Using peel to turn passive learners active

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  • How I came across it Why I found it useful Nothing new but a central compilation of tried and tested strategies
  • Use as quick introduction almost as success criteria would be used
  • Only one way
  • Used with a class that were aggressively passive
  • I like making as much learning public even where its just processing, as this encourages risk taking, you may have mistakes here for all to see, but by doing so you can get feedback
  • Use at the end as a review What activities that you have seen match these criteria
  • Using peel to turn passive learners active

    1. 1. Using PEEL to turn passive learners active Darren Mead
    2. 2. What is PEEL• The Project for Enhancing Effective Learning• was founded in 1985 by a group of teachers and academics who shared concerns about the prevalence of passive, unreflective, dependent student learning, even in apparently successful lessons• classroom approaches that would stimulate and support student learning that was more informed, purposeful, intellectually active and independent
    3. 3. PEEL principles of quality LEARNING• 1. Share intellectual • 5. Promote talk which is control exploratory, tentative and• 2. Look for occasions hypothetical when students can work • 6. Encourage students to out part (or all) of the learn from other students content or instructions questions and comments• 3. Provide opportunity for • 7. Build a classroom choice and independent environment that decision making supports risk taking• 4. Provide diverse range • 8. Using a wide variety of of experiencing success intellectually challenging teaching procedures
    4. 4. • 9. Use teaching • 11. Regularly raise procedures that are students awareness designed to promote of the nature Of specific aspects of different aspects of quality learning quality learning• 10. Develop students • 12. Promote awareness of the big assessment as part of picture: how various the process. activities fit together and link to the big idea
    5. 5. A PEEL Start point• The Semantic map• Original thoughts and questions• End of lesson different colour to change add and amend ideas• Highly motivating as students can see progress
    6. 6. High risk start point• Dirty trick- rubbish notes• Caution- students feel cheated will they trust you again?• Opens up discussion about active and passive learning• Stimulates students to ask more questions about what they are looking at• Students refused to make notes before they understood what they meant• Recommended that it is used sparingly• Science alternative plan experiment using this equipment with spurious extras.
    7. 7. Intellectual control• May need surrendering, but definitely shared• Rather than asking what you want to know ask what do you wonder• Increases student interest, self esteem, reveals misconceptions.• Student ownership of the learning• Students motivated by the responsibility
    8. 8. Alphabet analyser
    9. 9. Before before after after• Can be done over long time period e.g. picture of pyramids could lead to talk of impact of tourism etc• Can be done in a table describe what is seen now, then before, then after then before before• Allow discussion within student groups
    10. 10. BeforeBeforeBeforePresent What do you see? what do you think is happening?AfterAfterAfter
    11. 11. BeforeBeforeBeforePrese What do you see what do yount think is happening?After What will happen in one hours time to the pill?AfterAfter
    12. 12. BeforeBeforeBefore What happened to the pill 6 months before this picture was taken?Present What do you see what do you think is happening?After What will happen in one hours time to the pill?AfterAfter
    13. 13. BeforeBeforeBefore What happened to the pill 6 months before this picture was taken?Present What do you see what do you think is happening?After What will happen in one hours time to the pill?After What will happen to the pill in 5After days time?
    14. 14. Before What happened to the pill 5 yearsBefore before this picture was taken?Before What happened to the pill 6 months before this picture was taken?Present What do you see what do you think is happening?After What will happen in one hours time to the pill?After What will happen to the pill in 5 daysAfter time?
    15. 15. What? When? Which? Who? Why? How? Where? Event Situation Choice Person Reason MeansIs PresentDid PastCan PossibilityWould ProbabilityWill PredictionMight Imagination
    16. 16. New dictation• Text read by teacher students do not write but listen. They try to get the overview of the article.• Teacher questions• Teacher reads again, but, more slowly but to fast to copy!• Students bullet point key points• Teacher stops regularly to discuss what they have so far• Then give article to compare• Additions/ changes in a different colour
    17. 17. Jumbled instructions• Example from a practical• Debrief how is it different to just telling them.• Benefits from ambiguity
    18. 18. “X” marks the vowel• Increases interaction with text and recall• Replace all vowels in a piece of text and it• Xs stxll xndxrstxndxble!!!• Differentiate by having no support text, amount of translating or missing out th vwls ll tgthr!!!!
    19. 19. Venn a new way• Do not give the diagram• Ask them to design it• This will stimulate lots of questions even before they start using it.• Students will find that they need to know quite a bit before they can make decisions.
    20. 20. Biscuit challenge• Crackers• Chocolate bars• Chocolate biscuits• Cake• Bread• Biscuit
    21. 21. Biscuit challenge • Butter puff• Crackers • Ritz • Lemon puff• Chocolate bars • Chocolate digestives • Baps• Chocolate • Crumpet • Scones biscuits • Doughnut • Jaffa cake• Cake • Tea cake • Penguin• Bread • • Wagon wheel Twix• Biscuit • • Kit Kat Mars • French toast • Eccles cake
    22. 22. Process linking activities• Often only interested in end product, eg a piece of coursework• But students actually go through a lot of thinking to get there• Formalise this and value the stages• This example is exam question practice
