DFEEST Annual Report 2009
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The Annual Report represents an overview of DFEEST’s achievements, governance, workforce management and financial performance. It also outlines progress made towards achieving our objectives in ...

The Annual Report represents an overview of DFEEST’s achievements, governance, workforce management and financial performance. It also outlines progress made towards achieving our objectives in South Australia’s Strategic Plan.

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DFEEST Annual Report 2009 DFEEST Annual Report 2009 Document Transcript

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  • GENCY, ROLE AND GOVERNANCE – TITLE PAGEFOR FURTHER COPIES AND ENQUIRIES PLEASE CONTACTDepartment of Further Education, Employment, Science and TechnologyOffice of the Chief ExecutiveGPO Box 320ADELAIDE SA 5001ABN: 16692317206Telephone: (08) 8226 3821Facsimile: (08) 8226 9533The 2009 Annual Report is available on the department’s website at:http:://www.dfeest.sa.gov.auISSN: 1449-6437 2
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  • AGENCY ROLE AND GOVERNANCEChief Executive’s Overview ........................................................................................... 7Highlights 2009 .............................................................................................................. 9Vision, Mission and Values ............................................................................................ 14Role, Legislation and Structure...................................................................................... 15Boards, Committees and Authorities ............................................................................. 16Governance ................................................................................................................... 20REPORT ON OPERATIONS AGAINST THE DEPARTMENT OF FURTHEREDUCATION, EMPLOYMENT, SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY’S STRATEGICPLANGoal 1Ensure South Australians have the necessary education and skills toparticipate in the high skills economy ............................................................................ 24Goal 2Provide high quality employment and workforce development services ........................ 38Goal 3Ensure young people are supported in reaching their full potentialand actively engaged in learning, training, work and in their communities .................... 43Goal 4Provide a coordinated, whole of government approach to the development ofan innovative community ............................................................................................... 46Goal 5Build a high performance organisation .......................................................................... 53MANAGEMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCESWorkforce data ............................................................................................................. 61Workforce diversity ........................................................................................................ 64Occupational Health, Safety and Injury Management .................................................... 70 4
  • FINANCIAL REPORTFinancial Overview ........................................................................................................ 72Audited general purpose financial report ....................................................................... 78Account payment performance ...................................................................................... 113Contractual arrangements ............................................................................................. 113Fraud ............................................................................................................................. 113Consultancy expenditure ............................................................................................... 113PROFILE OF VET ACTIVITYProfile of VET Activity .................................................................................................... 119Training Package Activity .............................................................................................. 122OTHER REPORTING ITEMSEmployee’s Overseas Travel ......................................................................................... 128Reconciliation Statement Report ................................................................................... 130Reporting against Carers Recognition Act 2005 ............................................................ 130Disability Action Plans ................................................................................................... 131Freedom of Information ................................................................................................. 131Asbestos Management .................................................................................................. 134Urban Design Charter .................................................................................................... 134Sustainability Report ...................................................................................................... 135 5
  • I am pleased to present the 2009 Annual Report for the Department of FurtherEducation, Employment, Science and Technology.2009 has been an exciting and challenging year for the economy as it has been forthe department.South Australia has weathered the global economic crisis well. At the end of 2009 thestate economy has shown resilience with employment numbers far better than mostpredicted. The combination of significant national and state infrastructure spendingtogether with the strong focus on meeting the skills needs of industry and thecommunity have served to cushion South Australia from the worst effects of theglobal economic downturn.The government’s continuing commitment to increasing training, improvingemployment participation and boosting productivity through innovation, science andtechnology will be important for the state’s economy moving forward and thedepartment will play a key role in meeting these objectives.For the agency, 2009 has been a year of many achievements and highlights.There has been a significant increase in funding for training with $177 millioncommitted over four years by the state and Australian governments for training forjob seekers and existing workers through the Productivity Places Program.The infrastructure for students has also been enhanced with more than $70 millioncommitted in 2009 into upgrading and maintaining TAFE SA facilities - this includes anew campus at Victor Harbor and upgrades at both metropolitan and countrycampuses funded jointly by the Australian and state government – this represents thebiggest ever infrastructure upgrade in TAFE SA’s history.Strengthening the linkages with our three public universities and TAFE SA has beena key priority and will continue to be a focus in 2010. As a result we have seen asignificant increase in the number of TAFE SA students going on to study atuniversity with 20 new credit transfer and articulation agreements implemented withhigher education providers in 2009.Increasing workforce participation is crucial to the state’s economy and throughoutthe year the department has been active in providing support to retrenched workersand young unemployed through the implementation of a Youth Compact that givesevery young person aged 15-24 priority to gain an education or training place, inaddition, thousands of people were helped into employment through the SouthAustralia Works program.In 2009 South Australia continued to build its reputation as a high quality studydestination with a 21% increase in international student numbers including anincrease of 28.5% within TAFE SA. 7
  • Investment in research and technology will be an important foundation for boostinglong term productivity in the state including access to high speed broadband and ahighlight in 2009 was the rollout of the Broadband Blackspots Program which willprovide broadband access to around 50,000 South Australians who previously hadno access to competitively priced broadband.In 2010, a key focus will be the delivery of the government’s Jobs Strategy which willfund the provision of an additional 100,000 training places over the next six years,the South Australia Works program will be refocussed to further target those mostdisadvantaged, implementation of the Skills Strategy will be enhanced withconsideration of key recommendations of the Training and Skills Commission andthere will be increased focus on higher education reforms including establishingnational regulators for higher education and training providers to underpin quality.Science and information economy initiatives, including leveraging outcomes from theNational Broadband Network rollout, and acceleration of a whole-of-governmentscience and mathematics strategy will also be a priority.None of the achievements over the last year would have been possible without thededication and hard work of many staff in TAFE SA and the many directorates thatmake up the department. I would like to give my thanks for their efforts, passion andcommitment.Finally I would like to thank Minister O’Brien for his leadership and direction during2009.Raymond GarrandChief Executive 8
  • Training, Skills and EmploymentThe Training and Skills Commission, established in September 2008, released itsFive Year Plan for Skills and Workforce Development - Skills for Jobs: Priorities forDeveloping South Australia’s Workforce in December 2009. The plan is a keyinitiative within the state government’s Skills Strategy. It makes recommendations forfundamental changes in the states post school education and training system, toensure the state has the skills available to support future growth of the economy andsustainable employment opportunities for all South Australians.TAFE SA applications increased in semester two significantly, and despite thepredicted economic downturn, apprentice numbers have also held up well. NationalCentre for Vocational Education Research statistics, reported in June 2009, showthat in SA, 5500 apprentices and trainees commenced their training in the quarterending 30 June 2009, an increase of 2% compared to the same time last year.Nationally there was a 12.6% fall.The department’s South Australia Works initiative has helped many SouthAustralians gain employment or access training. South Australia Works learning,training and work programs expended $35.66 million in 2008-09 including$5.54 million leveraged funds from the Australian Government and other stategovernment agencies. The initiative assisted 32 135 people into work or training; ofthese 16 745 participated in work programs and 15 390 in learning, skillsdevelopment and training programs, with 8430 gaining employment.To assess the effectiveness of South Australia Works, a strategic review wasconducted taking account of changing labour market conditions and new policydirections at the state and national level. The review acknowledged the overalleffectiveness of the program and made recommendations to build on its strengthsand pursue new opportunities. Recommendations will be implemented in 2010-11.The introduction of the new South Australian Certificate of Education providesgreater opportunity for the recognition of vocational education and trainingqualifications to contribute to the South Australian Certificate of Education. Thedepartment has supported the South Australian Certificate of Education Board toensure industry’s endorsement of the vocational education and training pathwaysand the development of coherent recognition arrangements.TAFE SAThere has been continued progress in reforms to TAFE SA as part of the SkillsStrategy, including establishing the three TAFE SA institutes as separate registeredtraining organisations, increasing e-learning and recognition of prior learning andachieving further cost efficiencies. 9
  • Two new TAFE SA lead centres were established; the Lead Centre for Hospitality,Tourism and Food Studies at Regency campus and the Adelaide College for the Artsin the city - to further strengthen links with industry.An improved admissions system has been implemented with the South AustralianTertiary Admissions Centre along with a state of the art e-messaging servicethroughout TAFE SA.Other achievements by TAFE SA over 2008-09 include: 28.5% increase in international students commencing study in 2009 3.6% increase in TAFE SA admission offers in 2009 from 2008 six new international courses registered on the Commonwealth Register of Institutions and Courses for Overseas Students twenty new credit transfer and articulation agreements implemented with Higher Education providers in 2009 improvements and simplification of the admissions process through the South Australian Tertiary Admissions Centre implementation of the e-learning Strategy and improved models of delivery of recognition of prior learning and industry engagement.TAFE SA InfrastructureMore than $70 million, the biggest ever infrastructure upgrade in TAFE SA’s history,was committed by the state and Australian governments to upgrade and maintainTAFE SA facilities. This includes a new $20 million Student Information System, thestart of construction of the new $9.4 million TAFE SA Victor Harbor campus andsignificant upgrades at metropolitan and regional campuses.The department was successful in securing $33.3 million of infrastructure fundingthrough the Australian Government’s Better TAFE Facilities and TrainingInfrastructure Investment for Tomorrow Programs. Refurbishment and upgradeworks have commenced at Regency, Tea Tree Gully, Whyalla, Mt Gambier, MtBarker, Adelaide City and Noarlunga campuses. Machine guarding improvementsare also being made at a variety of regional campuses. All work is scheduled forcompletion by 30 June 2010.The first part of the new Victor Harbor project was completed with the purchase ofthe land for the new TAFE SA campus. Construction has commenced and is due forcompletion in 2010.The construction of a new building to provide business and computer studies,hairdressing, welding and fitting services was completed at the Narungga TAFEcampus, an Aboriginal teaching facility located on the southern tip of the YorkePeninsula.The development of the new Student Information System officially began with thesigning of the contract with SunGard Higher Education in 2009. The new system willsignificantly improve the enrolment process and data management for students andstaff. Implementation activities will begin in the 2009 – 2010 financial year.The Horse Skills Centre was successfully relocated from Cheltenham to Morphettvilleand delivery of programs commenced in the new facility. 10
  • Office for Youth1The largest annual youth event in Australia, National Youth Week, was held from28 March 2009 to 5 April 2009 with over 1000 young people volunteering their time todevelop and run youth week activities for over 20 000 participants across the state.The Intra-Government Youth Action Committee was established, consisting ofrepresentatives of government agencies and community groups working with youngpeople, to develop a new youth policy framework for South Australia.Forty young entrepreneurs (aged 18-30) commenced in the Ignite Program, aninitiative jointly funded with the Department of Education, Employment andWorkplace Relations and Primary Industries and Resources South Australia. Theprogram will support participants to develop the necessary skills to establish andexpand agri-enterprises that are commercially and environmentally sustainable.The first regional A-Team was held in the Riverland and examined the issue of howto engage young people in information and communication technology to build andconnect regional communities. Over 70 people from community and governmentattended the final presentation of recommendations which included making moreeffective use of e-learning, developing a pilot Individual Electronic Health Record andestablishing a Riverland virtual information hub.Science and Information EconomyThe 15th Thinker in Residence, Dr Genevieve Bell, a noted anthropologist, spentseveral months in South Australia. Dr Bell completed a report and maderecommendations relating to how the state can set strategic directions and takemaximum advantage of the opportunities arising from the use of new digitaltechnologies.In July, the Information Economy Agenda 2009-2014 was launched. This documentdefines priority areas and actions in support of South Australia’s Strategic Plan andprovides a framework for managing initiatives and partnerships between government,business, education and communities.In August, the Federal Minister for Broadband, Communications and the DigitalEconomy and the South Australian Minister for Science and Information Economyjointly launched a project to significantly enhance wireless broadband services inAdelaide.The roll out of the Broadband Blackspots Program, in partnership with Adam Internet,began in November to provide broadband access to around 50 000 SouthAustralians, starting with severely affected parts of the southern suburbs.The STI10 Progress Report was launched in August. This detailed the benefits to thestate from the government’s 10-Year-Plan for Science, Technology and Innovation atthe half-way mark, five years after its launch in 2004. This indicated that since 2004,some $200 million in state investment under STI10 had leveraged some1 The Office for Youth, and subsequently the Youth portfolio, transferred to the Attorney General’s Departmentfrom 1 July 2009. 11
  • $1.2 billion in Commonwealth, industry and institutional funds across various science,technology and innovation projects, both investing and operational (verified byDeloitte Touché Tohmatsu).The South Australian Government-supported Trans Tasman Commercialisation Fundmade its first investment in South Australia with $500 000 towards securitysurveillance software technology developed at the University of Adelaide. The fundcontinues to work with the states three local universities to identify technologiessuitable for commercialisation and investment.The department continued its international research collaborations with Manitoba,Canada. A delegation visited SA in March 2009 led by the Deputy Minister ofInnovation, Energy and Mines, Mr John Clarkson, to discuss the status of currentjoint research projects and examine opportunities for future new projectcollaborations.Partnerships with the Australian GovernmentAt the national level, agreement was reached with the Australian Government toestablish a national vocational education and training and higher education regulatorand reform support services regulation and legislation with regard to internationalstudents. This culminated in a series of decisions by the Ministerial Council forTertiary Education and Employment and the Council of Australian Governments toundertake ongoing policy reform in 2010.In 2009, $17.92 million of Commonwealth funding was committed to South Australiato provide additional training opportunities for existing workers and jobseekersthrough the National Agreement for Skills and Workforce Development. Theagreement sets out the commitment between the Australian Government and thestates to work towards increasing the skill levels of all Australians, includingIndigenous Australians.The Australian Government’s Productivity Places Program provided additionaltraining opportunities to assist South Australian workers and job seekers to developnew skills to meet the growing needs of industry.The Productivity Places Program for Jobseeker training is directed to people over17 years who are not currently working and intending to seek paid employment aftercompleting the qualification so that they are better equipped to participate inemerging work opportunities. In June 2009, the department allocated around$8.6 million of Productivity Places Program funding so that 48 registered trainingorganisations could deliver training toward 2760 jobseeker qualifications. As ofDecember 2009, the department recorded 1811 jobseeker enrolments and hadregistered 605 qualifications.In October 2009 the department allocated around $10 million of CommonwealthProductivity Places Program funding and $8 million of state funding so that60 registered training organisations could deliver training toward 4376 existingworker qualifications.This Commonwealth, state and industry commitment to train the existing workforce isin addition to funding released in 2008 through the Productivity Places Program for 12
  • Existing Worker Pilot Program when around 2760 qualifications were allocated forexisting worker training. As of December 2009, 2669 enrolments had been recordedand around 22% of enrolled existing workers had achieved a qualification.To support young people to participate and attain qualifications from 1 July 2009 theSouth Australian Government implemented a Compact with Young South Australiansto ensure that every young person aged 15 to 19 has priority to access agovernment-subsidised education or training place. The objective of the compact isto increase the level of participation and qualifications among young SouthAustralians, and has been implemented in South Australia in 2009 through the Learnor Earn initiative www.learnorearn.sa.gov.au.The Training Entitlement for Retrenched Workers is a state government initiativeintroduced in 2009 that complements the Australian Government’s Compact withRetrenched Workers which allows retrenched workers to access subsidisedvocational education and training places, such as those available throughProductivity Places Program. The South Australian Government’s training entitlementwill provide a government subsidised training place to retrenched workers, 25 yearsand older, for a higher level qualification than they already hold.Following the report prepared by the Australian Apprentices Taskforce in 2009, theCouncil of Australian Governments agreed to the recommendations set out in thereport to maximise the number of apprentices who commence and completeapprenticeships, and to strengthen the apprenticeship system. Recommendationswill be implemented by the Australian and state governments in 2010.In 2009, a review of the Education Services for Overseas Students Act 2000 wascommissioned by the Deputy Prime Minister, the Hon Julia Gillard MP who appointedthe Hon Bruce Baird to undertake the review with support from the Department ofEducation, Employment and Workplace Relations. The review examined theEducation Services for Overseas Students Act 2000 and the current regulatoryframework to identify and address areas for improvement to ensure Australiacontinues to offer a high quality education service to overseas students.A taskforce was also established in South Australia to investigate and address keyissues affecting the experience that overseas students have while studying inAdelaide and ensure that Adelaide provides Australia’s best educational and lifestyleexperience for overseas students studying at our universities and training institutions.This taskforce looks at issues such as accommodation, student welfare and safety,employment and student services. The department also continued to providefinancial support to Education Adelaide to lead the Study Adelaide marketinginitiative in overseas markets.During 2009, priority was given to investigating the nature of skills required forenvironmental sustainability and to support the industry development opportunitiesbeing pursued by the South Australian Government. The government made asubstantial contribution to the development of a National Green Skills Agreement,endorsed by the Council of Australian Governments on7 December 2009. The agreement enables individuals and businesses to contributeto a sustainable, low-carbon economy in their workplaces and communities. 13
  • Our VisionSouth Australia has a highly skilled workforce and maximised employmentparticipation that shapes the state’s economic competitiveness, and is distinguishedby a culture of excellence, innovation, continuous learning and social inclusion.Our MissionTo optimally match workforce skills, training and participation, with current and futureemployment, working with individuals, community and industry to strategicallysupport the state’s development. This mission requires creative and integrated policythat delivers effective training, employment programs and services.Our ValuesThe department is striving to become a high performance learning organisation,which attracts, develops and retains a highly talented workforce. The department willonly achieve its vision through a strong commitment to our people and core values.We will show integrity in our:Respect for: the values, beliefs, customs and cultures of individuals and our community others rights, responsibilities and professionalismResponsiveness in: providing timely and caring services generating creative, shared solutions embracing change where it is appropriate recognising and celebrating effort and achievementOpenness in decision-making by: providing supporting reasons restricting information only where there is a wider public interest declaring any relevant private interests resolving conflicts being transparentStriving for excellence in: using public resources efficiently and effectively embedding equality of access and opportunity fairness in our operations standards of serviceCourage in: challenging and being challenged taking risks doing things in different ways taking responsibility for mistakes and learning from them enforcing our code of conduct 14
  • Portfolio governance for further education, employment, science, technology andyouth2 is managed through a number of councils, boards and committees. Thesework in conjunction with the department to advise the Minister for Employment,Training and Further Education, the Minister for Science and Information Economyand the Minister for Youth on key strategic areas.AgencyThe Department of Further Education, Employment, Science and Technology.Acts AdministeredTechnical and Further Education Act 1975Training and Skills Development Act 2008Construction Industry Training Fund Act 1993Flinders University of South Australia Act 1966University of Adelaide Act 1971University of South Australia Act 1990RegulationsTechnical and Further Education Regulations 1999Technical and Further Education (Vehicles) Regulations 1998Training and Skills Development Regulations 2008Construction Industry Training Fund Regulations 2008Public Corporations (Bio Innovation SA) Regulations 2001Public Corporations (Education Adelaide) Regulations 1998Public Corporations (Playford Centre) Regulations 19962 The Office for Youth, and subsequently the Youth portfolio, transferred to the Attorney General’s Department from1 July 2009. 15
  • Training and Skills CommissionThe Training and Skills Development Act 2008 establishes the Training and SkillsCommission and outlines its functions.The commission, established on 1 September 2008, has nine members and twodeputy members appointed by the Governor. It is chaired by Emeritus ProfessorDenise Bradley AC.The Act gives authority to the commission in regulating training providers andapprenticeships and traineeships. The commission advises and makesrecommendations to the minister on matters relating to the development, funding,quality and performance of the vocational education and training, adult communityeducation and higher education sectors.The Act also establishes two reference groups, the Adult Community EducationReference Group and the Training Regulation Reference Group. These groups arechaired by the commission members but draw on the wider resources of industry andthe community for specialist advice through their membership and consultations.The commission is the peak advisory body to the South Australian Government onskills and workforce development priorities. It is responsible for the preparation, andannual update, of a Five Year Plan for Skills and Workforce Development in SouthAustralia - Skills for Jobs: Priorities for Developing South Australia’s Workforce. Theplan is the principal instrument by which the commission provides its advice to theminister.In developing its advice to the minister, the commission is required, under the Act, toconsult with a wide range of stakeholders, including groups representing industry,employees, education and training providers, industry skills boards and trainingadvisory bodies, government and community.For more information regarding the Training and Skills Commission go to:http://www.tasc.sa.gov.au/TAFE SA Institute CouncilsThe institute councils are established by the Minister for Employment, Training andFurther Education for each of the three institutes of TAFE SA under the Technicaland Further Education Act 1975. The councils advise, monitor performance andprovide supplementary funding for the institutes’ operations. 16
