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GENCY, ROLE AND GOVERNANCE – TITLE PAGEFOR FURTHER COPIES AND ENQUIRIES PLEASE CONTACTDepartment of Further Education, Emp...
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AGENCY ROLE AND GOVERNANCEChief Executive’s Overview ........................................................................
FINANCIAL REPORTFinancial Overview ..........................................................................................
I am pleased to present the 2009 Annual Report for the Department of FurtherEducation, Employment, Science and Technology....
Investment in research and technology will be an important foundation for boostinglong term productivity in the state incl...
Training, Skills and EmploymentThe Training and Skills Commission, established in September 2008, released itsFive Year Pl...
Two new TAFE SA lead centres were established; the Lead Centre for Hospitality,Tourism and Food Studies at Regency campus ...
Office for Youth1The largest annual youth event in Australia, National Youth Week, was held from28 March 2009 to 5 April 2...
$1.2 billion in Commonwealth, industry and institutional funds across various science,technology and innovation projects, ...
Existing Worker Pilot Program when around 2760 qualifications were allocated forexisting worker training. As of December 2...
Our VisionSouth Australia has a highly skilled workforce and maximised employmentparticipation that shapes the state’s eco...
Portfolio governance for further education, employment, science, technology andyouth2 is managed through a number of counc...
Training and Skills CommissionThe Training and Skills Development Act 2008 establishes the Training and SkillsCommission a...
Higher Education CouncilThe Higher Education Council was established in order to bring together universityvice-chancellors...
The functions are established to: promote employment, education and training provide independent complaint handling pro...
Playford CentrePlayford Centre is a subsidiary of the Minister for Science and Information Economyestablished by the Publi...
The department’s corporate governance obligations are prescribed in the Public        Sector Management Act 1995 and the T...
Corporate ExecutiveCorporate Executive is a high level decision making and leadership group in thedepartment. Its primary ...
DFEEST SENIOR MANAGEMENT STRUCTURE                                                             AND REPORTING ARRANGEMENTS ...
1.1   Accelerate skills take-up for the current and emerging workforce (Links      to South Australia’s Strategic Plan Tar...
1.2         Ensure a ready supply of qualified South Australian workers is            available from the state’s growth se...
2008-2010 Pre-Apprenticeship and Traineeship ProgramThe Pre-Apprenticeship and Traineeship Program continued in 2009, with...
Productivity Places Program      The department administered the Productivity Places Program in South      Australia throu...
During the year the department focussed on increasing advice and support      to registered training providers and held a ...
User Choice Subsidies           During 2008, 141 registered training organisations (consisting of TAFE SA           and pr...
The assessment of applications for registration and the monitoring ofcompliance with standards are managed by the departme...
An expert independent review of the Quality Directorate was conducted in2009 given the need for the department to respond ...
Table 1VET Registration                                            2007    2008    2009SummaryTotal registered training or...
Table 2VET Accreditation                                      2007    2008   2009SummaryTotal accredited courses          ...
Table 5Overseas Recognition                                      2007    2008    2009SummaryRegistered providers deliverin...
1.5   Continue to develop fresh approaches to skills development and      system reforms (Links to South Australia’s Strat...
jobseekers facing barriers to employment of which 822 gained employment.      The Abilities for All Program provided accre...
In 2008-09 group training organisations, which were funded under the stateand Australian government Joint Group Training P...
2.1   Provide access to high quality employment (Links to South Australia’s      Strategic Plan Targets T1.10 T1.11 T1.12 ...
Opportunities were provided to 475 mature aged unemployed people and      100 gained employment, through the Employment 40...
strategies to address increasing workforce retrenchments, while still       maintaining the longer term challenges posed b...
DFEEST Annual Report 2009
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DFEEST Annual Report 2009

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The Annual Report represents an overview of DFEEST’s achievements, governance, workforce management and financial performance. It also outlines progress made towards achieving our objectives in South Australia’s Strategic Plan.

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  2. 2. GENCY, ROLE AND GOVERNANCE – TITLE PAGEFOR FURTHER COPIES AND ENQUIRIES PLEASE CONTACTDepartment of Further Education, Employment, Science and TechnologyOffice of the Chief ExecutiveGPO Box 320ADELAIDE SA 5001ABN: 16692317206Telephone: (08) 8226 3821Facsimile: (08) 8226 9533The 2009 Annual Report is available on the department’s website at:http:://www.dfeest.sa.gov.auISSN: 1449-6437 2
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  4. 4. AGENCY ROLE AND GOVERNANCEChief Executive’s Overview ........................................................................................... 7Highlights 2009 .............................................................................................................. 9Vision, Mission and Values ............................................................................................ 14Role, Legislation and Structure...................................................................................... 15Boards, Committees and Authorities ............................................................................. 16Governance ................................................................................................................... 20REPORT ON OPERATIONS AGAINST THE DEPARTMENT OF FURTHEREDUCATION, EMPLOYMENT, SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY’S STRATEGICPLANGoal 1Ensure South Australians have the necessary education and skills toparticipate in the high skills economy ............................................................................ 24Goal 2Provide high quality employment and workforce development services ........................ 38Goal 3Ensure young people are supported in reaching their full potentialand actively engaged in learning, training, work and in their communities .................... 43Goal 4Provide a coordinated, whole of government approach to the development ofan innovative community ............................................................................................... 46Goal 5Build a high performance organisation .......................................................................... 53MANAGEMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCESWorkforce data ............................................................................................................. 61Workforce diversity ........................................................................................................ 64Occupational Health, Safety and Injury Management .................................................... 70 4
  5. 5. FINANCIAL REPORTFinancial Overview ........................................................................................................ 72Audited general purpose financial report ....................................................................... 78Account payment performance ...................................................................................... 113Contractual arrangements ............................................................................................. 113Fraud ............................................................................................................................. 113Consultancy expenditure ............................................................................................... 113PROFILE OF VET ACTIVITYProfile of VET Activity .................................................................................................... 119Training Package Activity .............................................................................................. 122OTHER REPORTING ITEMSEmployee’s Overseas Travel ......................................................................................... 128Reconciliation Statement Report ................................................................................... 130Reporting against Carers Recognition Act 2005 ............................................................ 130Disability Action Plans ................................................................................................... 131Freedom of Information ................................................................................................. 131Asbestos Management .................................................................................................. 134Urban Design Charter .................................................................................................... 134Sustainability Report ...................................................................................................... 135 5
