Peter c lippman creating learning environments for optimal experiences 2012 05-16

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Peter c lippman creating learning environments for optimal experiences 2012 05-16

  1. 1. Creating Learning Environments for Optimal ExperiencesFuture Learning Conference Peter C. Lippman,Stockholm, Sweden Associate DirectorMay 15, 2012 EIW Architects
  2. 2. Learning Objectives2 1.  Examine Practice Theory 2.  Define Learning Technology 3.  Review Exemplary Models of environments that connect the learner, the learning, & the things to be learned. 4.  Recommendations for Designing Future Learning Environments
  3. 3. 3
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  6. 6. 6
  7. 7. 7
  8. 8. 8 1920 1960 2000
  9. 9. 9
  10. 10. 10 •  Does the physical environment impact the learner? •  Does the physical environment influence the learning •  Does the physical environment shape the things to be learned?
  11. 11. 11 •  Focus on task •  No distractions •  Additional surface for displaying Windowless School Norman students’ work Thomas H.S. NYC
  12. 12. 12
  13. 13. 13
  14. 14. 14 •  The student is motivated to learn, because they choose what s/he wants to learn •  The student can chooses where s/he wants to acquire skills •  The students is motivated Open Plan School to learn because s/he chooses what they want to learn
  15. 15. 15 Open Plan School – Open Plan School – Design 2000 Design of Classrooms 2002
  16. 16. 16 2010
  17. 17. 17 •  Do we create spaces to fit the learner to the learning environment? •  Does the learning environment need to adapt to the learner? •  Do we design the learning environment around the learner(s), the things to be learned and the learning?
  18. 18. 18 Define the Learning Environment •  Who are the learners? •  Where does learning taking place? •  How does Learning take place?
  19. 19. 19
  20. 20. 20
  21. 21. 21 Type of Social Peripheral, Activity (reading, What does the Groupings Guided, Full writing, technology space require to Participation project work, etc. accomplish the activities Independent With Another With Others Entire Class
  22. 22. 22 •  Evidence Based Design (EBD) -  Rooted in design of healthcare facilities -  Building Technology Systems -  Information Technology -  Building Maintenance Programs -  Framework for programming & planning facilities •  Responsive Research - Participatory Action Research - Methodologies that can guide the programming, planning and design
  23. 23. 23 •  Participatory Action Research -  The impetus comes from the learning community. -  Empower the learning community -  Participants contribute their physical and/or intellectual resources -  Participants are involved w/ research process & analytic issues— interpretation, synthesis and the verification of conclusions •  Methodologies for guiding: -  programming, -  planning and -  design
  24. 24. 24 •  Defining Learning Technology -  Building Systems -  Electrical -  Mechanical -  Daylighting -  Information Technology -  Reflective Space -  Engagement Space -  Proximal Space -  Spatial Design -  Pedagogy -  Flow -  Flexibility
  25. 25. 25 Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning •  Potential health effects: Dirty, mold-like vents, ammonia / chlorine smell •  Humid classrooms •  A/C performance varies with classroom, can be overpowering– need temperature controls
  26. 26. 26 •  Natural light important for staying awake, day lighting needs controls •  Embedded blinds have not worked, traps bugs & leak •  Windows sometimes too high to enjoy view •  No air circulation in some classrooms, fans provided. •  Operable windows preferred
  27. 27. 27 United States Merchant Marine Academy Research PEHKA & JCJ Architecture (2010)
  28. 28. 28 Oliver, C. & Lippman, P.C. (2007). Examining Space and Place in Learning Environments.
  29. 29. 29 Teacher-Centered Learner-Centered Learner-Centered Classroom Environment Environment Classroom Environment 29