  • Higher Education CouncilThe Higher Education Council was established in order to bring together universityvice-chancellors and other key players in the higher education sector in recognition ofthe central role that education, training and research and development has to thefuture development of the South Australian economy and community. The council ischaired by the Minister for Employment, Training and Further Education and isadministratively supported by the department.Austraining InternationalAustraining International was formed in 1991 and is wholly owned by the SouthAustralian Government. Austraining is a specialist project management andinternational development organisation managing projects throughout the AsiaPacific and Middle East. Austraining employs around 85 staff with 19 in-countryoffices across the Asia-Pacific.For more information regarding Austraining International go to:http://www.austraining.com.au/aboutusEducation AdelaideEducation Adelaide is a subsidiary of the Minister for Employment, Training andFurther Education established under the Public Corporations (Education Adelaide)Regulations 1988. It operates as a partnership between the City of Adelaide, thestate’s universities, the state government and numerous private colleges andschools. Its strategic direction is to accelerate the growth of South Australia’seducation export industry to benefit the state’s education providers, the localeconomy and community. Education Adelaide works closely with the department toachieve international student targets outlined in South Australia’s Strategic Plan.For more information regarding Education Adelaide go to:http://www.studyadelaide.com/about-us.aspxOffice of the Training AdvocateThe Office of the Training Advocate provides a public contact point to respond toquestions or complaints about the training system.In this context the training system comprises higher education, vocational educationand training, apprenticeships and traineeships, adult community education andeducation services for overseas students.The Training Advocate is an independent statutory authority established under theTraining and Skills Development Act 2008 and operates in accordance with a Charterof Functions. These functions are designed to enhance consumer protection byimproving access and effective participation in employment and skill formationopportunities, and to contribute to strategies which raise the quality andresponsiveness of the training system in South Australia. 17
  • The functions are established to: promote employment, education and training provide independent complaint handling provide advocacy provide information and advice monitor the training system.The Training Advocate reports to the Minister for Employment, Training and FurtherEducation and tables a separate Annual Report.For more information regarding the Office of the Training Advocate go to:http://www.trainingadvocate.sa.gov.au/The Premier’s Science and Research CouncilThe Premier’s Science and Research Council was established to advise thegovernment on strategies for boosting local science and research capabilities andimproving levels of innovation. The council is chaired by the state’s chief scientist andis administratively supported by the department.Information Economy Advisory BoardThe Information Economy Advisory Board provides advice to the Minister for Scienceand Information Economy on potential benefits of the information economy to allSouth Australians and on how to maximise the benefits.SABRENet LtdSABRENet Ltd is a company limited by guarantee with the three local universitiesand the South Australian Government as members. It is a not for profit organisationwhich has as its objective to further the use of advanced data networking for theconduct of research and education in South Australia. SABRENet Ltd owns a darkfibre optical cable telecommunications network linking the major higher educationcampuses and research precincts, as well as some schools and TAFE SAcampuses. The department is represented on its board.For more information regarding SABRENet Ltd go to:http://sabrenet.edu.au/Bio Innovation SABio Innovation SA is a subsidiary of the Minister for Science and InformationEconomy established by the Public Corporation (Bio Innovation SA) Regulations2001. South Australia has a dynamic bioscience industry based on a strong traditionof medical and agricultural research that drives commercial opportunities. To build onthese opportunities, the South Australian Government established Bio Innovation SA,a bioscience industry development organisation that provides business development,finance, infrastructure and marketing assistance. An external review of thisorganisation was undertaken in 2009 which demonstrated the positive impact of itswork in the state economy.For more information on Bio Innovation SA go to:http://www.bioinnovationsa.com.au/ 18
  • Playford CentrePlayford Centre is a subsidiary of the Minister for Science and Information Economyestablished by the Public Corporations (Playford Centre) Regulations 1996, tocontribute to South Australia’s economic growth, exports, commercialisation ofresearch and entrepreneurial activity, by facilitating the formation and development ofinnovative technology ventures.Playford CapitalIn 2001, Playford Centre formed a subsidiary, Playford Capital Pty Ltd. PlayfordCapital uses funding provided by the Australian Government’s Building onInformation Technology Strengths and Information and Communications TechnologyIncubator Programs to invest in South Australian information and communicationstechnology firms which have the potential and commitment to become high growthcompanies exporting interstate and overseas. This has stimulated the inflow ofprivate equity into South Australia and supported information and communicationstechnology company growth. Playford was awarded $7.45 million from the AustralianGovernment’s Innovation Investment Follow on Fund to support its ongoinginvestment activities.For more information on Playford Capital go to:http://playford.com.auDuke of Edinburgh’s Award State Award Committee3The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award is an international self-development programavailable to young people aged 14-25. The Minister for Youth is the exclusive licenceholder in South Australia and appoints the State Awards Committee to maintainquality and support the delivery of the award.Minister’s Youth Council3The Minister’s Youth Council comprises young people aged 12-25 who provideadvice to the Minister for Youth on issues that affect young South Australians. TheMinister’s Youth Council consults and advises the minister directly through monthlymeetings.3 The Office for Youth, and subsequently the Youth portfolio, transferred to the Attorney General’s Departmentfrom 1 July 2009. 19
  • The department’s corporate governance obligations are prescribed in the Public Sector Management Act 1995 and the Technical and Further Education Act 1975. These Acts establish general management aims, personnel management and employee conduct standards. The Chief Executive of the Department of Further Education, Employment, Science and Technology is responsible for observance of these aims and standards. The department maintains a governance framework (below) that integrates strategic management, leadership and accountability, in the way it manages its people and resources to achieve best performance of its functions. Governance Framework Chief Executive Ray Garrand Audit and Risk Strategic Procurement Management Committee Committee Chair: Elaine Bensted Chair: Ian McLauchlan Occupational Health Executive Forum and Safety Committee Chair: Ray Garrand Chair: David Royle Corporate Executive Committee Chair: Ray Garrand Providing Quarterly Reports TAFE SA Adelaide TAFE SA Adelaide TAFE SA Regional South Institute North Institute Denise Janek Stephen Conway Adrian MarronBudget and Finance Asset Strategy ICT Governance People and CultureExecutive Committee Committee Board Committee Chair: Craig Fowler Chair: David Royle Chair: David Royle Chair: Elaine Bensted TAFE SA Network Executive TAFE SA Adelaide TAFE SA Adelaide North TAFE SA Regional South Institute Council Institute Council Institute Council These standing committees will be complimented with temporary policy feeder groups and project teams that are responsible to one of the standing committees. In 2009 the department’s governance structure encompassed the following: 20
  • Corporate ExecutiveCorporate Executive is a high level decision making and leadership group in thedepartment. Its primary role is to ensure the successful achievement of thedepartment’s strategic planning and portfolio outcomes and it has responsibility formaintaining the effectiveness of these governance mechanisms.The Budget and Finance Executive CommitteeThe committee provides financial governance over the department’s resources. Itmonitors performance against fiscal targets and tracks allocation of operating andcapital budgets and makes decisions on a range of finance related issues. Thecommittee provides advice on the best use of operating and capital budgets to thechief executive through Corporate Executive.The Business Services Strategic Reference GroupThe group provides leadership, advice and the strategic vision for business servicesacross the department. The group is a sub- committee of Corporate Executive andreports to Corporate Executive as required.The Asset Strategy CommitteeThe committee provides strategic guidance for the integrated planning andmanagement of all infrastructure requirements across the portfolio and thedevelopment of strategic portfolio infrastructure plans for TAFE SA.The Aboriginal Reference GroupThe group provides leadership within the department to improve access to, andoutcomes from, education, training and employment programs for Aboriginal peoplein South Australia.Executive ForumExecutive Forum is a broadly based group of executives responsible for thecollaborative achievement of departmental objectives across all initiatives andprograms.The TAFE SA Network ExecutiveThe network is a peak decision making body for all strategic issues relating to theTAFE SA Network. It leads the implementation of the Skills Strategy and willstandardise services across a range of institute operational areas across TAFE SA.The Audit and Risk Management CommitteeThe committee is an integral part of the governance framework and providesassurance to, and assists the chief executive in undertaking his statutory andadministrative responsibilities. It has an external chair.It is anticipated that changes to the governance structure will be made in 2010. 21
  • DFEEST SENIOR MANAGEMENT STRUCTURE AND REPORTING ARRANGEMENTS AS AT OCTOBER 2009 EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR TAFE SA ADELAIDE TAFE SA ADELAIDE TAFE SA REGIONAL SOUTH NORTH DEPUTY TAFE SA NETWORK SERVICES CHIEF EXECUTIVE EMPLOYMENT & TRAINING SERVICES DIRECTOR DIRECTOR TRAINEESHIP & EMPLOYMENT CORPORATE APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAMS COMMUNICATIONS UNIT SERVICES DIRECTOR DIRECTOR PRINCIPAL INFORMATION AND ORGANISATIONAL CONSULTANT COMMUNICATION DEVELOPMENT AND BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY HUMAN RESOURCES IMPROVEMENTMINISTER FOR EMPLOYMENT, TRAINING AND FURTHER CHIEF EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR EDUCATION EXECUTIVE SHARED BUSINESSMINISTER FOR SCIENCE AND SERVICES INFORMATION ECONOMY DIRECTOR DIRECTOR FINANCIAL, ASSET AND INFRASTRUCTURE PROCUREMENT PLANNING SERVICES MANAGER DIRECTOR INTERNAL AUDIT EXECUTIVE AND RISK SERVICES MANAGEMENT DIRECTOR DIRECTOR SCIENCE AND QUALITY AND TERTIARY INFORMATION EDUCATION POLICY ECONOMY DEPUTY CHIEF EXECUTIVE PLANNING, POLICY AND INNOVATION DIRECTOR DIRECTOR PLANNING AND INDUSTRY SKILLS WORKFORCE PLANNING AND POLICY EVALUATION DEVELOPMENT OFFICE OF THE TRAINING AND SKILLS COMMISSION DFEEST also has many important relationships with other organisations eg Office of the Training Advocate, Education Adelaide, Playford Capital, BioInnovation SA, Austraining. These relationships are not shown here. 22
  • 1.1 Accelerate skills take-up for the current and emerging workforce (Links to South Australia’s Strategic Plan Targets T6.15, T6.19, T6.20 and T6.21) A key focus for TAFE SA is to develop partnerships with industry and enterprises to provide responsive training solutions that meet current and future skills requirements for South Australia’s workforce. Growth in South Australia’s mining industry is significant and TAFE SA is working with BHP Billiton and the mining industry to create scholarships for Aboriginal people to study engineering and geosciences. The vocational scholarships are designed to support Indigenous students to undertake courses in engineering and geosciences with the aim of increasing the pool of Indigenous students moving to tertiary education in mining-related fields. A strategy to accelerate the attainment of qualifications is to recognise that many students already have significant knowledge and skills from life and work experience, previous courses and training, or self-taught knowledge and skills. Evidence of their skills and knowledge will enable them to gain recognition for all or part of a course through TAFE SA. This is known as recognition of prior learning. In June 2009, the department allocated around $8.6 million of Productivity Places Program funding so that 48 registered training organisations could deliver training toward 2760 jobseeker qualifications. The Productivity Places Program for Jobseeker training is directed to people over 17 years who are not currently working and intending to seek paid employment after completing the qualification so that they are better equipped to participate in emerging work opportunities. Almost 40% of jobseeker qualifications allocated in June 2009 were at Certificate II Level, 30.5% at Certificate III, 15.2% at Certificate IV and 38.6% at Diploma Level. As of December 2009, the department recorded 1811 jobseeker enrolments and had registered 605 qualifications. In October 2009 the department allocated around $10 million of Commonwealth Productivity Places Program funding and $8 million of state funding so that 60 registered training organisations could deliver training toward 4376 existing worker qualifications. This funding accounted for 90% of the agreed training costs for these qualifications and industry will contribute the outstanding 10% for training delivery. This Commonwealth, state and industry commitment to train the existing workforce is in addition to funding released in 2008 through the Productivity Places Program for Existing Worker Pilot Program when around 2760 qualifications were allocated for existing worker training, 13% at Certificate III, 43% at Certificate IV, 37% at Diploma and 7% at Advanced Diploma Levels. As of December 2009, 2669 enrolments had been recorded and around 22% of enrolled existing workers had achieved a qualification. 24
  • 1.2 Ensure a ready supply of qualified South Australian workers is available from the state’s growth sectors (Links to South Australia’s Strategic Plan Targets T6.19, T6.20 and T6.21) Traineeship and Apprenticeship Activity Traineeships and apprenticeships remain a key focus in ensuring the ongoing supply of skills for South Australian businesses and industry. The department is responsible for the regulation of the traineeship and apprenticeship system in South Australia under delegation from the Training and Skills Commission. Despite the global economic crisis experienced in the second half of 2008, traineeship and apprenticeship commencements remained relatively stable. In the 12 months ending 30 June 2009, there were an estimated 21 200 traineeship and apprenticeship commencements, representing a decrease of 2.3 percentage points on the 21 700 commencements recorded in the previous 12 months. This decline was relatively small when compared with the 6.2 percentage point reduction experienced nationally. In South Australia and nationally, apprenticeship commencements saw the greatest reductions, dropping by 11.0 percentage points and 20.1 percentage points respectively. Traineeship commencements remained constant. The below figure illustrates the small but steady growth of trainees and apprentices in training since 2007. At 30 June 2009, there were an estimated 32 400 trainees and apprentices in training, up 700 (2.2%) on the 31 700 recorded in June 2007. Trainee and apprentice activity, five years ending 30 June 20094 40000 35000 Number of trainees and apprentices 30000 25000 20000 15000 10000 5000 0 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Year In training Commencements Completions4 In training figures are provided at 30 June of each year; commencement and completion figures are provided for the12 months ending 30 June of each year. All figures are based on the National Centre for Vocational EducationResearch Australian vocational education and training statistics – apprentices and trainees June quarter (2009). Allfigures are estimated for 2009 and in training figures are estimated for 2008. The National Centre for VocationalEducation Research may revise these figures in the future. 25
  • 2008-2010 Pre-Apprenticeship and Traineeship ProgramThe Pre-Apprenticeship and Traineeship Program continued in 2009, witheight organisations delivering 12 courses. The program seeks to increasethe supply of apprentices and trainees in occupations and industriesexperiencing skills shortages in South Australia that are considered to be ofstrategic importance to the economy. Course participants are provided withtechnical training and employability skills specific to the targetedapprenticeship or traineeship, and where required, they are assisted todevelop their literacy and numeracy skills. Participants attend suitable workplacements with employers, who in many cases employ them in therelevant apprenticeship or traineeship.During 2009, 60 participants of the Pre-Apprenticeship and TraineeshipProgram gained apprenticeships or traineeships in the following targetedtrades and vocations - plumbing, electrical, bricklaying, carpentry,engineering (mechanical and fabrication), wall and floor tiling, child careand disability care. Further outcomes are expected when the remainingcourses conclude in 2010.User Choice Training SubsidiesThe department is responsible for the provision of User Choice trainingsubsidies to both public and private training organisations, to supporttrainees and apprentices with the cost of formal training. These subsidiesare focussed on traineeships and apprenticeships in occupationsexperiencing skills shortages. The User Choice Policy supports all trades(available for existing workers and new entrants), traineeships at CertificateII and III Australian Qualifications Framework levels, and pilot programs inother areas of skills shortage, which are not normally funded under UserChoice arrangements, for example, existing workers in civil construction.South Australia WorksThe South Australia Works Skills Recognition Service assisted over 2000clients in 2008-09 with the recognition of qualifications and skills (gainedlocally or overseas) in order to gain employment.An early intervention pilot program, Skilled Work SA, supported newlyarrived skilled migrants experiencing difficulties in gaining skilledemployment. This service assisted 150 participants of which 105 wereplaced into employment.In 2008-09 the Industry Partnership Program committed $2.1 million toindustry skills boards to support 11 initiatives across a range of industrysectors. This commitment was matched by industry contributions of$2.6 million. 26
  • Productivity Places Program The department administered the Productivity Places Program in South Australia through competitive application rounds. Applications were assessed based on individual merit for identified need, suitable partnerships and capacity to deliver desired outcomes for the program. Allocation of funding was determined by:  agreed Commonwealth targets for qualification levels to be met through the program  state priorities as identified through industry and workforce intelligence including the Training and Skills Commission identified priorities. Whilst Job Seeker places are fully funded by the Commonwealth, in 2009 the South Australian Government contributed $7.9 million of state funding, comprising 40% of existing worker training costs, and private investment (typically industry), contributed the remaining 10% of existing worker training costs.1.3 Enhance Adelaide’s reputation as a world class city for education, training and high education (Links to South Australia’s Strategic Plan Targets T1.16, T6.20 and T6.21) International student enrolments (as at November 2009) in South Australia increased by 21.2% compared to the same period in 2008. This growth rate is higher than the national average of 17.7%. There are 33 595 international students studying in South Australia compared to 629 618 nationally, representing a market share of 5.3%. A total of 18 840 new international students commenced their studies in South Australia this year compared to 362 926 nationally, representing a market share of 5.2%. Commencement rates of international students in South Australia also grew strongly at 17.3%, above the national average of 14.5%. The numbers of providers registered to deliver to overseas students grew at the same rate as in the previous 12 months with 17 new providers registered during the year bringing the total number of providers to 78. Again, as was the case in 2008, growth in the number of registered providers was almost entirely in the vocational education sector. The department increased its resources for regulation of this sector to meet the increased demand for services and to ensure that providers, in particular those new to the market, provided services to students in accordance with relevant legislation and national standards. 27
  • During the year the department focussed on increasing advice and support to registered training providers and held a number of forums to deliver a range of professional development services for registered providers. The South Australian Training Advocate, unique in the Australian training system, is an independent statutory authority established under the Training and Skills Development Act 2008. Of note in 2009 was the increase in support provided to international students who were provided with information and advice to confidentially address any aspect of studying, living or working in South Australia. In addition the Training Advocate worked collaboratively with the department, other state and federal agencies and peak bodies to contribute to strategies aimed at improving the international education experience for students and the employment and training arrangements for apprenticeships and traineeships. The Higher Education Registration and Accreditation Board was established in mid 2009 as an advisory body to the Delegate of the Training and Skills Commission on quality matters relating to higher education under Part 3 of the Training and Skills Development Act 2008. Key areas of the board’s work are:  the role of academic boards in non-self accrediting institutions  benchmarking activities against university education undertaken by non- self accrediting institutions  risk management of non-self accrediting institutions operations. The Higher Education Registration and Accreditation Board analysed annual report data submitted to the department by non self-accrediting institutions registered under the Training and Skills Development Act 2008. The analysis informed the department’s strategies for strengthening the capacity of these providers. The Minister for Employment, Training and Further Education approved the University College of London to deliver four qualifications that are recognised under the Australian Qualifications Framework and are also recognised higher education qualifications in the United Kingdom.1.4 Build a fair, quality oriented and competitive training market (Links to South Australia’s Strategic Plan Targets T1.16, 6.20 and T6.21) In 2009 the department sought proposals from the market to deliver the Learn 2 Earn program funding became contestable resulting in a broader range of projects being delivered across the state to 203 young people. Ten projects totalling $1.1 million were delivered by TAFE SA and privately owned providers resulting in some 60 employment outcomes. 28
  • User Choice Subsidies During 2008, 141 registered training organisations (consisting of TAFE SA and privately owned providers) received training subsidies under a User Choice agreement. Some $42.6 million was provided by the department to support over 21 000 trainees and apprentices undertaking a nationally recognised qualification. As illustrated in the figure below, just over half (51%) of students that attracted User Choice assistance were apprentices, and they were the beneficiaries of two thirds of the expenditure, reflecting the higher cost of apprenticeship training5. Student numbers Funding ($ million) T/ships $13.7 T/ships A/ships 33% A/ships 10,463 11,109 $28.1 49% 51% 67% Travel and Accommodation The department provides travel and accommodation subsidies to trainees and apprentices in regional and remote South Australia, who are required to travel to attend their off-the-job training. In 2008-09, $1.78 million was provided for this purpose and supported 1106 trainees and apprentices. Regulation of Training Providers The delivery of higher education, (other than that provided by the state universities), vocational education and training, and educational services to overseas students is regulated under the Training and Skills Development Act 2008. The Act provides the basis for ensuring the education and training providers and the courses that they deliver are quality assured under national education and training standards. The department manages the registration of training providers to deliver nationally recognised qualifications and Statements of Attainment under delegation from the Training and Skills Commission.5 Funding for traineeships and apprenticeships does not equal total expenditure for the User Choice, as otherexpenses associated with User Choice are included in the total expenditure for the program. 29
  • The assessment of applications for registration and the monitoring ofcompliance with standards are managed by the department with theengagement of personnel from industry, occupational licensing bodies,state universities and other stakeholders as relevant.Thirty one non-university higher education providers are registered in SouthAustralia to deliver 332 higher education qualifications. Two organisationswithdrew their registration during the year and two new providers wereregistered.The vocational education and training sector in South Australia grew morethan in previous years with 40 new providers registered.Seventeen providers withdrew their registration to give a total of 327registered providers, nine of whom have their registration managed throughthe National Audit and Registration Agency. The department significantlyincreased audits of private providers in 2009 and conducted 168 audits ofproviders registered to deliver vocational education and training. Theseaudits are conducted to assess applications for registration and also tomonitor provider compliance with national standards.The department receives and investigates complaints made aboutregistered providers. Twenty one written complaints were received duringthe year. These complaints were investigated and resolved with thedepartment’s intervention. In seven cases the investigation led to an auditof the registered provider to determine whether the provider was operatingin compliance with the Training and Skills Development Act 2008 and itsconditions of registration. Fifty nine verbal complaints were received andresolved with the department’s intervention.Twenty nine workshops covering regulatory and educational issues forproviders in the vocational education and training, higher education andoverseas students sectors were held with over 1000 attendees. Quarterlyforums covering the Productivity Places Program, the Budget, industry skillsboard activities and the Training and Skills Commission’s Skills for JobsPlan attracted about 400 participants.Over the last three years the department has managed a program fundedby the Council of Australian Governments to improve the quality and uptakeof recognition of prior learning services offered by registered trainingorganisations. The program has worked with industry skills boards, careerdevelopment centres, the Australian Council for Private Education andTraining, employer and employee associations, and the department’s SkillsRecognition Service, and the Productivity Places Program to embed goodrecognition of prior learning practice into their core activities. Activities ofparticular note included skills recognition services for workers to beretrenched from Mitsubishi and Bridgestone.Summary information on activity is provided in Tables 1 – 5. 30