  6. 6. I am pleased to present the 2009 Annual Report for the Department of FurtherEducation, Employment, Science and Technology.2009 has been an exciting and challenging year for the economy as it has been forthe department.South Australia has weathered the global economic crisis well. At the end of 2009 thestate economy has shown resilience with employment numbers far better than mostpredicted. The combination of significant national and state infrastructure spendingtogether with the strong focus on meeting the skills needs of industry and thecommunity have served to cushion South Australia from the worst effects of theglobal economic downturn.The government’s continuing commitment to increasing training, improvingemployment participation and boosting productivity through innovation, science andtechnology will be important for the state’s economy moving forward and thedepartment will play a key role in meeting these objectives.For the agency, 2009 has been a year of many achievements and highlights.There has been a significant increase in funding for training with $177 millioncommitted over four years by the state and Australian governments for training forjob seekers and existing workers through the Productivity Places Program.The infrastructure for students has also been enhanced with more than $70 millioncommitted in 2009 into upgrading and maintaining TAFE SA facilities - this includes anew campus at Victor Harbor and upgrades at both metropolitan and countrycampuses funded jointly by the Australian and state government – this represents thebiggest ever infrastructure upgrade in TAFE SA’s history.Strengthening the linkages with our three public universities and TAFE SA has beena key priority and will continue to be a focus in 2010. As a result we have seen asignificant increase in the number of TAFE SA students going on to study atuniversity with 20 new credit transfer and articulation agreements implemented withhigher education providers in 2009.Increasing workforce participation is crucial to the state’s economy and throughoutthe year the department has been active in providing support to retrenched workersand young unemployed through the implementation of a Youth Compact that givesevery young person aged 15-24 priority to gain an education or training place, inaddition, thousands of people were helped into employment through the SouthAustralia Works program.In 2009 South Australia continued to build its reputation as a high quality studydestination with a 21% increase in international student numbers including anincrease of 28.5% within TAFE SA. 7
  7. 7. Investment in research and technology will be an important foundation for boostinglong term productivity in the state including access to high speed broadband and ahighlight in 2009 was the rollout of the Broadband Blackspots Program which willprovide broadband access to around 50,000 South Australians who previously hadno access to competitively priced broadband.In 2010, a key focus will be the delivery of the government’s Jobs Strategy which willfund the provision of an additional 100,000 training places over the next six years,the South Australia Works program will be refocussed to further target those mostdisadvantaged, implementation of the Skills Strategy will be enhanced withconsideration of key recommendations of the Training and Skills Commission andthere will be increased focus on higher education reforms including establishingnational regulators for higher education and training providers to underpin quality.Science and information economy initiatives, including leveraging outcomes from theNational Broadband Network rollout, and acceleration of a whole-of-governmentscience and mathematics strategy will also be a priority.None of the achievements over the last year would have been possible without thededication and hard work of many staff in TAFE SA and the many directorates thatmake up the department. I would like to give my thanks for their efforts, passion andcommitment.Finally I would like to thank Minister O’Brien for his leadership and direction during2009.Raymond GarrandChief Executive 8
  8. 8. Training, Skills and EmploymentThe Training and Skills Commission, established in September 2008, released itsFive Year Plan for Skills and Workforce Development - Skills for Jobs: Priorities forDeveloping South Australia’s Workforce in December 2009. The plan is a keyinitiative within the state government’s Skills Strategy. It makes recommendations forfundamental changes in the states post school education and training system, toensure the state has the skills available to support future growth of the economy andsustainable employment opportunities for all South Australians.TAFE SA applications increased in semester two significantly, and despite thepredicted economic downturn, apprentice numbers have also held up well. NationalCentre for Vocational Education Research statistics, reported in June 2009, showthat in SA, 5500 apprentices and trainees commenced their training in the quarterending 30 June 2009, an increase of 2% compared to the same time last year.Nationally there was a 12.6% fall.The department’s South Australia Works initiative has helped many SouthAustralians gain employment or access training. South Australia Works learning,training and work programs expended $35.66 million in 2008-09 including$5.54 million leveraged funds from the Australian Government and other stategovernment agencies. The initiative assisted 32 135 people into work or training; ofthese 16 745 participated in work programs and 15 390 in learning, skillsdevelopment and training programs, with 8430 gaining employment.To assess the effectiveness of South Australia Works, a strategic review wasconducted taking account of changing labour market conditions and new policydirections at the state and national level. The review acknowledged the overalleffectiveness of the program and made recommendations to build on its strengthsand pursue new opportunities. Recommendations will be implemented in 2010-11.The introduction of the new South Australian Certificate of Education providesgreater opportunity for the recognition of vocational education and trainingqualifications to contribute to the South Australian Certificate of Education. Thedepartment has supported the South Australian Certificate of Education Board toensure industry’s endorsement of the vocational education and training pathwaysand the development of coherent recognition arrangements.TAFE SAThere has been continued progress in reforms to TAFE SA as part of the SkillsStrategy, including establishing the three TAFE SA institutes as separate registeredtraining organisations, increasing e-learning and recognition of prior learning andachieving further cost efficiencies. 9
  9. 9. Two new TAFE SA lead centres were established; the Lead Centre for Hospitality,Tourism and Food Studies at Regency campus and the Adelaide College for the Artsin the city - to further strengthen links with industry.An improved admissions system has been implemented with the South AustralianTertiary Admissions Centre along with a state of the art e-messaging servicethroughout TAFE SA.Other achievements by TAFE SA over 2008-09 include: 28.5% increase in international students commencing study in 2009 3.6% increase in TAFE SA admission offers in 2009 from 2008 six new international courses registered on the Commonwealth Register of Institutions and Courses for Overseas Students twenty new credit transfer and articulation agreements implemented with Higher Education providers in 2009 improvements and simplification of the admissions process through the South Australian Tertiary Admissions Centre implementation of the e-learning Strategy and improved models of delivery of recognition of prior learning and industry engagement.TAFE SA InfrastructureMore than $70 million, the biggest ever infrastructure upgrade in TAFE SA’s history,was committed by the state and Australian governments to upgrade and maintainTAFE SA facilities. This includes a new $20 million Student Information System, thestart of construction of the new $9.4 million TAFE SA Victor Harbor campus andsignificant upgrades at metropolitan and regional campuses.The department was successful in securing $33.3 million of infrastructure fundingthrough the Australian Government’s Better TAFE Facilities and TrainingInfrastructure Investment for Tomorrow Programs. Refurbishment and upgradeworks have commenced at Regency, Tea Tree Gully, Whyalla, Mt Gambier, MtBarker, Adelaide City and Noarlunga campuses. Machine guarding improvementsare also being made at a variety of regional campuses. All work is scheduled forcompletion by 30 June 2010.The first part of the new Victor Harbor project was completed with the purchase ofthe land for the new TAFE SA campus. Construction has commenced and is due forcompletion in 2010.The construction of a new building to provide business and computer studies,hairdressing, welding and fitting services was completed at the Narungga TAFEcampus, an Aboriginal teaching facility located on the southern tip of the YorkePeninsula.The development of the new Student Information System officially began with thesigning of the contract with SunGard Higher Education in 2009. The new system willsignificantly improve the enrolment process and data management for students andstaff. Implementation activities will begin in the 2009 – 2010 financial year.The Horse Skills Centre was successfully relocated from Cheltenham to Morphettvilleand delivery of programs commenced in the new facility. 10