    23. 23. Reading logs• Observations• What is the article about?• Links with other concepts being studied?• What technical/ structural parts of the brain are used?• Theories• What is the point that the author is trying to make?• What relevance has this article got to your study of the brain?• Is the author trying to tell you something about you? About Human beings? About our world?• Why did the author write this text?• Can I learn something from this text• Predictions• “I wonder if…..”• “Maybe…• Reactions and responses• “I like…”• “ I dislike …”• What does this article make you think about?”• Questions• For the author• For the scientists?• Quotations from the text• Reflections ( after you have read the article at least once)• On your interest level• Authors language• How scientific is the article?• Does the title help “sell” the article?
    24. 24. Post box responses• A method that ensures all students respond.• Use at the start of a module• Use for open ended opinion topics that will lead to debate Example• 6 statements for comment. All students respond• 6 groups to compile and feedback the responses
    25. 25. Yes but what about this one• Puzzle drill• The teacher draws up a 4x4 grid• writes an answer and either a question that will give that answer• Some dummy answers and questions need to be added to the outside edges of the grid.• Each jigsaw piece needs two answers and two questions/data sets.
    26. 26. Fact in fiction• Fact in Fiction – Creative writing challenge• A key skill for anyone working in healthcare is empathy, being able to feel their emotions by imaging to “walk in their shoes”. As part of your training we would like you to imagine you are a patient who has just been cured of a stomach (peptic) ulcer, that had been troubling you for sometime.• We would like you to start at the beginning of your story and tell it up to this point in time. Give details of what happened and how you felt at each stage of the process. Obviously, this is a science assignment and you are therefore will be credit for the use of scientific detail. Use the fact sheet provided to research the facts for your story. You MUST underline each use of these facts throughout your writing. For example.• My name is Boris, I am 73 years old and I’m sat on a bus. I often suffer terrible indigestion after each meal, although the worst pain is when I eat on an empty stomach .My wife has nagged me into going to see the Doctor, I’m on the 27 bus now and its approaching the doctor’s surgery…..• Make sure you include• The symptoms of an ulcer• What and endoscope is and how it works• How the doctors used the endoscope to confirm your ulcer• What medication and advice the doctors gave you to help cure your
    27. 27. 5 out of 3 quiz• Cut up the questions do what ever question your group finds easiest• You will be marked out of three• If you score is less than three you may now use your books as a source of information
    28. 28. • If your answer is so it good it includes extra relevant information you may get 4 out of 3• At the end of the lesson your teacher will judge which answer is the best for each question. This one will be awarded 5 out of 3• We will total your groups score at the end• Make sure you write your groups name on the back of each answer sheet
    29. 29. What was the earth’s early atmosphere? What impact did volcanoes have?What impact did the evolution of plants have? What is the earth’s atmosphere like today?Where did the earth’s Carbon dioxide go? What is the ozone layer?
    30. 30. What was the earth’s early atmosphere? What impact did volcanoes have?• Mainly Hydrogen and Helium escaped into space • Volcanoes erupted releasing carbon dioxide and water• Then mainly carbon dioxide and water vapour vapour• With small amounts of methane ammonia 3 marks • When the water vapour cooled it condensed to form theFormula H He CO2 H2O CH4 NH3 for additional mark oceansOr gravity not holding helium hydrogen • Water formation provided an environment for plants toOr volcanoes released gases evolve leading to oxygen being releasedOr water vapour eventually cooled to form lakes oceans When volcanoes were having their biggest impact the atmosphere had little oxygen The presence of oxygen then allowed the evolution of organisms that respiredWhat impact did the evolution of plants have? What is the earth’s atmosphere like today?• Appeared 3.5 billion years ago • Majority is nitrogen• Used water and carbon dioxide for Photosynthesis released • Next most common is oxygen oxygen into atmosphere • Other gases include carbon dioxide water vapour and• This oxygen reacts with ammonia and methane making noble gases water carbon dioxide and nitrogen 3 marks 78% Nitrogen 21% o2 0.04% co2Flammable to describe methane ammonia named noble gas (especially argon)Chloroplasts etc in context atmosphere has been more or less the same for 200 millionOxygen was a “pollutant” at the time killing some microbes yearsLed to a reduction in co2 levels measured in dry as water vapour would be variableWhere did the earth’s Carbon dioxide go? What is the ozone layer?• Through photosynthesis • Made from the oxygen in the air• Became locked up as carbohydrate? • Absorbs harmful radiation• Locked up as sedimentary rocks such as carbonates and • Forms between 25-50kn above the surface of the earth fossil fuels Formula is o3Naming a carbonate and the fossil fuels Harmful radiation would have stopped the evolution of lifeThe process of fossil fuel formation
    31. 31. • Photo of 5 from 3 quiz
    32. 32. Chain reaction• You and your genes module review example• Active listening• Each student must try to answer (in their heads each question)
    33. 33. www.peel.educ.monash.edu.au Searchable data base
    34. 34. PEEL principles of quality LEARNING• 1. Share intellectual • 5. Promote talk which is control exploratory, tentative and• 2. Look for occasions hypothetical when students can work • 6. Encourage students to out part (or all) of the learn from other students content or instructions questions and comments• 3. Provide opportunity for • 7. Build a classroom choice and independent environment that decision making supports risk taking• 4. Provide diverse range • 8. Using a wide variety of of experiencing success intellectually challenging teaching procedures
    35. 35. • 9. Use teaching • 11. Regularly raise procedures that are students awareness designed to promote of the nature Of specific aspects of different aspects of quality learning quality learning• 10. Develop students • 12. Promote awareness of the big assessment as part of picture: how various the process. activities fit together and link to the big idea

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