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Achieving Information Fluency   Via Inquiry-Based Learning                                             To Increase Engagem...
Framework for 21st Century Learning http://www.p21.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=254&Itemid=11 2LIS 665 Te...
Information Fluency        Information Fluency is the optimal        outcome when critical thinking skills are        comb...
The Significance of                     Context and Immersion       Acquiring     knowledge in the context in which it   ...
http://www.colleges.org/techcenter/if/if_definition.html 5LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy                ...
21st Century Information Fluency http://21cif.com/rkit/newRkit/gettingstarted.htmlDigital Information Fluency http://21cif...
The Search Process http://21cif.com/tutorials/micro/mm/searchprocess/index.htm 7                                          ...
Theoretical Basis            Constructivist learning models            Active learning models            Discovery lear...
Active Learning Models                                                    Relation   between                             ...
IBL Basics 10                               Model of the inquiry process (Justice et al., 2002:19)LIS 665 Teaching Informa...
Instructor Roles        Curriculum                       designer        Tutor-Facilitator        Resource        Eval...
Effective IBL Instruction                                                    Anengaging social                           ...
Effective PBL Instruction       Real-life  scenario designed to:           Challenge participants           Promote kno...
Effective PBL Problems                Require                     collaboration with peers                Relevant      ...
PBL Principles   1. Learning is student-centered   2. Learning occurs in collaborative environments   3. Instructors act a...
PBL Process:                                           Self-Directed Learning        1. Present the problem first and only...
Self-Directed Learning         8.       Tutors assist at every step         9.       Action Plans => library & Web researc...
Evaluation Process               Students achieve final solution               Students do peer assessment             ...
PBL & IBL Resources        PBL Clearing House: a searchable database of         problems tried by others             htt...
Exercise: Map Activities                                                         to ACS Outcomes       Select one active ...
Exercise: Usability Testing of                                           Active Learning Exercises         Usability test...
Exercise: Usability Testing of                                           Active Learning Exercises         Teams test you...
Next Week    Ch          7 Authentic Assessment    Radcliff                et al. Ch 11 Performance Assessments    Rose...
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665 Session8-pbl&info fluency-s13

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LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy
Spring 2013
Dr. Diane Nahl
University of Hawaii
LIS P{rogram


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  • LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy The affective domain governs behavior through myriad affections, including: values, attitudes, likes & dislikes, preferences, interests, self-confidence degree of commitment , sense of accomplishment, conflict, voluntary choice, priorities, goal setting, happiness, joy, frustration, desire for mastery, etc.
  • The Framework presents a holistic view of 21st century teaching and learning that combines a discrete focus on 21st century student outcomes (a blending of specific skills, content knowledge, expertise and literacies) with innovative support systems to help students master the multi-dimensional abilities required of them in the 21st century. The key elements of 21st century learning are represented in the graphic and descriptions below. The graphic represents both 21st century skills student outcomes (as represented by the arches of the rainbow) and 21st century skills support systems (as represented by the pools at the bottom).  Core Subjects and 21st Century Themes- disciplines plus global awareness, health literacy, financial literacy, etc. 2. Learning and Innovation Skills   Creativity and Innovation Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Communication and Collaboration 3. Information, Media and Technology Skills Information Literacy Media Literacy ICT Literacy 4. Life and Career Skills   LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy
  • LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy In his talk at the CIL 2010 conference David Schroeter, a strategic council member of the Partnership for 21st Century Learning, said that we are no longer dealing with an information highway, but rather we are floating in an information ocean. He questioned whether our students can navigate the waters of the depths of the Internet. He also questioned if they will be ready to enter the work force when they leave school. According to Schroeter, employers are no longer looking for basic competencies; they assume that graduates have those. Employers are now looking for evidence that potential hires are critical thinkers, creative and innovative, excellent communicators,and fluent with information technology. Most non-routine jobs have been outsourced to countries where labor is cheaper, meaning that tomorrow ’s employees need to be able to adapt and learn constantly.
  • LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Began in medical schools 1969, only recently in other disciplines. Constructivist learning theory, students construct knowledge via interaction
  • LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy
  • Joyce Valenza ’s site for 21at Century learners LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy
  • Process models LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy
  • LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy
  • IBL, PBL and CBL fall in the realm of active learning; PBL is a subset of IBL and CBL is a subset of PBL LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy
  • LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy
  • LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Experts who: Guide with out leading and assist without directing Select, structure and write problems that address lesson objectives and reflect real-life issues. Presenting the problem, Asking challenging questions Probing for understanding, Making resources available Encouraging self-evaluation Provide resources, clarify confusing concepts, encourage students to verify everything in other sources Monitor progress, evaluate effectiveness of problem, quality of students ’ performance/products
  • LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy It is the American educator and philosopher John Dewey (1859-1952), however, who was largely responsible for promoting ‘learning by doing’ (Dewey, 1933). Influenced by Dewey, inquiry-based learning was adopted by many school teachers in the 1970s and began to appear about the same time in tertiary institutions. Active reflection techniques—before the search, after the results, etc.
  • LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Assumes students will be motivated to learn when problems simulate complex, real-world, personally relevant situations. Creates a new framework for learning allowing students to take greater responsibility for their learning
  • LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Often a form of service learning. E.g., Current events, pop culture, students ’ life, field of study, lab problems, line of work, application of concepts to everyday life.
  • LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Students are encouraged to become actively engaged in learning and to be responsible for their learning and that of others in the group. Students work in groups of 5-10 and build teamwork skills in the process of solving problems together Teachers do not lecture, but guide students in the process of discovery, inquiry, analysis, and reporting. Problems are vehicles for the development of problem-solving skills. Students learn by trying to solve problems without one right answer. Formative: All types : worksheets, workbooks, quizzes, search logs or journals, ratings, open-ended feedback, action exercises, scenarios, rubrics (student or instructor or both) Validates needs assessment Helps identify Provides opportunities to practice Summative: final exam, quiz, post-test, course evaluation Reflect back, sum-up, review, rate and state value of accomplishments in class Have students rate their participation and effort in the process
  • LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Like the Jigsaw method used by Dave. Present the problem first, in the absence of any concepts or information, no text, no lectures, no searches “ You are interested in purchasing a new vehicle. What should your annual salary be to afford the car you want? ” [a math problem] The difference between having enough money and being able to afford it Students work together to determine what information they already have and what information they need to learn Students brainstorm ideas for solutions (hypotheses) after gathering information Tutors pose questions, answer student questions How could we convert this to a research problem statement?
  • LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Like in-class Design and Research Methods Workshops Current periodicals: car buying guides, Consumer Reports, Motor Trend, Kelly Blue Book, auto loan calculator site
  • LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Build-in Reflective practice
  • LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Systems analysis approach to problem-solving, what impacts what?
  • LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy
  • Transcript of "665 Session8-pbl&info fluency-s13"

    1. 1. Achieving Information Fluency Via Inquiry-Based Learning To Increase Engagement in Building Affective and Cognitive Information Skills LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Spring 2013 University of Hawaii
    2. 2. Framework for 21st Century Learning http://www.p21.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=254&Itemid=11 2LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Nahl 2013
    3. 3. Information Fluency Information Fluency is the optimal outcome when critical thinking skills are combined with information literacy and ICT skills. Digital Information Literacy is defined as the skillful use of information within digital environments. 3LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Nahl 2013
    4. 4. The Significance of Context and Immersion  Acquiring knowledge in the context in which it will be used facilitates recall and application of skills and concepts learned. (Gijselaers, 1996)  Objective: Engage students in solving real- world problems in order to develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills. 4LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Nahl 2013
    5. 5. http://www.colleges.org/techcenter/if/if_definition.html 5LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Nahl 2013
    6. 6. 21st Century Information Fluency http://21cif.com/rkit/newRkit/gettingstarted.htmlDigital Information Fluency http://21cif.com/rkit/core_competencies.htmlTurning Questions Into Querieshttp://21cif.com/resources/features/leadarticle_v1_n0.html 6LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Nahl 2013
    7. 7. The Search Process http://21cif.com/tutorials/micro/mm/searchprocess/index.htm 7 lLIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Nahl 2013