  10. 10. Office for Youth1The largest annual youth event in Australia, National Youth Week, was held from28 March 2009 to 5 April 2009 with over 1000 young people volunteering their time todevelop and run youth week activities for over 20 000 participants across the state.The Intra-Government Youth Action Committee was established, consisting ofrepresentatives of government agencies and community groups working with youngpeople, to develop a new youth policy framework for South Australia.Forty young entrepreneurs (aged 18-30) commenced in the Ignite Program, aninitiative jointly funded with the Department of Education, Employment andWorkplace Relations and Primary Industries and Resources South Australia. Theprogram will support participants to develop the necessary skills to establish andexpand agri-enterprises that are commercially and environmentally sustainable.The first regional A-Team was held in the Riverland and examined the issue of howto engage young people in information and communication technology to build andconnect regional communities. Over 70 people from community and governmentattended the final presentation of recommendations which included making moreeffective use of e-learning, developing a pilot Individual Electronic Health Record andestablishing a Riverland virtual information hub.Science and Information EconomyThe 15th Thinker in Residence, Dr Genevieve Bell, a noted anthropologist, spentseveral months in South Australia. Dr Bell completed a report and maderecommendations relating to how the state can set strategic directions and takemaximum advantage of the opportunities arising from the use of new digitaltechnologies.In July, the Information Economy Agenda 2009-2014 was launched. This documentdefines priority areas and actions in support of South Australia’s Strategic Plan andprovides a framework for managing initiatives and partnerships between government,business, education and communities.In August, the Federal Minister for Broadband, Communications and the DigitalEconomy and the South Australian Minister for Science and Information Economyjointly launched a project to significantly enhance wireless broadband services inAdelaide.The roll out of the Broadband Blackspots Program, in partnership with Adam Internet,began in November to provide broadband access to around 50 000 SouthAustralians, starting with severely affected parts of the southern suburbs.The STI10 Progress Report was launched in August. This detailed the benefits to thestate from the government’s 10-Year-Plan for Science, Technology and Innovation atthe half-way mark, five years after its launch in 2004. This indicated that since 2004,some $200 million in state investment under STI10 had leveraged some1 The Office for Youth, and subsequently the Youth portfolio, transferred to the Attorney General’s Departmentfrom 1 July 2009. 11
  11. 11. $1.2 billion in Commonwealth, industry and institutional funds across various science,technology and innovation projects, both investing and operational (verified byDeloitte Touché Tohmatsu).The South Australian Government-supported Trans Tasman Commercialisation Fundmade its first investment in South Australia with $500 000 towards securitysurveillance software technology developed at the University of Adelaide. The fundcontinues to work with the states three local universities to identify technologiessuitable for commercialisation and investment.The department continued its international research collaborations with Manitoba,Canada. A delegation visited SA in March 2009 led by the Deputy Minister ofInnovation, Energy and Mines, Mr John Clarkson, to discuss the status of currentjoint research projects and examine opportunities for future new projectcollaborations.Partnerships with the Australian GovernmentAt the national level, agreement was reached with the Australian Government toestablish a national vocational education and training and higher education regulatorand reform support services regulation and legislation with regard to internationalstudents. This culminated in a series of decisions by the Ministerial Council forTertiary Education and Employment and the Council of Australian Governments toundertake ongoing policy reform in 2010.In 2009, $17.92 million of Commonwealth funding was committed to South Australiato provide additional training opportunities for existing workers and jobseekersthrough the National Agreement for Skills and Workforce Development. Theagreement sets out the commitment between the Australian Government and thestates to work towards increasing the skill levels of all Australians, includingIndigenous Australians.The Australian Government’s Productivity Places Program provided additionaltraining opportunities to assist South Australian workers and job seekers to developnew skills to meet the growing needs of industry.The Productivity Places Program for Jobseeker training is directed to people over17 years who are not currently working and intending to seek paid employment aftercompleting the qualification so that they are better equipped to participate inemerging work opportunities. In June 2009, the department allocated around$8.6 million of Productivity Places Program funding so that 48 registered trainingorganisations could deliver training toward 2760 jobseeker qualifications. As ofDecember 2009, the department recorded 1811 jobseeker enrolments and hadregistered 605 qualifications.In October 2009 the department allocated around $10 million of CommonwealthProductivity Places Program funding and $8 million of state funding so that60 registered training organisations could deliver training toward 4376 existingworker qualifications.This Commonwealth, state and industry commitment to train the existing workforce isin addition to funding released in 2008 through the Productivity Places Program for 12
  12. 12. Existing Worker Pilot Program when around 2760 qualifications were allocated forexisting worker training. As of December 2009, 2669 enrolments had been recordedand around 22% of enrolled existing workers had achieved a qualification.To support young people to participate and attain qualifications from 1 July 2009 theSouth Australian Government implemented a Compact with Young South Australiansto ensure that every young person aged 15 to 19 has priority to access agovernment-subsidised education or training place. The objective of the compact isto increase the level of participation and qualifications among young SouthAustralians, and has been implemented in South Australia in 2009 through the Learnor Earn initiative www.learnorearn.sa.gov.au.The Training Entitlement for Retrenched Workers is a state government initiativeintroduced in 2009 that complements the Australian Government’s Compact withRetrenched Workers which allows retrenched workers to access subsidisedvocational education and training places, such as those available throughProductivity Places Program. The South Australian Government’s training entitlementwill provide a government subsidised training place to retrenched workers, 25 yearsand older, for a higher level qualification than they already hold.Following the report prepared by the Australian Apprentices Taskforce in 2009, theCouncil of Australian Governments agreed to the recommendations set out in thereport to maximise the number of apprentices who commence and completeapprenticeships, and to strengthen the apprenticeship system. Recommendationswill be implemented by the Australian and state governments in 2010.In 2009, a review of the Education Services for Overseas Students Act 2000 wascommissioned by the Deputy Prime Minister, the Hon Julia Gillard MP who appointedthe Hon Bruce Baird to undertake the review with support from the Department ofEducation, Employment and Workplace Relations. The review examined theEducation Services for Overseas Students Act 2000 and the current regulatoryframework to identify and address areas for improvement to ensure Australiacontinues to offer a high quality education service to overseas students.A taskforce was also established in South Australia to investigate and address keyissues affecting the experience that overseas students have while studying inAdelaide and ensure that Adelaide provides Australia’s best educational and lifestyleexperience for overseas students studying at our universities and training institutions.This taskforce looks at issues such as accommodation, student welfare and safety,employment and student services. The department also continued to providefinancial support to Education Adelaide to lead the Study Adelaide marketinginitiative in overseas markets.During 2009, priority was given to investigating the nature of skills required forenvironmental sustainability and to support the industry development opportunitiesbeing pursued by the South Australian Government. The government made asubstantial contribution to the development of a National Green Skills Agreement,endorsed by the Council of Australian Governments on7 December 2009. The agreement enables individuals and businesses to contributeto a sustainable, low-carbon economy in their workplaces and communities. 13
  13. 13. Our VisionSouth Australia has a highly skilled workforce and maximised employmentparticipation that shapes the state’s economic competitiveness, and is distinguishedby a culture of excellence, innovation, continuous learning and social inclusion.Our MissionTo optimally match workforce skills, training and participation, with current and futureemployment, working with individuals, community and industry to strategicallysupport the state’s development. This mission requires creative and integrated policythat delivers effective training, employment programs and services.Our ValuesThe department is striving to become a high performance learning organisation,which attracts, develops and retains a highly talented workforce. The department willonly achieve its vision through a strong commitment to our people and core values.We will show integrity in our:Respect for: the values, beliefs, customs and cultures of individuals and our community others rights, responsibilities and professionalismResponsiveness in: providing timely and caring services generating creative, shared solutions embracing change where it is appropriate recognising and celebrating effort and achievementOpenness in decision-making by: providing supporting reasons restricting information only where there is a wider public interest declaring any relevant private interests resolving conflicts being transparentStriving for excellence in: using public resources efficiently and effectively embedding equality of access and opportunity fairness in our operations standards of serviceCourage in: challenging and being challenged taking risks doing things in different ways taking responsibility for mistakes and learning from them enforcing our code of conduct 14
