SOME OECD WORKON EDUCATION,LEARNING AND ICTDavid IstanceCentre for Educational Research and Innovation (CERI),OECD
Education at OECD and CERI• OECD: inter-governmental, multi-sectoral;  focused on education since the early 1960s• A separ...
INNOVATIVE LEARNING   ENVIRONMENTS
Why learning?• Strong focus on measuring  learning outcomes but how to  change them?• The difficulties of changing  educat...
Why innovation?• Wider world is changing rapidly –  education has to be open to change• Even more as ambitions increase - ...
Why learning environments?• Learning is cumulative and  contextualised – calls for holistic  frameworks• Technology invite...
OECD PROJECT - “INNOVATIVE   LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS” (ILE)• Learning Research, research to  inspire practice• Innovative Ca...
“The Nature of Learning: Using Research to         Inspire Practice”, OECD Publications, 20101.Analysing & Designing      ...
The ILE research-based ‘learning principles’Learning environments should aim to do all of following:• Make learning centra...
21st century learning environments should:• Promote 21st century effectiveness  (apply the ILE learning principles)• Innov...
The pedagogical core – elements &dynamics
The formative design/redesign cycle   Feedback:                  Design toTeacher learning              innovate & make   ...
Wider partnerships to enhance the human,      physical, decisional, & social capitals of LEs                              ...
Technology everywhere• Technology must now be an integral part of  learning and schooling• Technology comes in in many way...
Towards wider change• Enhancing coherence between organisational  structures and 21st century learning environments• Leade...
ICT & EDUCATION AT OECD
Earlier work and recent OECD analyses• A lot of earlier work on adult learning and technology;  some on HE, especially e-l...
Some key findings and conclusions• Frequency of computer use at home not matched by  use at school• A stronger correlation...
‘Connected Minds’ (2012) final report on New       Millennium Learners• Compared competing ‘evangelist’ vs ‘sceptic’ these...
PISA 2015
Computer-based Assessment• There has been an incremental move towards  computer-based assessment in previous PISA  cycles....
PISA 2015• The computer is the main mode of  assessment• All new assessment items will be computer-  only• A paper-based o...
PISA 2015 - Domains• The major domain is science. All new science  items are computer-based, with no paper-  based version...
INNOVATION STRATEGY
Parallel work on broader innovation• Grew out of OECD-wide Innovation Strategy  (2009-2011)• Contributing to new Skills St...
THANK YOU!          David.istance@oecd.orgwww.oecd.org/edu/ceri/innovativelearningenvironments.htm
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David Istance, Centre for Educational Research and Innovation (CERI), OECD - SOME OECD WORK ON EDUCATION, LEARNING AND ICT ,

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David Istance, på DIUs seminarium Framtidens lärande, på Unesco i Paris 20 januari 2013.

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David Istance, Centre for Educational Research and Innovation (CERI), OECD - SOME OECD WORK ON EDUCATION, LEARNING AND ICT ,

