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DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
DFEEST Annual Report 2006
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DFEEST Annual Report 2006

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The Annual Report represents an overview of DFEEST’s achievements, governance, workforce management and financial performance. It also outlines progress made towards achieving our objectives in South …

The Annual Report represents an overview of DFEEST’s achievements, governance, workforce management and financial performance. It also outlines progress made towards achieving our objectives in South Australia’s Strategic Plan.

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  1. For further copies and enquiries please contact:Department of Further Education, Employment, Science and Technology (DFEEST)Office of the Chief ExecutiveGPO Box 320ADELAIDE SA 5001Telephone: (08) 8226 3821Facsimile: (08) 8226 9533The 2006 Annual Report is available on the DFEEST website atwww.dfeest.sa.gov.auISSN 1449-6437
  2. Section A DFEEST Annual Report 2006CONTENTS SECTION A CHIEF EXECUTIVE’S OVERVIEW 3 VISION AND VALUES 5 HIGHLIGHTS 6 MINISTERIAL LEGISLATIVE RESPONSIBILITIES 9 EMPLOYMENT, TRAINING AND FURTHER EDUCATION 9 SCIENCE AND INFORMATION ECONOMY 10 YOUTH 12 CORPORATE GOVERNANCE 13 ORGANISATION CHART 14 DEPARTMENTAL RESPONSIBILITIES 15 STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES 15 FINANCIAL OVERVIEW 18 SECTION B WORKFORCE PROFILE 22 EXECUTIVE PROFILE 23 WORKFORCE DIVERSITY 24 VOLUNTARY FLEXIBLE WORKING ARRANGEMENTS 27 LEAVE MANAGEMENT 29 EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYMENT PROGRAMS 29 OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH, SAFETY 30 AND INJURY MANAGEMENT SECTION C PERFORMANCE REPORTS TAFE SA 32 QUALITY 51 TRAINEESHIPS AND APPRENTICESHIPS 55 EMPLOYMENT PROGRAMS 62 WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT 68 INDIGENOUS TRAINING AND EMPLOYMENT 72 HIGHER EDUCATION 75 SCIENCE AND INNOVATION 77 INFORMATION ECONOMY 82 OFFICE FOR YOUTH 88 1
  3. Section A DFEEST Annual Report 2006CONTENTS SECTION D FEATURES DISABILITY ACTION PLAN 91 RECONCILIATION 94 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ACTION PLAN 95 CONTRACTS 97 EXTERNAL CONSULTANCIES 98 ASBESTOS MANAGEMENT IN GOVERNMENT BUILDINGS 99 ACCOUNT PAYMENT PERFORMANCE 100 FRAUD 100 OVERSEAS TRAVEL 101 URBAN DESIGN CHARTER 103 FREEDOM OF INFORMATION 103 ICT 105 SECTION E FINANCIAL INFORMATION 109 STATISTICAL APPENDICES APPENDIX 1: VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND TRAINING 135 APPENDIX 2: VET RECOGNITION DATA FOR 2005 AND 2006 142 APPENDIX 3: TAFE SA DATA 145 APPENDIX 4: GLOSSARY OF TERMS 147 2
  4. Section A DFEEST Annual Report 2006CHIEF EXECUTIVE’S OVERVIEWI am pleased to present the Annual Report for the Department of Further Education,Employment Science and Technology for 2006, which is my second full year in charge ofthis agency. I would like to acknowledge the leadership and direction offered by MinistersKey, Maywald and Caica.Many of the department’s activities continue to be undertaken in what is a very fluidenvironment of reform, driven internally but also through the Council of AustralianGovernments and in the context of significant workforce challenges facing the state’sindustries. It is vitally important that we continue to challenge how we support the SouthAustralian community and maintain a level of flexibility to be able to deliver on the economicand social and environmental directives of the government as outlined in South Australia’sStrategic Plan.South Australia’s apprenticeship and traineeship system continues to record successes,particularly among female, youth and traditional trades groups. The state had a 14 per centincrease in apprentices and trainees completing their training over the year ending 30 June2006 – nearly three times the national increase of just 5 per cent. The Training and SkillsCommission continued to play an important role in promoting quality, supporting apprenticesand trainees throughout their training, and providing industry and community advice togovernment about workforce development.In 2006 the number of South Australians in work rose to a new record high of 762 100 – thefourteenth consecutive rise in trend employment, with more South Australians in full-timework than ever before.The release in September of Skills for South Australia – Building on Strong Foundations wasthe precursor of a change agenda which will drive how we will deal with the challenges weface in future years. It also demonstrated the broad range of activity and significantinvestment that the government provides to support training and employment for the SouthAustralian community.DFEEST continues to play a significant role in supporting the economy in metropolitan andregional South Australia. It has developed collaborative training and development initiativessuch as the new air warfare destroyer program, defence industries and resource sectorworkforce development requirements and has been an integral player in the establishment ofthe Maritime Skills Centre and the Minerals, Resources and Heavy Engineering SkillsCentre. TAFE SA has continued to play a key role in skilling South Australia and hascontinued its critical role in supporting the training of disadvantaged groups to ensure thegovernment’s obligations to support all sections of the community are realised.Supportive and customised training packages have been developed specifically to addressthe individual requirements of industry and support current and future workforcedevelopment requirements. TAFE will be further taking on the challenge of engaging evenmore flexibly and effectively with industry over 2007 and we all look forward to the positiveoutcomes that this will bring to the South Australian economy.The South Australia Works initiative provided much needed assistance to South Australiansfacing difficulty in the labour market. Managed by the Employment Programs Directorate, 3
  5. Section A DFEEST Annual Report 2006the initiative linked people with skills training and jobs and focussed especially on the needsof young, Indigenous, and mature aged people. An outstanding result with over 28 700people participating in learning and work programs and over 7300 people gainingemployment; a result which exceeded the participant target by 9400 (49 per cent) and theemployment target by 500 (8 per cent).International student numbers continue to increase in South Australia, highlighting the qualityof the training product delivered by our local training providers. During 2006, Adelaide waschosen by 20 580 overseas students as their study destination compared to 18 035 during2005. Further strengthening South Australia’s education reputation was the establishmentand first intake of students in the Adelaide based campus of Carnegie Mellon University,which DFEEST’s Quality Directorate worked to ensure was the first legally recognisedinternational university in Australia. The Quality Directorate continues to play a leading rolein a number of significant national quality and regulatory initiatives.DFEEST also secured infrastructure investment from the commonwealth government andthe private sector for nine nationally collaborative infrastructure research projects in SouthAustralia under the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy.In the area of the information economy, I was pleased to see the launch of broadbandservices, under the Broadband SA program, in the Coorong District Council and Barossaand Light regions. The establishment of the South Australian Broadband Research andEducation Network (SABRENet) continued to progress well with the completion of most ofthe connections to university campuses, teaching hospitals and research precincts. 2006also marked the release of the Information Economy Agenda for South Australia, as theoverarching strategy for guiding the state’s future investments and activities in this criticalarea for the future of South Australia.Following the 2006 South Australian General Election, we were pleased to welcome theOffice for Youth which joined the department. This shift provides us with opportunities tostrengthen our links with the youth sector, continue to build and enhance youth participationin decision making and improve our focus on achieving positive education and employmentoutcomes for young people.This year I undertook an organisational realignment to ensure a number of functions androles within the agency are better able to support key business drivers and enable us torespond to the challenges we face moving forward.The establishment of a new Workforce Development Directorate has enabled a strongerfocus on future workforce development needs of the state. This reflects the size of the taskfacing the department in leading the government’s response to current and future skillsshortages. A new Planning and Evaluation Directorate ensures whole of departmentstrategic planning and a focus on evaluation of the impacts of our programs drives thedepartment budget and resource allocation processes. Changes to the Shared BusinessServices Directorate will help to embed financial reform measures as well as creatingopportunity for business improvements particularly in transactional processing.I extend my thanks to all staff for their ongoing support, commitment and endeavour duringthe year. I look forward to us continuing to make further changes which will result in evenmore valuable contributions towards achieving improved educational, training andemployment outcomes for the South Australian community.Brian CunninghamChief Executive 4
  6. Section A DFEEST Annual Report 2006VISION AND VALUESDepartment of Further Education, Employment, Science and TechnologyThe Department of Further Education, Employment, Science and Technology (DFEEST)reflects and supports the South Australian Governments priorities of sustaining a vibranteconomy and socially inclusive community by developing the states workforce, skills baseand life long learning opportunities.VisionDFEEST is integral to employment growth, wealth creation, innovation and economicdevelopment in South Australia by building the breadth and depth of workforce skills in thestate. Complementing this, DFEEST will lead science and technology development in SouthAustralia. DFEEST will also build community education and capacity, social inclusion andcontinuous learning in to the culture of the state.ValuesDFEEST is striving to become a high performance learning organisation, one which attracts,develops and retains the most talented workforce available. The department will onlyachieve its goals through a strong commitment to people. The department’s core valuesare: integrity respect responsiveness openness excellence courageDFEEST:• is committed to continuous learning at all levels and to high quality teaching services• believes that our goals will be achieved through innovation and a commitment to quality – we recognise that these values will flourish when stakeholders are free to challenge prevailing views in a climate of creative tension• is driven by a commitment to customer service for internal and external customers – we will be an out looking organisation which is sensitive and responsive to the environment in which we operate• recognises that every activity must contribute real value and an effective return on investment• strives for a high level of transparency and openness in a culture which values a ‘can-do’ approach• embraces the changes which are inherent in changing community demographics and in the changing demands of employers and employees in the state• values rewarding and safe jobs for its employees which allow personal growth and work/life balance• is committed to sustainable solutions which will preserve the natural environment and resources 5