  14. 14. Portfolio governance for further education, employment, science, technology andyouth2 is managed through a number of councils, boards and committees. Thesework in conjunction with the department to advise the Minister for Employment,Training and Further Education, the Minister for Science and Information Economyand the Minister for Youth on key strategic areas.AgencyThe Department of Further Education, Employment, Science and Technology.Acts AdministeredTechnical and Further Education Act 1975Training and Skills Development Act 2008Construction Industry Training Fund Act 1993Flinders University of South Australia Act 1966University of Adelaide Act 1971University of South Australia Act 1990RegulationsTechnical and Further Education Regulations 1999Technical and Further Education (Vehicles) Regulations 1998Training and Skills Development Regulations 2008Construction Industry Training Fund Regulations 2008Public Corporations (Bio Innovation SA) Regulations 2001Public Corporations (Education Adelaide) Regulations 1998Public Corporations (Playford Centre) Regulations 19962 The Office for Youth, and subsequently the Youth portfolio, transferred to the Attorney General’s Department from1 July 2009. 15
  15. 15. Training and Skills CommissionThe Training and Skills Development Act 2008 establishes the Training and SkillsCommission and outlines its functions.The commission, established on 1 September 2008, has nine members and twodeputy members appointed by the Governor. It is chaired by Emeritus ProfessorDenise Bradley AC.The Act gives authority to the commission in regulating training providers andapprenticeships and traineeships. The commission advises and makesrecommendations to the minister on matters relating to the development, funding,quality and performance of the vocational education and training, adult communityeducation and higher education sectors.The Act also establishes two reference groups, the Adult Community EducationReference Group and the Training Regulation Reference Group. These groups arechaired by the commission members but draw on the wider resources of industry andthe community for specialist advice through their membership and consultations.The commission is the peak advisory body to the South Australian Government onskills and workforce development priorities. It is responsible for the preparation, andannual update, of a Five Year Plan for Skills and Workforce Development in SouthAustralia - Skills for Jobs: Priorities for Developing South Australia’s Workforce. Theplan is the principal instrument by which the commission provides its advice to theminister.In developing its advice to the minister, the commission is required, under the Act, toconsult with a wide range of stakeholders, including groups representing industry,employees, education and training providers, industry skills boards and trainingadvisory bodies, government and community.For more information regarding the Training and Skills Commission go to:http://www.tasc.sa.gov.au/TAFE SA Institute CouncilsThe institute councils are established by the Minister for Employment, Training andFurther Education for each of the three institutes of TAFE SA under the Technicaland Further Education Act 1975. The councils advise, monitor performance andprovide supplementary funding for the institutes’ operations. 16
  16. 16. Higher Education CouncilThe Higher Education Council was established in order to bring together universityvice-chancellors and other key players in the higher education sector in recognition ofthe central role that education, training and research and development has to thefuture development of the South Australian economy and community. The council ischaired by the Minister for Employment, Training and Further Education and isadministratively supported by the department.Austraining InternationalAustraining International was formed in 1991 and is wholly owned by the SouthAustralian Government. Austraining is a specialist project management andinternational development organisation managing projects throughout the AsiaPacific and Middle East. Austraining employs around 85 staff with 19 in-countryoffices across the Asia-Pacific.For more information regarding Austraining International go to:http://www.austraining.com.au/aboutusEducation AdelaideEducation Adelaide is a subsidiary of the Minister for Employment, Training andFurther Education established under the Public Corporations (Education Adelaide)Regulations 1988. It operates as a partnership between the City of Adelaide, thestate’s universities, the state government and numerous private colleges andschools. Its strategic direction is to accelerate the growth of South Australia’seducation export industry to benefit the state’s education providers, the localeconomy and community. Education Adelaide works closely with the department toachieve international student targets outlined in South Australia’s Strategic Plan.For more information regarding Education Adelaide go to:http://www.studyadelaide.com/about-us.aspxOffice of the Training AdvocateThe Office of the Training Advocate provides a public contact point to respond toquestions or complaints about the training system.In this context the training system comprises higher education, vocational educationand training, apprenticeships and traineeships, adult community education andeducation services for overseas students.The Training Advocate is an independent statutory authority established under theTraining and Skills Development Act 2008 and operates in accordance with a Charterof Functions. These functions are designed to enhance consumer protection byimproving access and effective participation in employment and skill formationopportunities, and to contribute to strategies which raise the quality andresponsiveness of the training system in South Australia. 17
  17. 17. The functions are established to: promote employment, education and training provide independent complaint handling provide advocacy provide information and advice monitor the training system.The Training Advocate reports to the Minister for Employment, Training and FurtherEducation and tables a separate Annual Report.For more information regarding the Office of the Training Advocate go to:http://www.trainingadvocate.sa.gov.au/The Premier’s Science and Research CouncilThe Premier’s Science and Research Council was established to advise thegovernment on strategies for boosting local science and research capabilities andimproving levels of innovation. The council is chaired by the state’s chief scientist andis administratively supported by the department.Information Economy Advisory BoardThe Information Economy Advisory Board provides advice to the Minister for Scienceand Information Economy on potential benefits of the information economy to allSouth Australians and on how to maximise the benefits.SABRENet LtdSABRENet Ltd is a company limited by guarantee with the three local universitiesand the South Australian Government as members. It is a not for profit organisationwhich has as its objective to further the use of advanced data networking for theconduct of research and education in South Australia. SABRENet Ltd owns a darkfibre optical cable telecommunications network linking the major higher educationcampuses and research precincts, as well as some schools and TAFE SAcampuses. The department is represented on its board.For more information regarding SABRENet Ltd go to:http://sabrenet.edu.au/Bio Innovation SABio Innovation SA is a subsidiary of the Minister for Science and InformationEconomy established by the Public Corporation (Bio Innovation SA) Regulations2001. South Australia has a dynamic bioscience industry based on a strong traditionof medical and agricultural research that drives commercial opportunities. To build onthese opportunities, the South Australian Government established Bio Innovation SA,a bioscience industry development organisation that provides business development,finance, infrastructure and marketing assistance. An external review of thisorganisation was undertaken in 2009 which demonstrated the positive impact of itswork in the state economy.For more information on Bio Innovation SA go to:http://www.bioinnovationsa.com.au/ 18
  18. 18. Playford CentrePlayford Centre is a subsidiary of the Minister for Science and Information Economyestablished by the Public Corporations (Playford Centre) Regulations 1996, tocontribute to South Australia’s economic growth, exports, commercialisation ofresearch and entrepreneurial activity, by facilitating the formation and development ofinnovative technology ventures.Playford CapitalIn 2001, Playford Centre formed a subsidiary, Playford Capital Pty Ltd. PlayfordCapital uses funding provided by the Australian Government’s Building onInformation Technology Strengths and Information and Communications TechnologyIncubator Programs to invest in South Australian information and communicationstechnology firms which have the potential and commitment to become high growthcompanies exporting interstate and overseas. This has stimulated the inflow ofprivate equity into South Australia and supported information and communicationstechnology company growth. Playford was awarded $7.45 million from the AustralianGovernment’s Innovation Investment Follow on Fund to support its ongoinginvestment activities.For more information on Playford Capital go to:http://playford.com.auDuke of Edinburgh’s Award State Award Committee3The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award is an international self-development programavailable to young people aged 14-25. The Minister for Youth is the exclusive licenceholder in South Australia and appoints the State Awards Committee to maintainquality and support the delivery of the award.Minister’s Youth Council3The Minister’s Youth Council comprises young people aged 12-25 who provideadvice to the Minister for Youth on issues that affect young South Australians. TheMinister’s Youth Council consults and advises the minister directly through monthlymeetings.3 The Office for Youth, and subsequently the Youth portfolio, transferred to the Attorney General’s Departmentfrom 1 July 2009. 19