  • An expert independent review of the Quality Directorate was conducted in2009 given the need for the department to respond to the changing marketconditions for providers, determination to maintain quality across providersoperating in SA and national reviews, in particular the Bradley Review ofHigher Education. As a result the Quality and Higher Education Directorateswere merged in 2009 to establish the Quality and Tertiary Education PolicyDirectorate. 31
  • Table 1VET Registration 2007 2008 2009SummaryTotal registered training organisations registered in South 2966 3045 3275&7Australia for domestic deliveryRegistered training organisations also delivering higher 14 14 16education coursesRegistered training organisations registered in South 93 122 141Australia operating in another state/territoryRegistered training organisations who remain suspended 3 0 0Registered training organisations with delegated powers 1 1 38ApprovalsInitial registration 31 24 40Renewal of registration 55 51 41Extension to scope of registration 93 139 146TOTAL 179 214 227Qualifications added to TAFE SA scope of registration 70 77 203under delegationRefusals, Cancellations and SuspensionsRegistered training organisations who expired or 10 16 17voluntarily withdrew registrationRegistered training organisations who transferred to 0 0 0interstate registering bodyRegistered training organisations who had registration 0 0 0cancelled by registration authorityRegistered training organisations who had registration 0 0 0suspended by registration authorityRegistered training organisations who had registrationrefused by registration authority:- initial registration 3 3 4- extension to scope registration 1 1 2- renewal of registration 1 0 0Audit Activity: Number of audits conductedInitial registration 32 29 43Renewal of registration 53 52 39Extension to scope of registration 50 37 58Monitoring 34 33 28TOTAL 169 151 1686 These totals, given in previous annual reports have been adjusted to include the number of providers delivering inthe vocational education and training and higher education sectors7 Total figure inclusive of nine registered training organisations that have their auditing and registration managed byNational Audit and Registration Agency8 In 2009 TAFE SA registration changed from one entity to three separate institutes. The delegated powers to TAFESA to vary scope of registration and to accredit Crown copyright courses for each of these institutes are managed byone delegate. 32
  • Table 2VET Accreditation 2007 2008 2009SummaryTotal accredited courses 278 159 174ApprovalsCourses accredited 39 5 15Courses accredited (TAFE SA under delegated authority) 3 8 6Training package qualifications implemented in South 335 335 204AustraliaNew qualifications made available through traineeships 124 124 82or apprenticeships Table 3Higher Education Registration 2007 2008 2009SummaryHigher education providers registered in South Australia 28 31 31for domestic deliveryHigher education providers who also deliver vocational 14 14 16education and training coursesApprovalsInitial Registration 1 3 2Variation to scope of registration 10 2 12Refusals, Revocations and WithdrawalsHigher education providers who voluntary withdrew 0 0 2registrationHigher education providers who had registration 0 0 0cancelled by registration authorityHigher education providers who had registration 0 0 0suspended by registration authorityHigher education providers who had registration refusedby registration authority 0 0 0- initial registration 0 0 1- variation of registration 0 0 0- renewal of registrationTable 4Higher Education Accreditation 2007 2008 2009SummaryTotal current accredited courses 253 208 3329ApprovalsCourses accredited 35 20 82109 This figure includes all qualification streams listed on the South Australian Higher Education Register10 This figure does not include discipline streams approved within an accredited higher education course 33
  • Table 5Overseas Recognition 2007 2008 2009SummaryRegistered providers delivering only vocational education 18 32 47and training courses to overseas studentsRegistered providers delivering only higher education 9 10 11courses to overseas studentsRegistered providers delivering vocational education andtraining and higher education courses to overseas 8 9 9studentsRegistered providers delivering only English Language 5 6 5Intensive Courses to Overseas StudentsRegistered providers delivering vocational education andtraining, higher education and English Language 3 3 3Intensive Courses to Overseas StudentsRegistered providers delivering English LanguageIntensive Courses to Overseas Students and vocational 1 1 2education and training courses to overseas studentsRegistered providers delivering English LanguageIntensive Courses to Overseas Students and higher 1 1 1education courses to overseas studentsTotal registered providers approved to deliver to 45 62 78overseas studentsApprovalsInitial registration 2 17 17Renewal of registration 3 5 7Extension to scope of registration 13 10 41Refusals, Cancellations and SuspensionsRegistered training organisations who voluntarily 0 1 0withdrew registrationRegistered training organisations who had registration 0 0 0cancelled by registration authorityRegistered training organisations who had registration 0 0 0suspended by registration authorityRegistered training organisations who had registrationrefused by registration authority:- initial registration 1 1 1- extension to scope registration 0 1 1- renewal of registration 0 0 0Audit Activity: Number of audits conductedInitial registration 3 19 18Renewal of registration 3 5 6Extension to scope of registration 13 9 25Monitoring 1 3 9TOTAL 20 36 58 34
  • 1.5 Continue to develop fresh approaches to skills development and system reforms (Links to South Australia’s Strategic Plan Targets T6.15, T6.19 T6.20 and T6.21) A Strategic Review of South Australia Works was conducted in 2009 to assess the effectiveness of the initiative, taking account of changing labour market conditions and new policy directions at the state and national level. A high level reference group, consisting of representatives from the Training and Skills Commission, the Economic Development Board, the Social Inclusion Board, the Regional Communities Consultative Council, the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations and the Department of Further Education, Employment, Science and Technology provided advice on future priorities, directions and recommendations. The review acknowledged the overall effectiveness of the program and made recommendations designed to build on its strengths and exploit new opportunities. TAFE SA’s program delivery was underpinned through the establishment of lead centres, a key initiative of the Skills Strategy. Lead centres are designed to ensure close alignment to industry, and effectiveness in educational service delivery. The Lead Centre for Hospitality, Tourism and Food Studies and the Lead Centre for the Arts were launched in 2009. The appointment of an artistic director and advisory board and a name change - to the Adelaide College of the Arts - all signal a new direction for vocational arts training in South Australia to encourage artistic excellence. TAFE SA recognises e-learning has the potential to bring widespread benefits to students and teachers and that it will transform the way further education is delivered. In 2009 TAFE SA continued to invest and deliver the e-learning Strategy to further embed e-learning into the delivery of an increasing number of programs across TAFE SA. The TAFE SA Educational Information and Communications Technology Group was established in semester two, to oversee the implementation of the e-learning strategy.1.6 Promote community learning for the benefit of the individual, the economy and social health of the state (Links to South Australia’s Strategic Plan Target T6.19) South Australia Works in Communities creates learning opportunities for people and their communities. People with a disability, migrants and disadvantaged unemployed or under-employed people between 25 and 39 years were supported to participate in learning programs. Through a range of work programs, 4265 people were assisted and 1630 gained employment. The Employment Assistance Program supported 2900 35
  • jobseekers facing barriers to employment of which 822 gained employment. The Abilities for All Program provided accredited training to 154 people with a disability to develop their skills and create expanded employment pathways for the future. The South Australia Works Adult Community Education Program supported 94 projects delivering 30 000 accredited and 300 000 hours of non- accredited learning to over 11 000 people. Tauondi Aboriginal College provided 650 Aboriginal people with accredited or non accredited training. The college has a significant role in building the confidence, capacity and capability of the state’s Aboriginal community. The $2.23 million funding included $0.23 million in Australian Government funds under the Australian and state government agreement. Over 100 000 accredited training hours and 5000 non-accredited training hours were delivered.1.7 Specially focussed on disadvantaged members of society The South Australia Works Learning and Work Programs to 2010 initiative links people with skills and jobs. The initiative aims to increase learning, training and employment opportunities for all South Australians, particularly people who face barriers to accessing training and employment and who need extra help to break into the paid workforce. South Australia Works for Aboriginal People improves learning and employment outcomes for Aboriginal people by providing support, job training, work placements, recruitment leadership training, career enhancement, traineeships and apprenticeships. Of the 1580 Aboriginal people who participated in work programs, 795 gained employment. The Aboriginal Apprenticeship Program supported 150 apprentices, and 54 new apprentices commenced an apprenticeship. The TAFE SA Aboriginal Access Centre provides access to TAFE SA for Aboriginal people. Enrolled students are supported through the development of individual learning plans and a case management approach to lead Aboriginal students from unemployment to vocational education and training to meaningful employment. In 2008-09, $1.1 million was allocated to assist employers in drought designated areas to retain eligible trainees and apprentices. Of the 631 trainees and apprentices who attracted a retention subsidy, 95% remain in training or successfully completed their traineeship/ apprenticeship. The Drought Apprenticeship Retention Program is part of the government’s broader Drought Relief Program aimed at supporting farmers and rural communities. 36
  • In 2008-09 group training organisations, which were funded under the stateand Australian government Joint Group Training Program employed 244Indigenous and 167 disabled trainees and apprentices.In 2008 and 2009 calendar years a pilot project was conducted to test theefficacy of a support model to improve vocational education and trainingparticipation and outcomes in, and transition between, vocational educationand training and employment for people with a disability. The VocationalEducation and Training to Work: Disability Support and Transition Projecthas seen very successful outcomes with a 75% qualification completionrate and a 60% employment rate for participants in the 2008 pilot. Theproject has so far assisted 73 participants and is continuing in 2010. 37
  • 2.1 Provide access to high quality employment (Links to South Australia’s Strategic Plan Targets T1.10 T1.11 T1.12 and T1.26) In 2008-09, 32 135 participants were assisted with the development of foundation skills, generic skills, vocational training, brokerage into employment and post placement support. Of these, 16 745 participated in work programs and 15 390 in learning, skills development and training programs; 8430 people gained employment. Four hundred and twelve projects were undertaken to increase workforce participation, develop better workforce practices and build community capacity. In addition, over 895 000 accredited and 504 000 non-accredited hours of training were delivered through projects in metropolitan and regional areas. Expenditure on South Australia Works learning, training and work programs was $35.66 million, including $5.54 million of leveraged funds, including Australian Government funds. Nine South Australia Works Regional Coordinators work with the employment and skills formation networks to respond to each region’s unique learning, training and employment challenges. In 2008-09 $8.8 million was provided to assist 6350 people to participate in regional projects and a total of 3385 employment outcomes were achieved. South Australia Works in the Regions assisted 2127 mature aged participants, with 1195 finding employment. In addition, 710 Aboriginal people were supported through a diverse range of programs, with 355 gaining employment. South Australia Works for Aboriginal People improves learning and employment outcomes for Aboriginal people by providing support, job training, work placements, recruitment, leadership training, career enhancement, traineeships and apprenticeships. In 2008-09:  1580 Aboriginal people participated in work programs with 795 gaining employment  the South Australia Works Aboriginal Apprenticeship Program is currently supporting 150 Aboriginal apprentices, with 54 new apprentices commencing in 2008-09. In addition, 35 Aboriginal people achieved employment through the CareerStart SA program. South Australia Works for Mature Aged People continued to develop early intervention strategies by providing training, upskilling and employment programs for people 40 years and over. A total of 3620 mature-aged people participated in work programs and 1620 gained employment. 38
  • Opportunities were provided to 475 mature aged unemployed people and 100 gained employment, through the Employment 40 Plus Program. South Australia Works with Industry identified new employment and training possibilities, helped people to develop the skills required by a changing and dynamic economy, and assisted in meeting current and emerging workforce needs. Of 4820 people who participated in industry programs, 2575 gained employment. A joint initiative of the Australian and state governments, the Labour Market Adjustment Package continued to provide assistance in 2009 to retrenched workers from Mitsubishi Motors Australia Limited, eligible supply companies, Clipsal and Cooper Standard Automotive. Eligible retrenched workers received job search assistance, career counselling and case management, recognition of prior learning and training and skill development activities. This was supported by the Australian Government’s Job Network and Job Services Australia providers. Six hundred and fifteen retrenched workers accessed training and employment services, with 452 individuals gaining employment. In 2009, the Australian and state governments provided assistance to workers at Bridgestone by contributing $5.7 million towards assisting affected workers in upskilling, skills development, referral and placement into employment and work experience opportunities. In 2008-09, 613 businesses that tendered or applied for government works and service contracts and associated sub contracts valued at $250 000 or more per annum, registered with InSkill SA The Training and Skills Development Act 2008 introduced a requirement for employers to be registered to employ and train trainees and apprentices. The department implemented this requirement over 2009, with 2903 new employers registered and 769 employers increasing the scope of their registration to enable them to employ and train in additional trades or vocations. This brings the number of registered employers to 12 492. Employers seeking registration are provided with a comprehensive induction into the traineeship and apprenticeship system, which includes information on their obligations, responsibilities and rights and the support that is available to the contractual parties2.2 Increase and improve workforce participation in learning and work (links to South Australia’s Strategic Plan Targets T1.12 T6.20 and T6.21) Throughout 2009, the department facilitated dialogue on employment and skills participation for women through regular meetings with the Premier’s Council for Women. The impact of the global financial crisis led to a changed focus for policy development in workforce participation, focussing more on short term 39
  • strategies to address increasing workforce retrenchments, while still maintaining the longer term challenges posed by skill shortages. Gender- sensitive and whole-of-government strategies were adopted to advance and promote women’s employment in the workplace. In December 2009, the workforce participation rate was 63.2 per cent in South Australia in trend terms, which was 0.4 percentage points lower than the previous year (63.6 per cent). At the national level, the workforce participation rate also fell slightly from 65.3 per cent to 65.2 per cent over the same period (in trend terms).2.3 Foster career development (Links to South Australia’s Strategic Plan Targets T6.15 T6.19) The Careers SA Framework was implemented during 2009. The framework is the state government’s response to the need for a consistent and coordinated career development framework and included:  establishment of a state-wide network of high quality, consistent and coordinated career development services for individuals, groups of people, industry and career development practitioners  creation of a Careers SA web portal  the availability of high quality career and labour market information  promotion of state-wide skills recognition services  facilitation of an Interagency Career Development Network and a Career Practitioner’s Network  development of a tool kit to support the implementation of career development services. The Skills Recognition Service provides information, brokerage and referral services in the areas of recognition of qualifications and skills gained locally or overseas, pathways to recognition of prior learning and support with career development opportunities. A major focus of the service is the recognition of qualifications and skills, and career development as major pathway to employment. In 2008-09, the service assisted over 2000 clients with the recognition of qualifications and skills (gained locally or overseas) in order to gain employment. Career development centres continue to be expanded across the state. In 2008-09 new services were established in Southern Adelaide, Riverland, Eyre and Eastern Adelaide.2.4 Provide high quality workforce development services to industry and the community (Links to South Australia’s Strategic Plan Targets T1.10, T1.11, T1.12 and T 1.26) In 2009 the department implemented a new Structural Adjustment Program with the following components:  Down Time Training In conjunction with the Australian Government, the program provided 40
  • funding for training to avert retrenchments and respond to changes of direction in the automotive manufacturing sector at Holden and its Tier 1 supply companies.  Retrenched Worker Program Training and employment services were provided to support retrenched workers from Bridgestone Australia in accredited and non-accredited training. This program was delivered in conjunction with the Australian Government. The department operates an information service that promotes traineeships and apprenticeships and provides information and advice to trainees, apprentices, their employers, and the broader community on traineeship and apprenticeship matters. In 2009, demand for the service increased. The service received 25 215 enquiries, and averaged 485 enquiries each week. As at 31 December 2009, there were 3632 trainees and apprentices employed by group training organisations operating in South Australia. In 2008-09, $2.25 million was allocated to 16 group training organisations under the state and Australian Government Joint Group Training Program to support the employment of 5343 trainees and apprentices. In 2009 the department audited three group training organisations against the National Standards for Group Training with all assessed as compliant. The department promoted the development and communication of skills and workforce participation to a wide range of government, industry and community stakeholders. This promotion included the identification of strategic and emerging issues in skills and workforce policy and planning and encouraged the application of research findings to program design within the department, across government and other stakeholders. In 2009 the Workforce Information Service, an on-line resource portal was upgraded. The on-line service continues to inform industry and government on workforce planning strategies, through the provision of quality workforce planning tools and resources. Market research was undertaken to determine the requirements of a range of stakeholders and users of targeted state-wide career and labour market information and support services to inform the delivery of new services in 2010.2.5 Improve workforce planning and information (Links to South Australia’s Strategic Plan Targets T1.10, T1.11, T1.11 and T1.26) The Training and Skills Commission’s Five Year Plan for Skills and Workforce Development Skills for Jobs: Priorities for Developing South Australia’s Workforce, released in December 2009, identifies three key goals for skills and workforce development: raising the skill levels of South Australians, increasing the number of South Australians with post school qualifications and increasing employment participation. 41
  • The plan, which was developed following consultation with industry andregional stakeholders, includes information on where the future jobs arelikely to be over the next five years, and models the demand forqualifications to meet this growth and to up-skill the existing workforce. Adetailed industry appendix includes advice from industry on skillingpriorities.The commission will update its plan annually to respond to changingeconomic circumstances and policy developments.Industry Workforce Action Plans were progressed throughout 2009, inconjunction with ‘industry champions’ and in consultation with industry-ledgroups. The development and updating of industry and regional profilesproved invaluable in decision making processes associated with theseplans. The final reports were presented in a standard format that promotedconsistency and understanding and allowed valid comparisons betweenindustry sectors in relation to employment and skills needs.Enhanced modelling methods for forecasting skill and qualificationrequirements were developed for the commission in support of thedevelopment of its five year plan for South AustraliaA project was initiated to develop guidelines for agencies commissioningworkforce studies. These guidelines will lead to greater consistency in therange of workforce studies to be commissioned in the future and willenhance the quality of advice to the commission.The department contributed significantly to a number of national and stateforums and organisations, including the National Vocational Education andTraining Advisory Committee; Skills Australia; industry skills boards andcouncils; the Defence and Information and Communications Technologyindustries; the Department of Trade and Economic Development; thePremier’s Council for Women, state reform groups (for example EarlyChildhood, South Australia’s Skills Strategy and Engaging Older SouthAustralians).The department provided input into the ongoing development of a whole-of-government Workforce Participation in Procurement Policy designed toestablish targets for participation of apprentices and trainees and Aboriginalpeople in government tendered major projects. 42
  • 3.1 Ensure South Australians aged 15 to 24 have the skills and opportunities to make successful transitions from school or unemployment to education, training or work (Links to South Australia’s Strategic Plan Targets T6.15, T6.19, T6.20 and T6.21) South Australia Works for Young People provides young people with the skills and opportunities to move successfully from school, further education and training or unemployment into stable, rewarding work. In 2008-09 over 8300 young people participated in work programs with 4175 gaining employment. Of these, 2630 participated in South Australia Works in the Regions projects with 1410 gaining employment. Seven Youth Conservation Corps projects provided 300 young people with practical work experience on a range of conservation projects, with 100 gaining employment. Learn to Earn provided training to 203 disadvantaged young people and 60 of these gained employment. Alternative Learning Options assisted 668 school aged students to stay engaged with education by providing opportunities to participate in vocational education and training based programs delivered by TAFE SA. The Skills Register supported 270 young people who had successfully completed a traineeship to find ongoing employment in the public sector. Forty gained an ongoing employment placement through the register. South Australia Works in the Public Sector supported the creation of a highly skilled and responsive government sector, by providing opportunities to train and work in the public sector, especially for people who are disadvantaged in the job market. In 2008-09, 1226 people participated in public sector projects with 820 gaining employment. The state government’s Skills Recruitment Strategy, CareerStart SA and the Skills Register, facilitated a workforce planning approach to the recruitment of trainees, apprentices, cadets and apprentices across public sector agencies. A total of 586 participants were employed through CareerStart SA during 2008-09. Three hundred and forty of these were young people. In addition, 20 young people gained a traineeship, apprenticeship or cadetship with a not-for-profit community sector organisation. Traineeships and Apprenticeships Of all trainees and apprentices funded under User Choice arrangements in 2008, 70% were aged 15 to 24. 43
  • Ninety percent of trainees and apprentices employed by group trainingorganisations during 2008-09 were aged 15 to 24.In 2008-09, 339 school based trainees and apprentices were funded underthe Joint Group Training Program.In 2009, school based traineeship and apprenticeship commencementsincreased by 25.5% to 1947, continuing the growth observed during recentyears.The majority of school based trainees and apprentices continue toundertake Australian Qualifications Framework level II qualifications.However, there has been a recent increase in the number of school basedtrainees and apprentices undertaking Australian Qualifications Frameworklevel III qualifications through traditional apprenticeships and higher leveltraineeships.The department has worked closely with the three schooling sectors andother stakeholders to put in place arrangements that support the uptake ofschool based traineeships and apprenticeships. This included assisting theTraining and Skills Commission to develop guidelines for the approval ofschool based traineeships and apprenticeships and a new training planspecific to school based arrangements. The guidelines, which becameeffective in October 2009, provide greater protections for these trainees andapprentices, who are predominantly young people entering the workforcefor the first time, while also providing flexibility and clarity for employers whoare considering employing a school based trainee or apprentice.New South Australian Certificate of EducationThe introduction of the new South Australian Certificate of Educationprovides greater opportunity for the recognition of vocational education andtraining qualifications to contribute to the South Australian Certificate ofEducation. The Training and Skills Commission and the department havesupported the South Australian Certificate of Education Board to ensureindustry’s endorsement of the vocational education and training pathwaysand the development of coherent recognition arrangements.Youth CompactTo support young people to participate and attain qualifications, the SouthAustralian Government implemented a Compact with Young SouthAustralians from 1 July 2009 to ensure that every young person 15 to 19has the option to access a government-subsidised education or trainingplace. The compact will provide opportunities for young people to up-skill,re-skill and continue learning in the education and training sectors andincrease the qualification profile of the labour force. 44