  7. Section A DFEEST Annual Report 2006• acknowledges superior performance and will continually strive to increase levels of productivity.DFEEST’s values contribute positively to our capacity to provide services which are ofbenefit to all stakeholders – industry and commerce, student, employees, traininginstitutions, the community and the government. DFEEST aspires to a positive reputation asa key contributor to the future of the state. DFEEST staff will have a cause to feel pride intheir work and in their agency.DFEEST Strategic Plan 2006-08, Skills for South Australia, http://in.dfeest.sa.gov.au/dfeest/pages/department/ HIGHLIGHTSEmployment Training and Further Education• Between 2004 and 2005, the number of VET students in South Australia increased by 2863 (or 2.3 per cent), from 122 356 to 125 219 1.• In 2005, South Australia generated 22 764 134 hours of VET delivery, an increase of 1.3 per cent (or 289 452 hours) on 2004 levels1.• A total of 11 149 people applied for a place at TAFE SA, an increase of 11 per cent (1000 additional people) on the number of applicants during 2005.• OneSteel announced a joint venture arrangement with TAFE SA Regional to train and employ an additional 25 apprentices in July 2006 and a further 25 apprentices in January 2007. The apprentices, while employed by OneSteel, will be trained from TAFE SA Whyalla Campus in their first year.• In May 2006, TAFE SA won a contract worth more than $250 000 to provide intensive laboratory training for up to 85 new BHP Billiton employees.• From 13 to 15 November 2006, South Australia hosted a national conference focussing on skills shortages and vocational education reform. The conference explored the new Australian VTE reform agenda; international business opportunities for VTE and workforce planning and development.• International student numbers continued to increase. Adelaide was chosen by 20 580 overseas students as their study destination compared to 18 035 during 2005.• The government launched the Community Learning Strategy which aims to develop a culture of learning in South Australia. Developed by the Adult Community Education Reference Group of the Training and Skills Commission and with the assistance of the department, the strategy was shaped by the views of more than 450 people representing the education, community, government and business sectors.• Minister Caica announced a review of the Training and Skills Development Act 2003 to ensure that the training sector has contemporary legislation in place that will lead the sector in meeting South Australia’s current and future skills needs. It will focus on the regulation of training provision and the apprenticeship and traineeship system. A broad consultation process commenced in September. Drafting instructions for revisions to the Act will be undertaken in 2007.• The department provided support through the Industry Skills Boards to identify industry and region-specific workforce issues and to address those issues through initiatives such as the Industry Skills Boards Cluster projects. In July 2006, at the Industry Skills Forum,1 Latest available information – Source: NCVER, 2001-05 Australian vocational education and training statistics-financialinformation 6
  8. Section A DFEEST Annual Report 2006 Minister Caica announced the formation of three strategic clusters from the nine existing Industry Skills Boards and the provision of $150 000 for each cluster through the Workforce Development Fund budget to address skills shortages.• The number of trainees and apprentices reached a high of 34 100 in March 2006. This equals the previous record high achieved in September 2005.• The Trades Recognition Support Service began operation in February 2006. The Service enables people who have acquired trades skills or qualifications other than under the Australian Qualifications Framework to have their skills and experience recognised. Successful applicants are issued with a Certificate of Recognition.• The Pre-apprenticeship Program provided training to 90 jobseekers in trade areas experiencing skills shortage, such as roof plumbing, engineering (mechanical and fabrication), engineering (electrical and electronics), and carpentry/joinery. Of the jobseekers involved, 42 gained employment, including 37 in apprenticeships under a contract of training.• More than 28 700 people participated in learning and work programs with over 7300 participants gaining employment. Participant targets for 2005-06 were exceeded by over 9400 people (49 per cent) and the employment target was exceeded by over 500 people (eight per cent).• In March 2006, South Australia Works in the Public Sector successfully supported the variation of nine public sector awards through the Industrial Relations Commission to allow for the delivery of part-time traineeships, traineeships longer than 12 months in duration and school based new apprenticeships for government.• In the first national project of its kind, South Australia Works partnered with the Australian Government’s Department of Employment and Workplace Relations (DEWR), three other state governments and the Australian Manufacturing Technology Institute (AMTIL) to skill up and place job seekers into entry level positions within the precision engineering and manufacturing sector.• Higher Education Council Strategic Statement/Action Plan was approved for the next 12 months. The Plan will assist Council members better identify collaborative activities between universities and the state government to strengthen the higher education sector in South Australia.• Making Connections – Developing our Workforce was the theme of the annual DFEEST Training Sector Forum held in June in Adelaide. Over 320 delegates attended the forum which was one of several important strategies used by the department for the continuing development of high quality teaching and assessment in South Australia.• The Higher Education Directorate has collaborated across government, with universities, and with the professions, in reviewing medical student admission processes and to secure an additional 60 university places.Science and Innovation• The Premier’s Science Excellence Awards were initiated by the Premier’s Science Research Council to assist in raising the awareness of the importance of science, technology and innovation throughout the broader community.• In November 2006, the state government committed $22 million over five years for nine nationally collaborative infrastructure research projects in South Australia. This was matched by $28 million in commonwealth funding provided under National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS) with further contributions from industry and research institutions.• A business case supporting the creation of the Mawson Institute for Advanced Manufacturing (MIAM) was developed. Government funding for the Institute was provided in 2005 totalling $8 million over four years. The first $2 million grant from the government was used to purchase scientific and engineering equipment. 7
  9. Section A DFEEST Annual Report 2006Information Economy• The department launched broadband services, under the Broadband SA program, in Coorong District Council and Barossa and Light regions. Broadband SA program includes the Broadband Development Fund comprising $7 million (2003-08) for projects to enhance and extend the state’s broadband environment.• Completed the South Australian Broadband Research and Education Network (SABRENet), an optical-fibre telecommunications network constructed in metropolitan Adelaide to link the states major research and education sites, including university campuses, research precincts and teaching hospitals. By December 2006, the major backbones and most connections to participants’ sites were completed, making SABRENet one of Australias first and largest purpose-built customer owned fibre networks.• The department published an abridged version of the Information Economy Agenda for South Australia. This document develops a basis for responding to the profound change inherent in the information economy and presents a framework to recognise and pursue topics that demand priority attention and position the state to achieve present and future benefits. The priority areas identified are infrastructure, industry development, social inclusion, skills and online content and applications.Youth• The department contributed to a joint initiative between the Local Government Association of South Australia and the Office for State/Local Government Relations to increase young people’s participation as candidates and voters in the November local government elections.• A total of 3930 young people participated in volunteering activities through specific programs.• In June 2006 the directorate published the Celebrating Success report. This highlighted the achievements across government in implementing the South Australian Youth Action Plan.People• The department won the SA Public Sector Human Resource Excellence Award for developing and implementing the DFEEST Workforce Development Platform for building its workforce.• The department also implemented its Aboriginal Employment Strategy, which aims for 2.1 percent of its workforce to comprise Aboriginal people by 2010; implemented child protection procedures to protect students and children under 18; and introduced individual working agreements for TAFE Act staff. 8
  10. Section A DFEEST Annual Report 2006MINISTERIAL LEGISLATIVE RESPONSIBILITIESPortfolio governance for further education, employment, science, technology and youth ismanaged through a number of councils, boards and committees that work in conjunctionwith the department to provide the Minister for Employment, Training and Further Education,the Minister for Science and Information Economy and the Minister for Youth with advice inkey strategic areas.EMPLOYMENT, TRAINING AND FURTHER EDUCATIONOn 23 March 2006 the Hon Paul Caica MP took responsibility for this portfolio, previouslyheld by the Hon Stephanie Key MP.AgencyThe Department of Further Education, Employment, Science and TechnologyActs AdministeredConstruction Industry Training Fund Act 1993Technical and Further Education Act 1975Flinders University of South Australia Act 1966University of Adelaide Act 1971University of South Australia Act 1990Training and Skills Development Act 2003Statutory Authorities and BoardsConstruction Industry Training BoardEducation AdelaideTraining and Skills CommissionGrievances and Disputes Mediation CommitteeRegulationsConstruction Industry Training Fund Regulations 1993Public Corporations (Education Adelaide) Regulations 1998Technical and Further Education Regulations 1999Technical and Further Education (Vehicles) Regulations 1998Training and Skills Development Regulations 2003Boards, Committees and Authorities within the Minister’s portfolioInstitute CouncilsInstitute councils are established by the Minister for each of the three institutes of TAFE SAunder the Technical and Further Education Act 1975. The councils advise, monitorperformance and provide supplementary funding for the institute’s operation.Training and Skills CommissionThe Training and Skills Commission was established under the Training and SkillsDevelopment Act 2003. The Act gives authority to the commission in regulating vocationaleducation and training and non-university higher education in the state and in planning andpolicy advice on employment, vocational training and adult community education. It gives a 9
  11. Section A DFEEST Annual Report 2006strong leadership role to industry in workforce development for the state. The commissionhas nine members (plus deputies) appointed by the Governor, the majority from industry andthe balance representing the interest of employer associations and the United Trades andLabor Council.The commission is formally advised by two reference groups in the areas of quality, adultcommunity education. The Act also sets up a Grievances and Disputes MediationCommittee to adjudicate disputes between apprentices/trainees and their employers undercontracts of training.These groups are all convened by commission members, but draw on the wider resources ofindustry and the community for specialist advice through their membership and consultationstrategies. The Training and Skills Commission reports annually to Parliament on itsoperations and those of its committees and reference groups.Higher Education CouncilThe Higher Education Council was established in 2002 to foster collaborative arrangementsbetween industry and higher education institutions in South Australia.Areas of activity for the council include:• developing skills and knowledge for South Australian students and researchers• supporting cultural, environmental and professional exchanges• improving entrepreneurial skills for both industry and universities• attracting businesses for South Australia to engage the expertise of the state’s universities.Austraining InternationalAustraining International Pty Ltd is an international consulting and project managementcompany of the South Australian Government. Its head office is in Adelaide and thecompany has a regional presence in Asia through its subsidiary company PT AustrainingNusantatra, which was established in 1993 in Jakarta, Indonesia. It has a registeredcompany in Papua New Guinea which maintains an office in Port Morseby. Austraining hasa network of 18 agents in the Middle East, Asia and the Pacific and has ISO 9001accreditation for the development and management of international education and trainingprojects.Education AdelaideEducation Adelaide is a subsidiary of the Minister for Employment, Training and FurtherEducation established by the Public Corporations (Education Adelaide) Regulations 1998. Itoperates as a partnership between the City of Adelaide, the state’s universities, the stategovernment and numerous private colleges and schools. Its strategic direction is toaccelerate the growth of South Australia’s education export industry to benefit the state’seducation providers, the local economy and community and the City of Adelaide. EducationAdelaide works closely with DFEEST to achieve targets in South Australia’s Strategic Plan.SCIENCE AND INFORMATION ECONOMYThe Hon Karlene Maywald MP took responsibility for this portfolio from 23 March 2005.AgencyThe Department of Further Education, Employment, Science and Technology 10