  19. 19. The department’s corporate governance obligations are prescribed in the Public Sector Management Act 1995 and the Technical and Further Education Act 1975. These Acts establish general management aims, personnel management and employee conduct standards. The Chief Executive of the Department of Further Education, Employment, Science and Technology is responsible for observance of these aims and standards. The department maintains a governance framework (below) that integrates strategic management, leadership and accountability, in the way it manages its people and resources to achieve best performance of its functions. Governance Framework Chief Executive Ray Garrand Audit and Risk Strategic Procurement Management Committee Committee Chair: Elaine Bensted Chair: Ian McLauchlan Occupational Health Executive Forum and Safety Committee Chair: Ray Garrand Chair: David Royle Corporate Executive Committee Chair: Ray Garrand Providing Quarterly Reports TAFE SA Adelaide TAFE SA Adelaide TAFE SA Regional South Institute North Institute Denise Janek Stephen Conway Adrian MarronBudget and Finance Asset Strategy ICT Governance People and CultureExecutive Committee Committee Board Committee Chair: Craig Fowler Chair: David Royle Chair: David Royle Chair: Elaine Bensted TAFE SA Network Executive TAFE SA Adelaide TAFE SA Adelaide North TAFE SA Regional South Institute Council Institute Council Institute Council These standing committees will be complimented with temporary policy feeder groups and project teams that are responsible to one of the standing committees. In 2009 the department’s governance structure encompassed the following: 20
  20. 20. Corporate ExecutiveCorporate Executive is a high level decision making and leadership group in thedepartment. Its primary role is to ensure the successful achievement of thedepartment’s strategic planning and portfolio outcomes and it has responsibility formaintaining the effectiveness of these governance mechanisms.The Budget and Finance Executive CommitteeThe committee provides financial governance over the department’s resources. Itmonitors performance against fiscal targets and tracks allocation of operating andcapital budgets and makes decisions on a range of finance related issues. Thecommittee provides advice on the best use of operating and capital budgets to thechief executive through Corporate Executive.The Business Services Strategic Reference GroupThe group provides leadership, advice and the strategic vision for business servicesacross the department. The group is a sub- committee of Corporate Executive andreports to Corporate Executive as required.The Asset Strategy CommitteeThe committee provides strategic guidance for the integrated planning andmanagement of all infrastructure requirements across the portfolio and thedevelopment of strategic portfolio infrastructure plans for TAFE SA.The Aboriginal Reference GroupThe group provides leadership within the department to improve access to, andoutcomes from, education, training and employment programs for Aboriginal peoplein South Australia.Executive ForumExecutive Forum is a broadly based group of executives responsible for thecollaborative achievement of departmental objectives across all initiatives andprograms.The TAFE SA Network ExecutiveThe network is a peak decision making body for all strategic issues relating to theTAFE SA Network. It leads the implementation of the Skills Strategy and willstandardise services across a range of institute operational areas across TAFE SA.The Audit and Risk Management CommitteeThe committee is an integral part of the governance framework and providesassurance to, and assists the chief executive in undertaking his statutory andadministrative responsibilities. It has an external chair.It is anticipated that changes to the governance structure will be made in 2010. 21
  21. 21. DFEEST SENIOR MANAGEMENT STRUCTURE AND REPORTING ARRANGEMENTS AS AT OCTOBER 2009 EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR TAFE SA ADELAIDE TAFE SA ADELAIDE TAFE SA REGIONAL SOUTH NORTH DEPUTY TAFE SA NETWORK SERVICES CHIEF EXECUTIVE EMPLOYMENT & TRAINING SERVICES DIRECTOR DIRECTOR TRAINEESHIP & EMPLOYMENT CORPORATE APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAMS COMMUNICATIONS UNIT SERVICES DIRECTOR DIRECTOR PRINCIPAL INFORMATION AND ORGANISATIONAL CONSULTANT COMMUNICATION DEVELOPMENT AND BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY HUMAN RESOURCES IMPROVEMENTMINISTER FOR EMPLOYMENT, TRAINING AND FURTHER CHIEF EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR EDUCATION EXECUTIVE SHARED BUSINESSMINISTER FOR SCIENCE AND SERVICES INFORMATION ECONOMY DIRECTOR DIRECTOR FINANCIAL, ASSET AND INFRASTRUCTURE PROCUREMENT PLANNING SERVICES MANAGER DIRECTOR INTERNAL AUDIT EXECUTIVE AND RISK SERVICES MANAGEMENT DIRECTOR DIRECTOR SCIENCE AND QUALITY AND TERTIARY INFORMATION EDUCATION POLICY ECONOMY DEPUTY CHIEF EXECUTIVE PLANNING, POLICY AND INNOVATION DIRECTOR DIRECTOR PLANNING AND INDUSTRY SKILLS WORKFORCE PLANNING AND POLICY EVALUATION DEVELOPMENT OFFICE OF THE TRAINING AND SKILLS COMMISSION DFEEST also has many important relationships with other organisations eg Office of the Training Advocate, Education Adelaide, Playford Capital, BioInnovation SA, Austraining. These relationships are not shown here. 22
  22. 22. 1.1 Accelerate skills take-up for the current and emerging workforce (Links to South Australia’s Strategic Plan Targets T6.15, T6.19, T6.20 and T6.21) A key focus for TAFE SA is to develop partnerships with industry and enterprises to provide responsive training solutions that meet current and future skills requirements for South Australia’s workforce. Growth in South Australia’s mining industry is significant and TAFE SA is working with BHP Billiton and the mining industry to create scholarships for Aboriginal people to study engineering and geosciences. The vocational scholarships are designed to support Indigenous students to undertake courses in engineering and geosciences with the aim of increasing the pool of Indigenous students moving to tertiary education in mining-related fields. A strategy to accelerate the attainment of qualifications is to recognise that many students already have significant knowledge and skills from life and work experience, previous courses and training, or self-taught knowledge and skills. Evidence of their skills and knowledge will enable them to gain recognition for all or part of a course through TAFE SA. This is known as recognition of prior learning. In June 2009, the department allocated around $8.6 million of Productivity Places Program funding so that 48 registered training organisations could deliver training toward 2760 jobseeker qualifications. The Productivity Places Program for Jobseeker training is directed to people over 17 years who are not currently working and intending to seek paid employment after completing the qualification so that they are better equipped to participate in emerging work opportunities. Almost 40% of jobseeker qualifications allocated in June 2009 were at Certificate II Level, 30.5% at Certificate III, 15.2% at Certificate IV and 38.6% at Diploma Level. As of December 2009, the department recorded 1811 jobseeker enrolments and had registered 605 qualifications. In October 2009 the department allocated around $10 million of Commonwealth Productivity Places Program funding and $8 million of state funding so that 60 registered training organisations could deliver training toward 4376 existing worker qualifications. This funding accounted for 90% of the agreed training costs for these qualifications and industry will contribute the outstanding 10% for training delivery. This Commonwealth, state and industry commitment to train the existing workforce is in addition to funding released in 2008 through the Productivity Places Program for Existing Worker Pilot Program when around 2760 qualifications were allocated for existing worker training, 13% at Certificate III, 43% at Certificate IV, 37% at Diploma and 7% at Advanced Diploma Levels. As of December 2009, 2669 enrolments had been recorded and around 22% of enrolled existing workers had achieved a qualification. 24
  23. 23. 1.2 Ensure a ready supply of qualified South Australian workers is available from the state’s growth sectors (Links to South Australia’s Strategic Plan Targets T6.19, T6.20 and T6.21) Traineeship and Apprenticeship Activity Traineeships and apprenticeships remain a key focus in ensuring the ongoing supply of skills for South Australian businesses and industry. The department is responsible for the regulation of the traineeship and apprenticeship system in South Australia under delegation from the Training and Skills Commission. Despite the global economic crisis experienced in the second half of 2008, traineeship and apprenticeship commencements remained relatively stable. In the 12 months ending 30 June 2009, there were an estimated 21 200 traineeship and apprenticeship commencements, representing a decrease of 2.3 percentage points on the 21 700 commencements recorded in the previous 12 months. This decline was relatively small when compared with the 6.2 percentage point reduction experienced nationally. In South Australia and nationally, apprenticeship commencements saw the greatest reductions, dropping by 11.0 percentage points and 20.1 percentage points respectively. Traineeship commencements remained constant. The below figure illustrates the small but steady growth of trainees and apprentices in training since 2007. At 30 June 2009, there were an estimated 32 400 trainees and apprentices in training, up 700 (2.2%) on the 31 700 recorded in June 2007. Trainee and apprentice activity, five years ending 30 June 20094 40000 35000 Number of trainees and apprentices 30000 25000 20000 15000 10000 5000 0 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Year In training Commencements Completions4 In training figures are provided at 30 June of each year; commencement and completion figures are provided for the12 months ending 30 June of each year. All figures are based on the National Centre for Vocational EducationResearch Australian vocational education and training statistics – apprentices and trainees June quarter (2009). Allfigures are estimated for 2009 and in training figures are estimated for 2008. The National Centre for VocationalEducation Research may revise these figures in the future. 25