  • The objective of the compact is to increase the level of participation and qualifications among young South Australians. It was implemented in South Australia in 2009 through the Learn or Earn initiative www.learnorearn.sa.gov.au. Worldskills WorldSkills is an international competition program for young Australians interested in challenging their skills and ability against other young trade or skilled people in their region, the nation and the world. TAFE SA achievements for World Skills for 2009 included:  TAFE SA contributed 241 out of the 244 students who competed in the South Australian World Skills competition across the three regional districts (Spencer Gulf, Adelaide and South East South Australia) in 2009  TAFE SA Regional student Ben Hooper was a dual gold medallist in both the Fitting and Turning categories.3.2 Ensure many more young people are engaged in political and civic life in their communities During the 2008-09 financial year, around 4380 young people volunteered over 68 000 hours to their local communities including 1000 young people who volunteered their time to develop and run activities during National Youth Week (28 March to 5 April 2009) for over 20 000 participants across the state. Around 2500 young people participated in a range of youth development programs including Active8 - the Premiers Youth Challenge and the Duke of Edinburghs Award, and a further 2000 young people were involved in government and community decision making processes through programs such as the Youth Advisory Committee Program. 45
  • 4.1 Build science, technology and innovation capability and infrastructure (Links to South Australia’s Strategic Plan Targets T4.6, T4.9, T4.10, T4.11) The STI10 – A 10 Year Vision for Science Technology and Innovation in South Australia has reached its half-way mark, after its launch in 2004. The report indicates that since 2004, some $200 million in state investment under STI10 had leveraged some $1.2 billion in Commonwealth, industry and institutional funds across various science, technology and innovation projects, both investing and operational (verified by Deloitte Touché Tohmatsu). Constellation SA Seven key alliances have been developed under Constellation SA: Food, Wine and Agriculture, Health and Medical Science, Defence, Advanced Manufacturing and Enabling Industries, Natural Resource Management and Climate Change, Minerals and Energy, Social Adaptation to Change. Achievements in 2009 included:  Agriculture, Food and Wine Alliance was bolstered by the establishment of clusters in Plant Bioscience, Animal Science and Food Innovation  Healthy Development Adelaide cluster won the South Australian Science Excellence Award in Excellence in Research Collaboration and Convenor Professor Robert Norman was awarded South Australian Scientist of the Year  Plant Biosciences cluster appointed an executive officer and established its leadership group  $10 000 provided by the department for Digital Heritage Symposium held in Adelaide in August 2009 and seed funding of $35 000 for business case development  application submitted to the Premier’s Science and Research Fund by the Human Dimensions in Natural Resource Management cluster with $11 000 in seed funding provided by the department  building on previous Thinker in Residence, Professor Laura Lee, the Built Environment and Design cluster submitted an issues and challenges paper to the Industry Association and the Commonwealth in preparation for a Super Science funding bid. National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy The establishment of major scientific research infrastructure continued in 2009 under the Australian Government’s $542 million five-year National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy. As at 30 June 2009, $17.3 million of the $21.9 million in state government co-funding had been allocated to all recipients. 46
  • All 11 SA-based infrastructure projects have commenced, with openings ofthe following facilities by 30 December 2009: national node of the Australian Plant Phenomics Facility at University of Adelaide’s Waite campus microfluidics nanofabrication facility at the University of South Australia’s Ian Wark Research Institute remote launch of South Australian Research and Development Institute’s high-frequency radar facility on lower Eyre Peninsula supporting South Australia’s Integrated Marine Observation System.Premier’s Science and Research FundFive major research initiatives received state government backing throughthe Premier’s Science and Research Fund: $1.35 million for the TRansect for EnviroNmental monitoring and Decision making: adaptive management of productive and native systems for climate change $381 793 to design a decision making tool on the human dimensions of climate change adaptation in South Australia (this project builds on the TRansect for EnviroNmental monitoring and Decision project) $420 000 for plant image analysis to facilitate and expedite the development of stress-tolerant crops $592 708 to assist in establishing methods for extracting higher level information from modern aerial and satellite imagery $794 268 to design and develop an integrated solar, geothermal and combustion system for a high efficiency baseload power generation system.These projects will all contribute significantly to the state’s ability to adapt toclimate change.SA NT DataLinkIn 2009, SA NT DataLink was formally established and launched from$2.6 million in National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategyfunding awarded to South Australia in 2008. This will link routinely collectedhistorical government health, education and community services data fromSouth Australia and the Northern Territory. Two demonstration projects arecurrently being developed in the areas of cancer and early childhood.South Australian Health and Medical Research InstituteIn December 2009, the state government signed the Constitution andMembers’ Agreement for a new South Australian Health and MedicalResearch Institute which will be housed in a new state-of-the-art health andmedical research facility located within the new Royal Adelaide Hospitalprecinct. The new 25 000 square metre research facility has been allocated$200 million in funding under the 2009 Australian Government Budgetand is scheduled for completion by the end of 2012. 47
  • International CollaborationThe department continued its international research collaborations withManitoba, Canada. A delegation visited South Australia in March 2009 ledby Deputy Minister of Innovation, Energy and Mines, Mr John Clarkson.The delegation from Manitoba held meetings with South Australianscientists/researchers to discuss the status of current joint research projectsand examine opportunities for future new project collaborations.Other ResearchAdditional research work funded by the department in 2009 includes: Omega 3 enrichment in poultry The project seeks to develop a low cost procedure for enrichment of omega 3 lipids in chicken meat and eggs to benefit human and animal health - South Australian Government support: $180 000 over two years (2008-09 – 2009-10). Micro-algae engineering Combines the expertise of the South Australian Research and Development Institute, Australian National University and University of Manitoba to develop algal production systems with high levels of oil production and growth yields - South Australian Government support: $50 000 for preliminary research and a detailed project plan.During 2009, work progressed on the Science, Technology, Engineeringand Mathematics Strategy and the report that was endorsed by thePremier’s Science and Research Council. The department, together withthe Department of Education and Children’s Services and the Departmentof Trade and Economic Development has been developing an action planto identify priority areas for implementation. This is a priority for 2010.The department worked with Primary Industries and Resources SouthAustralia and the South Australian Chamber of Mines and Energy tocommission a Research and Development and Innovation Roadmap for theSouth Australian Mining Industry. The roadmap provides valuable baselineinformation to identify needs and gaps in research and development andinnovation capabilities to give the states mining sector a competitive edge.Science Excellence AwardsThe South Australian Science Excellence Awards is the premier scienceshowcase event in South Australia and highlights the diversity of scientificresearch within our state. The awards, held again in 2009, promoteexcellence in science, technology and science teaching and reinforce itsimportance with regards to state economic development. 48
  • 4.2 Support the implementation of the Information Economy Agenda (Links to South Australia’s Strategic Plan Targets T4.6, T4.9, T4.10, T4.11) An updated version of the Information Economy Agenda for South Australia was launched in July 2009, covering the period 2009 to 2014, (the initial version was launched in 2006.) The Information Economy Agenda supports South Australia’s Strategic Plan by representing the state’s strategic response to the opportunities presented by the global information economy and aims to set out a framework for delivering our digital future. The review of the Information Economy Agenda recognised that a healthy information economy eco- system brings social, environmental and economic benefits. The agenda identifies three key inter-related elements of the information economy: connectivity, capability and content – the three Cs. It recognises that connecting to high-speed broadband, building a confident, educated and digitally-literate population and supporting our local creative content and Information and Communications Technology industry are ingredients necessary to succeed in the global economy. Thinker in Residence Instigated and supported by the department, Dr Genevieve Bell spent several months in South Australia as the 15th Thinker in Residence. Dr Bell is a noted anthropologist and addressed the question of the role played by new information, communication and entertainment technologies. Dr Bell travelled extensively throughout the state and investigated how we use technology today and how we might make best use of it in the future. Digital Engagement 2009 saw the continuation of existing, and the implementation of new projects and research to encourage pathways for digital engagement. Achievements included:  the Australian Health Inequities Program at Flinders University was commissioned and completed a study to explore the impact of social and economic disadvantage on the limited use and or access to digital technology, under the Australian Health Inequities Program Health Lens Initiative  encourage the creative use of digital technologies whilst developing capability and in 2009 twelve grants were awarded for a range of purposes including the purchase of hardware, software and funding of workshops  sponsorship was provided to a workshop co-ordinated by Australian Information Industries Association in partnership with Business SA on the theme of Green information technology issues in South Australia 49
  • and beyond  collaboration with the Office for Youth to develop a Risk Mitigation Strategy, policies and procedures, training for staff and Cyber Safety information for staff and young people for the safe and effective use of Facebook as communication tool for the Office for Youth. Information and Communications Technology Skills In conjunction with the Information Economy Advisory Board, the department continued its work to address issues relating to information and communications technology skills such as mis-matches between supply and demand of jobs and potential employees, the decline in the number of students choosing information and communications technology related courses and the gender imbalance. Industry Development The Information and Communications Technology – Driving Growth for South Australia document proposes actions to strengthen the role of information and communications technology in ensuring the continuing growth of all South Australian industry. In 2009 focus was on two activities:  the continued development of the Information and Communications Technology Innovation Partnerships Grant Program which aims to promote business innovation in the South Australian Government through information and communications technology and accelerate the development of information and communications technology companies in South Australia  the Seeding Information and Communications Technology Innovation Forum series. In November 2009, South Australia’s Transport Technology Forum – Reducing Our Carbon Footprint was attended by over 180 delegates and addressed the challenges of the emerging carbon economy and the role of innovative technology developers and commercialisation experts in creating solutions for high-emissions industries. The e-Business Program aims to increase the effective use of online technologies by South Australian small to medium sized enterprises by providing funding support on a dollar-for-dollar basis to help ensure that South Australian small to medium sized enterprises remain competitive within an increasingly global economy.4.3 Stimulate the state’s economy through better application of research encouraging transfer and application of knowledge (Links to South Australia’s Strategic Plan Target T4.6) In August 2009 the Research Capability Directory was launched. It provides a ‘one-stop-shop’ of information, containing comprehensive data about the state’s research capability and activities, listing more than 160 institutions currently conducting research in South Australia, and can be found at www.research.sa.gov.au. 50
  • 4.4 Exploit advanced communication technologies to benefit learning, skills and training for all South Australians (Links to South Australia’s Strategic Plan Target T4.8) In 2009 the department initiated a major shift in the South Australian component of the Clever Networks Broadband Development Program, a project jointly funded by the department and the Australian Government. A significant emphasis was placed on the planning and delivery of a series of events to increase the awareness of regional communities about the selection and use of broadband services and their application for personal and commercial activities. A collaborative skills and industry development program, the Mega Enterprise Growth Alliance - ‘Growing Australia’s Digital Economy’ aims to increase the size and capability of the mobile content and applications industry. It is led by industry and supported by the department, TAFE SA, universities and the Department of Trade and Economic Development. In 2008-09 the program received Commonwealth funding and raised matching funds to manage the implementation of the program in New South Wales and Victoria. There were 84 participants in the 2009 program who presented 36 pitches.4.5 Improve accessibility of broadband to improve quality or work and life for all South Australians In 2009, the department continued to support the objective of widely available, affordable broadband connections for South Australians and the issue of Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line broadband blackspots in the Adelaide metropolitan region was the major broadband infrastructure project for 2009. In August 2009, the South Australian Government jointly announced the AdamMax Metropolitan Broadband Blackspots Project. Adam Internet Pty Ltd was chosen as the commercial service provider following a competitive process to deliver a project which is focussed on addressing the need to reduce metropolitan broadband blackspots through the deployment of an AdamMax wireless network that utilises high speed wireless connections to customer premises in the Adelaide Metropolitan area. This $18 million project to deliver wireless broadband services is jointly funded by the South Australian Government, the Australian Government’s Australian Broadband Guarantee program and the internet service provider Adam Internet. South Australia’s Broadband Development Fund committed $3 million to the project. Work began in 2009 to address more than 350 blackspot locations across Adelaide. First connections were marked for significant problem areas in Reynella and other southern suburbs. The project is scheduled for completion in November 2010. 51
  • The Australian Government’s National Broadband Network initiativedominated planning and policy development for the telecommunicationsindustry throughout 2009. The department contributed to national policy bypreparing submissions representing the state’s view on several issuesrelated to the National Broadband Network.The department worked with the Department of Premier and Cabinet todevelop the broadband section for South Australia’s Strategic Plan’s 2009Household Survey and has used the data from that survey to furtheranalyse the distribution of broadband access and associated trends acrossSouth Australia’s regions.Outback Connect Extension ProgramThe Outback Connect Extension program has registered 1971 people wholive primarily in regional and remote areas of South Australia. During 2009,196 sessions were presented and 1739 hours of online training delivered inbasic and practical uses of information and communication technologies.The program partnered with government agencies and communityorganisations to engage South Australians in using online resources forinformation, recreation and business purposes including: State Library of South Australia - family history sessions for Adult Learners Week Country Women’s Association - conducting committee meetings online Australian Government’s Department of Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy – eSecurity Week presentations. 52
  • 5.1 Provide all staff with a safe working environment During 2009 the department delivered excellent results in Occupational, Health Safety and Injury Management. The department achieved significant reductions in new injuries with 74 new injuries being recorded in the 2008-09 financial year. This represents 10 less injuries than last financial year and 18 less than the government’s set target for the department. The department has now reduced injuries for the last four financial years from a rate of 130 injuries in 2004-05. Significant success was achieved from the sprain/strain project. Injuries of this type reduced from 33 (2007-08) to seven this financial year. Injuries resulting from psychological distress were targeted during 2009 with the recruitment of two specialists to implement the Improved Prevention of Psychological Injuries Project. The project will conclude 30 June 2010 and is expected to mitigate against the identified ‘root causes’ to psychological injury as identified from the significant research undertaken. Further, the department in 2010 will implement an Early Care Project to remove identified barriers that negatively impact on the restoration and early return to work of injured employees. Injury management costs rose slightly in 2008-09 however, the department’s long term liability reduced by $1.7 million. The department has achieved reductions in its long term liabilities in three out of the last four years. A TAFE SA machine management program is resulting in significant improvement to the plant and equipment used at all TAFE SA campuses. During 2008-09 and 2009-10, approximately $3 million will be spent on improving the safety of plant and equipment. This will ensure safety of students, the community and TAFE SA staff. Injury management practices were critically reviewed and strategies identified and implemented to improve all processes in injury management. There has been a separation of the ‘care’ (rehabilitation) component to that of the ‘insurance’ (workers compensation). Investment has occurred in identifying return to work processes that significantly reduce claims of long duration. 2009 also saw the department’s Occupational, Health Safety and Injury Management System being evaluated by WorkCover and the department has been awarded a two year renewal licence. The evaluation allowed the department to demonstrate the substantial improvements that have occurred over recent years. The department will not rest on its achievements and is planning further improvements that will be implemented over the next two calendar years. 53
  • 5.2 Develop the people within the Department of Further Education, Employment, Science and Technology and improve working conditions An evaluation and review of the 2008 department’s leadership and management development programs was undertaken in 2009. This has led to a new holistic leadership and management development program for employees within the department. The focus is on continuous learning and developing leadership capabilities throughout an employee’s career development. The new leadership and management development programs will be implemented in 2010. The Employee Climate survey (known as BULB) was again undertaken in 2009 and results show that there have been improvements in the area of performance management. Results from staff demonstrate that managers are also focussing on an employee’s longer term career goals and the skills required to achieve them, as well as the skills and abilities required in their current role. Through the Aboriginal Traineeship Program 20 Aboriginal trainees commenced employment in January 2009. Five of the trainees were placed in corporate head office, and five in each of the three TAFE SA institutes. The program is part of the department’s Aboriginal Employment Strategy and is linked to South Australia’s Strategic Plan targets to increase the number of Aboriginal people working in the South Australian public sector to 2% by 2010 in line with the proportion of Aboriginal people within the population.5.3 Strengthen the publicly owned TAFE SA system The Skills Strategy identified the imperative for TAFE SA to operate as three independent registered training organisations, within a collaborative network. The increasingly competitive environment and the national agenda for an open market for vocational education and training amplify the need for independent institutes to effectively control their service delivery. The change to TAFE SA’s registered training organisation status came into effect on 1 July 2009. This implementation date enabled the development of appropriate TAFE SA Network (a mechanism that supports the three devolved TAFE SA institutes to achieve increased efficiency and effectiveness in the delivery of quality vocational education and training) policies, processes and procedures and the full implementation of interrelated Skills Strategy projects that now place the three institutes in a strong position to respond to the market. As part of the devolution process, each TAFE SA institute entered into a Ministerial Charter with the Minister for Employment, Training and Further Education and the chief executive. 54
  • The charters clarify and stipulate the roles and responsibilities of eachTAFE SA institute to staff within the department and to key externalstakeholders.Included in each charter are key objectives and directions including: aligning training to meet the skill needs of the economy increasing offsite delivery and e-learning increasing engagement with business and fee for service activity increasing international education improving the alignment with schools and the university sector improving participation especially for disadvantaged groups.Under the new arrangements, institutes will have a greater level andconsistency of customer service and an assurance that a TAFE SANetwork and institute perspective is reflected in all policy and proceduredevelopment for matters associated with its registered training organisationstatus.It also facilitates greater alignment to the state planning initiatives of theTraining and Skills Commission’s Five Year Plan for Skills and WorkforceDevelopment in South Australia.The managing directors of each institute are the accountable officers for allAustralian Qualifications Training Framework compliance requirements ofrunning a registered training organisation.TAFE SA achievements over 2008-2009 include: 28.5% increase in international students commencing study in 2009 3.6% increase in TAFE SA admission offers in 2009 from 2008 six new international courses registered on the Commonwealth Register of Institutions and Courses for Overseas Students twenty new credit transfer and articulation agreements implemented with Higher Education providers in 2009 the creation of TAFE SA Network services the development of lead centres for Hospitality at Regency campus and for the Arts at the Adelaide College for the Arts improvements and simplification of the admissions process through the South Australian Tertiary Admissions Centre new and improved TAFE SA website with increased functionality improvements in TAFE SA data management and development of a TAFE SA Educational Information and Communications Technology plan implementation of the e-learning Strategy and improved models of delivery in recognition of prior learning and industry engagement the establishment of protocols and development of stronger relations in higher education with South Australian universities. 55
  • 5.4 Increase the flexibility and responsiveness of business systems processes and practices In April 2009, the chief executive endorsed the department’s Red Tape Reduction Plan for 2009 that provides a combination of initiatives that have savings for businesses as well as internal business process savings (business improvement initiatives). Throughout corporate directorates and TAFE SA, officers were assigned as ‘red tape reduction champions’ to assist the department with recognising opportunities for red tape reduction. Progress on individual red tape reduction projects is consistently monitored through the regular monthly meetings with the champions where ideas and further opportunities for business improvement are discussed. The Student Information System Project officially began with the signing of the contract with SunGard Higher Education in June 2009. Implementation activities will begin in the 2009 – 2010 financial year. The project remains on schedule and within budget forecasts for a completion by no later than June 2012 with the following milestones:  all new admissions through the Student Information System by April 2011  core student management functions including all enrolments by June 2011  core plus functionality by January 2012, to deliver additional activities and functions. The department is committed to integrating risk management into its culture, decision making processes, programs, practices, business planning, and performance reporting activities, and establishing a safe working environment for staff. Consequently in 2009 significant effort was put into revising the departments Risk Management Policy and Framework in line with Australian and International standards.5.5 Improve the cost effectiveness of the Department of Further Education, Employment, Science and Technology’s services A major driver of the Skills Strategy, in addition to the challenges of improved vocational education and training and employment participation and qualification attainment in South Australia, was to improve the efficiency of the South Australian vocational education and training system and reduce the cost per hour from the 2006 level. Significant improvements to the cost per hour have been made since the launch of the Skills Strategy. The results for South Australia, recently published in the Annual National Report of the Australian VET System 2008, show a marked improvement in the cost per hour: from $16.23 in 2006 to $13.99 in 2008 (both expressed in 2008 dollars). The 56
  • improvements have been the result of general efficiencies across the department and a focus within TAFE SA institutes on improving productivity, all credit must go to staff, especially those within TAFE for achieving those significant efficiency while increasing services. The department successfully transitioned a further 14 financial services staff to Shared Services SA. Services involved include financial statement preparation for calendar and financial year, purchase card administration, taxation services, general ledger maintenance and asset accounti ng. The Server Virtualisation Project, Stage 1 delivered the future Information and Communications Technology Infrastructure platform, moving from a physical to a virtual environment. Within the existing development, test and production environments, the Server Virtualisation Project saw the decommissioning of 37 physical servers and replaced these with ‘virtual instances’ running on nine blade servers. The following benefits were realised:  rack space savings in the Glenside Data Centre to the value of $32 600 per annum  power savings across data centres to the value of $10 000 per annum  a reduction in CO2 emissions across data centres to the value of 43 tonnes per annum  a flexible and fault resilient platform that allows for rapid deployment of applications  a powerful set of management tools to monitor and modify services as demand dictates  streamlined mechanism to manage operating system licensing and compliance.5.6 Improve environmentally sustainable and eco-efficient practices in the Department of Further Education, Employment, Science and Technology’s operations The department is committed to reducing its environmental impact and, as part of the South Australian Government, is actively collaborating with other government agencies to meet relevant goals as outlined in South Australia’s Strategic Plan. The department has developed a detailed Environmental Action Plan. The plan has 13 key actions to drive the department to become a more environmentally sustainable organisation. The actions cover improved energy performance of the department’s facilities, increased recycling of waste, more efficient fleet vehicles, reducing water usage and raising staff awareness of environmental impacts. This new plan is an integral part of departmental policy, and has strong commitment from senior executives and management and is expected to result in stronger collaboration with all staff to improve the department’s environmental credentials. Ownership and accountability are cornerstone pillars to ensure delivery against targets relating to improving environmental 57