  12. Section A DFEEST Annual Report 2006RegulationsPublic Corporations (Bio Innovation SA) Regulations 2001Public Corporations (Playford Centre) Regulations 1996Statutory AuthoritiesBio Innovation SAPlayford CentreBoards, Committees and Authorities within the Minister’s portfolioThe Premier’s Science and Research CouncilThe Premier’s Science and Research Council was established in June 2002 to advise thegovernment on strategies for boosting local science and research capabilities and improvinglevels of innovation. The council is co-chaired by the Premier and the state’s chief scientistDr Max Brennan AO and is administratively supported by DFEEST.The council was responsible for establishing the Premier’s Science and Research Fund in2003, to facilitate strategic investment in science and research in South Australia and thetransfer of research outcomes to end users, as a foundation for South Australia’s economic,social and environmental future. Since then, the fund, through a competitive process, hascommitted a total of over $11 million for collaborative science and research projects in SouthAustralia.Information Economy Advisory BoardThe Information Economy Advisory Board provides advice to the Minister for Science andInformation Economy on potential benefits of the information economy for all SouthAustralians and on how to maximise these benefits. The board’s membership bringstogether prominent individuals from the community, academia and industry. It is supportedby, and works closely with DFEEST to provide advice on the state’s current capacity tobenefit from the information economy.Bio Innovation SABio Innovation SA is a subsidiary of the Minister for Science and Information Economyestablished by the Public Corporations (Bio Innovation SA) Regulations 2001.Funded by the state government, Bio Innovation SA provides grants to companies andpublic research organisations to promote company development and enablecommercialisation of technologies.The organisation also provides mentoring advice on business and product development,financial and marketing advice, as well as infrastructure development support for the localbioscience industry. Over the past five years, Bio Innovation SA has established itself as thefocal point for the local bioscience community and industry development in South Australia.Adelaide has one of the fastest-growing biotechnology industry clusters in Australia and itsglobal position is growing by the day. The biotechnology sector contributes 14 per cent ofthe state’s total business research and development expenditure. The number of biotechcompanies has doubled since 2001 with now more than 80 biotechnology companies inSouth Australia, employing about 1000 people and generating more than $175 million inrevenue. 11
  13. Section A DFEEST Annual Report 2006Investigator Science and Technology CentreThe Investigator Science and Technology Centre was an incorporated non-profit associationthat worked closely with the state’s three universities, research organisations and industry topromote science and technology to the community at large and targeted school age children.In October 2006, the Investigator announced it would cease trading. DFEEST providedassistance to enable it to wind down its operations by the end of December 2006.Playford CentrePlayford Centre is a subsidiary of the Minister for Science and Information Economy establishedby the Public Corporations (Playford Centre) Regulations 1996, to contribute to South Australia’seconomic growth, exports, commercialisation of research and entrepreneurial activity, byfacilitating the formation and development of innovative technology ventures.Playford CapitalIn 2001, Playford Centre formed a subsidiary Playford Capital Pty Ltd. Playford Capital usesfunding provided by the Commonwealths Building on IT Strengths and ICT IncubatorsPrograms to invest in South Australian ICT firms which have the potential and commitmentto become high growth companies exporting interstate and overseas. This has stimulatedthe inflow of private equity into South Australia and supported ICT company growth.SABRENet LtdSABRENet Ltd is a not for profit tax-exempt public company limited by guarantee. Onceconstructed, SABRENet will own the multicore optical fibre network connecting majorresearch and education sites in Adelaide.YOUTHOn 23 March 2006 the Hon Paul Caica MP took responsibility for this portfolio, previouslyheld by the Hon Stephanie Key MP.AgencyThe Department of Further Education, Employment, Science and TechnologyBoards, Committees and Authorities within the Minister’s portfolioDuke of Edinburgh’s Award, State Award CommitteeThe Duke of Edinburgh’s Award is an international self-development program available toyoung people aged between 14 and 25. The Minister for Youth is the exclusive licenceholder to deliver the Award in South Australia, and appoints the State Award Committee tomaintain quality and support the delivery of the Award.Minister’s Youth CouncilThe Minister’s Youth Council comprises young people aged 12-25 who provide advice to theMinister for Youth on issues that affect young South Australians. The Office for Youthmanages the application process and recommends membership to the Minister who seeksto appoint a diverse membership of young people for 1-3 year terms. The Minister’s YouthCouncil consults and advises the Minister directly through monthly meetings.Dame Roma Mitchell Trust FundDame Roma Mitchell Trust Fund for Children and Young People Board (transferred toDepartment for Families and Communities on 24 April 2006). The Dame Roma MitchellTrust Fund for Children and Young People makes grants available to children and youngpeople who are, or have been, under the guardianship of the Minister for Families andCommunities. 12
  14. Section A DFEEST Annual Report 2006CORPORATE GOVERNANCEThe department’s principal corporate governance obligations are prescribed in the PublicSector Management Act 1995 and the Technical and Further Education Act, 1975. TheseActs establish general management aims, personnel management and employee conductstandards. The chief executive is responsible for observance of these aims and standardswithin the department.The department operates within a framework that integrates strategic management andleadership, accountability, robust standards and processes, and the effective and efficientmanagement of people, resources and risk. The corporate executive leadership team hasresponsibility for maintaining the effectiveness of these governance mechanisms.The department is committed to developing a culture that delivers best-practice services andencourages the involvement of all employees in a process of continuous improvement thatrecognises and values their contribution to departmental objectives.The allocation of funds across the department, including TAFE institutes, is based on theprinciple of delivering value for money and services that implement the department’s role ineducation, training and employment, science and innovation and link to whole-of-government objectives. The Corporate Executive Team oversees high-level corporatestrategy and determines major internal resource allocation.Reports are provided monthly to the Corporate Executive Team, the Budget and FinanceExecutive and the Executive Forum (senior management group) to enable monitoring andevaluation of performance. This includes reporting in the areas of financial results,occupational health, safety and welfare statistics, workforce details, project status, andresults against other key performance indicators, including the targets contained in SouthAustralia’s Strategic Plan.The Budget and Finance Executive Committee monitors the financial performance of thedepartment and the portfolio. In line with this role, a comprehensive review of departmentalfinancial practices and processes was completed. As a result, a number of reforms havebeen identified and are in the process of being implemented.An Audit and Risk Management Committee is being established to provide governance,audit and risk management advice and additional services to assist management with theachievement and maintenance of the management aims and standards in line with thedepartment’s objectives and priorities.The department’s personnel management practices ensure the fair and consistent treatmentof employees. It has established policies and procedures that reflect its commitment to thepublic service code of conduct. 13
  15. Section ADFEEST Annual Report 2006 14
  16. Section A DFEEST Annual Report 2006DEPARTMENTAL RESPONSIBILITIESDFEEST plays a pivotal role in building the breadth and depth of workforce skills in SouthAustralia. This is complemented by leading science and technology development, andbuilding community education and capacity, social inclusion and continuous learning into theculture of the state.The portfolio plays a central role in achieving South Australia’s Strategic Plan objectivesGrowing Prosperity, Fostering Creativity, and Expanding Opportunity; and makes asubstantial contribution to Improving Wellbeing, Attaining Sustainability and BuildingCommunities.The department undertakes a range of functions in order to meet its objectives andcontribute to the achievement of South Australia’s Strategic Plan objectives and targetsincluding:• provision of strategic policy advice for developing the state’s workforce• provision of strategic advice for science, technology, information economy and innovation policy that links government with business, industry and education sectors• ensuring high quality vocational education and training (VET) delivered by TAFE institutes, private registered training organisations and adult community education providers• regulation of VET organisations, university and non-university higher education providers, and providers of English language intensive courses for overseas students• regulation, administration and funding of apprenticeships and traineeships• managing state funded employment and community development programs• supporting the government’s strategic direction in the higher education sector• initiating, advocating and facilitating policies and strategies, including appropriate programs and grants, that create opportunities for positive outcomes for all young people in South Australia• supporting the implementation of the Youth Action Plan• raising the profile of South Australia in the international education market place through its support of Education Adelaide.STRATEGIC OBJECTIVESThe strategic intent of DFEEST is to contribute to the development of a skilled workforce inSouth Australia; to assist individuals to maximise their workforce potential and to build oureducation and training capability through schools, TAFE, VET and higher educationproviders. In order to deliver on these objectives, DFEEST will develop as a highperformance learning organisation. 15
  17. Section A DFEEST Annual Report 2006South Australia is a regional economy in a highly connected and interdependent globaleconomy. In order to prosper, South Australia must be globally competitive in key areas ofeconomic activity, many of which have achieved importance either through our naturalresources or as a result of our economic history.South Australia’s ageing workforce demands that a strong focus be placed on workforceplanning and workforce development in order to ensure that the skills demanded by thefuture are readily available. Furthermore, and economy which has focused on skilling theworkforce will be in a prime position to improve competitive advantage and to attract newinvestment to the region.DFEEST Strategic Objectives and South Australia’s Strategic PlanSouth Australia’s Strategic Plan, Creating Opportunity, identifies a number of targets ofdirect relevance to the business of DFEEST. These targets are specific in terms of theoutcomes to be achieved and the time frame in which this will occur. The targets from SouthAustralia’s Strategic Plan which DFEEST leads for the government provide a framework forDFEEST’s Strategic Objectives 1 to 4.Strategic Objective #1 Building a high performance organisationDFEEST will become a skilled, high performance organisation in order to ensure that wehave the capacity to deliver our strategic objectives. This involves developing DFEEST’speople, improving our business systems and processes and ensuring a high focus oncustomer service.Strategic Objective #2 Skilling South AustraliaDFEEST will lead the way in skilling South Australia by working with employeerepresentatives, industry, businesses, communities and regions to implement workforceplanning and skill development of programs, building a quality and competitive trainingmarket and strengthening the publicly owned TAFE SA system. At the same time DFEESTwill support the government’s social inclusion agenda regarding the skills needs of Aboriginalpeople, disadvantaged and marginalised groups.Strategic Objective #2 is directly relevant to achieving the following South Australia’sStrategic Plan targets with DFEEST as lead agency. Increase the proportion of the South Australian Non-school qualifications labour force with non-school qualification from T 6.15 2 50.7% in 2002 within 10 years University participation Exceed the national average within 10 years T 6.16 TAFE participation Continue to exceed the national average T 6.17 Double South Australia’s share of overseas Share of overseas students T 1.14 students within 10 yearsStrategic Objective #3 Employment and workforce developmentDFEEST will lead the way in supporting individuals and communities to make the rightchoices in relation to careers and learning by providing high quality employment andworkforce development services and community education.Strategic Objective #3 is directly relevant to achieving the following South Australia’sStrategic Plan targets with DFEEST as lead agency.2 Targets refer to South Australia’s Strategic Plan V.1 of March 2004 16