  24. 24. 2008-2010 Pre-Apprenticeship and Traineeship ProgramThe Pre-Apprenticeship and Traineeship Program continued in 2009, witheight organisations delivering 12 courses. The program seeks to increasethe supply of apprentices and trainees in occupations and industriesexperiencing skills shortages in South Australia that are considered to be ofstrategic importance to the economy. Course participants are provided withtechnical training and employability skills specific to the targetedapprenticeship or traineeship, and where required, they are assisted todevelop their literacy and numeracy skills. Participants attend suitable workplacements with employers, who in many cases employ them in therelevant apprenticeship or traineeship.During 2009, 60 participants of the Pre-Apprenticeship and TraineeshipProgram gained apprenticeships or traineeships in the following targetedtrades and vocations - plumbing, electrical, bricklaying, carpentry,engineering (mechanical and fabrication), wall and floor tiling, child careand disability care. Further outcomes are expected when the remainingcourses conclude in 2010.User Choice Training SubsidiesThe department is responsible for the provision of User Choice trainingsubsidies to both public and private training organisations, to supporttrainees and apprentices with the cost of formal training. These subsidiesare focussed on traineeships and apprenticeships in occupationsexperiencing skills shortages. The User Choice Policy supports all trades(available for existing workers and new entrants), traineeships at CertificateII and III Australian Qualifications Framework levels, and pilot programs inother areas of skills shortage, which are not normally funded under UserChoice arrangements, for example, existing workers in civil construction.South Australia WorksThe South Australia Works Skills Recognition Service assisted over 2000clients in 2008-09 with the recognition of qualifications and skills (gainedlocally or overseas) in order to gain employment.An early intervention pilot program, Skilled Work SA, supported newlyarrived skilled migrants experiencing difficulties in gaining skilledemployment. This service assisted 150 participants of which 105 wereplaced into employment.In 2008-09 the Industry Partnership Program committed $2.1 million toindustry skills boards to support 11 initiatives across a range of industrysectors. This commitment was matched by industry contributions of$2.6 million. 26
  25. 25. Productivity Places Program The department administered the Productivity Places Program in South Australia through competitive application rounds. Applications were assessed based on individual merit for identified need, suitable partnerships and capacity to deliver desired outcomes for the program. Allocation of funding was determined by:  agreed Commonwealth targets for qualification levels to be met through the program  state priorities as identified through industry and workforce intelligence including the Training and Skills Commission identified priorities. Whilst Job Seeker places are fully funded by the Commonwealth, in 2009 the South Australian Government contributed $7.9 million of state funding, comprising 40% of existing worker training costs, and private investment (typically industry), contributed the remaining 10% of existing worker training costs.1.3 Enhance Adelaide’s reputation as a world class city for education, training and high education (Links to South Australia’s Strategic Plan Targets T1.16, T6.20 and T6.21) International student enrolments (as at November 2009) in South Australia increased by 21.2% compared to the same period in 2008. This growth rate is higher than the national average of 17.7%. There are 33 595 international students studying in South Australia compared to 629 618 nationally, representing a market share of 5.3%. A total of 18 840 new international students commenced their studies in South Australia this year compared to 362 926 nationally, representing a market share of 5.2%. Commencement rates of international students in South Australia also grew strongly at 17.3%, above the national average of 14.5%. The numbers of providers registered to deliver to overseas students grew at the same rate as in the previous 12 months with 17 new providers registered during the year bringing the total number of providers to 78. Again, as was the case in 2008, growth in the number of registered providers was almost entirely in the vocational education sector. The department increased its resources for regulation of this sector to meet the increased demand for services and to ensure that providers, in particular those new to the market, provided services to students in accordance with relevant legislation and national standards. 27
  26. 26. During the year the department focussed on increasing advice and support to registered training providers and held a number of forums to deliver a range of professional development services for registered providers. The South Australian Training Advocate, unique in the Australian training system, is an independent statutory authority established under the Training and Skills Development Act 2008. Of note in 2009 was the increase in support provided to international students who were provided with information and advice to confidentially address any aspect of studying, living or working in South Australia. In addition the Training Advocate worked collaboratively with the department, other state and federal agencies and peak bodies to contribute to strategies aimed at improving the international education experience for students and the employment and training arrangements for apprenticeships and traineeships. The Higher Education Registration and Accreditation Board was established in mid 2009 as an advisory body to the Delegate of the Training and Skills Commission on quality matters relating to higher education under Part 3 of the Training and Skills Development Act 2008. Key areas of the board’s work are:  the role of academic boards in non-self accrediting institutions  benchmarking activities against university education undertaken by non- self accrediting institutions  risk management of non-self accrediting institutions operations. The Higher Education Registration and Accreditation Board analysed annual report data submitted to the department by non self-accrediting institutions registered under the Training and Skills Development Act 2008. The analysis informed the department’s strategies for strengthening the capacity of these providers. The Minister for Employment, Training and Further Education approved the University College of London to deliver four qualifications that are recognised under the Australian Qualifications Framework and are also recognised higher education qualifications in the United Kingdom.1.4 Build a fair, quality oriented and competitive training market (Links to South Australia’s Strategic Plan Targets T1.16, 6.20 and T6.21) In 2009 the department sought proposals from the market to deliver the Learn 2 Earn program funding became contestable resulting in a broader range of projects being delivered across the state to 203 young people. Ten projects totalling $1.1 million were delivered by TAFE SA and privately owned providers resulting in some 60 employment outcomes. 28
  27. 27. User Choice Subsidies During 2008, 141 registered training organisations (consisting of TAFE SA and privately owned providers) received training subsidies under a User Choice agreement. Some $42.6 million was provided by the department to support over 21 000 trainees and apprentices undertaking a nationally recognised qualification. As illustrated in the figure below, just over half (51%) of students that attracted User Choice assistance were apprentices, and they were the beneficiaries of two thirds of the expenditure, reflecting the higher cost of apprenticeship training5. Student numbers Funding ($ million) T/ships $13.7 T/ships A/ships 33% A/ships 10,463 11,109 $28.1 49% 51% 67% Travel and Accommodation The department provides travel and accommodation subsidies to trainees and apprentices in regional and remote South Australia, who are required to travel to attend their off-the-job training. In 2008-09, $1.78 million was provided for this purpose and supported 1106 trainees and apprentices. Regulation of Training Providers The delivery of higher education, (other than that provided by the state universities), vocational education and training, and educational services to overseas students is regulated under the Training and Skills Development Act 2008. The Act provides the basis for ensuring the education and training providers and the courses that they deliver are quality assured under national education and training standards. The department manages the registration of training providers to deliver nationally recognised qualifications and Statements of Attainment under delegation from the Training and Skills Commission.5 Funding for traineeships and apprenticeships does not equal total expenditure for the User Choice, as otherexpenses associated with User Choice are included in the total expenditure for the program. 29
  28. 28. The assessment of applications for registration and the monitoring ofcompliance with standards are managed by the department with theengagement of personnel from industry, occupational licensing bodies,state universities and other stakeholders as relevant.Thirty one non-university higher education providers are registered in SouthAustralia to deliver 332 higher education qualifications. Two organisationswithdrew their registration during the year and two new providers wereregistered.The vocational education and training sector in South Australia grew morethan in previous years with 40 new providers registered.Seventeen providers withdrew their registration to give a total of 327registered providers, nine of whom have their registration managed throughthe National Audit and Registration Agency. The department significantlyincreased audits of private providers in 2009 and conducted 168 audits ofproviders registered to deliver vocational education and training. Theseaudits are conducted to assess applications for registration and also tomonitor provider compliance with national standards.The department receives and investigates complaints made aboutregistered providers. Twenty one written complaints were received duringthe year. These complaints were investigated and resolved with thedepartment’s intervention. In seven cases the investigation led to an auditof the registered provider to determine whether the provider was operatingin compliance with the Training and Skills Development Act 2008 and itsconditions of registration. Fifty nine verbal complaints were received andresolved with the department’s intervention.Twenty nine workshops covering regulatory and educational issues forproviders in the vocational education and training, higher education andoverseas students sectors were held with over 1000 attendees. Quarterlyforums covering the Productivity Places Program, the Budget, industry skillsboard activities and the Training and Skills Commission’s Skills for JobsPlan attracted about 400 participants.Over the last three years the department has managed a program fundedby the Council of Australian Governments to improve the quality and uptakeof recognition of prior learning services offered by registered trainingorganisations. The program has worked with industry skills boards, careerdevelopment centres, the Australian Council for Private Education andTraining, employer and employee associations, and the department’s SkillsRecognition Service, and the Productivity Places Program to embed goodrecognition of prior learning practice into their core activities. Activities ofparticular note included skills recognition services for workers to beretrenched from Mitsubishi and Bridgestone.Summary information on activity is provided in Tables 1 – 5. 30