    8. 8. Theoretical Basis  Constructivist learning models  Active learning models  Discovery learning models  Collaborative learning models  Hypothesis testing models  Reflection learning models 8LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Nahl 2013
    9. 9. Active Learning Models  Relation between inquiry-based learning (IBL), problem-based learning (PBL) and case-based learning (CBL) (adapted from Spronken-Smith, R. A., Jennings, J., Robertson, J., Mein Smith, P. Vincent, G., Wake, G. (2000). The Research-Teaching Link at Canterbury., 2008) 9LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Nahl 2013
    10. 10. IBL Basics 10 Model of the inquiry process (Justice et al., 2002:19)LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Nahl 2013
    11. 11. Instructor Roles  Curriculum designer  Tutor-Facilitator  Resource  Evaluator  Objective: Involve instructors in multiple roles as scaffolding to student learning. 11LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Nahl 2013
    12. 12. Effective IBL Instruction  Anengaging social issue:  Reflection for, in, on action  Research  Discussion  Interpretation, Meaning, Significance  Analysis of relationships  Explanation, justification of results, give evidence 12LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Nahl 2013
    13. 13. Effective PBL Instruction  Real-life scenario designed to:  Challenge participants  Promote knowledge acquisition  Develop effective problem-solving skills  Develop critical thinking skills 13LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Nahl 2013
    14. 14. Effective PBL Problems  Require collaboration with peers  Relevant to students  Complex and open-ended  Require researching information  No one solution or path to solution 14LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Nahl 2013
    15. 15. PBL Principles 1. Learning is student-centered 2. Learning occurs in collaborative environments 3. Instructors act as facilitators called tutors 4. Problems are a stimulus for learning  Objectives: Put students in the position of creating solutions to real-word problems in order to teach them how to create knowledge, depend on each other for input, and develop 15 critical thinking skills.LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Nahl 2013
    16. 16. PBL Process: Self-Directed Learning 1. Present the problem first and only 2. Students work together to analyze the problem 3. Students brainstorm ideas 4. Students list facts from prior knowledge 5. Students generate questions they need to answer 6. Each student selects one question to research 7. Each student develops a plan of action 16LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Nahl 2013
    17. 17. Self-Directed Learning 8. Tutors assist at every step 9. Action Plans => library & Web research plans 10. Use a variety of source formats 11. Students report new information to group 12. Students review progress 13. Revise hypotheses (questions) 14. Research any new questions 17LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Nahl 2013
    18. 18. Evaluation Process  Students achieve final solution  Students do peer assessment  Students do self-assessment  Tutor does student assessment  Objective: Involve all participants in assessment to reinforce a sense of accountability for learning and for helping others to learn, as evidenced by the quality of the problem solving process and its products. 18LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Nahl 2013
    19. 19. PBL & IBL Resources  PBL Clearing House: a searchable database of problems tried by others  http://www.udel.edu/pbl/  Background and sample PBL and IBL Problems  http://www.udel.edu/pbl/problems/  http://www.fhs.mcmaster.ca/pbls/writing/contents.htm  http://cte.umdnj.edu/active_learning/active_pbl.cfm  http://iub.edu/~pbltec/wordpressj/jacobs-educator-program/inqui 19LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Nahl 2013
    20. 20. Exercise: Map Activities to ACS Outcomes Select one active learning exercise and map it onto your ACS Outcomes to show how it demonstrates students have learned from your lesson.  Map a draft Active Learning Exercise to your PIs and ACS Outcomes.  Make sure it incorporates Active Learning Principles (pp. 18-19)  Identify the evidence it will produce to demonstrate students have learned new knowledge and skills, attitude change, or completed an assignment.  SAOAC includes criteria, outcome/evidence measures (pp. 9 & 12)  Audit all exercises to ensure they map to all of your ACS Outcomes.20 20LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Nahl 2013
    21. 21. Exercise: Usability Testing of Active Learning Exercises Usability testing cross-team match-ups (Share documents & materials now)  Identity Team 1 (Driving) Sharrese with Google Team 4 (Driving) Susan & Arianna  Identity Team 1 (Driving) online Liz & Jerome with Google Team 4 (Driving) DeHanza  Identity Team 2 (Marriage) Kapena & Rachel with Google Team 5 (Cyber Psychology) Lee & Alex  Identity Team 3 (Cyber Psychology) Roberta, Zoia & Adam with Google Team 5 (Cyber Psychology) Rita 21LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Nahl 2013 Nahl 2013
    22. 22. Exercise: Usability Testing of Active Learning Exercises  Teams test your actual activities with members from another Team. 1. Select one exercise to test. 2. Introduce it as you would online to the psychology class. 3. Avoid chat during the test, really act as if these are your students and test it for real, stay in character. 4. Run through the procedures you planned. 5. Team members observe the usability test. 6. Provide feedback for revising the activity. 7. Repeat with another activity until all are tested.  Revise the exercises based on reviews and discussion. 22LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Nahl 2013 Nahl 2013
    23. 23. Next Week  Ch 7 Authentic Assessment  Radcliff et al. Ch 11 Performance Assessments  Rosen  Hillyer et al.  Identity Teams final materials, evaluation instruments, and working links  Google Teams final drafts of materials and links 23LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Nahl 2013
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