  18. Section A DFEEST Annual Report 2006 Better the Australian average employment growth Jobs T 1.1 rate within 10 years Equal or better the Australian average within 5 Unemployment T 1.2 years Equal or better the Australian average within 5 Youth Unemployment T 1.3 yearsStrategic Objective #4 An innovative communityDFEEST is committed to the strategies endorsed by the Premier’s Science and ResearchCouncil detailed in the ten year vision for science technology and innovation in SouthAustralia (STI10), in conjunction with implementing the state Broadband Strategy and thestate’s current Information Economy Agenda, both endorsed by the Information EconomyAdvisory Board. This includes connectivity, content and capability in support of state skillsand e-learning objectives.Strategic Objective #4 is directly relevant to achieving the following South Australia’sStrategic Plan targets with DFEEST as lead agency. Double South Australia’s share of overseas Share of overseas students T 1.14 students within 10 years Increase patent applications to exceed our Commercialisation of population share of all Australian applications T 4.2 research within 5 years Exceed the national average of business Investment in science, expenditure on research and development (as a T 4.6 research and innovation percentage of GSP) and approach the OECD average within 10 years Increase the level of internet use in metropolitan Internet usage and regional South Australia by 20 per cent within T 4.7 10 years Increase the proportion of the South Australian labour force with non-school qualifications from Non-school qualifications T 6.15 50.7 per cent in 2002 to 55 per cent within 10 years University participation Exceed the national average within 10 years T 6.16 Have based in South Australia the headquaters of Cooperative research a major node of at least 40 per cent of all centres, centres of Cooperative Research Centres, Centres of T 4.8 excellence and major Excellence and Major National Research national research facilities Facilities within 5 yearsNote: the above tables contain targets from South Australia’s Strategic Plan V.1 of March 2004. South Australia’s Strategic PlanV.2 issued January 2007 provides revised targets http://www.stateplan.sa.gov.au/ 17
  19. Section A DFEEST Annual Report 2006FINANCIAL OVERVIEWThe tables provided in this section set out a summary of the actual results for the 2005-06financial year. The detailed financial statements reflecting actual results for 2005-06 arepresented under Financial Information (refer to Section E of this report).Income Statement Summary Actual Actual 2005-06 2004-05 $’000 $’000 Expenses 461 307 433 688 Revenues 189 730 181 116 Net Cost of Providing Services 271 577 252 572 Revenues from Government 244 120 239 693 Net Result before Restructure (27 457) (12 879) Net Expenses from Restructuring (335) Net Result After Restructuring (27 792) (12 879)Net Result after RestructuringThe deterioration in the Net Result after Restructuring from 2004-05 to 2005-06 is principallydue to higher employee expenses as a result of an increase in the number of full-timeequivalents within the department during 2005-06. There was also increased demand forservices. The result for 2005-06 also includes a payment of $3.589 million for the return ofsurplus cash to treasury in accordance with the government’s cash alignment policy.Operating RevenuesActual operating revenues for 2005-06 were $437.4 million. The principal source of fundingfor the department is state government appropriation which totalled $247.7 million. Otheroperating revenues included commonwealth grants of $100.7 million and $69.7 million fromstudent and other fees and charges. 18
  20. Section A DFEEST Annual Report 2006The table below depicts an overview of revenue sources 2005-06 State Government Funding $247.7m C/W Grants $100.7m Sales/fee for Service Revenue $39.4m Other $12.3m Student Enrolment Fees and Charges $27.8m Other Grants & Contributions $9.5mOperating ExpensesActual employee benefits of $254.7 million for 2005-06 constituted 55 per cent of the totaloperating expenses of $461.3 million. Grants and subsidies expenses totalled $58.4 millionincluding $17 million for employment programs, $12.1 million for science and technologyprograms, $9.9 million for vocational education and training programs and $6.7 million forTertiary Student Transport Concessions.The other major component of operating expenses (Supplies and Services) amounted to$133.9 million. Included in this category were $20.7 million for funding to non-TAFE providersfor Vocational Education and Training, $19.6 million for information technology infrastructureand communication, $17.6 million for fees for contracted services, $16.7 million for minor works,maintenance and equipment, $15.1 million for printing and consumables. A further $14.3 millionwas charged to depreciation expense.The table below depicts an overview of operating expenses 2005-06 Employee Expenses $254.7m Supplies & Services $133.9m Grants & Subsidies $58.4m Depreciation $14.3m 19
  21. Section A DFEEST Annual Report 2006Overview of Operating Expenses 2005-06The following table depicts how expenditure was applied to the following programs inaccordance with approved strategic priorities. Overview of Operating Expenses 2005-06 Actual 2005-06 $’000 Employment and Skills Formation – Vocational Education and Training. Provision of $401.4m vocational education and training by TAFE institutes and other providers outside the school sector (including publicly funded Adult Community Education), including contestable and non-contestable sources of funding; policy advice and support for post- secondary education $0.6m Employment and Skills Formation – Higher Education. Provision of advice to Minister Caica on higher education policy and planning $6.0m Employment and Skills Formation – Regulatory Services. Provision of registration, accreditation and approval services for registered training organisations, and the regulation, administration and funding of apprenticeships and traineeships Employment and Skills Formation – Employment Development. Addressing $26.4m disadvantage by providing opportunities to participate in employment, training, skills development, adult community education and assisting industry to meet current and future skills needs. (Includes funding for SA Works) Science, Technology and Innovation. Provides the Government’s principal strategic $25.3m focus for science, technology, information economy and innovation policy development and program delivery in South Australia that links the government, business, industry and education sectors. (Includes funding for Bio Innovation SA, Premier’s Science and Research Fund, Broadband Development Program, Playford Capital) Youth Programs. Development of innovative policies and proactive strategies to further $1.4m promote youth development and youth engagement within the community Youth Policy and Resource Management. Implementation of efficient and effective $0.2m client service and resource management practices which optimise positive outcomes for young people Total $461.3m 20
  22. Section A DFEEST Annual Report 2006The table below depicts a summary of program expenditure for 05-06 Employment & Skills Formation - VET $401.4m Employment & Skills Formation - Employment Development $26.4m Science, Technology & Innovation $25.3m Employment & Skills Formation - Regulatory Services $6m Youth - Youth Programs $1.4m Employment & Skills Formation - Higher Education $0.6m Youth - Policy & Resource Management $0.2mSummary of Financial Position Actual Actual 2005-06 2004-05 $’000 $’000 Financial Position: Total Assets 514 432 523 602 Total Liabilities 102 587 83 965 Net Assets 411 845 439 637In 2005-06 the department’s net assets decreased by $27.8 million. This was primarily dueto decreases in cash, receivables and property, plant and equipment, together withincreases in accounts payable and employee benefits liabilities.Summary of Capital Investing Activities Actual Actual 2005-06 2004-05 $’000 $’000 Capital Investing Activities: Investing Payments 12 924 2951 Investing Receipts 2 013 1635 Net Investing Payments 10 911 1316The actual investing payments for 2005-06 were $12.9 million. This primarily reflectsexpenditure incurred against the veterinary and applied science capital project at GillesPlains Campus of TAFE SA. 21
  23. Section B DFEEST Annual Report 2006WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENTA key focus for the department was meeting the objectives of its strategic plan including theaim of building a sustainable workforce and demonstrating leadership in workforcedevelopment.By building on the initiatives implemented during the year, the department continues to striveto become an increasingly high performance learning organisation which attracts, developsand retains the most talented workforce available with a workforce profile that supports thesustainability of the organisation into the future.Workforce DataThe following data are based on records from the human resource information systemEmpower for persons identified as being employed on 31 December. Hourly PaidInstructors (HPIs) are excluded from the data tables and reported separately below to avoiddata distortion.EMPLOYEE NUMBERS, GENDER AND STATUS (EXCLUDING HPIs)The following table depicts the total number of employees including persons and full timeequivalent employees (FTEs).Total Number ofEmployeesPersons 3799.00FTEs 3481.21The following table depicts the total staff and gender composition of departmentalemployees. A person is the head count and FTE is the full time equivalent of full time andpart time staff.Gender Persons % Persons FTEs %FTEsMale 1456 38.32 2057.60 40.89Female 2343 61.68 1423.61 59.11Totals 3799 100.00 3481.21 100.00Number of persons separated from the agency (excluding HPIs): 375Number of persons recruited to the agency (excluding HPIs): 479Number of persons on Leave Without Pay (excluding HPIs): 279In addition, 192 people started and completed the term of their employment during 2006.This group was comprised of temporary employees (approx 60 per cent PSM Act and 40 percent TAFE Act) and a very small percentage of weekly paid employees.Hourly Paid InstructorsDFEEST augments its teaching force by employing casual Hourly Paid Instructors (HPIs) toprovide specialist and back up support to lecturers. In total, 2297 individual HPIs provided269 383 hours teaching at a cost of $13 553 266. 22
  24. Section B DFEEST Annual Report 2006Number of employees by salary bracket (excluding HPIs)This table depicts the total staff by gender under the salary brackets determined Salary Bracket Males Females Total $0-40 399 188 855 1043 $40 400-54 999 224 465 689 $55 000-67 999 559 656 215 $68 000-88 999 417 313 730 $89 000 + 68 54 122 Total 1456 2343 3799Employment status of persons (excluding HPIs)The following two tables depict the total staff and the full time equivalent staff by theiremployment status in their current position. Short term contracts are under two years; longterm contracts are over two years. Persons Ongoing Short-Term Long-Term Total Other Total Contract Contract (Casuals) with CasualsMale 1095 307 55 1457 48 1505Female 1731 560 51 2342 38 2380Total 2826 867 106 3799 86 3885Employment Status of FTEs (excluding HPIs) FTEs Ongoing Short-Term Long-Term Total Other Total Contract Contract (Casuals) with CasualsMale 1076.10 294.11 54.40 1424.61 0.16 1424.77Female 1545.53 466.74 44.33 2056.60 0.95 2057.55Total 2621.63 760.85 98.73 3481.21 1.11 3482.32EXECUTIVE PROFILEThe table below depicts the number of executives by status in current position, gender andclassification. Contract Contract Total Tenured Untenured Classification Male Female Male Female Male Female CD 3 1 1 EMC 12 14 12 14 Exec A 2 2 5 3 7 5 Exec B 2 2 5 4 5 Exec C 1 2 2 2 3 Exec D 1 1 1 1 Exec E 1 1 MINAPP 1 1 1 2 1 23
