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Literary analysis essays djd1
 

Literary analysis essays djd1

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    Literary analysis essays djd1 Literary analysis essays djd1 Presentation Transcript

    • Literary Analysis Essays: Where do I start? D. Johnson Dahrouge The purpose is to critique, not summarize.
    • What do I analyze?
      • Character
      • Setting
      • Theme
      • Point of view
    • What is the purpose?
      • Analysis requires one to look at the parts and consider how they affect or interact with the whole.
      • Literary analysis essays consider how parts of literature affect the overall piece of literature.
        • How does the setting affect the story “The Demon Lover”?
        • What role does the setting play in the story?
    • What should I consider in a character analysis?
      • What is the character’s outstanding trait?
      • What is the character's character?
      • Is the character lifelike?
      • Is the character one-dimensional?
      • What is your opinion of the character?
    • Character Analysis Example
      • Focus : Miss Brill is worth my sympathy.
      • Thesis : My feelings of her worthiness results from her harmlessness from her loneliness and vulnerability, and from Katherine Mansfield’ skillful treatment of her plight.
    • Supporting a thesis, example
      • Thesis : My feelings of Miss Brill’s worthiness of my sympathy results from her harmlessness, from her loneliness and vulnerability, and from Katherine Mansfield’ skillful treatment of her plight.
        • TS: Her harmlessness makes the hurt done to her seem unjustified and unnecessarily cruel.
        • TS: Her loneliness and vulnerability make her pitiable.
        • TS: Katherine Mansfield's skillful treatment of Miss Brill’s plight encourages the right proportion of sympathy.
      • Conclusion: Sympathy for Miss Brill is the dominate effect of the story.
    • What do I consider when doing an analysis on setting?
      • Is the setting minimized or maximized in the story?
      • Is it morning (new beginning) , or winter
      • ( dreary, depressing) or does the time and seasons change, which parallel's the character’s changing?
      • How is the setting described?
      • Does the setting shift, requiring the character’s to change too, or does it shift and create an uncomfortable situation for the character?
    • What might a setting analysis look like?
      • Focus: In “The Secret Sharer” Conrad make his setting an inseparable part of his action and ideas.
      • Thesis : The integration of setting and story may be followed in details about the Captain’s cabin and the ocean itself, and also in Conrad’s suggestion that large, cosmic forces are at work in human affairs.
    • Setting Outline, example
      • Thesis : The integration of setting and story may be followed in details about the Captain’s cabin and the ocean itself, and also in Conrad’s suggestion that large, cosmic forces are at work in human affairs.
        • The captain’s cabin is essential as a place of action for the story, because it enables the Captain successfully to conceal Leggatt.
        • The ocean is just as essential as the cabin.
        • While both the cabin and the ocean help in the adventure and tension of the story, Conrad also suggests a larger, philosophical setting against which hi adventures is played.
      • Conclusion: An additional merging of setting and story should be mentioned in conclusion.
    • What does a Theme Analysis focus on?
      • Direct statements by the author or the author’s persona
      • Imagery and symbolism
      • Dramatic statements made by the characters in the work
      • Characters who stand for ideas
      • The work itself as it implies ideas
    • Theme outline, example
      • Focus : There are many ideas about love and the many ways it affects human relationships, but one idea that takes in all these is that loving is an essential part of human nature- that it is human destiny to love.
      • Thesis: The idea is embodied negatively in characters who are without love, and prohibitively in characters who find love.
    • What does a Theme Analysis look like?
      • Thesis: The idea is embodied negatively in characters who are without love, and prohibitively in characters who find love.
        • In the first part of the story, Lawrence illustrates characters who have no love, and whose lives are therefore negative , incomplete, and without a destiny.
        • The thought that life is impossible without love is finally brought to bear on Mabel, Joe’s sister.
        • Rather than ending Mabel's life, however, the pond really begins it, for her attempt at suicide is the occasion of her love with Dr. Jack Fergusson, and therefore, it also is the positive means ne which she moves towards her destiny.
        • Therefore, Lawrence builds the idea that one’s destiny in love is not only something to be sought but also something to be feared.
      • Conclusion: This realistic presentation of human emotions raises Lawrence's treatment of hi s idea above the level of the popular, romantic, “Hollywooden” conception of love, and answers all potential objections that love between Mabel and the doctor happens too easily.
    • What about Point of View?
      • How does the point of view relate to :
        • Selection of details
        • Characterization
        • Narrative development
        • Diction
        • How does POV contribute toward making the story unique?
    • What might one look like?
      • Focus: The dramatic point of view in Shirley Jackson’s story “The Lottery” is essential to the success with which the author is able to render horror in the midst of the ordinary.
      • Thesis: The success of Shirley Jackson's rendering of horror is achieved through her rudimentary but expert characterization, her almost clinically detached selection of details, and her deceivingly simple diction.
    • How should it be developed?
      • Thesis: The success of Shirley Jackson's rendering of horror is achieved through her rudimentary but expert characterization, her almost clinically dethatched selection of details, and her deceivingly simple diction.
        • The villagers are depicted as ordinary folks attending a normal, festive event-in contrast to the real horror of their ultimate activity.
        • While the dramatic point of view could theoretically permit the introduction of many details, Jackson’s method in “The Lottery” is to concentrate almost clinically on only those details that bring out the horror.
        • Without exaggeration, if there had been more detail in the story, contrast could not have been brought out so well.
        • Appropriate to the conclusion, and the graceless, simple unquestioning, overly conservative nature of the villagers, is the diction.
      • Conclusion: Because of such masterly control over point of view, it is obvious that Jackson has created a supremely successful story.
    • Important points to remember:
      • If you start with a shallow focus, you will end with a shallow paper.
      • Take time to plan the content, then take time to craft your writing.
      • Refer to the rubric after you write, as a way to self-check and proofread.