  1. 1. SOME OECD WORKON EDUCATION,LEARNING AND ICTDavid IstanceCentre for Educational Research and Innovation (CERI),OECD
  2. 2. Education at OECD and CERI• OECD: inter-governmental, multi-sectoral; focused on education since the early 1960s• A separate Directorate for Education since 2002• CERI founded in 1968 to inform long-term policy development through research and innovation• New Millennium Learners & Innovative Learning Environments have been at the heart of this mission
  3. 3. INNOVATIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS
  4. 4. Why learning?• Strong focus on measuring learning outcomes but how to change them?• The difficulties of changing education invites a fresh focus on learning itself
  5. 5. Why innovation?• Wider world is changing rapidly – education has to be open to change• Even more as ambitions increase - promoting deep learning, 21st century competences, foundations for lifelong learning 5
  6. 6. Why learning environments?• Learning is cumulative and contextualised – calls for holistic frameworks• Technology invites the rethinking of learning & teaching possibilities, in connected ways• Not necessarily school, but a range of settings and forms of learning in combination 6
  7. 7. OECD PROJECT - “INNOVATIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS” (ILE)• Learning Research, research to inspire practice• Innovative Cases, practice to inspire research & policy• Implementation & Change growing & sustaining new forms of learning, including innovative approaches to change
  8. 8. “The Nature of Learning: Using Research to Inspire Practice”, OECD Publications, 20101.Analysing & Designing 7. Technology & LearningLearning Environments for the21st Century 8. Cooperative Learning & Group-work2. Historical Developments in theUnderstanding of Learning 9. Inquiry-based Learning3. The Cognitive Perspective onLearning 10. The Community & Service Learning4. The Crucial Role of Emotions& Motivation in Learning 11. The Effects of Family on Learning5. Developmental & Biological 12. Implementing Innovation: fromBases of Learning visions to everyday practice6. Formative Assessment 13. Future Directions
  9. 9. The ILE research-based ‘learning principles’Learning environments should aim to do all of following:• Make learning central, encourage engagement, where learners come to understand themselves as learners• Ensure that learning is social and often collaborative• Be highly attuned to learners’ motivations and the importance of emotions• Be acutely sensitive to individual differences including in prior knowledge• Be demanding for each learner but without excessive overload• Use assessments consistent with its aims, with emphasis on formative feedback• Promote horizontal connectedness across activities and subjects, in-and out-of-school 9
  10. 10. 21st century learning environments should:• Promote 21st century effectiveness (apply the ILE learning principles)• Innovate the “pedagogical core”• Engage the “Design/Redesign” formative cycle• Extend their ‘capitals’ through partnerships
  11. 11. The pedagogical core – elements &dynamics
  12. 12. The formative design/redesign cycle Feedback: Design toTeacher learning innovate & make Learning learning happen leadershipInformation about activities, learners & outcomes
  13. 13. Wider partnerships to enhance the human, physical, decisional, & social capitals of LEs Engaging families Networking to engage learners with other Engaging the local ILEs communityCorporate,highereducation andculturalpartners
  14. 14. Technology everywhere• Technology must now be an integral part of learning and schooling• Technology comes in in many ways, not a single ‘technology effect’: – innovating the ‘pedagogical core’ – supporting schools as ‘formative organisations’ – extending their boundaries to other partners and through networks
  15. 15. Towards wider change• Enhancing coherence between organisational structures and 21st century learning environments• Leadership as design and redesign• Give priority to the ‘meso’ level - learning-focused networks and communities of practice• Growing and sustaining rather than ‘scaling up’• Policy leadership to create favourable climates, conditions and capacities• In sum, the Cs: coherence, creation, communities, capacities, conditions & climates
  16. 16. ICT & EDUCATION AT OECD
  17. 17. Earlier work and recent OECD analyses• A lot of earlier work on adult learning and technology; some on HE, especially e-learning• Also focus on schools, e.g. ‘Learning to Change - ICT in Schools’, 2001• E-learning in Tertiary Education: Where do we stand? 2005• Giving Knowledge for Free: The Emergence of Open Educational Resources, 2007• Beyond Textbooks: Digital Learning Resources as Systemic Innovation in the Nordic Countries, 2009• Are New Millennium Learners Making the Grade? 2010• Inspired by Technology, Driven by Pedagogy, 2010• PISA Results 2009: Students On Line: Digital Technologies and Performance, 2011• Connected Minds, 2012
  18. 18. Some key findings and conclusions• Frequency of computer use at home not matched by use at school• A stronger correlation between educational performance and ICT use at home than at school• Despite increasing investments in ICT infrastructure, student-computer ratios still a handicap for school ICT use• All OECD countries surveyed except Korea have significant numbers of students who perform poorly in digital reading• Many ‘digital natives’ cannot operate and navigate effectively in a digital environment 18
  19. 19. ‘Connected Minds’ (2012) final report on New Millennium Learners• Compared competing ‘evangelist’ vs ‘sceptic’ theses about the significance of digital media - mixed messages• yes, technology is changing social and cultural environments but…• … Little evidence that young people want radically different learning environments . But they do look for: – Engagement – Convenience – any time, any where – Enhanced productivity• Instrumental, conservative? 19
  20. 20. PISA 2015
  21. 21. Computer-based Assessment• There has been an incremental move towards computer-based assessment in previous PISA cycles.• In PISA 2012, computer-based elements were optional assessments of digital reading and maths, and a ‘core’ assessment of problem solving.• In PISA 2015, for the first time, the computer will be the main mode of delivery for all tests and questionnaires.
  22. 22. PISA 2015• The computer is the main mode of assessment• All new assessment items will be computer- only• A paper-based option is available for countries which are not able to implement computer assessment• The paper-based assessment will enable comparisons with previous cycles, but limit future trend measurement
  23. 23. PISA 2015 - Domains• The major domain is science. All new science items are computer-based, with no paper- based versions.• Reading and mathematics are minor domains so have no new assessment items.• Test questions from previous cycles are being converted from paper to computer format, to enable measurement of trends.• There is a new assessment of collaborative problem solving. Students will interact with computer ‘agents’ in problem-solving tasks.
  24. 24. INNOVATION STRATEGY
  25. 25. Parallel work on broader innovation• Grew out of OECD-wide Innovation Strategy (2009-2011)• Contributing to new Skills Strategy, launched May 2012• Dual focus: – Innovation in education – Education and skills for innovation
  26. 26. THANK YOU! David.istance@oecd.orgwww.oecd.org/edu/ceri/innovativelearningenvironments.htm

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