  25. Section B DFEEST Annual Report 2006WORKFORCE DIVERSITYThe department recognises the value of workforce diversity and the benefits inherent in aworkforce that is representative of the broader community. The following section outlinesthe department’s profile.Age ProfileThe following table and bar graph depict the total staff by gender under their age bracket,and includes age bracket total as a percentage of the total staff and the SA WorkforceBenchmark. SA Workforce Age Bracket Female Male Total % of Total Benchmark% 15 - 19 years 16 5 21 0.55 7.90 20 - 24 years 102 35 137 3.61 10.70 25 - 29 years 197 65 262 6.90 9.80 30 - 34 years 216 110 326 8.58 10.50 35 - 39 years 263 108 371 9.77 11.40 40 - 44 years 276 138 414 10.90 12.40 45 - 49 years 394 245 639 16.82 12.40 50 - 54 years 421 264 685 18.03 10.90 55 - 59 years 287 292 579 15.24 8.30 60 - 64 years 156 159 315 8.29 4.40 Over 65 Years 15 35 50 1.32 1.30 2343 1456 3799 100.00 100.00Australian Bureau of Statistics, Labour Force, Australia, Detailed – Electronic Delivery, Monthly – Supertable LM8 –Labour Force Status by Sex, State, Age, Catalogue Number 6291.0.55.001 (as at June 2006) Em ployees by Age Bracket Over 65 Years 55 - 59 years Age Brackets 45 - 49 years Male 35 - 39 years Female 25 - 29 years 15 - 19 years 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 Num ber of Em ployeesCultural and Linguistic DiversityThe following table depicts the number of staff who reported being born overseas or whospeak another language other than English at home. % of % of SA Male Female Total Agency Community Number of employees born 168 247 415 10.5 20.3 overseas Number of employees who speak language(s) other than English at 70 77 147 3.7 15.5 home*Benchmarks from ABS Publication Basic Community Profile (SA) Cat No. 2001.0. 24
  26. Section B DFEEST Annual Report 2006The following table depicts the number of employees with ongoing disabilities. Number of Employees with Ongoing Disabilities Male Female Total % of Agency 37 37 74 1.87Aboriginal EmploymentThe Aboriginal Employment Strategy to 2010: Walking Together Towards Prosperity waslaunched in September 2005.By 2010 the department aims to have:• 2.1 per cent of its workforce comprising of Aboriginal people• a higher level of sustainable employment for Aboriginal staff• a high level of non-school qualifications held by Aboriginal staff• a high level of representation in decision-making positions held by Aboriginal staff.The following represents progress against the intended outcome:A total of 2.1 per cent of DFEEST’s workforce comprising of Aboriginal people at a higherlevel of sustainable employment for Aboriginal staff. This exceeds the target set in SouthAustralia’s Strategic Plan.The following table demonstrates there has been a steady increase in the number ofAboriginal people employed and in particular an increase in the number of Aboriginal staff inpermanent positions. COMPARATIVE DATA SEPTEMBER 2004 – DECEMBER 2006 Total Number of % of Total DFEEST Date Permanent Temporary HPI Staff (incl HPIs) Workforce Sept 20 11 N/A 31 N/A 2004 Dec 22 32 10 64 1.4 2004 (33.4%) (52%) (15.6%) June 44 29 15 88 2.35 2006 (50%) (33%) (17%) Dec 47 24 10 81 2.1 2006 (58%) (30%) (12%)The Aboriginal Employment Strategy recognises that in achieving the above outcomes thedepartment needs to focus on the following areas of activity:• Raising staff awareness, respect and support for Aboriginal culture and peopleExecutive Forum members, a group of their direct reports and an Institute managementgroup have undertaken a cultural respect program. TAFE SA has developed and launchedan online cultural awareness program called Interactive Ochre.The department’s on-line induction program now includes the Statement of Reconciliationand the Aboriginal Employment Strategy. A specific session ensuring the providers of theEmployee Assistance Program deliver culturally appropriate support was provided as part ofthe induction program. 25
  27. Section B DFEEST Annual Report 2006• Improving recruitment and selection processes for Aboriginal peopleRecruitment models have been developed to include procedures around Expression ofInterest positions. The use of the Aboriginal Employment Register to fill some of thesevacancies has been investigated, as have policies and procedures. This will see informationrelating to Aboriginal Employment in the Selection Practice Package being updated.Five undergraduate degree/advanced diploma scholarships in skills shortage areas wereawarded.• Improving the retention of and security for Aboriginal employeesThe inaugural Aboriginal Staff Convention was held in June and provided approximately 45staff the opportunity to engage with Executive Forum members and other Aboriginal staff.One important element of this focus area was the recognition of prior learning. A staffprofiling exercise was conducted with all Aboriginal employees. Information gained from thisexercise assists in the retention and progression of staff within the department.Options are being investigated to provide Aboriginal staff with opportunities to act in higherlevel positions and to gain knowledge and skills to increase the potential to win positionsbased on merit.• Improving recognition of success and celebration of Aboriginal eventsStaff were encouraged to participate in National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander DayObservance Committee celebrations. Widespread acknowledgement of the David UnaiponAwards occurred across the department and articles profiling Aboriginal staff have featuredwithin editions of InsideDFEEST.Six Aboriginal staff members were nominated for the David Unaipon Awards. They areparticipating in the DFEEST Leadership Development Program.The Premier’s Council for Women offered Aboriginal female staff sponsored places toparticipate in Governance Training. Two staff members are participating in the programwhich will see them develop leadership skills within their community.To underpin the Aboriginal Employment Strategy, activity included:• dissemination and communication of the strategy across the department and public sector forums• incorporation of the strategy into DFEEST’s Strategic Plan and Workforce Development Platform as well as institute plans• support of the development and delivery by Institutes of Aboriginal employment strategies• development of auditing and improvement of systems and processes to capture reliable and accurate data of our Aboriginal workforce• provision of individual support and advice to Aboriginal staff and their managers• establishment of an advisory committee and its input into planning and evaluation• discussions with work areas regarding the employment of Aboriginal people and increased sustainability of all employment for existing Aboriginal staff. 26
  28. Section B DFEEST Annual Report 2006VOLUNTARY FELXIBLE WORKING ARRANGEMENTSAs part of the department’s commitment to attracting and retaining the best possible staffand to assist employees to balance work and family life, a number of voluntary flexibleworking arrangements (VFWA) were made available to DFEEST employees. Someemployees use a combination of VFWAs.Current VFWA arrangements include:• flexitime• purchased leave• compressed weeks• part-time and job share• working from home• provision for special leave up to 15 days for cultural leave.LEAVE MANAGMENTThe number of persons on Leave without Pay as at 31 December 2006 (excluding HPIs) is279.The following table depicts the average days taken per FTE (excluding HPIs) Leave Type 2006 Sick Leave 9.18 Family Carers Leave * Special Leave with Pay 1.94 *Note: Family Carers Leave may be taken as part of an employees entitlement to Sick Leave or Special Leave with Pay. It cannot currently be reported upon as a separate leave type.Workforce DevelopmentAs the department responsible for developing and driving the state’s WorkforceDevelopment Strategy Better Skills. Better Work. Better State, DFEEST has an imperative toprovide leadership in the development of its workforce.DFEEST’s Workforce Development Platform to 2010 (WDP) was released in April 2006 toaddress a number of critical business challenges and included:• ageing of DFEEST workforce• the gap between the current and required capability profile and capacity of staff• the prevailing ‘industrial’ model of management.The WDP is designed to achieve DFEEST’s strategic objective of becoming a skilled, high-performing learning organisation. The core purpose of the initiative is to ensure DFEEST isequipped with the right capability mix, and profile in its workforce supported by appropriateworkplace systems. The WDP is underpinned by the development and delivery ofDFEEST’s workforce planning toolkit. A high level Workforce Development SteeringCommittee has been established to guide and drive the implementation of the WDPthroughout the department. The WDP was awarded the 2006 Commissioner for PublicEmployment’s Award for HR Achievement. 27
  29. Section B DFEEST Annual Report 2006Since the launch of the WDP a range of activities commenced:Leadership and Management Development• An inaugural DFEEST Leadership Development Program was undertaken with 46 participants from across the department in a range of classifications.• The Office of the Chief Executive Leadership Development Program was established with the first placement being a three-month appointment in the Office of the Chief Executive.• The DFEEST Executive Leadership Program entered its second year with plans for rolling it out to the next level of leaders in the department in 2007.• HRSMART piloted a streamlined approach to recognition of prior learning focusing on 12 staff from both metropolitan and regional areas. Three participants achieved full qualifications and others achieved units of competency.• The AdminSMART initiative was implemented using a new innovative RPL SMART methodology, developed within TAFE SA Business Services. It provided the opportunity to expand the workforce development initiatives in building the capability of 12 ASO 1 – ASO 3 corporate and program administration staff within TAFE Institutes. Following the research and development of the online RPL SMART tool it will be placed on the DFEEST Induction website for all corporate and administration staff to access.• An intensive 12 month management program called BusinessSMART was instituted as a pilot with 20 staff from across three TAFE institutes. It is aimed at building the personal and professional leadership and business management and business generation skills of new and emerging leaders within TAFE SA.Workforce Planning• The DFEEST Workforce Planning Toolkit was produced.• As part of the Skills Reform agenda for South Australia, DFEEST established a working party and commenced development work on TAFE workforce flexibility initiatives.• A DFEEST research project concerning work/life balance and use/effectiveness of flexible work arrangements has been completed. A departmental policy will be developed and implemented in 2007.People and Cultural Development• TAFE Act Workforce Development (WD) Policy recognises, encourages and supports professional development for all workers. A workforce development skills framework for all staff based on the DFEEST values and attributes has been developed.• Extensive work concerning employee performance and retention with a fresh framework/model was drafted. This system will incorporate strategies and guidelines for rewarding good performance.• DFEEST has increased its effort to recognise and celebrate achievements of staff and volunteers through the introduction of the Australia Day Awards, widespread publication of public service and educational staff awards and by celebrating our achievements against our Strategic Plan and in the community.• The result of the whole-of-department annual staff survey (BULB: shedding light on staff perspectives) was released to staff in May with each institute and directorate implementing activities in response to their particular results. A working party will design the March 2007 survey.• A departmental Customer Service Charter was developed and approved in December. 28