  • performance. Further detail on the department’s activities in this area can be found under ‘Other Reporting Items’ in this report. In 2009, the Office of Sustainability worked with officials from the department and TAFE SA in developing a Vocational Education and Training Sector Agreement which aims to exemplify leadership and co- operation in responding to climate change. The agreement complements and is consistent with the National Green Skills Agreement seeks to build the capacity of the vocational education and training sector to deliver the skills for sustainability required in the workplace and to enable individuals, businesses and communities to adjust to and prosper in a sustainable, low carbon economy. The principles and objectives as outlined in the National Green Skills Agreement have been incorporated into the agreement. Also in 2009, TAFE SA developed a Sustainability Strategy and Action Plan that outlines its commitment to sustainability. The TAFE SA strategy and action plan integrates targets and actions from a range of key sustainability agreements and plans including the Vocational Education and Training Sector Agreement, the department’s Environmental Action Plan and the National Vocational Education and Training Sector Sustainability Policy and Action Plan (2009 -2012). The intent of the TAFE SA Sustainability Strategy and Action plan is to not only meet targets and actions from these key sustainability initiatives but, more importantly to position TAFE SA as a market leader in the vocational education and training sector sustainability area in Australia.5.7 A high focus on customer service The department undertakes annual customer service satisfaction surveys with a sample of trainees, apprentices and their employers. The 2009 survey found that 92% of trainees and apprentices were satisfied with the service that they received from the department, while 82% of employers of trainees and apprentices expressed satisfaction. The department has set a satisfaction target of 95% for both cohorts. The department has established a program of regular meetings with stakeholders in the traineeship and apprenticeship system to gather feedback, identify opportunities for improvement and discuss and implement change in consultation with stakeholders. This program has been responsible for providing a collaborative framework for improvements, including the updated guidelines for the approval of school based traineeships and apprenticeships, and the establishment of streamlined systems for lodging employer registration applications. TAFE SA students have an opportunity to provide regular feedback to staff during teacher assessments and ‘tell us what you think’ brochure located on all TAFE SA campuses. 58
  • On-line Disability Awareness training has been emphasised by the chief executive as an important means of ensuring better service delivery, which includes meeting the needs of people with disabilities.The above is in response to goals and objectives set out in the department’s StrategicPlan 2007 – 2010. The department’s executive commenced a review of its strategic planbased on South Australia’s Strategic Plan and emerging Council of AustralianGovernment led priorities. A refreshed strategic plan for the department 2010 – 2014 isto be released early in 2010. 59
  • During 2009 the department made significant progress in meeting the objectives of its2007-2010 Strategic Plan which aims to build a sustainable workforce.Significant work has been undertaken across the department to develop and implementa graduate development program and to evaluate the leadership and managementdevelopment programs, which will form the basis of the new programs to beimplemented in 2010.Workforce DataThe following data is based on records from the Human Resource Information System,Empower, for persons identified as being employed on 30 June 2009.Hourly paid instructors are excluded from most data tables as they are employed underdifferent conditions and reported accordingly. To combine hourly paid instructors datawith regular staff information would result in data distortion.Employee Numbers, Gender and StatusAll data has been sourced from employer records. Unless otherwise stated, data relatesto the final pay period in June 2009.The following table depicts the total number of employees including persons and full-time equivalent employees. Employees and Full-time Equivalents by Employment Type (in pay period) Hourly Paid Workforce Casuals Total Instructors Persons 3 624 101 819 4 544 Full-time Equivalents 3 314.07 39.55 240.27 3 593.89The following table depicts the total staff and gender composition of departmentalemployees. A person is the head count and full-time equivalent of full-time and part-timestaff. Employees and Full-time Equivalents by Gender (in pay period) Full-time % Full-time Gender Persons % Persons Equivalents Equivalents Male 1 431 39.49 1 395.81 42.12 Female 2 193 60.51 1 918.26 57.88 Total 3 624 100.00 3 314.07 100.00 61
  • The following table depicts the total staff who separated from and who were recruited tothe agency during 2008 – 2009. This data excludes casuals and hourly paid instructors. Number of Persons who were recruited to and separated from the department 11 during 2008 - 2009 Separated from the department 560 Recruited to the department 414 Number of Persons on Leave Without Pay On Leave Without Pay 115Hourly Paid InstructorsThe department augments its teaching force by employing casual hourly paid instructorsto provide specialist and back up support to lecturers. In total, 819 persons or 240.3 full-time equivalents, hourly paid instructors provided 229 703 teaching hours at a cost of$14.7 million during 2008-2009.Number of Employees by Salary BracketThis graph depicts the total staff by gender and salary bracket. Employees by Salary Bracket 1,000 900 Male 800 700 Female 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 $0-39999 $40000-58999 $59000-76999 $77000-92499 $92500+ Male 58 304 747 250 72 Female 162 926 778 247 80 Employees by Salary Bracket and Gender (in pay period) Male Female Total $0-39999 58 162 220 $40000-58999 304 926 1,230 $59000-76999 747 778 1,525 $77000-92499 250 247 497 $92500+ 72 80 152 Total 1 431 2 193 3 62411 #89 of these people were recruited and separated within 2008-2009. 62
  • Status of Employees in Current PositionThe following two tables show the total staff and the full time equivalent staff byemployment status in their current position. Short-term contracts are under two years;long term contracts are over two years.Employees by Gender and Ongoing or Contract Employment Status (in pay period) Short Hourly Long Term Persons Ongoing Term Casuals Paid Total Contract Contract Instructors Male 1 036 365 30 22 329 1 782 Female 1 662 510 21 79 490 2 762 Total 2 698 875 51 101 819 4 544Full-time Equivalents by Gender and Ongoing or Contract Employment Status (in pay period) Short Hourly Full-time Long Term Ongoing Term Casuals Paid Total Equivalents Contract Contract Instructors Male 1 015.45 350.37 30.00 11.40 101.31 1 508.53 Female 1 472.70 424.56 21.00 28.16 138.95 2 085.37 Total 2 488.15 774.92 51.00 39.55 240.27 3 593.89 Em ployees by Gender and Ongoing or Em ploym ent Status 1,800 1,600 1,400 Male Female 1,200 1,000 800 600 400 200 0 Ongoing Short Term Contract Long Term Contract Casuals HPIsExecutive ProfileThis table shows the number of employees receiving $98 996 per annum or more intheir current positions. This year the basis of reporting executive numbers has beenchanged in accordance with revised Department of Premier and Cabinet requirements.Executives by Gender and Classification (in pay period) Classification Tenure Male Female Total CD-3 Y 0 1 1 EM-C Y 4 8 12 EXEC ULE N 1 0 1 EXMINAPPT N 1 0 1 SAES-1 N 14 12 26 SAES-2 N 4 2 6 Total 24 23 47 63
  • Leave ManagementThe following table depicts the average days taken per full-time equivalent (excludinghourly paid instructors). Average Leave Days taken per full-time equivalents over each Financial Year 2003- 2004- 2005- 2006- 2007- 2008-2009 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Sick Leave 6.79 7.10 6.44 7.26 7.59 8.21 Special Leave With Pay 0.91 0.93 1.29 2.10 2.29 2.46 12 Family Carers LeaveThe outbreak of Swine Flu in Australia contributed to the increase in sick leave as staffwith flu like symptoms were asked to remain at home.Workforce DiversityThe department recognises the value of workforce diversity and the benefits inherent ina workforce that is representative of the broader community. The following sectionoutlines the department’s profile.Aboriginal and/ or Torres Strait Islander EmployeesAn Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander is someone who: is of Australian Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander descent and identifies as an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander and is accepted as such by the community in which they live or have lived.This table depicts the staff who reported being of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islanderdescent with comparison to the target in South Australia’s Strategic Plan. Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Employees (in pay period) Agency % of % Male Female Total 13 Total Agency Target Workforce 23 52 75 3 624 1.96% 2.10% Aboriginal Workforce Employees by Salary Bracket (in pay period) % Aboriginal Salary Bracket Aboriginal Agency Total Staff in Salary Bracket $0-39999 19 220 8.63% $40000-58999 22 1 230 1.78% $59000-76999 10 1 525 0.65% $77000-92499 15 497 3.01% $92500+ 9 152 5.92% Total 75 3 62412 Family Carer’s Leave may be taken as part of an employee’s entitlement to Sick Leave or Special Leave with Pay.Currently this cannot be reported upon as a separate leave type.13 Target to be achieved by 2010 as set by South Australia’s Strategic Plan 64
  • Aboriginal Employment StrategyThe strategy continues to develop and implement new programs and initiatives forAboriginal and non Aboriginal staff to work towards building a culturally inclusiveenvironment. The following projects have been developed: Aboriginal Traineeship Program The program was implemented in January 2009 to increase the employment rate of Aboriginal employees in the department. Nineteen trainees began their traineeship in January 2009 and 15 trainees have either completed or are on target to complete their traineeships and will graduate in January 2010. The Aboriginal Traineeship Program included a number of key features designed to support the trainees to be successful in their placement including: - mentors and contact officers - culturally guided selection processes - group intake - group training. An evaluation of the traineeship program was undertaken and recommendations from the findings have been incorporated into the next Aboriginal Traineeship Program which will commence in 2010. Aboriginal Mentoring Program The program was implemented in January 2009 to complement the Aboriginal Traineeship Program to mentor and assist young trainees during their placement. Aboriginal Contact Officers During 2009 a program to identify Aboriginal contact officers across the department continued. The opportunity to provide support and guidance to the Aboriginal Trainees was one of the roles Aboriginal contact officers undertook and they continued to monitor and assist Aboriginal staff in the workplace.Number of Employees by Age Bracket and GenderThis table shows the total staff by gender and age bracket. The age bracket total isexpressed as a percentage of total staff and compared to the state’s workforcebenchmark.Current statistics reveal a significant difference between the department workforce andthe workforce benchmark for those employees aged 44 years and under. Thedepartment is currently addressing this disparity through its workforce developmentstrategy which aims to ensure a better balance in its age profile. 65
  • Employees by Age and Gender (in pay period) Benchmark Male Female Total % of Total %* 15-19yrs 0 11 11 0.30 6.5 20-24yrs 34 71 105 2.90 10.3 25-29yrs 57 129 186 5.13 11.1 30-34yrs 104 209 313 8.64 10.7 35-39yrs 106 228 334 9.22 11.7 40-44yrs 134 253 387 10.68 11.4 45-49yrs 208 332 540 14.90 11.9 50-54yrs 263 401 664 18.32 10.3 55-59yrs 273 338 611 16.86 8.2 60-64yrs 197 176 373 10.29 5.3 65yrs and over 55 45 100 2.76 2.6 Total 1 431 2 193 3 624 100.00 100.00 Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics Australian Demographic Statistics, 6291.0.55.001 Labour Force Status (ST LM8) total from Feb78 Supertable, SA at May 2009 Employees by Age Bracket 65yrs & over 60-64yrs 55-59yrs 50-54yrs 45-49yrs 40-44yrs 35-39yrs 30-34yrs 25-29yrs Male 20-24yrs Female 15-19yrs 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450Cultural and Linguistic DiversityThis table depicts the number of staff who reported being born overseas or who speak alanguage other than English at home.The variation between the departmental figure and the general community figure can beattributed to the fact that these fields are not mandatory fields to be completed in staffsurveys. Therefore some staff choose not to disclose this information. Employees with Cultural and Linguistic Diversity specific elements (in pay period) % of % in SA Male Female Total Agency Community* Number of employees born overseas 114 169 283 7.81% 20.30% Number of employees who speak language(s) other than English at home 74 80 154 4.25% 16.6% Source: Benchmarks from Australian Bureau of Statistics Publication Basic Community Profile (SA) Cat No. 2001.0 66
  • Number of Employees with Ongoing Disabilities Number of Employees with Ongoing Disabilities Male Female Total % of Agency 30 27 57 1.57%Number of Employees with Disabilities Requiring Workplace AdaptionNo information currently is available. The department is reviewing how it recordsinformation on the number of workplaces that may need adaptation to assist those withdisabilities being able to undertake their work responsibilities.Performance Management and DevelopmentThe 2009 Employee Climate survey (known as BULB) shows that there have beenimprovements in the area of performance management from the last survey in 2007.Managers have actioned the results of the 2007 survey to focus on a model ofcontinuous improvement in performance management including discussing employee’sstrengths. Although there is still a need to improve the numbers of employeesundertaking performance reviews, it demonstrates that managers are also focussing onan employee’s longer term career goals and the skills required to achieve them, as wellas the skills and abilities required in their current role.A summary of the 2009 results relating specifically to performance management are asfollows: 66% of respondents indicated they had had a performance review in the last 12 months, compared to 65% in 2007 70% of respondents reported that the review focused on their strengths (same as for 2007) 52% of respondents reported that the review focused on their career prospects compared with 47% in 2007 60% of employees reported that their manager placed a strong emphasis on specific suggestions for improvement as opposed to 53% in 2007 60% said their manager also placed a strong emphasis on skills to develop in the future as opposed to 55% in 2007.There will be a strong focus on the review of performance management in 2010 as thenew Public Sector Act is implemented.Voluntary Flexible Working ArrangementsAs part of the department’s commitment to attracting and retaining the best possiblestaff and to assist employees to balance work and family life, a number of voluntaryflexible working arrangements are made available to departmental employees.A recent staff survey indicated that most staff within the department access variouscomponents of the voluntary flexible working arrangements. 67
  • Voluntary Flexible Working Arrangements by Gender Male Female Total Purchased leave 5 15 20 Flexitime 385 633 1 018 Compressed Weeks 9 15 24 Part-time / Job Share 90 901 991 Working from Home 9 17 26TraineesThis table depicts the number of trainees within the department. Graduates recruitedduring the year have been included in general staffing numbers reported earlier. Trainees as at 31 December2009 Male Female Trainees 5 21 TOTAL 5 21The CareerStart SA program within South Australia Works in the Public Sector fundsagencies for placing a person with a disability into an apprenticeship, traineeships andcadetshipsHuman Resources and Industrial RelationsPreparation and negotiation, including ballot processes, for two Enterprise Bargainingagreements covering TAFE Act and Public Sector Management Act staff wasundertaken. Significant effort was undertaken regarding the preparation andrepresentation of the department in the TAFE Act staff award arbitration before theIndustrial Relation Commission of South Australia.A total of 17 complaints were received by the Industrial Relations Unit; one complaintwas withdrawn and the remaining 16 complaints were finalised.Significant reductions in red tape have been implemented in a number of humanresource related activities including: simplifying the application process for recruitmentand selection; reducing the number of selection criteria on position descriptions; andreducing the application process related to classification management.A process of continuous improvement in relation to policy and procedural review andupdate has been undertaken throughout 2009.The Employee Assistance Program continued to be available to staff. It offersconfidential, impartial and culturally sensitive counselling support to employees and theirfamilies 24 hours a day, seven days a week. A total of 193 new referrals accessed theservice from January – December 2009; services used were trauma services, managerassistance and consultancy advisory services. 68
  • The department has continued to implement child protection initiatives in line with theamendments to the Children’s Protection Act 1993. Criminal History Checks continuedto be undertaken by employees and volunteers throughout 2009. Relevant employeeshave continued to undertake Mandated Notification Training. 69
  • 14 2008-09 2007-08 2006-07 1 OHS Legislative Requirements (includes incidents involving students, contractors and visitors) Number of notifiable occurrences pursuant to Occupational, Health, Safety 7 (3 from 6 (1 from 8 (2 from and Injury Management Regulations Division 6.6 students) student and 3 students and 2 from from contractors) contractors) Number of notifiable injuries pursuant to Occupational, Health, Safety and 1 3 (1 from 3 (2 from Injury Management Regulations Division 6.6 student and 1 students and 1 from visitor) from contractor) Number of notices served pursuant to Occupational, Health, Safety and 12 2 6 (1 from Welfare Act s35, s39 and s40 (relate to 4 student and 2 incidents) from contractors) 2 Injury Management Legislative Requirements Total number of new claimants who participated in the rehabilitation 23 17 26 program Total number of employees rehabilitated and reassigned to alternative 2 0 1 duties Total number of employees rehabilitated back to their original work 4 6 12 3 WorkCover Action Limits Number of open claims as at 30 June 2009 182 178 176 Percentage of workers compensation expenditure over gross annual 0.0137 0.0138 0.0112 remuneration 4 Number of Injuries Number of new workers compensation claims in the financial year 74 84 95 Number of fatalities, lost time injuries, medical treatment only Fatalities 0 0 0 Lost-time Injuries 27 16 30 Medical Treatment Only 47 68 65 Total number of whole working days lost 8 198 7 969 7 679 5 Cost of Workers Compensation Cost of new claims for the financial year $417 801.63 $513 927 $329 072 Cost of all claims excluding lump sum payments $2 328 242 $2 337 784 $2 039 529 Amount paid for lump sum payments (s42, s43, s44) $726 837 $644 973 $338 865 Total claims expenditure $3 055 079 $2 982 757 $2 378 394 Total amount recovered from external sources (s54) $0.00 $745 $0 Budget allocation for workers compensation $3 200 000 $3 000 000 $3 000 000 Actuarial (Outstanding) Liability $7 411 427 $9 151 328 $8 830 931 6 Trends Injury frequency rate for new lost-time injury/disease for each million hours 4.86 2.85 5.30 worked15 Most frequent cause (mechanism) of injury Body Stressing Body Stressing Body Stressing Most expensive cause (mechanism) of injury Mental Stress Mental Stress Mental Stress14 Occupational Health Safety and Injury Management reporting is based on financial year as determined by the Australian standard.Prior to 2006-07 reporting was based on calendar years as determined by the TAFE Act.15 Based on lost time flag (i.e. > 1 day or shift) 70
  • 71
  • On a comparative basis to 2007-08, expenses increased in 2008-09 by 1.6%; madeup of a 1.1% increase in salaries and 10.5% increase for goods and services anddecreases of 11.1% for grants and subsidies and 1.2% for depreciation. Salariesdecreased in real terms from 2007-08 in line with budget.The department’s income excluding ‘Revenues from Government’ decreased by13.2% during 2008-09 driven predominantly by a decrease in Commonwealthrevenue (37.9%) as a result of the implementation of new arrangements forvocational education and training specific purpose funding from 1 January 2009where these revenues are now received by the Department of Treasury and Finance.The decrease in Commonwealth revenue is partly offset by increases in agency feesand charges (10.7%) arising from higher domestic fee for service revenue and higherrevenue from overseas students and other grants and contributions (42.2%)principally due to higher grants for the Labour Market Adjustment Program from theDepartment of Trade and Economic Development to provide training for retrenchedworkers.The tables provided in this section set out a summary of the actual results for the2008-09 financial year. The detailed financial statements reflecting actual results for2008-09 are presented under ‘Financial Information’.Summary of Financial Information Actual Actual 2008-09 2007-08 $’000 $’000 Statement of Comprehensive Income Expenses 512 658 504 754 Income 177 811 204 896 Net Cost of Providing Services 334 847 299 858 Revenues from Government 326 781 281 394 Net Result (8 066) (18 464)Net ResultThe improvement in the Net Result from 2007-08 to 2008-09 is principally due to theimpact of carryovers which were higher in 2008-09 compared to 2007-08 mainly dueto payments under the National Training Infrastructure Program.Operating RevenuesTotal actual operating revenues, including revenues from government, for 2008-09were $504.6 million. The principal source of funding for the department is stategovernment appropriation which totalled $326.8 million, an increase of $45.4 million 72
  • compared to 2007-08 which principally reflects the impact of the new arrangementsfor Commonwealth vocational education and training specific purpose revenues from1 January 2009 where these revenues are now received by the Department ofTreasury and Finance. Other operating revenues included Commonwealth grants of$66.0 million and $93.2 million from student and other fees and charges. The chart below depicts an overview of revenue sources for 2008-09 State Government Funding $326.8 million Commonwealth Grants $66.0 million Student Enrolment Fees & Charges $32.7 million O Sales/Fee for Service $60.4 million Other Grants and Contributions $12.3 miilion Other $6.4 millionOperating ExpensesActual employee benefits of $270.6 million for 2008-09 constituted 53% of the totaloperating expenses of $512.7 million. Grants and subsidies expenses totalled $71.6million including $25.0 million for science and technology programs, $22.2 million foremployment programs, $10.6 million for vocational education and training programsand $9.5 million for tertiary student transport concessions.The other major component of operating expenses (supplies and services) amountedto $149.1 million. Included in this category were $30.0 million for funding to non-TAFE providers for vocational education and training, $20.2 million for minor works,maintenance and equipment, $19.6 million for information technology infrastructureand communication, $18.1 million for fees for contracted services and $15.0 millionfor printing and consumables. A further $19.8 million was charged to depreciationexpense. The chart below depicts an overview of operating expenses for 2008-09 Employee Benefits $270.6 million Supplies and Services $149.1 million Grants and Subsidies $71.6 million Depreciation $19.8 million Other $1.5 million 73
  • The following table depicts how expenditure was applied to the following programs in accordance with approved strategic priorities:  Employment and Skills Formation – Vocational Education and Training $440.2 million Provision of vocational education and training by TAFE SA and other registered training organisations including: - resource allocation of contestable and non-contestable funds - funding of apprenticeships and traineeships - support for post secondary training and education - providing state and national policy advice.  Employment and Skills Formation – Learning, Workforce Development and Employment $30.5 million Addressing the state’s economic development and social inclusion objectives by: - providing opportunities for people to participate in employment, training, skills development and adult community education - meeting the current and future labour and skills needs of industry - providing state and national policy advice.  Science, Technology and Innovation – Science and Innovation Provision of high level strategic advice to the Minister for Science and Information Economy on maximising $17.6 million economic, environmental and social benefits from the state’s scientific research and innovation by: - identifying strategic priorities for state government investment - raising awareness and understanding of the benefits of science and innovation amongst government, business and the community - facilitating coordinated and strategic bids for Commonwealth grants - facilitating coordination of education and research activity with end-user (industry) requirements to maximise the benefits for South Australia. (Includes funding for Premier’s Science and Research Fund). 74
  •  Science, Technology and Innovation - Bioscience Industry Development Development of the bioscience industry through providing assistance in business development, finance, $8.0 million infrastructure and marketing. Employment and Skills Formation – Regulatory Services $4.9 million Administering the state’s further education and training system through: - provision of registration, accreditation and approval services for registered training organisations - quality oversight of the state vocational education system through the Training and Skills Commission - administration of apprenticeships and traineeships - providing state and national policy advice. Office for Youth The Office for Youth has a significant leadership role in coordinating a whole-of-government and community $4.8 million response in supporting young people, aged 12 to 25, and addressing issues affecting them. It achieves this through: - developing strong partnerships across government, the youth sector, business and the community - creating and supporting opportunities for young people to have a voice and make an informed contribution to public debate - providing young people with positive experiences and opportunities which enhance their strengths and capacity, and which affirm their contributions to their communities and their ability to shape their own future. Science, Technology and Innovation – Information Economy Provision of high level strategic policy advice to the Minister for Science and Information Economy and $2.7 million government on the information economy and the Information and Communications Technology sector that: - raises awareness and greater understanding of the information economy among government, business, industry and education providers - develops strategy and facilitates programs and projects relevant to promoting the information economy - facilitates bids for significant Commonwealth grants. (Includes funding for Broadband Development) 75
