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Postgrad slides mk5 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Moving from research design to data collection: understanding which methods are most appropriate Dorothy Faulkner and Cindy Kerawalla
  • 2. Introduction
    • Background: probationary report
    • In this session you will think about:
    • Your disciplinary and theoretical perspective
    • How you can unpack your research question,
    • What types of data you need
    • Why you need it
    • Where you will get it from
    • When you will collect it
    • Who you will collect it from
  • 3. Your ‘What’, ‘Why’ & ‘How’.
    • E very proposal reader constantly scans for clear answers to three questions:
    • 1. What are we going to learn as the result of the proposed project that we do not know now?
    • 2. Why is it worth knowing?
    • 3. How will we know that the conclusions are valid?
  • 4. Unpacking your research question/s Some examples
    • A Personal Baroque?: What is the sociohistoric and aesthetic significance of the fold in the work of Alfred Gilbert and Gilles Deleuze?
    • What is the role of consumption in the everyday life of young mothers? How might young mother’s consumption be regulated by poverty? How might young women be/feel excluded from consumer practices by poverty? How might the pressures of consumption be felt as oppressive?
    • How has the fall of communism changed the population structure of the Czech Republic and what will be the social and economic effects of this?
    • Climate change stipulates capital flows and migration. How does this affect regional economies?
  • 5. Unpacking your research question/s
    • Two examples from the project: Personal Inquiry (PI): Designing for Evidence-based Inquiry Learning across Formal and Informal Settings
    • Question 1 In what ways do scripted inquiry learning activities develop children's learning skills, including working collaboratively, the ability to argue and debate from evidence, judge the veracity of source information, deal with noise in data, and construct and interpret appropriate visualisations of data?
  • 6. Research question/s: key constructs
    • In what ways do scripted inquiry learning activities develop children's learning skills , including working collaboratively , the ability to argue and debate from evidence, judge the veracity of source information, deal with noise in data, and construct and interpret appropriate visualisations of data?
  • 7. Research question/s: key constructs
    • Key constructs requiring definition in Question 1:
    • Scripted inquiry learning
    • Development
    • Learning skills
    • Learning skills are identified as:
    • Working collaboratively
    • The ability to argue and debate from evidence
    • Judge the veracity of source information
    • Deal with noise in data
    • Construct appropriate visualisations
  • 8. Research question/s: key constructs
    • You will need to be able to identify WHAT are your key constructs
    • WHO (if anyone) has used them before and WHERE
    • You will need to identify WHY they are key to your research (e.g. your literature review suggests that they are important; they have been overlooked by previous researchers)
    • You will have to think about HOW you want to define these (accepted definition; modified definition; new definition)
    • You will need to think HOW you are going to capture or measure them
  • 9. Unpacking your research question/s Identifying the theoretical/disciplinary focus
    • Question 2
    • How are digital technologies appropriated as tools for learning and how does the conduct and experience of scripted inquiry learning mediate and change the activities of learning?
  • 10. Research question/s: theoretical focus
    • 2. How are digital technologies appropriated as tools for learning and how does the conduct and experience of scripted inquiry learning mediate and change the activities of learning?
  • 11. Research question/s: theoretical focus
    • Appropriation
    • Tools
    • Mediation
    • Are key theoretical constructs that locate Question 2 within the sociocultural tradition and reveal the researcher’s theoretical stance. You will need to justify WHY your research is located within a particular theoretical framework, WHAT alternatives there are and WHY you have rejected them
  • 12.
    • Write your research question on the card
    • Swap cards with the person sitting next to you
    • Discuss how you think the research question could be unpacked
    • 5 minutes
  • 13. What? Deciding on types of evidence
    • What type of evidence do I need?
    • How will it help me address my RQ?
    • What methods will I use to get it?
    • What sort of data will it provide?
    • Who will provide it?
    • Where will I find it?
  • 14. Research question/s: key constructs
    • In what ways do scripted inquiry learning activities develop children's learning skills , including working collaboratively , the ability to argue and debate from evidence, judge the veracity of source information, deal with noise in data, and construct and interpret appropriate visualisations of data?
  • 15. Examples of quantitative data
    • Large Government data sets (e.g. household survey, census, school league tables) i.e. population/demographic data
    • Research data archives (e.g. ESRC) – previous researchers’ data sets
    • Linguistic corpora
    • Standardised test data (e.g. IQ tests, personality tests, mental health, job satisfaction indices, happiness indices)
    • Bespoke questionnaire & survey data from instruments you have designed
  • 16. Examples of qualitative data
    • Transcripts of conversation & dialogue
    • Videos of gestures and embodiment
    • Documents and texts
    • Archives (film, newspapers, public records, Hansard)
    • Log files of software use
    • Learning diaries and field notes
    • Transcripts of interviews and focus groups
    • Children’s school work
    • Photographs and/or audiovisual records
  • 17. What types of evidence and data might you need to address your RQ?
    • Discuss with others at your table
    • 5 minutes
  • 18. Who, how, what, when, where. Ethics.
    • You need to submit an ethics pro forma to the OU HREC – see https://intranet-gw.open.ac.uk/strategy-unit/committees/HREC/index.shtml
    • Adhere to OU ethical guidelines
    • Example issues: use of images online, anonymity, children and parent consent mismatches, mixed levels of consent within a group or class, data protection
  • 19. Your ethics
    • What are the ethical issues that you anticipate arising in your research?
    • 5 mins
    • (ED841 checklist and HREC pro forma as resource)
  • 20. How? Who, what, when, where, why
    • Sample and location
    • Expenses
    • Travel
    • Procedure: equipment
    • Time span
    • Access
    • Your skills: Training in camera use? Interviewing skills?
    • Building up working relationships (cake!)
    • Keeping participants on board (benefits to them?)
    • Transcribing (who, time, money)
  • 21. Resources - websites
    • http://www.phdtips.com/
    • http://www.phd2published.com/
    • http:// thethesiswhisperer.wordpress.com /
    • http://researchproposalguide.com/
    • http://www.vitae.ac.uk/researchers/1220/Managing-your-research-project.html
  • 22. Resources - Books
    • Dunleavy, P. (2003) Authoring a PhD: How to Plan, Draft, Write and Finish a Doctoral Thesis or Dissertation (Palgrave Study Guides), Palgrave Macmillan
    • Marshall, S. & Green, N. (2010) Your PhD Companion: The Insider Guide to Mastering the Practical Realities , How to Books Ltd
    • Petre, M. & Rugg, G. (2010) The Unwritten Rules of PhD Research (Open Up Study Skills) , Open University Press