  30. Section B DFEEST Annual Report 2006• DFEEST is party to the Premier’s Memorandum on Youth Participation, which formalises DFEEST’s commitment to widening opportunities for young people in government decision making.Systems Development• Significant headway was made in the automation of human resources forms through the Employee Self-Service system.• DFEEST’s Online Induction program was created and implemented.• Online training packages were instituted for managers in OHSW&IM.• A major review of HR data systems and reporting requirements was undertaken leading to a recommendation report to guide further work in the development of workforce management systems.Employee Assistance Program• This program, established in 2005, continues to be available to staff. It offers confidential, impartial and culturally sensitive counselling support to employees and their families 24 hours a day, seven days a week.• A total of 242 new referrals were made to the service which provided 490 hours of counselling. Ninety six per cent of time was dedicated to new referrals and four per cent was for ongoing cases.• Trauma services for the period consisted of four new clients totalling 10.75 hours. A total of 11.25 hours of additional services were provided covering manager assistance, mediation and rehabilitation.• Of all clients 90.6 per cent were employees and 7.4 per cent were family members.Equal Employment Opportunity Programs• DFEEST recruited 12 graduates from the Office of the Commissioner for Public Employment Graduate Scheme and 39 trainees through the State Government Youth Traineeship Program.Child Protection• DFEEST implemented child protection initiatives in line with the pending amendments to the Children’s Protection Act 1993, which was proclaimed on 31 December 2006. These amendments are aimed at minimising risks for children and young people using government and non-government services across South Australia.• Mandated notification training was undertaken by 2300 employees.• Voluntary police checks were undertaken by 2336 employees and volunteers. 29
  31. Section B DFEEST Annual Report 2006OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH, SAFETY ANDINJURY MANAGEMENTThe minister and the chief executive signed off the DFEEST Occupational Health, Safety andInjury Management (OHS&IM) Policy.Commitment by executive, senior managers, OHS&IM Committee members and practitionerswas further highlighted with a mock trial training session. Mock judge Ms Michelle Paterson(Executive Director WorkSafe SA and person responsible for South Australian OHS&Wprosecutions) effectively communicated what may happen if a prosecution occurred under theOccupational Health, Safety and Welfare (OHS&W) Act to officers of a governmentdepartment. The training proved highly successful based on participant feedback.A holistic approach to OHS&W has been adopted. It saw the Lettuce be Healthy programimplemented. DFEEST staff and TAFE SA students had the opportunity to undertake healthchecks, learn about common diseases, healthy life-styles, taste healthy food and undertakevarious activities.A new and improved injury management contract was signed in late 2006 with theDepartment of Premier and Cabinet that will see the service extended for another two years.In November, WorkCover commenced a gap analysis of DFEEST’s OHS&IM managementsystem in a partnership arrangement which included DFEEST and the relevant unions. TheWorkCover report and its recommendations will become part of DFEEST’s new OHS&IMstrategic plan.The department’s Employee Assistance Program has continued to contribute to positiveoutcomes for employees and this is complemented by DFEEST’s Minor Incident InterventionProgram. Both programs have been well received by employees and managers.Into the future OHS&IM is committed to:• introduce the government’s new safety strategy• participate in a review of the OHS&IM management system• see a continuing focus on the remaining workers’ compensation cases• achieve DFEEST cultural change. 30
  32. Section B DFEEST Annual Report 2006The table below depicts Occupational Health, Safety and Injury Management statistics 2005 - 06^ 2005 2004 1 OHS Legislative Requirements (includes incidents with students not included in 2004 figures) Number of notifiable occurrences pursuant to OHS&W Regulations 4 (1 from student) 4 2 Division 6.6 Number of notifiable injuries pursuant to OHS&W Regulations 7 (2 from students) 6 1 Division 6.6 Number of notices served pursuant to OHS&W Act s35, s39 and 2 3 3 s40 2 Injury Management Legislative Requirements Total number of new claimants who participated in the rehabilitation 41 35 52 program Total number of employees rehabilitated and reassigned to 3 7 2 alternative duties Total number of employees rehabilitated back to their original work 33 32 43 3 WorkCover Action Limits ^Number of open claims as at 30 June 2006 181 209 205 Percentage of workers’ compensation expenditure over gross 0.0159 0.016* 0.017* annual remuneration 4 Number of Injuries ^Number of new workers’ compensation claims in the financial year 105 (4 withdrawn) 108 (4 139 withdrawn) Number of fatalities, lost time injuries, medical treatment only (F) 0 0 0 (LTI) 69 (2 withdrawn) 58 (3 87 36 (2 withdrawn) withdrawn) (MTO) 50 (1 52 withdrawn) Total number of whole working days lost 9659 10 126 15 550 5 Cost of Workers’ Compensation ^Cost of new claims for the financial year $377 798 $234 808 $570 655 Cost of all claims excluding lump sum payments $2 357 033 $2 526 077 $2 476 378 Amount paid for lump sum payments (s42, s43, s44) $1 308 079 $747 874 $458 683 Total claims expenditure $3 665 113 $3 273 951 $2 935 061 Total amount recovered from external sources (s54) $8 391 $20 004 $3 112 Budget allocation for workers compensation $3 750 000 $3 300 000 $3 000 000 6 Trends **Injury frequency rate for new lost-time injury/disease for each 11.50 10.28 16.04 million hours worked Most frequent cause (mechanism) of injury Falls, Trips and Slips Falls, Trips Body and Slips Stressing Most expensive cause (mechanism) of injury Mental Stress Falls, Trips Mental and Slips Stress^ From 2006 all OHS&IM reporting will be based on financial year as determined by the Australian Standard. Previous reportingwas based on calendar year as determined by the Technical and Further Education Act, 1975* Calendar year costs divided by fiscal year** Based on lost time flag (i.e. ≥ 1day or shift) 31
  33. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006PERFORMANCE REPORTSTAFE SATAFE SA is the public provider of vocational education and training (VET) in South Australia.It plays a critical role in delivering the government’s objectives to improve economic andsocial development, the skill base and employment opportunities for all South Australians.TAFE SA places an emphasis on delivering training to the individual, rural and remoteregions, business, community and industry.QUALITY EDUCATION AND TRAINING DELIVERYTAFE SA is delivering nationally endorsed training packages and accredited curricula tosupport the workforce development needs of the state. All TAFE SA training products arequality endorsed and meet the protocols identified within the Australian QualificationsFramework (AQF).TAFE SA offers 1063 qualifications from 87 training packages and 176 curriculum courses in53 campuses across the state. Two hundred and thirty three out of date qualifications werede-activated to ensure currency and responsiveness to industry needs. There were 185 newtraining package qualifications implemented and 13 new courses were accredited in TAFESA.Quality assurance and compliance with national quality VET standards is a prime focus ofTAFE SA. Its state wide quality network ensures that mechanisms are in place to regulateand support the delegation to self-accredit courses.TAFE SA Strategic Program DevelopmentTAFE SA is committed to reviewing and refining its training and development productofferings to assist industries and businesses in building their workforce capacity. Theseactions directly support the objectives in South Australia’s and DFEEST’s strategic plans.TAFE SA has developed collaborative training and development initiatives to support the AirWarfare Destroyer Program, defence industries and resource sector workforce developmentrequirements. These initiatives have been supported by the customisation andcontextualisation of TAFE SA training and development products to address the specificrequirements of industry and support the current and future workforce developmentrequirements.RESPONSIVE STATE-WIDE PROGRAMSDevelopment of TAFE SA training programs and training package implementation prioritiesare targeted to address areas of skills shortage and the needs of emerging industries withinSouth Australia. The diversity of courses being offered by TAFE SA continues to grow andclose links and partnerships with industry help broaden the state’s skills base.The following are program outcomes are based on state training priorities, needs andidentified skills shortages. 32
  34. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006Aboriginal EducationThe Certificate II Vocational Education - Mining Operations in Port Augusta - was a greatsuccess. Of the 15 students who commenced the program, 11 gained certificates and 13completed the course. There was a 93 per cent attendance for the six months and sixstudents gained employment in various areas.The greatest need of the Anangu community of Yalata has been to underpin individuals’wellbeing. This was achieved by providing an ongoing Family Wellbeing Program.The Scotdesco community is focused towards enterprise and guided by the provision of theLearning Pathways Program, which is creating a community based project around a bushfood enterprise.The Ceduna community and Aboriginal Education Program identified a growing concern atthe disengagement of youth in learning. An Alternative Learning Options Program has beenrunning for two years and is growing in strength and capacity to re-engage youth in the valueof lifelong learning.Twenty three students from the Whyalla Aboriginal Education Program were accepted intothe Whyalla Goal 100 Program that trains applicants for employment.Some of the northern remote areas including Coober Pedy and Oodnadatta worked withOxiana mining company and assisted seven students in their endeavours to be employed inthe mine.The TAFE SA Aboriginal Education Program in the Riverland successfully negotiated apartnership with the Riverland Regional Health Service Incorporation to deliver theAustralian Accredited Family Well Being Program (FWB). This was in response to the FamilyViolence Partnership Program, and the Family Violence Regional Activities Programdelivered through the Commonwealth Department of Finance and Administration. The FWBProgram is a counselling skills and personal development program developed specifically forIndigenous people and their communities. The program is now being offered to the widercommunity due to its overwhelming success.Four Study Centre Programs operated at Gawler, Berri, Renmark and Loxton. Study Centresoffer Indigenous students a safe learning environment for those who have low numeracy andliteracy skills. The staff encourage and support students to develop new skills at theintroductory level.TAFE SA worked closely with the Aboriginal Education and Employment Unit and regionsthrough South Australia Works to enable people to be trained in skills which will benefit localindustries and provide sustainable jobs and apprenticeships for local communities.Further information on the programs delivered and outcomes achieved by the AboriginalEducation and Employment Unit is contained within the Indigenous Training andEmployment section of this report.Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (APY)DFEEST played an active role in supporting employment and training in the APY Lands aspart of the government’s across-agency approach to the regions.The TAFE SA program on the APY Lands is supported by ten lecturing staff (Trades andGeneral Education) across the following locations: Pipalyatjara/Kalka (2); Fregon (1);Indulkana (1); Amata (2); Ernabella (2); and Mimili (2). 33
  35. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006The Regional Manager was based at Mimili with four program support staff in Adelaide. Theyincluded two visiting lecturers who delivered training on the Lands and provided support toLands-based staff.Initiatives that operated under the program follow:Department of Employment and Workplace Relations (DEWR) Structured Training andEmployment Projects.A program coordinated from Adelaide by two staff, one of whom was funded by DEWR,resulted in 28 trainees gaining employment and, of these, 21 completed traineeships.Consultations on a new program to increase employment outcomes through the recentlyestablished Job Network arrangement on the Lands have commenced. Training will befunded by DEWR through Work for the Dole and the Structured Training and EmploymentProjects (STEP).New Traineeship ProgramA new traineeship program commenced in June. Seventeen new trainees have gainedemployment in ceramics, retail, office administration and land management.Youth Engagement and School to Work TransitionAPY Lands staff worked closely with a range of agencies to develop a comprehensiveprogram aimed at engaging young learners and providing pathways to employment. Theprogram will build employability skills and allow participants to sample a range of vocationaloptions.Schools Traineeship ProgramThe program is available to all nine schools in the APY Lands. At 30 December 11 traineescommenced the program, eight graduated and are employed and one was studying in atraineeship outside of the schools program.The Department for Premier and Cabinet has responsibility for the coordination andoversight of government initiatives on the Lands. In this role it has been successful inattracting additional funds for essential new programs and initiatives, many of which rely fortheir success on the TAFE program. An ongoing initiative in Community GovernanceEducation and Management Training leading to real self-determination and self-management was developed and will be implemented in 2007. This program will assistindividuals and organisations on the APY Lands to gain community and organisationaldevelopment skills. TAFE SA worked with key Anangu and agencies to develop materialsand train local staff for support roles.Bush food plots operated at Mimili and Amata as economic development projects. More areplanned for other communities. TAFE SA used visiting lecturers and other staff on the Landsto provide horticulture training for people working on the plots.Staff worked with a range of agencies (including the Departments of Education andChildrens Services, and Administrative and Information Services) to develop trainingopportunities for construction and infrastructure projects on the Lands. This program willenable participants to gain training and employment in community maintenance projects andgeneral construction, both on and off the Lands.A proposal was developed to employ Anangu Malparara (Malpa means friend) to workalongside TAFE SA lecturers in the delivery of training programs. These positions will enableTAFE SA to offer programs that align with the needs and expectations of communities. As 34