  •  Employment and Skills Formation – International and Higher Education $2.5 million Supporting the development of Adelaide as a centre for education, international education and South Australian education exports including the provision of marketing services, analysis and student and community support. Provision of high-level strategic policy advice to the minister on higher education policy and planning. Science, Technology and Innovation – Technology Investment $1.5 million Provision of seed capital and business guidance to start-up and early stage technology companies.Total $512.7 million 76
  • Statement of Comprehensive Income for the Year Ended 30 June 2009 Note 2009 2008 $000 $000EXPENSESEmployee Benefits 5 270,637 267,814Supplies and Services 6 149,130 135,101Grants and Subsidies 7 71,642 80,572Depreciation 8 19,772 20,020Net Loss from the Disposal of Non-Current Assets 15 957 673Other Expenses 9 520 574Total EXPENSES 512,658 504,754INCOMECommonwealth Grants 11 65,989 106,323Student and Other Fees and Charges 12 93,150 85,039Other Grants and Contributions 13 12,250 8,615Interest 14 24 28Other Income 16 6,398 4,891Total INCOME 177,811 204,896NET COST OF PROVIDING SERVICES 334,847 299,858REVENUES FROM/PAYMENTS TO SA GOVERNMENTRevenues from SA Government 17 340,031 286,764Less Payments to SA Government 17 13,250 5,370Total REVENUES FROM/PAYMENTS TO SA GOVERNMENT 326,781 281,394NET RESULT (8,066) (18,464)OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOMEChanges in property, plant and equipment asset revaluationreserve 150,577 (1,495)Total COMPREHENSIVE RESULT 142,511 (19,959)THE NET RESULT AND COMPREHENSIVE RESULT AREATTRIBUTABLE TO THE SA GOVERNMENT AS OWNER 78
  • Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June 2009 Note 2009 2008 $000 $000CURRENT ASSETSCash and Cash Equivalents 18 77,980 73,580Receivables 19 20,946 17,256Inventories 22 935 923Non-current assets classified as held for sale 20 419 788Total CURRENT ASSETS 100,280 92,547NON-CURRENT ASSETSReceivables 19 266 223Investments 28 3,206 2,604Property, Plant and Equipment 21 627,045 488,179Total NON-CURRENT ASSETS 630,517 491,006TOTAL ASSETS 730,797 583,553CURRENT LIABILITIESPayables 23 32,584 37,783Employee benefits 24 23,730 22,808Provisions 25 1,896 2,568Unearned Revenue 26 12,257 8,286Other Current Liabilities 27 6,353 4,130Total CURRENT LIABILITIES 76,820 75,575NON-CURRENT LIABILITIESPayables 23 2,111 1,979Employee benefits 24 50,387 45,558Provisions 25 5,717 6,691Other Non-current Liabilities 27 0 499Total NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES 58,215 54,727TOTAL LIABILITIES 135,035 130,302NET ASSETS 595,762 453,251EQUITYRetained Earnings 30 370,267 378,333Asset revaluation reserve 30 225,495 74,918Total EQUITY 595,762 453,251The Total Equity is attributable to the SA Government asowner.UNRECOGNISED CONTRACTUAL COMMITMENTS 31CONTINGENT ASSETS AND LIABILITIES 32 79
  • Statement of Changes in Equity – For the Year Ended 30 June 2009 Asset Note Revaluation Retained No. Reserve Earnings Total $000 $000 $000Balance at 30 June 2007 76,413 386,458 462,871First Time Recognition of assets 0 10,412 10,412Current Asset Adjustments 0 (73) (73)Restated balance at 30 June 2007 76,413 396,797 473,210Net Result for 2007-08 0 (18,494) (18,494)Investments Adjustment 0 30 30Gain on buildings during 2007-08 520 0 520Loss on revaluation of library during2007-08 (2,015) 0 (2,015)Total comprehensive result 2007-08 (1,495) (18,464) (19,959)Restated balance at 30 June 2008 74,918 378,333 453,251Net Result for 2008-09 0 (8,066) (8,066)Gain on buildings during 2008-09 54,681 0 54,681Gain on land during 2008-09 95,896 0 95,896Total comprehensive result 2008-09 150,577 (8,066) 142,511Balance at 30 June 2009 225,495 370,267 595,762All changes in equity are attributable to the SAGovernment as owner. 225,495 370,267 595,762 (0) (0) 0 80
  • Statement of Cash Flows for the year ended 30 June 2009 2009 2008 Note $000 $000 Inflows Inflows (Outflows) (Outflows)CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES CASH OUTFLOWS Employee benefit payments (266,338) (258,785) Payments for supplies and services (171,335) (141,419) Payments of grants and subsidies (71,642) (81,695) GST paid to the ATO (4,199) (3,998) Other payments (884) (275) Cash used in operations (514,398) (486,172) CASH INFLOWS Commonwealth grants 65,989 106,323 Student and other fees and charges 99,668 91,458 Other grants and contributions 12,250 8,615 Interest received 24 28 GST recovered from the ATO 17,697 17,440 Other receipts 4,791 5,096 Cash generated from operations 200,419 228,960 CASH FLOWS FROM SA GOVERNMENT: Receipts from SA Government 340,031 286,764 Payments to SA Government (13,250) (5,370) Cash generated from SA Government 326,781 281,394 Net Cash provided by Operating Activities 36 12,802 24,182CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES Cash Outflows Purchase of property, plant and equipment (8,583) (9,647) Cash used in investing activities (8,583) (9,647) Cash Inflows Proceeds from the sale of property, plant and equipment 643 107 81
  • Cash generated from investing activities 643 107 Net Cash used in Investing Activities (7,940) (9,540)CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES Cash Outflows Cash transferred as a result of restructuring activities (462) 0 Cash used in financing activities (462) 0 Net Cash used in financing activities (462) 0NET INCREASE IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS 4,400 14,642CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS AT 1 JULY 2008 73,580 58,938CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS AT 30 JUNE 2009 18 77,980 73,580 77,980 73,580 (0) 0 82
  • Disaggregated disclosures - Expenses and Income for the year ended 30 June 2009 Employment and Skills Formation Office forExpenses/Income Vocational Learning, Regulatory International Science, Technology and Innovation Total Youth Education Workforce Dev Services and Higher Information Bioscience and Training & Employment Education Science and Economy Industry Technology Innovation Development Investment $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000ExpensesEmployee benefits 251,495 9,482 3,373 668 1,620 1,702 0 0 2,297 270,637Supplies and services 139,740 5,488 1,122 412 806 681 0 0 881 149,130Grants and subsidies 27,878 15,429 324 1,457 15,124 280 8,017 1,545 1,588 71,642Depreciation 19,772 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 19,772Net Loss on disposal of assets 849 57 17 4 9 9 0 0 12 957Other expenses 470 34 5 1 3 3 0 0 4 520Total Expenses 440,204 30,490 4,841 2,542 17,562 2,675 8,017 1,545 4,782 512,658IncomeCommonwealth grants 63,858 1,903 0 0 0 105 0 0 123 65,989Student and other fees and charges 93,150 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 93,150Other grants and contributions 10,329 921 774 150 66 0 0 0 10 12,250Interest income 24 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 24Other income 6,068 (884) 388 599 126 (90) 0 0 191 6,398Total Income 173,429 1,940 1,162 749 192 15 0 0 324 177,811Net Cost of Providing Services 266,775 28,550 3,679 1,793 17,370 2,660 8,017 1,545 4,458 334,847Revenues from/payments toSA GovernmentRevenues from SA Government 272,509 23,588 5,830 2,168 19,006 2,732 8,017 1,545 4,636 340,031Payments to SA Government (13,250) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 (13,250)Net Result (7,516) (4,962) 2,151 375 1,636 72 0 0 178 (8,066) 83
  • Disaggregated disclosures - Assets & Liabilities for the year ended 30 June 2009 Employment and Skills Formation Office forAssets/Liabilities Vocational Learning, Regulatory International Science, Technology and Innovation Youth Workforce Education Dev Services and Higher & Science and Information Bioscience General/ Not and Training Employment Education Innovation Economy Industry Technology attributable Total Development Investment $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 AssetsCash & CashEquivalents 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 77,980 77,980Receivables 15,795 295 1,380 0 9 0 0 0 77 3,656 21,212Inventories 935 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 935Non-current Assets Heldfor Sale 419 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 419Investments 0 0 0 3,206 0 0 0 0 0 0 3,206Property, Plant &Equipment 626,516 265 88 19 45 48 0 0 64 0 627,045Total Assets 643,665 560 1,468 3,225 54 48 0 0 141 81,636 730,797LiabilitiesPayables 26,362 787 195 42 1,795 75 0 0 222 5,217 34,695Employee Benefits 68,927 2,421 1,166 247 425 467 0 0 464 0 74,117Provisions 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7,613 7,613Unearned Revenue 11,917 155 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 185 12,257Other Liabilities 6,353 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6,353Total Liabilities 113,559 3,363 1,361 289 2,220 542 0 0 686 13,015 135,035Net Assets 530,106 (2,803) 107 2,936 (2,166) (494) 0 0 (545) 68,621 595,762 84
  • Disaggregated disclosures - Expenses and Income for the year ended 30 June 2008 Employment and Skills Formation Office for YouthExpenses/Income Vocational International Regulatory Learning, Science, Technology and Innovation Total Education and Higher Services Workforce Dev Young Information Strengthened Peoples Creative and Training Education & Employment Science and Economy Bioscience Partnerships Engagement Leadership Industry Technology Innovation Development Investment $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000ExpensesEmployee benefits 247,485 1,032 2,946 10,898 1,487 1,829 0 0 881 628 628 267,814Supplies and services 126,002 637 637 5,592 406 919 0 0 413 283 212 135,101Grants and subsidies 18,730 5,014 22 25,666 19,632 944 7,450 1,778 163 893 280 80,572Depreciation 20,020 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 20,020Net Loss on disposal of assets 673 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 673Other expenses 531 2 9 22 2 4 0 0 2 1 1 574Total Expenses 413,441 6,685 3,614 42,178 21,527 3,696 7,450 1,778 1,459 1,805 1,121 504,754IncomeCommonwealth grants 104,382 0 0 1,808 0 133 0 0 0 0 0 106,323Student and other fees andcharges 85,039 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 85,039Other grants and contributions 7,646 0 0 856 66 0 0 0 30 17 0 8,615Interest income 28 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 28Other income 2,946 755 425 324 145 109 0 0 128 40 19 4,891Total Income 200,041 755 425 2,988 211 242 0 0 158 57 19 204,896Net Cost of ProvidingServices 213,400 5,930 3,189 39,190 21,316 3,454 7,450 1,778 1,301 1,748 1,102 299,858Revenues from/payments toSA GovernmentRevenues from SAGovernment 200,836 6,804 3,129 38,163 21,282 3,104 7,450 1,778 1,294 1,807 1,117 286,764Payments to SA Government (5,370) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 (5,370)Net Result (17,934) 874 (60) (1,027) (34) (350) 0 0 (7) 59 15 (18,464) 85
  • Disaggregated disclosures - Assets & Liabilities for the year ended 30 June 2008 Employment and Skills Formation Office for YouthAssets/Liabilities Vocational International Regulatory Learning, Science, Technology and Innovation Workforce Education and Higher Services Dev Young & Science and Information Strengthened Peoples Creative General/ Not and Training Education Employment Innovation Economy Bioscience Partnerships Engagement Leadership attributable Total Industry Technology Development Investment $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 AssetsCash & CashEquivalents 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 73,580 73,580Receivables 12,021 (1) 25 523 453 20 0 0 22 2 1 4,413 17,479Inventories 923 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 923Non-current AssetsHeld for Sale 788 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 788Investments 0 2,604 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2,604Property, Plant &Equipment 483,466 11 58 212 30 36 0 0 18 12 12 4,324 488,179Total Assets 497,198 2,614 83 735 483 56 0 0 40 14 13 82,317 583,553LiabilitiesPayables 16,156 7 54 1,194 1,535 366 0 0 46 215 40 20,149 39,762Employee Benefits 61,205 145 1,149 2,455 378 440 0 0 159 55 55 2,325 68,366Provisions 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9,259 9,259Unearned Revenue 7,439 14 833 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8,286Other Liabilities 4,629 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4,629Total Liabilities 89,429 152 1,217 4,482 1,913 806 0 0 205 270 95 31,733 130,302Net Assets 407,769 2,462 (1,134) (3,747) (1,430) (750) 0 0 (165) (256) (82) 50,584 453,251 86
  • Notes to the Income Statement for the Year Ended June 2009 5 Employee Benefits $000 $000 Salaries and Wages (including Annual Leave) 220,758 215,137 Superannuation 24,139 23,728 Payroll Tax 12,509 12,887 Long Service Leave 9,799 11,046 Workers’ Compensation 1,699 3,584 Other Employee Related Costs 1,733 1,432 270,637 267,814 Remuneration of Employees The number of employees whose remuneration received or receivable falls within the following bands: 2009 2008 Number of Number of Employees Employees $100 000 to $109 999 107 86 $110 000 to $119 999 32 30 $120 000 to $129 999 20 13 $130 000 to $139 999 5 6 $140 000 to $149 999 2 9 $150 000 to $159 999 6 2 $160 000 to $169 999 4 2 $170 000 to $179 999 3 2 $180 000 to $189 999 5 3 $200 000 to $209 999 3 1 $210 000 to $219 999 1 1 $220 000 to $229 999 0 1 87
  • $230 000 to $239 999 3 1 $260 000 to $269 999 0 2 $270 000 to $279 999 2 0 $280 000 to $289 999 1 1 $320 000 to $329 999 0 1 Total number of employees 194 161 The table includes all employees who received remuneration of $100 000 or more during the year. Remuneration of employees reflects all costs of employment including salaries and wages, superannuation contributions, fringe benefits tax and any other salary sacrifice benefits. The total remuneration received by these employees for the year was $23.7 million ($19.7 million). 2009 2008 $000 $0006 Supplies and Services Funding to Non-TAFE Providers for Vocational Education and Training 30,013 24,071 Printing and Consumables 15,040 14,570 Minor Works, Maintenance and Equipment 20,176 16,421 Information Technology Infrastructure and Communication 19,609 18,712 Fees - Contracted Services (Including Consultants) 18,139 16,047 Trainee & Apprenticeship Reimbursements 717 504 Utilities 6,674 6,414 Cleaning 8,866 8,728 Vehicle and Travelling Expenses 7,067 7,259 Rentals and Leases 6,167 5,570 Other 16,662 16,805 Total Supplies and Services 149,130 135,101 88
  • Supplies and Services Provided by Entities Within the SA Government Funding to Non-TAFE Providers for Vocational Education and Training 221 103 Minor Works, Maintenance and Equipment 14,670 12,304 Information Technology Infrastructure and Communication 3,518 3,564 Fees - Contracted Services (Including Consultants) 5,585 3,742 Utilities 1,096 1,201 Cleaning 7,494 7,521 Vehicle and Travelling Expenses 3,245 2,772 Rentals and Leases 4,414 4,028 Other 499 472 40,742 35,707 The total supplies and services amount disclosed includes GST amounts not-recoverable from the ATO due to the Department not holding a valid tax invoice or payments relating to third party arrangements Consultancy The number and dollar amount of Consultancies paid/payable (included in supplies and services) that fell within the following bands: 2009 2008 Number $000 Number $000 Below $10,000 2 13 4 22 Between $10,000 and $50,000 6 163 7 142 Above $50,000 2 177 3 183 Total paid/payable to the consultants engaged (GST exclusive) 353 347 2009 20087 Grants and Subsidies $000 $000 Total Grants and Subsidies Employment Programs 22,183 19,151 Vocational Education and Training Programs 10,602 11,659 Science and Technology Programs 24,950 29,683 Tertiary Student Transport Concessions 9,541 9,175 89
  • National Training Infrastructure Program 1,715 3,259 Other Specific Grants 2,651 7,645 71,642 80,572 Grants and Subsidies Paid/Payable to Entities Within the SA Government Employment Programs 3,311 3,445 Vocational Education and Training Programs 2,358 3,385 Science and Technology Programs 11,283 13,747 Tertiary Student Transport Concessions 9,541 9,175 National Training Infrastructure Program 939 440 Other Specific Grants 713 5,766 28,145 35,958 2009 2008 $000 $0008 Depreciation Buildings and Improvements 15,468 15,347 Plant and Equipment 2,122 2,197 Library 2,182 2,476 Total Depreciation 19,772 20,020 Change in Depreciation Due to a Revaluation The Department revalued its Library assets in 2007-08. As a result of that revaluation, depreciation on assets calculated for the current reporting period decreased by $0.3m. Change in Depreciation Due to A Revision in Accounting Estimates A revaluation of the department’s building and paving assets was performed in June 2009 which also included a reassessment of its useful lives. It is expected to decrease this expense in future periods by approximately $3.0million. 2009 20089 Other Expenses $000 $000 Audit Fees 322 275 Asset Revaluation Reserve Adjustments (209) 0 Allowance for Doubtful Debts and Debt Write-offs (118) 299 Other 525 0 90
  • Total Other Expenses 520 574 2009 2008 $000 $00010 Auditors Remuneration Audit Fees Paid/Payable to the Auditor-Generals Department 240 240 Other Audit fees 82 35 Total Auditors Remuneration Paid/Payable 322 275 No other services were provided by the Auditor-General’s Department. 2009 200811 Commonwealth Grants $000 $000 Recurrent Grants 1 Skilling Australias Workforce Act 42,187 81,086 Specific Purpose 8,341 8,638 50,528 89,724 Capital Grants 1 Skilling Australias Workforce Act 6,800 13,600 Specific Purpose 8,661 2,999 15,461 16,599 Total Commonwealth Grants 65,989 106,323 1 A change in the management of funding received from the Commonwealth Government has led to a reduction in revenues reported in this note. A significant portion of the funding is now received by the Department of Treasury and Finance and transferred to DFEEST. Please refer also to Note 17. DFEEST has received $49.0 million worth of Commonwealth Contributions in 2008/09 under the Skilling Australias Workforce Act. DFEEST has received $16.9 million worth of Commonwealth funding for other Specific Projects of which $8.2 million is to be incurred in future periods. The National Training Infrastructure Program received $8.6 million of Commonwealth contributions in 2008/09 of which a commitment exists to spend $7.9 million in the 2009/10 year. The committed funds are for the provision and development of skills centres and capital equipment. 91
  • DFEEST has received $1.2 million of Commonwealth revenue for the Group Training Scheme in the financial year, $27,000 of which will be incurred in the 2009/10 financial year. The Clever Networks program has received a Commonwealth contribution of $0.2 million for maintenance expenses relating to the Clever Networks project. DFEEST is recognising $0.2 million as expenditure to be incurred in the next 4 years. The Targeting Skills Needs in Regions program has received $0.6 million of Commonwealth funding to enable flexible responses to emerging issues related to the provision of skills training, particularly through Australian Apprenticeships. The program has $0.2 million of expenditure to be incurred in 2009/10 relating to this Commonwealth funding. The Office for Youth has a commitment to spend $41,000 in the 2009/10 financial year relating to the Targeting Skills Needs in Regions program. This expenditure will be incurred by the Office for Youth when they transfer to the Attorney Generals Department. In 2007/08 DFEEST received $1.1 million of Commonwealth contributions that was used to fund expenditure in 2008/09. The National Training Infrastructure Program received $1.0 million of Commonwealth contributions in 2007/08 which was used to fund expenditure on Capital Infrastructure in 2008/09. The Targeting Skills Needs in Regions program received $52,000 of Commonwealth contributions in 2007/08 that was used to fund expenditure in 2008/09. The Group Training Scheme Program received $21,000 of Commonwealth contributions in 2007/08 that was used to fund expenditure in 2008/09. $000 $00012 Student and Other Fees and Charges Total Fees and Charges Received/Receivable Sales/Fee for Service Revenue 57,966 52,562 Student Enrolment Fees and Charges 32,742 29,836 Other User Fees and Charges 2,442 2,641 93,150 85,039 Fees and Charges Received/Receivable from Entities Within the SA Government Sales/Fee for Service Revenue 1,104 1,139 Student Enrolment Fees and Charges 636 529 Other User Fees and Charges 36 132 1,776 1,800 2009 2008 $000 $000 92
  • 13 Other Grants and Contributions Grants and Subsidies Revenue 4,214 3,416 Miscellaneous Contributions 434 474 Donations 93 98 Grants from Entities Within the SA Government 7,509 4,627 Total Other Grants and Contributions 12,250 8,615 2009 2008 $000 $00014 Interest Interest from Entities External to the SA Government 24 28 Total Interest 24 28 2009 200815 Net (Loss)/Gain on Disposal of Non-Current Assets $000 $000 Asset Held for Sale Proceeds from Disposals 616 0 Less: Net Book Value of Assets Disposed (790) 0 (174) 0 Land and Buildings Proceeds from Disposals 0 23 Less: Net Book Value of Assets Disposed (280) (34) (280) (11) Plant and Equipment Proceeds from Disposals 27 84 Less: Net Book Value of Assets Disposed (530) (746) (503) (662) Total Assets Total Proceeds from Disposal 643 107 Less: Net Book Value of Assets Disposed (1,600) (780) (957) (673) 93
  • 2009 2008 $000 $00016 Other Income Share of Net Gains from Investments 601 755 Recoup of Salaries 830 863 Application/Assessment Fees 418 324 Rental & Lease Charges 428 228 Registration Fees 259 287 Sundry Income 3,862 2,434 Total Other Income 6,398 4,891 2009 2008 $000 $00017 Revenues from/Payments to SA Government Revenues from SA Government Appropriations from Consolidated Account Pursuant to the Appropriation Act 273,849 271,864 Accrual Appropriation 8,564 4,772 Appropriation Transfers from Contingency 7,833 10,128 1 Commonwealth Grants received via Treasury 49,785 0 340,031 286,764 Payments to SA Government Return of Surplus Cash Pursuant to Cash Alignment Policy (13,250) (5,370) (13,250) (5,370) Total Revenues from/Payments to SA Government 326,781 281,394 Total revenues from Government consists of $6.8 million ($9.2million) for capital projects and the remainder for operational funding. For details on expenditure associated with the operational funding and capital funding received refer to Note 5 to 10 and 36. There was no material variations between the amount appropriated and the expenditures associated with this appropriation. 94
  • 1 A change in the management of funding received from the Commonwealth Government has led to an increase in revenues reported in this note. A significant portion of the funding is now received by the Department of Treasury and Finance and transferred to DFEEST. Please refer also to Note 11. 2009 200818 Cash and Cash Equivalents $000 $000 Deposits with the Treasurer 45,378 36,814 Special Deposit Account with the Department of Treasury and Finance 32,543 36,191 Imprest Account/Cash on Hand 59 555 External Bank Account 0 20 Total Cash and Cash Equivalents 77,980 73,580 Deposits with the Treasurer Includes funds held in the Accrual Appropriation Excess Funds Account. The balances of these funds are not available for general use (ie funds can only be used in accordance with The Treasurers/Under Treasurers approval). External Bank Account Interest is calculated based on the average daily balances. The account earned a floating interest rate of 3.0%. Interest rate risk Interest is not earned on deposits with the Treasurer, however the imprest account earns interest at a floating interest rate, based on daily bank deposit rates. The carrying amount of cash and cash equivalents represents fair value. 2009 200819 Receivables $000 $000 Current Fees and Charges Receivable 17,679 13,872 Less: Allowance for Doubtful Debts (2,012) (2,264) Prepayments 1,188 1,353 GST Recoverable from ATO 3,971 4,174 Other Receivables 120 121 Total Current Receivables 20,946 17,256 95
  • Non-CurrentWorkers compensation receivable 266 223Total Non-current Receivables 266 223Total Receivables 21,212 17,479Receivables from SA Government EntitiesReceivables 1,861 1,211Workers Compensation Receivable 266 223Prepayments 5 51 2,132 1,485Movement in the allowance for doubtful debtsThe allowance for doubtful debts (allowance for impairment loss) is recognised when there is objective evidence (ie calculated on pastexperience and current and expected changes in client credit rating) that a receivable is impaired.An allowance for impairment loss has been recognised in other expenses in the Statement of Comprehensive Income for specific debtorsand debtors assessed on a collective basis for which such evidence exists. 2009 2008Movement in the allowance for doubtful debts $000 $000Carrying amount at the beginning of the period 2,264 2112Increase in the allowance 15 299Amounts written off (267) (147)Carrying amount at the end of the period 2,012 2,264Interest rate riskReceivables are raised for all goods and services provided for which payment has not been received. Receivables are normally settled within30 days. Trade receivables, prepayments and accrued revenues are non-interest bearing.Other than as recognised in the allowance for doubtful debts, it is not anticipated that counterparties will fail to discharge their obligations.The carrying amount of receivables approximates net fair value due to being receivable on demand. There is no concentration of credit risk. 96
  • (a) Maturity analysis of receivables - Please refer to table 37.3 in Note 37. (b) Categorisation of financial instruments and risk exposure information - Please refer to note 37. 2009 200820 Non-Current Assets Held for Sale $000 $000 Land at Fair Value 419 56 Buildings and Improvements at Fair Value/Cost 0 732 419 788 During 2008-09 land at Murray Bridge was identified as surplus to requirements. It is anticipated that the land at Murray bridge will be sold by 30 June 2010. 2009 200821 Property, Plant and Equipment $000 $000 Land and Buildings Land at Fair Value 154,715 58,738 Buildings and Improvements at Fair Value/Cost 895,892 756,075 Accumulated Depreciation (455,041) (358,433) Construction Work in Progress 3,491 2,485 599,057 458,865 Plant and Equipment Plant and Equipment at Cost (Deemed Fair Value) 31,707 31,024 Accumulated Depreciation (16,302) (15,790) 15,405 15,234 Libraries Libraries at Valuation 29,288 28,603 Accumulated Depreciation (16,705) (14,523) 12,583 14,080 Total Property, Plant and Equipment 1,115,093 876,925 Total Accumulated Depreciation at the end of the period (488,048) (388,746) Total Property, Plant and Equipment 627,045 488,179 97
  • Valuation of Land and Buildings The valuation of land and buildings was performed by Martin Burns and Andrew J Lucas independent valuers from Liquid Pacific and Valcopr respectively as at 30 June 2009. The valuers arrived at fair value based on recent market transactions for similar land and buildings in the area taking into account zoning and restricted use. Impairment There were no indications of impairment of property and plant and equipment assets at 30 June 2009. 2009 200822 Inventories $000 $000 Current Inventories Held for Sale 540 562 Inventories Held for Distribution 395 361 Total Inventories 935 923 2009 200823 Payables $000 $000 Current Creditors 18,493 25,981 Accrued Expenses 7,783 5,636 Employment On-Costs 6,210 6,111 Other 98 55 Total Current Payables 32,584 37,783 Non-Current Employment on-costs 2,111 1,979 Total Non-current Payables 2,111 1,979 Total Payables 34,695 39,762 98
  • Payables to SA Government Entities Creditors 2,691 6,055 Accrued Expenses 4,641 2,871 Employment On-costs 8,321 8,090 15,653 17,016 As a result of an actuarial assessment performed by the Department of Treasury and Finance, the average factor for the calculation of employer superannuation cost on-cost has changed from the 2008 rate 10.8% to 10.5%. These rates are used in the employment oncost calculation Interest rate and credit risk Creditors are raised for all amounts billed but unpaid and accruals are raised where goods and services are received but an invoice has not yet been received. Sundry Creditors are normally settled within 30 days. Employment on-costs are settled when the respective employee benefit that they relate to is discharged. All payables are non-interest bearing. The carrying amount of payables represents fair value due to the amounts being payable on demand. (a) Maturity analysis of payables - Please refer to table 37.3 in Note 37. (b) Categorisation of financial instruments and risk exposure information - Please refer to note 37. 2009 200824 Employee Benefits $000 $000 Current Annual Leave 9,802 9,219 Long Service Leave 5,780 6,570 Accrued Salaries and Wages 3,281 2,369 Non-Attendance Days 4,867 4,650 Total Current Employee Benefits 23,730 22,808 Non-Current Employee Benefits Long Service Leave 50,387 45,558 Total Non-Current Employee Benefits 50,387 45,558 Total Employee Benefits 74,117 68,366 99