  29. 29. An expert independent review of the Quality Directorate was conducted in2009 given the need for the department to respond to the changing marketconditions for providers, determination to maintain quality across providersoperating in SA and national reviews, in particular the Bradley Review ofHigher Education. As a result the Quality and Higher Education Directorateswere merged in 2009 to establish the Quality and Tertiary Education PolicyDirectorate. 31
  30. 30. Table 1VET Registration 2007 2008 2009SummaryTotal registered training organisations registered in South 2966 3045 3275&7Australia for domestic deliveryRegistered training organisations also delivering higher 14 14 16education coursesRegistered training organisations registered in South 93 122 141Australia operating in another state/territoryRegistered training organisations who remain suspended 3 0 0Registered training organisations with delegated powers 1 1 38ApprovalsInitial registration 31 24 40Renewal of registration 55 51 41Extension to scope of registration 93 139 146TOTAL 179 214 227Qualifications added to TAFE SA scope of registration 70 77 203under delegationRefusals, Cancellations and SuspensionsRegistered training organisations who expired or 10 16 17voluntarily withdrew registrationRegistered training organisations who transferred to 0 0 0interstate registering bodyRegistered training organisations who had registration 0 0 0cancelled by registration authorityRegistered training organisations who had registration 0 0 0suspended by registration authorityRegistered training organisations who had registrationrefused by registration authority:- initial registration 3 3 4- extension to scope registration 1 1 2- renewal of registration 1 0 0Audit Activity: Number of audits conductedInitial registration 32 29 43Renewal of registration 53 52 39Extension to scope of registration 50 37 58Monitoring 34 33 28TOTAL 169 151 1686 These totals, given in previous annual reports have been adjusted to include the number of providers delivering inthe vocational education and training and higher education sectors7 Total figure inclusive of nine registered training organisations that have their auditing and registration managed byNational Audit and Registration Agency8 In 2009 TAFE SA registration changed from one entity to three separate institutes. The delegated powers to TAFESA to vary scope of registration and to accredit Crown copyright courses for each of these institutes are managed byone delegate. 32
  31. 31. Table 2VET Accreditation 2007 2008 2009SummaryTotal accredited courses 278 159 174ApprovalsCourses accredited 39 5 15Courses accredited (TAFE SA under delegated authority) 3 8 6Training package qualifications implemented in South 335 335 204AustraliaNew qualifications made available through traineeships 124 124 82or apprenticeships Table 3Higher Education Registration 2007 2008 2009SummaryHigher education providers registered in South Australia 28 31 31for domestic deliveryHigher education providers who also deliver vocational 14 14 16education and training coursesApprovalsInitial Registration 1 3 2Variation to scope of registration 10 2 12Refusals, Revocations and WithdrawalsHigher education providers who voluntary withdrew 0 0 2registrationHigher education providers who had registration 0 0 0cancelled by registration authorityHigher education providers who had registration 0 0 0suspended by registration authorityHigher education providers who had registration refusedby registration authority 0 0 0- initial registration 0 0 1- variation of registration 0 0 0- renewal of registrationTable 4Higher Education Accreditation 2007 2008 2009SummaryTotal current accredited courses 253 208 3329ApprovalsCourses accredited 35 20 82109 This figure includes all qualification streams listed on the South Australian Higher Education Register10 This figure does not include discipline streams approved within an accredited higher education course 33
  32. 32. Table 5Overseas Recognition 2007 2008 2009SummaryRegistered providers delivering only vocational education 18 32 47and training courses to overseas studentsRegistered providers delivering only higher education 9 10 11courses to overseas studentsRegistered providers delivering vocational education andtraining and higher education courses to overseas 8 9 9studentsRegistered providers delivering only English Language 5 6 5Intensive Courses to Overseas StudentsRegistered providers delivering vocational education andtraining, higher education and English Language 3 3 3Intensive Courses to Overseas StudentsRegistered providers delivering English LanguageIntensive Courses to Overseas Students and vocational 1 1 2education and training courses to overseas studentsRegistered providers delivering English LanguageIntensive Courses to Overseas Students and higher 1 1 1education courses to overseas studentsTotal registered providers approved to deliver to 45 62 78overseas studentsApprovalsInitial registration 2 17 17Renewal of registration 3 5 7Extension to scope of registration 13 10 41Refusals, Cancellations and SuspensionsRegistered training organisations who voluntarily 0 1 0withdrew registrationRegistered training organisations who had registration 0 0 0cancelled by registration authorityRegistered training organisations who had registration 0 0 0suspended by registration authorityRegistered training organisations who had registrationrefused by registration authority:- initial registration 1 1 1- extension to scope registration 0 1 1- renewal of registration 0 0 0Audit Activity: Number of audits conductedInitial registration 3 19 18Renewal of registration 3 5 6Extension to scope of registration 13 9 25Monitoring 1 3 9TOTAL 20 36 58 34
  33. 33. 1.5 Continue to develop fresh approaches to skills development and system reforms (Links to South Australia’s Strategic Plan Targets T6.15, T6.19 T6.20 and T6.21) A Strategic Review of South Australia Works was conducted in 2009 to assess the effectiveness of the initiative, taking account of changing labour market conditions and new policy directions at the state and national level. A high level reference group, consisting of representatives from the Training and Skills Commission, the Economic Development Board, the Social Inclusion Board, the Regional Communities Consultative Council, the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations and the Department of Further Education, Employment, Science and Technology provided advice on future priorities, directions and recommendations. The review acknowledged the overall effectiveness of the program and made recommendations designed to build on its strengths and exploit new opportunities. TAFE SA’s program delivery was underpinned through the establishment of lead centres, a key initiative of the Skills Strategy. Lead centres are designed to ensure close alignment to industry, and effectiveness in educational service delivery. The Lead Centre for Hospitality, Tourism and Food Studies and the Lead Centre for the Arts were launched in 2009. The appointment of an artistic director and advisory board and a name change - to the Adelaide College of the Arts - all signal a new direction for vocational arts training in South Australia to encourage artistic excellence. TAFE SA recognises e-learning has the potential to bring widespread benefits to students and teachers and that it will transform the way further education is delivered. In 2009 TAFE SA continued to invest and deliver the e-learning Strategy to further embed e-learning into the delivery of an increasing number of programs across TAFE SA. The TAFE SA Educational Information and Communications Technology Group was established in semester two, to oversee the implementation of the e-learning strategy.1.6 Promote community learning for the benefit of the individual, the economy and social health of the state (Links to South Australia’s Strategic Plan Target T6.19) South Australia Works in Communities creates learning opportunities for people and their communities. People with a disability, migrants and disadvantaged unemployed or under-employed people between 25 and 39 years were supported to participate in learning programs. Through a range of work programs, 4265 people were assisted and 1630 gained employment. The Employment Assistance Program supported 2900 35