  36. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006participants develop skills, they will be able to take increased responsibility for the provisionof training as well as enhancing their career opportunities.Staff from TAFE SA and the Department of Families and Communities are developing acoordinated approach to the provision of training and support for community servicesprogram staff on the Lands. A meeting held at Marla to develop a framework for this programincluded representatives from Nganampa Health and Ngaanyatjarra PitjantjatjaraYankunytjatjara (NPY) Womens Council which laid the foundation for greater cross-agencycollaboration. Planning is well advanced for a comprehensive program that will provideskilled workers to support aged care, family support and childcare services on the Lands.Four communities were involved in the Indigenous Environmental Health Worker programand received funding to employ people from within the communities and purchaseequipment.Collaborative arrangements are being put in place with agencies such as PitjantjatjaraYankunytjatjara Media to provide training for Anangu to manage the new Rural TransactionCentres.TAFE SA – APY Lands staff coordinated the provision of training for swimming poolmanagement staff at Mimili. The program will be expanded to provide trained staff for poolsin other communities as they are completed.Two lecturers (one based at Amata and the other at Pipalyatjara) conducted training with aMobile Skills Centre on a rotational basis at the western communities of Kalka, Watarru,Pipalyatjara and associated homelands.TAFE SA – APY Lands staff provided a wide range of support programs such as pre-employment training and language, literacy and numeracy. A program to enhanceemployability skills for a wide range of Anangu is also being planned.Building, Construction and FurnishingThe high-level review of TAFE SA services to the building, construction and furnishingindustry was completed and the final report released mid-year. A review implementationgroup was formed, comprising TAFE SA managers and industry members to oversee andreport back on progress against the recommendations.A number of pre-employment training programs targeting areas of skill shortages werecompleted with funding from the Construction Industry Training Board and DFEEST. Theprograms contained a literacy and numeracy component and were supported by structuredindustry placements. Programs included carpentry, plumbing, roof plumbing and wall andceiling fixing.There has been a focus on investigating flexible arrangements for the delivery of trainingpackage competencies to apprentices, and workshops to identify the key professionaldevelopment requirements for staff.TAFE SA students enjoyed considerable success at the 2006 Australian WorldskillsChampionships, and received gold medals for bricklaying, CAD mechanical constructionsteelwork and fibrous plastering. Fifteen other students performed admirably in the tradessections against a very high standard of competition from across Australia. Staff judged andcoordinated both the Regional and National 2006 Worldskills competitions.The building, construction and furnishing program secured funding to work with a majorindustry partner, the Master Builders Association (MBA), to provide 300 hours of accredited 35
  37. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006training to students in the construction area. Two 13-week pre-apprenticeship programswere delivered. A work experience program with MBA members and private contractors is indevelopment.Two new national qualifications in asset management and spatial sciences were developedin response to industry needs. A Vocational Graduate Certificate and Diploma in SpatialInformation Services will cater for a growing demand for asset management and spatialscience training.Responding to a skills shortage in the wood trades, TAFE SA and the SA Chamber ofCommerce in collaboration with employment agencies have developed a new program thatincreases Indigenous participation.Thirty Aboriginal students participated in a pre-vocational program aimed at gainingemployment within the building industry. The program, which catered for the long-termunemployed, engaged participants with learning and developing skills using the internet,email and other software programs. More than a third of participants had positiveemployment outcomes.The Geoscience program area continued to achieve significant employment outcomes for itsstudents both in Australia and overseas. Department for Primary Industries, ResourcesSouth Australia contributed $65 000 for equipment purchases which recognised ongoingdemand for the course and the value of its training to industry. TAFE SA worked with theUniversity of South Australia to develop a Bachelor Degree of Sustainable Development.Business, Finance, Retail and Property ServicesTAFE SA developed specialised skills centres to engage students in simulated workingenvironments, combining traditional classroom teaching with industry skilling in a simulatedenvironment. The Retail Industry Training Store (RITS) was opened at Adelaide Citycampus. Key industry retail leaders donated stock, fixtures, technology and offeredplacements to course graduates.A Customer Contact – Call Centre Training Room was launched following successfulcollaboration with industry. The Customer Contact – Call Centre program boosts students’confidence through practical exposure to the telecommunications industry using relevanttechnology. Students gain the necessary skills to apply and win positions within this field.Approximately 85 per cent of graduates found work within this industry.TAFE SA business trainee Mathew Smith was recognised for frontline management skills bybeing runner-up at the National Training Awards. The TAFE SA graduate represented SouthAustralia after winning the Australian Apprenticeships Trainee of the Year Award. Mathewcompleted a Certificate IV in Frontline Management with Clipsal Australia.The Justice Studies Program was actively involved in international business development inconjunction with its partners in the Legal and Justice Project Alliance. The alliance, which isalready operating in India and Vietnam, secured new funding for projects in the SolomonIslands and Samoa. 36
  38. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006Community Services and HealthTAFE SA won $1.4 million from the Commonwealth Better Skills for Better Care Program foraged care workers. Training under this program is well underway with 155 Personal CareWorkers seeking training in a range of qualifications, predominantly the Diploma of Nursing.A number of innovative projects relating to Aged Care, Home and Community Care andChildren’s Services were developed and funded in partnership with South Australia Works.The regions involved include Yorke Peninsula, Whyalla, Pt Lincoln, Clare, Barossa Valley,Victor Harbor and the Adelaide Hills.The regional program has commenced training in the APY Lands aimed at developing theskills of aged care and home and community workers. Aboriginal workers from Umuwa andPukatja completed some competencies and will continue in 2007 to complete appropriatecertificates or skill clusters.TAFE SA staff from the Mt Barker campus developed an innovative workshop model fordelivery of the Australian Career Development Studies (ACDS). The partnership developedwith DECS resulted in delivery of the ACDS program for more than 150 teachers fromacross South Australia and more than 150 providers of DEST - funded programs includingYouth Pathways, Learning Community Partnerships and Regional Industry Career Advisors.Children’s Services program staff are engaged in a number of strategies to assist inaddressing the skill shortage in all areas of childcare and out of school hours care. Theseinclude pre-employment programs to fast track students into jobs while they continue tostudy.The delivery of training in Children’s Services in regional South Australia was the highest inmany years. Traineeship numbers increased through an up-skilling program for existingworkers, engaging them to complete the diploma which qualifies them as workers. Theuptake by industry has been favourable, with a continuation of this initiative into the out ofschool hours care sector for 2007.Following a successful tender to the Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing, theGilles Plains campus coordinated the implementation of the aged care and medicationmanagement training across the northern and western suburbs, at the Salisbury and PtAdelaide campuses.The Nursing Program at Port Adelaide received international visitors from Singapore seekingfuture partnerships for training in Malaysia.A medical training facility was established at the Panorama campus of TAFE SA. TheMedical Practice Firm assists in delivering training to students seeking careers in medicaladministration. It will address skills shortages in private consulting rooms, hospitals (privateand public) and the government health sector.A state of the art nursing facility at TAFE SA’s Noarlunga campus was officially opened byMinister Caica. The facility, used by nursing and aged care students, included twoclassrooms and skills laboratories.A high school group of at risk students participated in a pilot program designed to raiseawareness of career options. The students completed a work placement at Mitsubishi, withthe aim of developing confidence and learning new skills through workplace mentoring. The 37
  39. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006program was delivered with the collaboration of TAFE SA, Mitsubishi Motors Australia, theSmith Family and DECS.A Mental Health Peer Support Workers Program is being offered by the Australian NursingFederation in conjunction with TAFE SA. After completing the Certificate III in CommunityService work with a focus on mental health, many are enrolling in further study with TAFESA to complete the Certificate IV and Diploma level qualifications specialising in non clinicalmental health work.Design, Arts, Information Technology and Related IndustriesTAFE SA was a major partner of the Mobile Entertainment Growth Alliance (mEga|SA)Incubator Program. Twenty eight participants from a variety of backgrounds including ICT,creative content production, business and marketing, worked together in teams to developnew products and businesses. In October, their ideas were pitched to a panel of investment,mobile, media and IT professionals from across Australia. From the six pitches made on theday, one team received both prizes offered. The winning presentation was a personalisedSMS application developed by Infinity Monkey, a team of four tertiary students from TAFESA, Flinders University, University of Adelaide and the University of South Australia.TAFE SA students were finalists for a national short film competition. One was the first TAFESA graduate to be offered a place in the Graduate Diploma in Factual Television Producingand Television Editing Course at the Australian Film Television and Radio School (AFTRS)which offers only six places annually.In addition, two TAFE SA students from Croydon campus were finalists in the prestigiousAustralian Graphic Design Awards.Film students undertook a project with Tea Tree Gully Council to provide the footage for thecouncil’s weekly program on community television on events and people in the area.Design students in conjunction with the South Australian Art Gallery produced an onlineeducational program. It is aimed at developing primary school aged students’ understandingof design concepts and allows them to familiarise themselves with the Art Gallery beforegoing there.The TAFE SA 2006 Open Day for Arts, Design, IT, Fashion and Multimedia was held at theAdelaide Centre for the Arts campus, with more than 400 prospective students touring thefacilities and attending information sessions, fashion and dance classes. Participants wereinvited to attend further sessions at participating campuses.The highly successful TAFE SA student television program Mag-TV produced four episodes.The program included TAFE SA advertisements, promoting courses in geoscience, fashion,horse racing and music. The series will screen in 2007.Dance students received international recognition from choreographer Xioa Xiong Zhongfrom Taipei who choreographed a piece for the students. Xioa Xiong was accompanied bythree male dancers on a cultural exchange from Taipei and worked closely with the TAFESA students.A significant event on the TAFE SA calendar, the Fashion Program’s annual Trade Showwas held at the Adelaide Convention Centre in November. Close to 1000 people attended,including some of the state’s top designers. The inaugural Hall of Fame Award waspresented to George Gross and Harry Watt in recognition and honour of the outstanding 38