  • The total current and non-current employee benefits (i.e. aggregate employee benefit plus related on-costs) for 2009 is $29.9 million and $52.5 million respectively. As a result of an actuarial assessment performed by the Department of Treasury and Finance, the benchmark for the measurement of long service leave liability has changed from the 2008 benchmark 7.5 years to 6.5 years. The net financial effect of the changes in the current financial year is an increase in the long service liability of $0.5million and employee benefit expense of $0.5million. The impact on future periods is impracticable to estimate as the benchmark is calculated using a number of assumptions – a key assumption is the long-term discount rate. With current conditions, the long-term discount rate is experiencing significant movement. In addition, the actuarial assessment performed by the Department of Treasury and Finance also revised the salary inflation rate down by 0.5% from the 2008 rate 4.5%. The net financial effect of the changes in the current financial year is a decrease in the annual leave liability of $67,000 and employee benefit expense of $78,000. The estimated impact on 2010 is $70,000 and $82,000 respectively and 2011 is $73,000 and $85,000 respectively. 2009 200825 Provisions $000 $000 Current Workers Compensation 1,896 2,568 1,896 2,568 Non-Current Workers Compensation 5,717 6,691 5,717 6,691 Total Provisions 7,613 9,259 Carrying amount at 1 July 9,259 8,681 Reductions arising from payments/other sacrifice of future economic benefits (1,646) 0 Additional provisions recognised 0 578 Carrying amount at 30 June 7,613 9,259 A liability has been reported to reflect unsettled workers compensation claims. The workers compensation provision is based on an actuarial assessment performed by the Public Sector Workforce Division of the Department of Premier and Cabinet. These claims are expected to be settled within the next financial year. 100
  • 2009 200826 Unearned Revenue $000 $000 Unearned Revenue to SA Govt Entities 472 1,693 Unearned Revenue for Non-SA Govt Entities 11,785 6,593 12,257 8,28627 Other Liabilities $000 $000 Current Deposits 6,255 4,034 Other Liabilities 98 96 6,353 4,130 Non-Current Advances 0 499 0 499 Total Other Liabilities 6,353 4,62928 Investments Austraining Austraining International International Pty Ltd Pty Ltd $000 $000 Contributed Capital in Subsidiary Company (Austraining) 400 400 Share of Retained Profit 100% 100% 2009 2008 Retained Profits Attributable to Subsidiary Company $000 $000 Balance at 1 July 2,604 1,449 Share of Operating Profit/(Loss) After Income Tax 602 1,155 Total Investments 3,206 2,604 101
  • Austraining International Pty Ltd Austraining International Pty Ltd, which has a reporting date of 30 June, is controlled by the Minister for Employment, Training and Further Education. Its principal activity is to secure international contracts for work in vocational education and training. The current investment value is based on unaudited financial statements as at 30 June 2009.29 Adjustments to Equity Asset Revaluation Reserve Retained Earnings 2008 $000 $000 $000 Balance at 1 July 2007 74,918 367,965 442,883 First Time Recognition of assets in prior period error 0 10,412 10,412 Current Asset adjustments 0 (44) (44) Total Equity as at 30 June 2008 74,918 378,333 453,251 Buildings and improvements adjustments These adjustments reflect buildings and improvements that have been recognised in the 2008-09 financial year, where the valuers through their valuation provided more comprehensive information which had not previously been recognised in particular, fencing and utility reticulation. Current asset adjustments This adjustment reflects the understatement of the 30 June 2008 investment in Austraining International Pty Ltd and adjustments for the Imprest account and Salaries.30 Equity 2009 2008 $000 $000 Retained earnings 370,267 378,333 Asset revaluation reserve 225,495 74,918 Total Equity 595,762 453,251 The asset revaluation reserve is used to record increments and decrements in the fair value of land, buildings and libraries to the extent that they offset one another. 102
  • 31 Unrecognised Contractual Commitments Remuneration Commitments Commitments for the payment of salaries and other remuneration under fixed-term employment contracts in existence at the reporting date but not recognised as liabilities are payable as follows: 2009 2008 $000 $000 Within one year 9,248 5,086 Payable later than one year and not later than five years 12,485 11,814 Total Remuneration Commitments 21,733 16,900 Amounts disclosed include commitments arising from executive contracts and hourly paid instructors. The Department does not offer remuneration contracts greater than 5 years. Capital Commitments Capital expenditure contracted for at the reporting date but are not recognised as liabilities in the financial statements are payable as follows: 2009 2008 $000 $000 Within one year 14,084 846 Later than one year and not later than five years 6,339 0 Total Capital Commitments 20,423 846 The departments capital commitments relate to construction works at Victor Harbor campus and Narungga and the acquisition and implementation of the student information system. 103
  • Other Commitments 2009 2008 $000 $000These amounts are due for payment:Within one year 22,168 851Later than one year and not later than five years 24,771 992Later than five years 0 853Total Other Commitments 46,939 2,696The Departments other commitments relate to agreements for cleaning contracts and other procurement commitments. There are no purchaseoptions available to the department.Operating Leases CommitmentsCommitments in relation to operating leases contracted for at the reporting date but not recognised as liabilities are payable as follows: 2009 2008 $000 $000Within one year 5,407 4,548Payable later than one year and not later than five years 26,319 18,266Payable later than five years 17,135 19,376Total Operating Lease Commitments 48,861 42,190The departments operating leases are for office accommodation and equipment. Office accommodation is leased from Department forTransport, Energy and Infrastructure. The leases are non-cancellable with some leases having the right of renewal.Rent is payable in arrears. 104
  • 32 Contingent Assets and Liabilities The Department is not aware of any items which meet the definition of contingent assets. There are, however, a number of outstanding personal injury and common law claims not settled as at 30 June 2009 with an estimated settlement value of $69,000. The Minister for Employment, Training and Further Education has provided a $3.0 million guarantee to Austraining International Pty Ltd which has not been invoked as at 30 June 2009. The Minister for Employment, Training and Further Education has entered an agreement to provide Le Cordon Bleu with a 10 year interest free loan of $7.0 million conditional upon Le Cordon Bleu entering into a building contract for the development of Le Cordon Bleus city training facility.33 Transferred functions Transferred Out In September 2006 the South Australian Government announced a shared services initiative to streamline and simplify internal corporate and business support services to deliver savings. In late 2007 State Cabinet approved the shared services model developed by the Shared Services Reform Office for the creation of Shared Services SA in the Department of Treasury and Finance. The business services of South Australian Government Agencies are transferring to Shared Services SA in a series of transition programs known as Tranches. In most cases, these services transition in their current state with the current employees, who have been providing these services within the Agencies. Cabinet approved Tranche 1 services on 15 October 2007, which comprised Accounts Payable, Accounts Receivable and Payroll services. The next Tranche of services to transition was approved by Cabinet on 8 December 2008 and comprised of certain financial and taxation services, ICT services and Support, Contract Services and Purchase card administration. As part of this reform: • From October 2008, the Accounts Payable, Accounts Receivable and Payroll services from the Shared Business Services Division transitioned to Shared Services SA. The effective date of the transfer was 1 October 2008. • From 19 October 2009, certain financial accounting and taxation services from the Shared Business Services Division will transition to Shared Services SA. In October 2008, 29.6 full time equivalent employees of the Shared Business Services Division, budget funding of $1.7m and the following assets and liabilities were transferred to Shared Services SA. 105
  • Tranche 1 Oct 2008 $,000 Cash 462 Total Assets 462 Payables 47 Employee Benefits Liability 415 Total Liabilities 462 Total net assets transferred 0 Net assets transferred by the department as a result of the administrative restructure were at the carrying amount. The net assets transferred were treated as a distribution to the Government as owner.34 After Balance Day Events Effective 1 July 2009 the Office for Youth was transferred to the Attorney-Generals Department.35 Remuneration of Board and Committee Members Members that were entitled to receive remuneration during the 2008-09 financial year were: Training and Skills Commission (up to August 2008) T Phillips (Chair) P Wright A Smith D Frith T Hudson Prof H Winchester B Mowbray I Curry 106
  • Training and Skills Commission (from September 2008)Prof D Bradley AC (Chair)P WrightP DowdJ GilesProf R GreenProf R HarrisDr M Keating ACA SmithP VaughanJ ChapmanI CurryTraining Regulation Reference Group (previously QualityReference Group)A Smith (Chair) (Appointed October 2008)I CurryD FrithG PeakK ThieleAdult Community Education Reference GroupP Wright (Chair)K DanielP Ronan (Appointed October 2008)S SchrapelM SmithInformation Economy Advisory BoardProf S RichardsonA CannonA NobleT Whiting 107
  • Prof C Marlin (Chair)P RuwoldtM DuhnePremiers Science Research CouncilProf B BrookDr I GouldDr W HarchProf C MarlinProf J Hopwood (Appointed October 2008)Dr A KoultunowProf R Lewis (Appointed January 2009)Prof T MonroMr D MuttonDr T Rainsford (Appointed October 2008)Dr L ReadMs R McLeod (Appointed March 2009)Ministers Youth CouncilR Barry (Resigned December 2008)J BattyD CalicM DeaneL DeBoerK GblaE Gillet (appointed May 2009)M Holmwood (resigned February 2009)S IrelandA KingN Leung (Appointed May 2009)E Moulds (Chair from April 2008)L ParsonsR RichardsS Scott 108
  • H SkehanA Solomon-Bridge (Resigned October 2008)T Swanson (Chair up to March 2008)M ThompsonV Wong (Appointed October 2008)P WundkeAudit and Risk Management CommitteeI McLachlanHigher Education CouncilProf M BarberProf P HojProf J McWhaDr D RathjenT ZakThe number of members whose income from the entity falls within the following bands is: 2009 2008 No. of members No. of members$1 - $9 999 38 41$10 000 - $19 999 0 4$20 000 - $29 999 2 1$30,000 - $39,999 6 0$40,000 - $49,999 1 0 47 46Remuneration of board members reflects all costs of performing board/committee member duties including sitting fees, superannuationcontributions, fringe benefits tax and any other salary sacrifice arrangements. The total remuneration received or receivable by memberswas $0.3 million ($0.2 million). 109
  • Amounts paid to a superannuation plan for board/committee members was $21,000 ($9,000). In accordance with the Department of Premier and Cabinet Circular No. 016, government employees did not receive any remuneration for board/committee duties during the financial year. Unless otherwise disclosed, transactions between members are on conditions no more favourable than those that it is reasonable to expect the entity would have adopted if dealing with the related party at arms length in the same circumstances. Reconciliation of cash and cash equivalents - cash at year end36 as per: $000 $000 Cash and cash equivalents disclosed in the Statement of Financial Position 77,980 73,580 Balance as per the Cash Flow Statement 77,980 73,580 Reconciliation of Net Cash Provided by Operating Activities to Net Cost of Providing Services Net Cash Provided by Operating Activities 12,802 24,182 Depreciation (19,772) (20,020) Investments - share of operating gains 601 755 Loss on Sale of Assets (957) (673) Asset Revaluation Decrement 209 0 Prior Period Adjustments 40 0 (Increase) in Employee Benefits (5,751) (6,200) Increase/(Decrease) in Receivables 3,733 (2,456) Increase/(Decrease) in Inventories 12 (5) (Increase)/Decrease in Payables 5,066 (12,558) (Increase)/Decrease in Unearned Revenue (3,971) 1,359 (Increase) in Other Liabilities (1,724) (2,270) Decrease/(Increase) in Provisions 1,646 (578) Revenues from Government (340,031) (286,764) Payments to Government 13,250 5,370 Net Cost of Providing Services (334,847) (299,858) 110
  • 21a Reconciliations Reconciliations of the carrying amount of each class of non-current assets at the beginning and end of the current financial year are set out below: 1 July 2008 Net revaluation 30 June 2009 Carrying Increment/ Other Carrying amount Additions Disposals (decrement) Movements Depreciation amount $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 2009 Land at fair value 58,738 0 0 95,896 81 0 154,715 Buildings and improvements 397,642 0 (280) 54,681 4,276 (15,468) 440,851 Plant & Equipment 15,234 2,045 (530) 0 778 (2,122) 15,405 Construction work in progress 2,485 5,999 0 0 (4,993) 0 3,491 Libraries at valuation 14,080 685 0 0 0 (2,182) 12,583 Total 488,179 8,729 (810) 150,577 142 (19,772) 627,045 1 July 2007 Net revaluation 30 June 2008 Carrying Increment/ Other Carrying amount Additions Disposals (decrement) Movements Depreciation amount $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 2008 Land at fair value 58,794 0 0 0 (56) 0 58,738 Buildings and improvements 407,470 0 0 520 4,999 (15,347) 397,642 Plant & Equipment 15,575 2,602 (746) 0 0 (2,197) 15,234 Construction work in progress 1,206 7,548 (34) 0 (6,235) 0 2,485 Libraries at valuation 18,571 0 0 (2,015) 0 (2,476) 14,080 Total 501,616 10,150 (780) (1,495) (1,292) (20,020) 488,179 111
  • 37 Financial instruments Table 37.1 Categorisation of financial instruments Details of significant accounting policies and methods adopted including the criteria for recognition, the basis of measurement, and the basis on which income and expenses are recognised with respect to each class of financial asset, financial liability and equity instrument are disclosed in Note 2 Summary of significant Accounting Policies Category of Financial Assets and Financial Statement of Financial Position line 2009 Carrying 2008 Carrying Liabilities item Note amount $000 amount $000 Financial Assets Cash and Cash Equivalents Cash and cash equivalents 18 77,980 73,580 Receivables Receivables 19 21,212 17,256 Held to maturity investments Investments 28 3,206 2,604 Financial Liabilities Financial Liabilities at cost Payables 24 34,695 39,762 Other liabilities 26,27 18,610 12,915 Total Net Financial Assets at cost 49,093 40,763 All amounts recorded are carried at cost (not materially different from amortised cost) except for employee oncost which are determined via reference to the employee benefit liability to which they relate. Credit Risk Credit risk arises when there is the possibility of the department’s debtors defaulting on their contractual obligations resulting in financial loss to the department. The department measures credit risk on a fair value basis and monitors risk on a regular basis. The department has minimal concentration of credit risk. The department has policies and procedures in place to ensure that transactions occur with customers with appropriate credit history. The department does not engage in high risk hedging for its financial assets. Allowances for impairment of financial assets is calculated on past experience and current and expected changes in client credit rating. Currently the department does not hold any collateral as security to any of its financial assets. Other than receivables, there is no evidence to indicate that the financial assets are impaired. Refer to Note 19 for information on the allowance for impairment in relation to receivables. 112
  • Account Payment Performance Particulars Number of Percentage of Value in $A Percentage Accounts Accounts of Account of Paid Paid (by Paid Accounts Number) Paid (by Value) 16 Paid by due date 72 688 87% 233 140 082 83% Paid within 30 days or less from due date 6 537 8% 36 286 673 13% Paid more than 30 days from due date 4 584 5% 9 974 607 4%Contractual ArrangementsThe department executed nine contracts for the provision of goods and servicesand/or consultancies that individually exceeded $110 000. The total value of thesecontracts across their full term is $23.8 million (rounded up).FraudThe department’s Internal Audit and Risk Management Review Branch providesassurance in relation to department control systems and risk managementprocesses.The branch utilises a risk based approach to its review activities and the annualinternal audit program includes testing of compliance with controls over the resourcesand assets of the department.The department has also implemented a prescribed Risk Management Framework.Under the framework, fraud risk assessments are integrated as part of normal riskmanagement processes. This includes the development of strategies and internalcontrols to minimise the potential for fraud in identified areas.Internal audit and risk management findings are reported to the department’s Auditand Risk Management Committee.No instances of fraud were found within the department during the year.Consultancy Expenditure Number of Amount (excl GST) consultancies Below $10 000 $12 885 2 Between $10 000 and $50 000 $162 838 6 Above $50,000 $176 831 2 $352 554 1016 The due date is defined as per 11.2 of the instruction. Unless there is a discount or a written agreement betweenthe public authority and the creditor, payment should be within thirty days of the date of the invoice or claim. 113
  • AmountConsultant Report (excl GST) To provide an analysis and evaluation of the supply ofSA Centre for and demand situation for Information andEconomic Studies Communications Technology Skills in the South $65 681.37 Australian Economy (to end 2010) To undertake an independent review of thePKF Accounting (SA)Pty Ltd organisational structure of the Financial, Asset and $16 568.00 Procurement Services Directorate of the department To undertake a comprehensive analysis and review ofW Cossey the Workforce Development Directorate within the $11 600.00 department To assist with the development a Five Year Skills andPaige Group Workforce Development Plan $30 600.00 To review and provide advice on the future direction ofRobyn Archer the TAFE SA Adelaide Centre for the ARTS in order $45 000.00 to maximise the quality of Arts training Provision of financial advice for the implementation ofErnst and Young the Skills for the 21st Century Initiative $111 149.61 Review the practice of declaring trades and vocationsMiles Morgan Pty Ltd and to determine whether current legislation, policies $35 070.35 and procedures are fit for purpose Assist South Australian Government agencies develop strategies for the development and promotionProfessor EmeritusAnne R. Edwards of research in selected Humanitarian and Social $24 000.00 Sciences areas so as to achieve maximum benefit for the state Provide independent advice and assessment of theLloyds Register Quality management system used in Traineeship and $4 485.00 Apprenticeship ServicesMcLachlan Hodge To advise on the options relating to the department’sMitchell Pty Ltd strategic financial management structure $5 400.00 Services provided in the development of revenueMcLachlan Hodge targets for the Tele Learning Connections based onMitchell Pty Ltd the review performed by Mclachlan Hodge Mitchell n $3 000.00 2008 114
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  • Unless otherwise stated, all data relates to the 2008 calendar year and is sourcedfrom the National Centre for Vocational Education Research using publication scopeactivity. The National Centre for Vocational Education Research defines publicationscope as activity intended as vocational and does not include fee-for-service andoverseas full-fee paying student activity delivered through private providers;recreation, leisure and personal enrichment activity; and activity delivered throughschools where the delivery was undertaken by the schools. The annual figures for2009 were not available at the time this report was prepared.Number of Vocational Education and Training studentsIn 2008, 125 271 students undertook vocational education and training in SouthAustralia, an increase of 1.8% on the 2007 figure (of 122 998). By gender, 51.1% (or64 037 students) were female and 48.7% (60 973) were male, with a further 0.2%(261) not specifying their gender.In South Australia, 11.2%17 of South Australia’s working age (15-64 years) populationparticipated in vocational education and training in 2008, an increase of 0.1 of apercentage point on the 2007 figure (of 11.1%).Number of Delivered Vocational Education and Training HoursIn 2008, South Australia delivered 25 133 853 hours of vocational education andtraining activity, an increase of 0.5% on the 2007 figure (of 25 018 656).Vocational Education and Training Students by Age GroupThe figure below shows that the largest proportion of students undertaking vocationaleducation and training in South Australia in 2008 were aged between 20 to 29 years,with 26.0% (or 32 517) of total students, followed by those aged 19 years or under,with 24.2% (or 30 288) and those aged between 30 to 39 years, with 17.0% (or 21347).17 Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (2009) Annual National Report of theAustralian Vocational Education and Training System 2008: Appendix B – State and Territory Tables – SA Table1.1 119
  • VET Students by Age Groups, South Australia, 2008 Age 60 or over Unknown 5.9% 0.6% Age 50-59 Age 19 or under 10.5% 24.2% Age 40-49 15.8% Age 20-29 26.0% Age 30-39 17.0% Source: National Centre for Vocational Education Research (2009). Vocational Education and Training provider collection 2008.The largest share of male students were aged between 20 to 29 years with 29.3% (or17 857) followed by those aged 19 years or under with 26.8% (or 16 363) and thoseaged between 30 to 39 years with 16.7% (or 10 201).The largest share of female students were aged 20 to 29 years 22.8% (or 14 602) oftotal females, followed by those aged 19 years or under 21.7% (or 13 903) and thoseaged between 40 to 49 years 18.1% (or 11 581).Vocational Education and Training hours by Australian QualificationsFramework levelThe following figure shows the distribution of vocational education and training hoursby the Australian Qualifications Framework level. The largest share of vocationaleducation and training provision for 2008 was at the Certificate III level, whichaccounted for 32.4% (or 8 140 367), followed by Diploma or higher with 16.9% (or4 235 639), Certificate II with 15.7% (or 3 942 312), Certificate IV with 13.8% (or3 473 861) and Certificate I with 6.2% (or 1 567 682). The remainder of hours(16.0%) were attributed to other education and subject/award only courses. 120
  • VET Hours Delivered by AQF Level, South Australia, 2008 Certificate I Other education 6.2% 12.3% Subject/Award only - no Certificate II 15.7% qualification 2.7% Diploma or higher 16.9% Certificate III 32.4% Certificate IV 13.8% Source: National Centre for Vocational Education Research (2009). Vocational Education and Training provider collection 2008.Vocational Education and Training hours by Field of EducationThe following figure shows the distribution of South Australia’s 2008 vocationaleducation and training hours by field of education. Field of education defines thesubject matter of an educational activity. The field of education with the largest shareof hours was Management and Commerce with 22.3% (or 5 614 030). This wasfollowed by Engineering and Related Technologies with 18.3% (or 4 604 208) andSociety and Culture with 14.0% (or 3 510 848). VET Hours Delivered by Field of Education, Education South Australia, 2008 Management & Health 1.9% commerce 4.3% 22.3% Agriculture, Society & culture environmental & 14.0% related studies 4.1% Creative arts Architecture & 3.9% building 5.5% Food, hospitality & Engineering & related personal services technologies 7.6% 18.3% Mixed field Information programmes technology 12.8% 1.9% Subject/Aw ard only - Natural & physical no qualification sciences 2.7% 0.5% Source: National Centre for Vocational Education Research (2009). Vocational Education and Training provider collection 2008. 121
  • Training Package Activity Vocational education and training activity can be classified by training package activity or non-training package activity. In 2008, training package activity in South Australia accounted for 49.3% (or 61 749) of student and 69.3% (or 17 419 517) of vocational education and training hour activity. In contrast, non-training package activity generated 50.7% of student (or 63 552) and 30.7% of vocational education and training hour (or 7 714 336) activity. Of the 75 training packages used in South Australia in 2008, 15 training packages alone accounted for nearly 75% of training package hour and student activity (12 637 670 hours and 46 067 students respectively). The Community Services Training Package had the largest share of training package hours with 15.8% (or 2 746 214 hours), followed by Business Services with 10.7% (or 1 862 953) and Hospitality with 6.1% (or 1 056 220). Delivered Per cent Training Package Hours (all training packages)Community Services 2 746 214 15.8%Business Services 1 862 953 10.7%Hospitality 1 056 220 6.1%Retail 1 005 618 5.8%Automotive Industry Retail, Service and Repair 767 165 4.4%Information and Communications Technology 765 649 4.4%Metal and Engineering 720 151 4.1%General Construction 714 733 4.1%Financial Services 600 853 3.4%Health 490 608 2.8%Tourism 440 120 2.5%Training and Assessment 414 696 2.4%Transport and Distribution 364 963 2.1%Food Processing Industry 346 350 2.0%Hairdressing 341 377 2.0%Total (top fifteen training packages) 12 637 670 72.5%Total (all training packages) 17 419 513 100.0%Total (training and non-training package) 25 133 853 – Source: National Centre for Vocational Education Research (2009). Vocational Education and Training provider collection 2008. 122
  • When considering students, the Business Services Training Package had the largestshare with 13.0% (or 8003 students), followed by Community Services with 11.9% (or7377), and Retail with 8.4% (or 5210).VET Students by Non-English Speaking BackgroundThe figure below shows 11.9% (or 14 898) of South Australia’s 2008 vocationaleducation and training students have a language background other than English,79.8% (or 99 987) have an English speaking background with a further 8.3% (or10 386) not stating their language background. VET Students Language Background, South Australia, 2008 Not know n 8.3% English 79.8% Non-English 11.9% Source: National Centre for Vocational Education Research (2009). Vocational Education and Training provider collection 2008.Vocational Education and Training Students by Disability StatusThe following figure shows 6.8% of South Australia’s vocational education andtraining students (or 8539) stated they had a disability in 2008. Of those, females witha disability comprised 51.0% (or 4351) and males 49.0% (or 4183). 123
  • VET Students by Disability Status, South Australia, 2008 With a disability 6.8% Without a disability 89.0% Not known 4.2% Source: National Centre for Vocational Education Research (2009). Vocational Education and Training provider collection 2008.Vocational Education and Training students by Indigenous statusThe following figure shows 3.8% (or 4712) of South Australia’s vocational educationand training students identified themselves as Indigenous in 2008. Of these students,52.2% (or 2457) were female, 47.1% (or 2221) were male and a further 0.7% ofstudents reporting their Indigenous status but not their gender. VET Students by Indigenous Status, South Australia, 2008 Indigenous 3.8% Not indigenous Not known 87.4% 8.8% Source: National Centre for Vocational Education Research (2009). Vocational Education and Training provider collection 2008.Provider Type by Students and HoursThe following figure shows the distribution of student training activity by vocationaleducation and training provider type. In 2008, 63.0% (or 78 917) of students in SouthAustralia had their training provided by TAFE SA, followed by private providers with18.8% (or 23 531), Adult Community Education with 7.5% (or 9337), Vocational 124