  30. 30. 30 •  Reflective Space •  Engagement Space •  Proximal Space St. Stephen’s ELC, Perth Designed by EIW Architects
  31. 31. 31 Projects for Environmental Health Knowledge & Action (2011) The Gateway School, New York, NY
  32. 32. 32 •  Flow -  Within Setting -  Between Activity Settings North Platte High School Meadowdale Middle School North Platte, Nebraska Washington Designed by The Architectural Partnership Designed by INTEGRUS Architecture, P.S.
  33. 33. 33 School of One / Dull Oslen Weekes & the Chemistry Lab, University of Melbourne/ Cuningham Group Associate Professor Peter Jamieson with Bloomquist & Wark Architects
  34. 34. 34 Engineering School Classroom at the University of Melbourne Designed by: Associate Professor Peter Jamieson with Woods Bagot Architects
  35. 35. Loris Malaguzzi Infant School, Reggio Emilia, Italy Year of Completion: 2008 Architect:ZPZ Partners Size: 3,000 m2 Pupils: 9035
  36. 36. Loris Malaguzzi Infant School, Reggio Emilia, Italy Year of Completion: 2008 Architect:ZPZ Partners Size: 3,000 m2 Pupils: 9036
  37. 37. Springfield Literacy Center Springfield, Pennsylvania Year of Completion: 2010 Architect: Burt Hill Size: 51,000 sq.ft. Pupils: 35037
  38. 38. Springfield Literacy Center Springfield, Pennsylvania Year of Completion: 2010 Architect: Burt Hill Size: 51,000 sq.ft. Pupils: 35038
  39. 39. The Montessori School, Kingsley Perth, Western Australia Year of Completion: 2011 Architect: EIW Architects39
  40. 40. The Montessori School, Kingsley Perth, Western Australia Year of Completion: 2011 Architect: EIW Architects40
  41. 41. The Montessori School, Kingsley Perth, Western Australia Year of Completion: 2011 Architect: EIW Architects41
  42. 42. Rachel Carson Elementary School Lake Washington School District—2009 Seattle, Washington Designed by: INTEGRUS Architecture, P.S., Seattle, Washington Photographer: Lara Swimmer Photographer42 •  Managing Interactions •  Place Identity
  43. 43. Hatwell Primary School Secondary School Building Architect: Baldasso Cortese Melbourne, Australia Proposed Scheme43
  44. 44. Aspen Middle School Aspen, Colorado , Aspen School District—2007 Architect: Hutton Ford Architects (now Hutton Architecture Studio, Denver, Co) with Studio B Architects (Aspen, Co) Photographer: Paul Furhmeister44
  45. 45. Cavelero Mid-High School LAKE STEVENS SCHOOL DISTRICT Lake Stevens, Washington Designed by: NAC Architecture, Seattle, Washington Photgrapher: Harlan Chinn, NAC Architecture45
  46. 46. Santa Maria College Perth, Western Australia Year of Completion: 2011 Architect: EIW Architects46
  47. 47. Santa Maria College Perth, Western Australia Year of Completion: 2011 Architect: EIW Architects47
  48. 48. Science Leadership Academy School District of Philadelphia –2006 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Designed by: Stephen Varenhorst Architects, Philadelphia, PA. Photographer: Stephen Varenhorst Architects, Philadelphia, PA.48 •  Privacy •  Place Identity
  49. 49. Science Leadership Academy School District of Philadelphia –2006 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Designed by: Stephen Varenhorst Architects, Philadelphia, PA. Photographer: Stephen Varenhorst Architects, Philadelphia, PA.49
  50. 50. The Metropolitan Learning Alliance Bloomington, Minneapolis, Richfield, and Saint Paul School Districts – 2006 Bloomington, Minnesota Designed by: Cuningham Group Architecture, P.A., Minneapolis MN. Photgrapher: Don Wong Photo50
  51. 51. Holy Cross College Secondary School Building Architect: EIW Architects Proposed Scheme A51
  52. 52. Holy Cross College Secondary School Building Architect: EIW Architects Perth Australia Proposed Scheme B52
  53. 53. CONCLUSION53
  54. 54. Creating Learning Environments for Optimal ExperiencesPeter C. Lippman, Associate DirectorEIW Architects, Perth, Australiapclipp@eiwarch.com.au

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