETROIT Mac 75 the east side. The aim is a network of hundreds of miles of biking and walking paths connecting DETAIL eastern section of the RiverWalk completed 19 Private room renovation neighborhoods and attractions across the city. forts to shore up eroding middle- in 2012 if contamination issues at the former Uniroyal 20 ICU bed expansion, Huron Valley class neighborhoods, such as Palmer Woods, North WINDSOR property are addressed. The west riverfront plan is Bike lanes on the street lvd. Rosedale Park, the University District and Boston nd B on a five-year schedule; it depends on fund-raising W. Gra DETAILS 94 Edison. and addressing a few remaining ownership issues. Coch Rosa P Bike routes designated C C RiverWalk will stretch over five miles from bridge to bridge miles, with signs only New life for Fairgrounds Greenway projects elsewhere are proceeding in sec- rane s Parks r e s Pa s r e GREENING OF THE CITY, tions — groundbreaking is set for April 15 on the Mid- 3rd Existing RiverWalk rd rd The Detroit Riverfront Conservancy has mapped plans to extend the RiverWalk more than five miles from the A repurposed State Fairgrounds would be open o o town loop — and would require roughly $50 million to Future RiverWalk URBAN FARMS Ambassador Bridge to beyond the MacArthur Bridge to Belle Isle. At this writing, a little over half has been completed. year-round as a Metropark. T m Trum T m ren DET DET DETROIT ET complete in full. a s 94 War 14th 16th bull 2nd t t State Blvd Rivard THE PLAN: The city, private foundations and com- n n ll ll Rosa Parks STATE FAIRGROUNDS E. Grand St. Aubin St. Aubin St. Aubin Mt. Elliott Blvd. Blvd. Blvd. v v . Trumbull FERNDALE Woodward Chene L dg L dg Lodg People Beaubien Beaubien Beaubien Fairgrounds umbu umbu munity activists are all studying how DETROIT E. Jefferson 96 96 Jr. 8 Mile th th St. Anne Mover King Cass Cass Cass Parks Parks E. Larned ple e Fw to expand food production within 375 ther Tem ck THE PLAN: Convert the property F F UNIROYAL u Ma ard ard 1/2 mile tin L Pine 1/2 mile S S St. W. Fort Mar t t Detroit. Urban farming is one of 10 SITE closed down by the state in 2009 y. y. y. GABRIEL W. Jefferson Jea J Je TRI-CENTENNIAL CHENE STROH Woodlawn many ideas for filling up and RICHARD Michigan into a year-round urban park. W W W. PARK PARK ley nn n RIVER greening Detroit’s desolate HART PLAZA Atwater PARK B ag Cemetery WHAT HAS TO HAPPEN: The Huron- Gra Ga Ga John R PLACE Clar C r C r val L e L e Live Rail che nd B n B n B MacArthur Bridge 6th expanses of vacant land. Ker rson Clinton Metroparks board is consid- Cn Cn Con k h h rno S co WHAT HAS TO HAPPEN: City Tunnel (Belle Isle) tte lvd. fe c tt c tt aye o ois ner nr nr UNITED STATES Jef DETROIT ering the idea, which could cost from d d Laf tten 2 h 2 h 24th 7 Mile Mile Wo Wo Council needs to create a new $15 million to $50 million. The state, n n Ambassador CANADA nor er odd Ver ort odw o w t zoning class for urban farms. Bridge Detroit River Detroit-Windsor P For DETAIL which had hopes of selling the property to a wrd 1/2 mile aad ad Other changes — such as taxing Tunnel Belle Isle developer, would have to agree to lease the site for $1 rd r DETAIL agricultural land at a lower rate than DETROIT 75 Maheras Palmer 1/4 mile a year. other property — also would boost the idea. WINDSOR W. Riverside son Ambassador Park Park fer Jef Bridge Detroit River
  • Opportunities  Recent Movement in of Young Talent – Millenials / Anchor Institutions  Office of Foreclosure Created – Foundations Targeting Abandoned Properties  City to Address Issue of Rightsizing the Land for Better Delivery of Services – Budget Discussions, etc.  DEGC and Social Compact Address the Food Dessert and Look to Attract Retail / NEI and Kauffman Foundation promote Entrepreneurship  Neighborhood Stabilization Funds and Other Programs will Address Demolition and Rehab  Skillman Foundation and others Address Preschool and HS Graduation – Revamp DPS and Promote Alternatives  Cobo and Light Rail Discussions May Herald Changes for Greater Cooperation in the Future
  • City of Detroit | Toni L. Griffin | DCDC | CBI | JSA building towards a vision eight planning propositions 1 Who will live in Detroit ? 2 Where will people live ? 3 Where will people work ? 4 How will people move ? 5 What will people need ? 6 How will the city invest ? 7 How will Detroit look ? 8 How will we decide ? future Detroit
  • City of Detroit | Toni L. Griffin | DCDC | CBI | JSA The Technical Scope Neighborhoods, Housing 1 Land Use Development 2 Economic Recovery 3 Amenities Green & Gray 4 Landscape & Ecology 9 Infrastructure Environmental 8 Transportation 5 Sustainability & Transit 7 Public Services, Operations & Fiscal Reform 6 Historic & Cultural Resources
  • The Demographics of Metropolitan Detroit presentation to Detroit Orientation Institute for New WSU Faculty Kurt Metzger Director Data Driven Detroit (D3) August 20, 2010