  • Education and Training in Schools Arrangements with 5.7% (or 7089), and Workers’Education Association with 5.1% (or 6397). VET Students by Provider Type, South Australia, 2008 VISA 5.7% Private Providers 18.8% TAFE 63.0% ACE 7.5% WEA 5.1% Source: National Centre for Vocational Education Research (2009). Vocational Education and Training provider collection 2008.The figure below shows the distribution of training activity by hours. TAFE SA wasthe largest provider in 2008, with 74.2% (or 18 637 627 hours). Private providersaccounted for 20.1% (or 5 053 482), followed by VISA with 3.4% (or 847 838), AdultCommunity Education with 1.8% (or 459 594) and Workers’ Education Associationwith 0.5% (or 135 312). VET Hours Delivered by Provider Type, South Australia, 2008 VISA 3.4% Private Providers TAFE 20.1% 74.2% ACE 1.8% WEA 0.5% Source: National Centre for Vocational Education Research (2009). Vocational Education and Training provider collection 2008. 125
  • Vocational Education and Training hours by Funding SourceThe figure below shows 79.6% of total vocational education and training hours (or20 088 626) was funded by Commonwealth and state recurrent funding in 2008. Thenext largest funding source was domestic fee-for-service students with 11.6% (or2 914 520), followed by international fee-for-service students with 4.7% (or1 185 996) and Commonwealth specific funding with 4.1% (or 1 024 711). VET Hours Delivered by Funding Source, South Australia, 2008 International fee for service 1.7% Commonwealth and state general funding Domestic fee for 73.1% service 22.2% Commonwealth specific funding 3.0% Source: National Centre for Vocational Education Research (2009). Vocational Education and Training provider collection 2008. 126
  • Employee’s Overseas TravelDepartmental employees, including TAFE SA staff have undertaken overseas travelduring the last financial year for the following purposes; officially representing thestate government via ministerial delegations, attending and presenting atconferences/ seminars, undertaking quality assurance audits of ‘Transnational’ (Off-shore licensed and delivered TAFE SA courses), conducting commercial promotionof departmental programs and undertaking marketing and recruitment to attract fullfee paying fee overseas students.The total cost of travel was $363 490 with 45 staff travelling to: China East Timor Hong Kong India Japan Korea Malaysia New Zealand Philippines Samoa Singapore Sri Lanka Taiwan Thailand Vietnam.Refer to the following table for further information.The department, including TAFE SA generated $21.35 million dollars of revenue in2008-09 from its international travel as it received $13.5 million of overseas studentfull fee paying revenue, plus an additional $7.2 million derived from fees from thestrategic partnerships with Le Cordon Bleu and the International College of HotelManagement. (An additional $650 000 was generated from ‘Transnational’ or Off-shore licensed and delivered TAFE SA courses in countries such as China, India,Vietnam and Indonesia). This does not include the economic multiplier to the statethat factors in the additional spend of overseas students and their visiting friends andfamily.1818 There are limitations in this analysis as not all revenue generated in 2008-09 can be directly attributed to theinternational travel undertaken in 2008-09 as previous years travel undertaken across the department may havecontributed towards the 2008-09 revenue generated. 128
  • Report Type All Categories Of TravelDate From 01-Jul-08Date To 30-Jun-09 Employees Costs to departmentDestination/s Reason for Travel Involved ($) a) Participate b) Recruitment c) d) Business e) Attendance f) Presenting g) h) Project i) School j) Teacher / k) Offshore l) in of International Discussion Developmen at workshop / papers at a Facilitating Management Excursion Student Delivery of a Other Promotional Students with Tertiary t conference Conference a workshop Exchange course / Exhibitions Institutions Program of Country visited $China 5 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 5 67,856.49 $East Timor 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 7 13,114.00 $Hong Kong 4 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 4 45,370.34 $India 2 2 1 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 4 28,455.48 $Japan 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 21,167.34 $Korea 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 20,888.24 $Malaysia 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 10,283.69 $New Zealand 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 3 7,774.38 $Philippines 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 21,319.43 $Samoa 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 2,942.00 $Singapore 1 0 2 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 4 16,880.58 $Sri Lanka 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 17,810.28 $Taiwan 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 17,946.47 $Thailand 3 3 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 3 21,860.97 $Vietnam 4 2 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 2 7 49,820.67 $TOTAL 25 13 11 11 1 3 1 2 0 1 5 21 45 363,490.36Note: A traveller can nominate more than one objective / purpose of travel in a single travel application 129
  • Aboriginal Reconciliation Statement ReportThe department is committed to reconciliation and support for the Council forAboriginal Reconciliation’s vision of ‘A united Australia which respects this land ofours, values the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander heritage and provides justiceand equity for all’.The department’s Aboriginal Action Committee provides leadership within thedepartment to collaboratively improve planning and service delivery for AboriginalSouth Australians to reduce disadvantage.The Aboriginal Access Centre provides access to vocational education and trainingfor Aboriginal people. Enrolled students are supported through the development ofindividual learning plans and a case management approach to lead Aboriginalstudents from unemployment to vocational education and training to meaningfulemployment.The South Australian Government’s commitment to reconciliation is enunciated inSouth Australia’s Strategic Plan with reference to: Objective 1 Growing Prosperity, specifically in Target 1.26 Aboriginal unemployment: reduce the gap between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal unemployment rates each year Objective 2 Improving Wellbeing, specifically in Target 2.5 Aboriginal healthy life expectancy: lower the morbidity and mortality rates of Aboriginal South Australians Objective 3 Attaining Sustainability, specifically in Target 3.15 Aboriginal lands – access and management: resolve 75% of all native title claims by 2014 Objective 4 Fostering Creativity and Innovation, specifically Target 4.5 Understanding of Aboriginal culture: Aboriginal cultural studies included in school curriculum by 2016 with involvement of Aboriginal people in design and delivery Objective 5 Building communities, specifically Target 5.7 Aboriginal leadership: increase the number of Aboriginal South Australians participating in community leadership and in community leadership development programs Objective 6 Expanding Opportunity, specifically in Target 6.1 Aboriginal Well Being: improve the overall wellbeing of Aboriginal South Australians, Target 6.9 Aboriginal housing: reduce overcrowding in Aboriginal households by 10% by 2014, Target 6.18 Aboriginal education – early years: increase yearly the proportion of Aboriginal children reading at age appropriate levels at the end of year 1 and Target 6.24 Aboriginal employees: increase the participation of Aboriginal people in the South Australian public sector, spread across all classifications and agencies, to 2% by 2010 and maintain or better those levels through to 2014.Reporting Against the Carers Recognition Act 2005The department has implemented a number of policies and protocols in line with theCarers Recognition Act 2005, including the establishment of a carer’s referencegroup that can be consulted on priorities and specific requirements related to theirroles and the development and promotion of information sheets and complaintprocedures for carers. 130
  • Disability Action PlansThe department’s Disability Action Plan focuses on improving participation andoutcomes for groups experiencing disadvantage and unequal education andemployment outcomes and on making equity a core organising principle of thedepartment’s business.Disability Awareness Training is available online for all departmental employees andis linked to the department’s online induction for new employees. The training hasbeen emphasised by the chief executive as an important means of ensuring betterservice delivery, which includes meeting the needs of people with disabilities.A dedicated ‘Disability Awareness’ area has been created on the department’swebsite which promotes the importance for all employees within the department to beaware of the needs of people with disabilities.The TAFE SA Disability Action Plan aims to increase participation and successfuloutcomes in vocational education and training for people with a disability.The Commitment to People with a Disability Statement is displayed in each TAFE SAcampus.South Australia Works recognises that people with a disability experience significantbarriers to employment and training. A set of guiding principles have been developedto assist with strategic planning and the development of regional projects that willmaximise opportunities for participants with a disability.Freedom of InformationThe Freedom of Information Act 1991 confers on each member of the public a legallyenforcable right to be given access to documents held by the government, subjectonly to such restrictions as are reasonably necessary for the proper administration ofthe government. It also enables members of the public to apply for the amendment ofrecords concerning their personal affairs if the records are incomplete, incorrect,misleading or out of date.The structure and functions of the department are described in the ‘Governance’section of the report. These functions affect the public through the direct delivery ofthe education, training, employment and youth-related services, as well as through thepurchase of such services from private and community providers, the accreditation oftraining courses, the registration of training providers, the investigation of complaintsabout training organisations and accredited courses, the management of contracts oftraining, facilitation and development of the skills in the state, the encouragement ofscience, technology and innovation based industries, and the uptake and usage in thecommunity of online technologies and other ways of enhancing the economy of SouthAustralia. The public can participate in the department’s policy development in anumber of ways. These include membership of TAFE SA institute councils and otherboards and committees as well as responding to calls for public consultation onparticular issues. 131
  • The department holds correspondence and administrative records including: personnel records accounts records payroll records supply records facilities management records students’ records in TAFE SA institutes student services records records relating to accredited training courses complaints made about registered training providers and contracts of training contracts records relating to grants of funding surveys and statistics.Records are held in a variety of media including paper, microfiche and electronic formats.Information and explanatory documents about courses, contracts of training, courseaccreditation and training organisation registration, youth services, science, innovationand information economy are available free of charge from the following websites.TAFE SA:http://www.tafe.sa.edu.au/Skills SA:http://www.skills.sa.gov.au/Information on accreditation / registration and contracts of training:http://www.training.sa.gov.au/Higher Education accreditation:http://www.aqf.edu.au/Adult Community Education Grants:http://www.training.sa.gov.au/OVETstudents/pages/default/fundace/User Choice Policy located under the User Choice submenu:http://www.training.sa.gov.au/OVETorgs/Training and Skills Commission guidelines:http://www.employment.sa.gov.au/employ/Office for Youth:http://www.officeforyouth.sa.gov.au/Science, Innovation and Information Economy information:http://www.innovation.sa.gov.au/General departmental website:http://www.dfeest.sa.gov.au/dfeest/ 132
  • Hard copies of documents are available from:Freedom of Information and Copyright OfficerLegislation and Delegations UnitDepartment of Further Education, Employment, Science and TechnologyGPO Box 320ADELAIDE SA 5001Telephone enquiries can be made on (08) 8226 3276.Public access to documents:Application under the Freedom of Information Act 1991 must be made in writing,specifying that they are made under the Act, include an address in Australia to whichcorrespondence may be sent, be accompanied by either the prescribed applicationfee or proof of financial hardship, and should be addressed to:Freedom of Information and Copyright OfficerLegislation and Delegations UnitDepartment of Further Education, Employment Science and TechnologyGPO Box 320ADELAIDE SA 5001Telephone enquiries can be made on (08) 8226 3276.Access requests in 2009During the 2009 calendar year, the department received eight and processed18 applications under the Freedom of Information Act 1991.Policy documentsDepartmental policy documents are available via the internet at:http://tafe.sa.edu.au/http://www.saworks.sa.gov.au/http://www.youthworks.sa.gov.au/http://www.officeforyouth.sa.gov.au/1919 The Office for Youth, and subsequently the Youth portfolio, transferred to the Attorney General’s Department from 1 July2009. 133
  • Asbestos Management in Government BuildingsManagement of asbestos is a health risk management issue and requires aprofessional risk management process.The table below outlines the details of asbestos within the department. Number Category Interpretation23 of Sites21 One or more item(s) at these sitesCategory Description2220 At end of year 1 0 Remove Should be removed promptly. Should be scheduled for removal at a 2 9 Remove as soon as practicable practicable time. 3 8 Use care during maintenance May need removal during maintenance works. Has asbestos present. Inspect according to 4 15 Monitor condition legislation and policy (All asbestos identified as per Occupational No asbestos identified / identified 5 2 asbestos has been removed Health Safety and Injury Management 4.2.10(1) has been removed) 6 24 Further information required (These sites not yet categorised)In the previous four years, the department has removed from its sites the following: 2005 – 06 – 480 l/mts and 883m2 2006 - 07 – 1400m2 and 116 items 2007 – 08 – 1065m2 2008 – 09 – 1092m2.Urban Design CharterThe department recognises the important role the TAFE SA institutes andcampuses play in the local community. The institute/campus structure providessignificant input into social networks and reinforces local character. They are also aphysical resource and a landmark place of activity. The departments facilitiesmanagement and capital works processes include consideration of urban designconcepts. This helps support the building of community capacity and social capitalthrough safe, accessible and welcoming facilities.20 Category: The site performance score, determined by the lowest item performance score at each site.21 Number of Sites in Category: A count of how many sites have the corresponding site performance score, withseparate counts done at the start and the end of each year.22 Category Description: Indicates the recommended action corresponding to the lowest item performance score(recorded in the asbestos register by a competent person, as per OHS and W Regulations (SA) 1995, 4.2.10).23 Interpretation: A brief real-world example of what each category implies for a site. 134
  • Urban design is integrated with our core systems and procedures. Consultants,contractor tenders and major contracts are managed on behalf of the department bythe Department of Transport, Energy and Infrastructure. The department hassupported the Department of Transport Energy and Infrastructure in the preparationof policies, including the impact of our presence in the local community, with a viewto integrating with the urban fabric so that a positive contribution is made.To initiate the engagement of consultants to undertake design work, the departmentcollaborates with the Department of Transport Energy and Infrastructure to defineand/or request specific urban design principles associated with the project or requesttheir investigation, including: Ecologically Sustainable Development initiatives to be considered specific site issues such as cultural, political and heritage issues corporate parameters (relevant policies, standards and guidelines) specific consultant services required (for example tree audits, traffic management surveys, disability access, Indigenous/cultural issues).The department interacts and communicates with the community through theinstitutes and campuses. With respect to major projects, Cabinet Submissions, thePublic Works Committee process and the Department of Transport, Energy andInfrastructure on behalf of the department to help ensure exposure to a wide rangeof community views and scrutiny.The current construction of the new Victor Harbor TAFE SA campus demonstratesthe department’s commitment to this whole-of-government policy, in collaboratingwith the local community to provide a positive contribution at Victor Harbor. This newTAFE SA campus is expected to be completed by mid 2010.Sustainability Report 2008 – 09The department has developed a detailed Environmental Action Plan. The actionplan has 13 key actions to drive the department to become a more environmentallysustainable organisation. The actions cover improved energy performance of thedepartment’s facilities, increased recycling of waste, more efficient fleet vehicles, andreducing water usage and raising staff awareness of environmental impacts.This new plan is an integral part of departmental policy, and has strong commitmentfrom senior executives and management and is expected to result in strongercollaboration with all staff to improve the department’s environmental credentials.Ownership and accountability are cornerstone pillars to ensure delivery againsttargets relating to improving environmental performance.The following information covers the department’s environmental performance andcovers the financial year 2008 – 09. 135
  • Year Being Reported: Energy Efficiency Energy Business Expenditure Emissions Use Measure ($) (t/CO2) (GJ)24 25 (MJ/m²) 2008 - 09 162 308 5 861 345 29 091 370 2007 - 08 150 114 5 302 621 28 456 345 Energy Consumption TargetsBase Year 2000 - 01 156 222 49 878 376Department’s target for year 135 632 43 304 317being reported26Department’s target for year201027 132 789 42 396 311 Corporate2008 - 09 2 412 124 949 562 2302007 - 08 2 325 112 137 543 216 TAFE Adelaide North2008 - 09 77 970 2 860 804 13 876 4182007 - 08 71 196 2 590 678 13 343 384 TAFE Adelaide South2008 - 09 53 980 1 727 356 9 405 3872007 - 08 50 128 1 601 886 9 298 360 TAFE SA Regional2008 - 09 27 946 1 148 236 5 248 2742007 - 08 26 465 997 920 5 272 265Disclaimer - the greenhouse gas emissions coefficient is dependent upon a number of factors, most importantly, the mix of primaryfuels used to generate electricity that is supplied in South Australia. Decisions about the mix of fuels are made as a function of theNational Electricity Market and are therefore beyond the control of the department. The department has endeavoured to provide themost accurate information from all possible sources available to it. 24 Energy use is expressed in gigajoules (GJ) and is the sum of all fuel types used in the department’s facilities (electricity, natural and bottled gas) for that period. 25 The key performance indicator for energy efficiency is energy intensity; the amount of energy consumed per unit of a given Business Measure. The department uses the net size of all of departmental facilities in m2. This is a common measure used across many agencies. 26 It is acknowledged that portfolio structures change over time. Therefore the Portfolio baseline will represent the structure of the portfolio in the given reporting period. 27 Per footnote 23 136
  • The department consumed 7.5% more energy and spent 9.5% more in energy costs.The department produced 2.2% more greenhouse gas emissions and was 6.8% lessenergy efficient than in 2007 – 08.This result is attributed to adverse weather (unusually hot summer and cold winter)conditions affecting energy usage. The age, nature and condition of TAFE facilities,has resulted in higher energy usage.Department of Further Education, Employment, Science and Technology –CorporateCorporate operations consumed 3.6% more energy and cost an additional 9.4%. Thegreenhouse gas emissions increased by 3.4% and were less energy efficient by 6%.Corporate occupies two sites in the CBD, 11 Waymouth Street and 55 Currie Street.The main corporate occupation at City Central (11 Waymouth St – a five starGreenstar building) remains more efficient than the previous locations, as well asreducing the ecological footprint by 3.8%. The department’s information andcommunications technology area has been instrumental in reducing printingdemands by modifying printer profiles. For black and white printers, the profile hasbeen set to duplex printing. Colour printers are default set to greyscale and alsoduplex printing. Computers are automatically programmed to shut down each day.Continued focus on increasing equipment utilisation (doing more with lessequipment) will be reinforced under the new Environmental Action Plan 2009 - 11 toall staff within the department.Information and communications technology has implemented a server virtualisationproject which is replacing old and inefficient servers with new energy efficient BladeServers. This project is concentrated within Corporate at City Central and also in theGlenside Data Centre.These new Blade servers are expected to reduce energy consumption by anestimated 65,000 kWhs at a cost of approximately $13 000 which will reduce carbonemissions by 53 tonnes annually.Scanning to email, default duplexing and ‘greyscale’ (a light shade of black) areinitiatives introduced to reduce energy usage, paper and associated products (suchas toners) usage.TAFE SATAFE SA has: installed energy efficient T5 tubes which has reduced the number of tubes by 50%, increased the Lux`readings (light levels) by 23% and extended the life cycle replacement from 12 months to four years. It is anticipated the new T5 globes will save up to 30% in energy usage and associated greenhouse gas emissions and cost upgraded the new chillers and Building Management System at Noarlunga Campus which will see a reduction in yearly running cost for air-conditioning of 22% 137
  •  implemented Information and Communications Technology initiatives in relation to print devices, such as default duplexing, cost savings for students, energy saving modes reduced to one minute idle time, scanning to email and new printing devices incorporating vegetable based plastics which breakdown naturally. In addition, retired Ricoh print devices are recycled through the Ricoh Green Partners Program the most up-to-date and safest energy efficient welding equipment is now available at ten TAFE SA campuses around the state, thanks to the delivery of 163 new Voltage Reduction Device equipped welding units.Water Efficiency Year Being Reported Water Consumption Expenditure 4 (Kilolitres28)2008-09 184 513 839 5402007-08 165 642 845 129Base Year 2002-08 271 501 829 426Department’s Target for year 2013 235 357 Corporate2008-09 Corporate is in a tenancy that does not supply water consumption data2007-08 TAFE SA Adelaide North2008-09 102 919 324 6852007-08 94 653 323 720 TAFE SA Adelaide South2008-09 47 685 303 9062007-08 37 478 304 615 TAFE SA Regional2008-09 33 909 210 9492007-08 33 511 216 794Disclaimer – SA Water which includes property values, sewerage and water supply charges. River Murray levies which allinfluence the total utility price of water.The department’s overall water usage has dropped dramatically over recent years. Itis a 32% drop compared to the base year of 2002 - 03. The cost of water usage roseby 1.2% from 2007 – 2008. The department has exceeded its 2014 water reductiontarget by 22%.This is an excellent result and is primarily due to the extensive replacement of waterintensive lawn areas with drought resistant native vegetation at TAFE SA. Extensiveuse of mulch across all three institutes has also dramatically reduced outdoor area’sreliance on water. The incorporation of water tanks, particularly those at Port Augustacampus, which was successful in obtaining a Commonwealth water grant (eight polytanks each holding 22 000 litres), has also contributed to the reduced reliance onmains water.28 1: 1 kilolitre equals 1 000 litres of water consumed 138
  • Fleet efficiency for the departmentPlan and Vehicles 2008-09 Compared ComparedTarget to 2007-08 to 2001-01 Base year Number of vehicles 237 2.1% 38% Total cost of fuel $561 829 7.5% 12%SASP Target Distance travelled km 4 593 933 4.2% N/AT3.5 (estimated) Number of Alternative (Dual 118 3% 50% fuels/ LPG vehicles/ Hybrid) Tonnes CO2 1 14329 12% 25.7% Fuel usage (litres) 529 540 4.9% 19.2%Number % %4 Total KMs29 Total fuel Total Totalof Alternate cylinder consumed Cost tonnes 30Vehicles fuelled vehicles CO2 Corporate52 25% 15% 1 007 951 116 186 123 270 251 TAFE SA Adelaide North36 44% 33% 697 813 80 436 85 341 174 TAFE SA Adelaide South31 81% 13% 600 894 69 265 73 488 150 TAFE SA Regional118 63% 19% 2 287 275 263 653 279 730 568 The table outlines the department’s motor vehicle fleet leased through Fleet SA. Fleet SA has changed reporting profiles for 2008 – 09 which has provided additional information for the first time, specifically relating to institute vehicle statistics. Overall the department continues to utilise its vehicle fleet more efficiently. The use of alternate fuelled vehicles continues to grow along with a strong drop in fuel consumed and greenhouse gas emissions. The vehicle fleet is carbon neutral for the third successive year through collaboration with Greenfleet Australia. The estimated cost is $5 per vehicle per month, and will 29 These figures are averaged figures from the total department’s Vehicle Fleet data supplied by Fleet SA. 30 The greenhouse gas emissions (CO²) can vary year to year due to the changes in the CO² co-efficient, which is determined yearly by the federal government, are therefore beyond the control of the department. 139
  • result in an additional 4634 native trees being planted in South Australia. This is apublic demonstration of the department’s commitment to reducing its CO2 emissions.To date over 9600 trees have been planted in South Australia offsettingapproximately 2500 tonnes of CO2. The department is the only governmentdepartment to fully neutralise vehicle emissions.The department’s fleet policy outlines preferences for the leasing of four cylinderAustralian manufactured vehicles and dual fuel/ dedicated LPG six cylinder vehicleswherever possible.A trial booking system was introduced to utilise executive vehicles more efficientlyacross a selected section of the Corporate tenancy. Once the results of the trial areevaluated, the booking system will be rolled out across the whole tenancy.Waste efficiencyExcess information and communications technology related equipment is sent to theComputer Recycling Scheme for refurbishment. These refurbished information andcommunications technology products are then offered for sale to schools andcommunity groups at very competitive prices. This scheme is an exemplar of reusingsuch products and avoiding placing these items into landfill. Once they have reachedthe end of their useful life the products are sustainably recycled.Waste streams were simplified to reduce contamination of waste and grow recyclingefforts. It is broadly based on the domestic recycling schemes (yellow lidded wheeliebins) along with organic waste collected separately for reuse in garden products, andrefundable containers are collected for charity.Continued focus on reducing paper usage by increasing the awareness of reducingpaper used in toilets and kitchens ensures it complements the low flow water taps,dual flush cisterns and waterless urinals providing a message of reducing waterusage.The department is introducing electronic payslips in 2010 as part of enhancing theoverall Employee Self Service human resource system. Leave arrangements for staffare already completed electronically. This has the potential of significantly reducingpaper associated with the payroll process.The department is continuing investigations into the reporting aspects of wastemanagement to identify efficiencies with the greatest impact for the wholedepartment. 140