  34. 34. jobseekers facing barriers to employment of which 822 gained employment. The Abilities for All Program provided accredited training to 154 people with a disability to develop their skills and create expanded employment pathways for the future. The South Australia Works Adult Community Education Program supported 94 projects delivering 30 000 accredited and 300 000 hours of non- accredited learning to over 11 000 people. Tauondi Aboriginal College provided 650 Aboriginal people with accredited or non accredited training. The college has a significant role in building the confidence, capacity and capability of the state’s Aboriginal community. The $2.23 million funding included $0.23 million in Australian Government funds under the Australian and state government agreement. Over 100 000 accredited training hours and 5000 non-accredited training hours were delivered.1.7 Specially focussed on disadvantaged members of society The South Australia Works Learning and Work Programs to 2010 initiative links people with skills and jobs. The initiative aims to increase learning, training and employment opportunities for all South Australians, particularly people who face barriers to accessing training and employment and who need extra help to break into the paid workforce. South Australia Works for Aboriginal People improves learning and employment outcomes for Aboriginal people by providing support, job training, work placements, recruitment leadership training, career enhancement, traineeships and apprenticeships. Of the 1580 Aboriginal people who participated in work programs, 795 gained employment. The Aboriginal Apprenticeship Program supported 150 apprentices, and 54 new apprentices commenced an apprenticeship. The TAFE SA Aboriginal Access Centre provides access to TAFE SA for Aboriginal people. Enrolled students are supported through the development of individual learning plans and a case management approach to lead Aboriginal students from unemployment to vocational education and training to meaningful employment. In 2008-09, $1.1 million was allocated to assist employers in drought designated areas to retain eligible trainees and apprentices. Of the 631 trainees and apprentices who attracted a retention subsidy, 95% remain in training or successfully completed their traineeship/ apprenticeship. The Drought Apprenticeship Retention Program is part of the government’s broader Drought Relief Program aimed at supporting farmers and rural communities. 36
  35. 35. In 2008-09 group training organisations, which were funded under the stateand Australian government Joint Group Training Program employed 244Indigenous and 167 disabled trainees and apprentices.In 2008 and 2009 calendar years a pilot project was conducted to test theefficacy of a support model to improve vocational education and trainingparticipation and outcomes in, and transition between, vocational educationand training and employment for people with a disability. The VocationalEducation and Training to Work: Disability Support and Transition Projecthas seen very successful outcomes with a 75% qualification completionrate and a 60% employment rate for participants in the 2008 pilot. Theproject has so far assisted 73 participants and is continuing in 2010. 37
  36. 36. 2.1 Provide access to high quality employment (Links to South Australia’s Strategic Plan Targets T1.10 T1.11 T1.12 and T1.26) In 2008-09, 32 135 participants were assisted with the development of foundation skills, generic skills, vocational training, brokerage into employment and post placement support. Of these, 16 745 participated in work programs and 15 390 in learning, skills development and training programs; 8430 people gained employment. Four hundred and twelve projects were undertaken to increase workforce participation, develop better workforce practices and build community capacity. In addition, over 895 000 accredited and 504 000 non-accredited hours of training were delivered through projects in metropolitan and regional areas. Expenditure on South Australia Works learning, training and work programs was $35.66 million, including $5.54 million of leveraged funds, including Australian Government funds. Nine South Australia Works Regional Coordinators work with the employment and skills formation networks to respond to each region’s unique learning, training and employment challenges. In 2008-09 $8.8 million was provided to assist 6350 people to participate in regional projects and a total of 3385 employment outcomes were achieved. South Australia Works in the Regions assisted 2127 mature aged participants, with 1195 finding employment. In addition, 710 Aboriginal people were supported through a diverse range of programs, with 355 gaining employment. South Australia Works for Aboriginal People improves learning and employment outcomes for Aboriginal people by providing support, job training, work placements, recruitment, leadership training, career enhancement, traineeships and apprenticeships. In 2008-09:  1580 Aboriginal people participated in work programs with 795 gaining employment  the South Australia Works Aboriginal Apprenticeship Program is currently supporting 150 Aboriginal apprentices, with 54 new apprentices commencing in 2008-09. In addition, 35 Aboriginal people achieved employment through the CareerStart SA program. South Australia Works for Mature Aged People continued to develop early intervention strategies by providing training, upskilling and employment programs for people 40 years and over. A total of 3620 mature-aged people participated in work programs and 1620 gained employment. 38
  37. 37. Opportunities were provided to 475 mature aged unemployed people and 100 gained employment, through the Employment 40 Plus Program. South Australia Works with Industry identified new employment and training possibilities, helped people to develop the skills required by a changing and dynamic economy, and assisted in meeting current and emerging workforce needs. Of 4820 people who participated in industry programs, 2575 gained employment. A joint initiative of the Australian and state governments, the Labour Market Adjustment Package continued to provide assistance in 2009 to retrenched workers from Mitsubishi Motors Australia Limited, eligible supply companies, Clipsal and Cooper Standard Automotive. Eligible retrenched workers received job search assistance, career counselling and case management, recognition of prior learning and training and skill development activities. This was supported by the Australian Government’s Job Network and Job Services Australia providers. Six hundred and fifteen retrenched workers accessed training and employment services, with 452 individuals gaining employment. In 2009, the Australian and state governments provided assistance to workers at Bridgestone by contributing $5.7 million towards assisting affected workers in upskilling, skills development, referral and placement into employment and work experience opportunities. In 2008-09, 613 businesses that tendered or applied for government works and service contracts and associated sub contracts valued at $250 000 or more per annum, registered with InSkill SA The Training and Skills Development Act 2008 introduced a requirement for employers to be registered to employ and train trainees and apprentices. The department implemented this requirement over 2009, with 2903 new employers registered and 769 employers increasing the scope of their registration to enable them to employ and train in additional trades or vocations. This brings the number of registered employers to 12 492. Employers seeking registration are provided with a comprehensive induction into the traineeship and apprenticeship system, which includes information on their obligations, responsibilities and rights and the support that is available to the contractual parties2.2 Increase and improve workforce participation in learning and work (links to South Australia’s Strategic Plan Targets T1.12 T6.20 and T6.21) Throughout 2009, the department facilitated dialogue on employment and skills participation for women through regular meetings with the Premier’s Council for Women. The impact of the global financial crisis led to a changed focus for policy development in workforce participation, focussing more on short term 39
  38. 38. strategies to address increasing workforce retrenchments, while still maintaining the longer term challenges posed by skill shortages. Gender- sensitive and whole-of-government strategies were adopted to advance and promote women’s employment in the workplace. In December 2009, the workforce participation rate was 63.2 per cent in South Australia in trend terms, which was 0.4 percentage points lower than the previous year (63.6 per cent). At the national level, the workforce participation rate also fell slightly from 65.3 per cent to 65.2 per cent over the same period (in trend terms).2.3 Foster career development (Links to South Australia’s Strategic Plan Targets T6.15 T6.19) The Careers SA Framework was implemented during 2009. The framework is the state government’s response to the need for a consistent and coordinated career development framework and included:  establishment of a state-wide network of high quality, consistent and coordinated career development services for individuals, groups of people, industry and career development practitioners  creation of a Careers SA web portal  the availability of high quality career and labour market information  promotion of state-wide skills recognition services  facilitation of an Interagency Career Development Network and a Career Practitioner’s Network  development of a tool kit to support the implementation of career development services. The Skills Recognition Service provides information, brokerage and referral services in the areas of recognition of qualifications and skills gained locally or overseas, pathways to recognition of prior learning and support with career development opportunities. A major focus of the service is the recognition of qualifications and skills, and career development as major pathway to employment. In 2008-09, the service assisted over 2000 clients with the recognition of qualifications and skills (gained locally or overseas) in order to gain employment. Career development centres continue to be expanded across the state. In 2008-09 new services were established in Southern Adelaide, Riverland, Eyre and Eastern Adelaide.2.4 Provide high quality workforce development services to industry and the community (Links to South Australia’s Strategic Plan Targets T1.10, T1.11, T1.12 and T 1.26) In 2009 the department implemented a new Structural Adjustment Program with the following components:  Down Time Training In conjunction with the Australian Government, the program provided 40

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