  40. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006commitment and support they have provided to TAFE SA students and graduates over thepast 10 years.More than 1000 people attended the 2006 TAFE SA Karl Chehade Fashion Parade held atthe Adelaide Convention Centre. With a theme of a Material World the event showcasedboth fashion and millinery student work in front of family, friends and local fashion industryicons. The 2006 Fashion Student Award was awarded to Kelly Lewis who will travel to LosAngeles and New York to be involved in Gday USA Week 2007.Visual Arts students were widely recognised for their achievements. Visual Arts studentRebecca Johns was selected as a Youth Ambassador to Vanuatu. Three Visual Art andApplied Design graduates, Arlette Hunt, Gritta Walker and Sarah Carey, were chosen tohave their work displayed in Hatched, a national exhibition of visual art graduate work whichwas held at the Perth Institute of Contemporary Art. Their work was then featured in leadingretail and jeweler outlets in Perth.The annual Helpmann Academy Gallery Exhibition awarded accolades and prizes worth$8000 to four students: Brook Bobby Harris, Sun-Woong Bang, Jason Milanovic and GrittaWalker. Dr PC and Micro Arts agreed to provide $3000 annually for a prize to acknowledgeand promote the talent of Visual Art students at the Adelaide Centre for the Arts. Acquiredworks will be accumulated over 10 years to establish a collection to be displayed in publicand private locations.Manufacturing, Engineering and TransportOneSteel Whyalla and the TAFE SA Engineering Program at Whyalla campus formed apartnership to train 25 apprentices in July, with another 25 apprentices commencing inJanuary 2007. This is the first time that TAFE SA has entered into a partnershiparrangement with OneSteel for the training of its apprentices. The partnership was formed toaddress the skills shortage in Whyalla. OneSteel, in partnership with TAFE SA, provides thesecond six months of apprenticeship training, providing the apprentices with the hands-onskills they, and OneSteel, require. This training concept basically replaces the internaltraining shop system which most big companies had disbanded in the mid 1990s. Thepartnership has initially been set for a minimum of five years.A Skills Training Centre for Engineering Apprentices established at the Whyalla campus,specifically for the use of the OneSteel apprentices was officially opened by Minister Caica.A new Renewable Energy Centre is being established at the Regency campus. The centrewill incorporate wind generation, solar panels and grid-connect systems, as part of a jointventure between industry partners and TAFE SA. It is scheduled for completion in mid-2007.Following on from the extremely popular I-Bot campaign in 2005, TAFE SA was again amajor sponsor for the Ai2 campaign. The Ai2 robotics campaign offers an opportunity toadvance awareness and understanding of the Electrotechnology Program.Transport SA has invested more than $300 000 towards the latest exhaust emissions testingequipment to enable diesel emissions training for the transport industry in South Australiathrough the O’Halloran Hill campus.TAFE SA shared sponsorship of the Pedal Prix event which was attended by over 20 000spectators. More than 260 state and national teams from primary and secondary schoolsand universities competed at Victoria Park Racecourse and Murray Bridge in May, July andSeptember. 39
  41. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006TAFE SA was successful in winning a tender to develop a fabrication toolbox through theAustralian Flexible Learning Framework. This highly innovative and creative toolbox provideslearning resources and activities to assist flexible learning in a range of training contextsincluding self-paced study, on-campus study and on the job training. The toolbox will benefitremote and industry based learners who have little opportunity or time to travel to urbanregistered training organisations, as well as providing much needed resource material forproject based and workplace based learning in all locations.Primary and Allied IndustriesA study entitled Forest Green Print – Forest Industry Workforce Requirements – GreenTriangle Region: 2006 – 2011 (the project) was developed to commence the necessarydiscussions for the forest industry to consider future workforce requirements and trainingneeds in the Limestone Coast area.TAFE SA has been a joint sponsor of this project with the Forest Industry Training Network(FITNET), the Government of South Australia through the South Australian Works Program,the Limestone Coast Area Consultative Committee, Auspine, Logging Investigations TrainingAssociation, and the Green Triangle Regional Plantation Committee.The project has three key outcomes:• collaboration with the timber industry to develop a profile of the workforce through targeted data collection• investigation of workforce issues including recruitment, training and planning needs• exploration in collaboration with forestry business operators of strategies to address workforce needs.The project covered areas such as forest growing, saw milling, harvesting, haulage andtreatment, providing enough information to ascertain labour and skills shortages, projectedneeds into the future, and recruitment and training issues.The Urrbrae campus of TAFE SA initiated a project to make the watering of plants in itsproduction nursery self-sufficient. The project involves the installation of rainwater tanks tocollect water from the roofs of buildings at the campus and the Plant Production Nursery.The water will be used to irrigate the nursery and hydroponics greenhouse. The run-off willthen be collected in a retention pond and recycled for use in the nursery. This project willsave 3 254 000 litres of water each year.Tourism, Hospitality, Hair and Beauty, Recreation and FitnessTAFE SA hosted the annual young chefs ‘Top Hat’ competition for which there were 70entrants this year. The competition is sponsored by SA Gas and judges are drawn fromindustry and Regency campus of TAFE SA Adelaide North staff. A special awards eveningwas held in the Graduates Restaurant, at the Regency campus.The Regency campus also hosted the Australian Meat Industry Council smallgoodscompetition with over 110 entries from butchers and smallgoods from across the state.Adelaide hosted the Grand Chapitre of the Chaine des Rotisseurs, in conjunction with the30th Annual Concours International des Jeune Commis Rotisseurs. La Chaine is aninternational gastronomic society.The Jeune Commis (Young Chefs) competition gave TAFE SA an enormous opportunity toshowcase its facilities to the world, as the 23 competitors brought a large entourage from 40
  42. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006various countries including Australia, Austria, Bermuda, Canada, China, France, Finland,Germany, Great Britain, Kenya, Portugal, Russia, South Africa and Turkey.The Don Dunstan Foundation erected a plaque, unveiled by Minister Caica in the RegencyInternational Centre foyer outside Graduates Restaurant in commemoration of the formerPremier’s vision for the Regency campus. The Foundation awarded the first annualscholarship valued at $3000 for a cookery student from a disadvantaged background.TAFE SA was represented at the South Australian Training Awards with students winningthree of five student awards.The Department of Education, Science and Training’s Australian School-based Apprentice ofthe Year was Emma Clark of Seaview Downs. Emma, who in 2006 was completing Year 12at Woodcroft College, trained at Regency campus in the Certificate III in Food Processing(Retail Baking - Combined) and was employed with Maxima Group Training.Hospitality Studies hosted a sold-out event in Martinhas Training Restaurant in June. Theevent, titled Young Guns, was a part of a mentorship program that involved past graduatesreturning to work with current students to prepare and serve a meal.Vocational Preparation and EquityThe Vocational Preparation and Equity Program continues to provide a significant andimportant access point and pathway to further study in other courses once student numeracyand literacy skills are developed.Refugees, migrants, older aged people returning to study and the workforce, youthdisengaged with education and women returning to study after child rearing have allappreciated the accessibility, individual support and encouragement that enabled successon both academic and personal levels.Often this training is individualised and as the student gains skills and confidence, othermethodologies such as open learning and or video conferencing are used. Students after ashort period of time can see a clear pathway into further training within TAFE SA.Thirteen TAFE SA campuses in regional SA were involved in a significant Commonwealthfunded program aiming to serve those most disadvantaged in the communities. The programoffered language, literacy, numeracy and access to vocational education and training forthose students eligible through the Centrelink and JobNetwork agencies.TAFE SA helped female Vietnamese farm workers in Virginia to develop vital safety andcommunication skills. A specially tailored TAFE SA English language program enabledparticipants to better understand safety instructions crucial to their work. The English forFarmers course provided a warm and friendly learning environment and an opportunity forsocial contact with others in similar situations. Through tasks such as grocery shopping,reading and filling out forms, the women learnt skills they can use in their everyday lives.Topics covered included safety signs and codes, hazardous substances, safety at home andrisk management.In the Riverland, there is a strong emphasis on meeting the needs of the local non-Englishspeaking background (NESB) community with staff working in partnership with the EnglishLanguage Services. The Riverland campuses receive funding through the Adult MigrantEnglish Program (AMEP) to support English as a Second Language (ESL) classes. 41
  43. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006English Language Services (ELS) launched another ‘Interlink Migrant Employment Program’during Semester 2. This initiative was designed to service the needs of skilled migrants andindustry within the state. Current and past students network with industry groups andagencies to foster a collaborative relationship and explore opportunities. Previous studentsfrom Jordan, India and the Philippines have been successful in gaining employment withinstate government agencies.ELS management and the ELICOS team at the Adelaide City campus reported an increasein student numbers with 130 students per term. International students studied English toprepare for entry into TAFE award courses.Shipbuilding / Defence Training ProgramsThe Air Warfare Destroyer (AWD) Project progressed with DFEEST making significantcontributions to its success.TAFE SA, the Education Services and Programs Directorate continued to support this majorshipbuilding venture by working closely with ASC Shipbuilders and the Port AdelaideMaritime Corporation (PAMC).While TAFE SA continued to increase its enrolments in the key trades and professionalareas relevant to shipbuilding and other defence industries, TAFE SA devised and piloted aunique Defence Industries Pathways program with the aim of:• providing a number of training and development pathways that lead to a variety of vocations required by the AWD project including – metal fabrication and design• integrating VET and DECS requirements to assist individuals to obtain – Year 12/SACE recognition, a VET qualification, credit towards an apprenticeship and/or further study• utilising young ASC apprentices/graduates to promote the benefits of careers within the defence industry sector and the AWD Project• providing the opportunity to access meaningful, sponsored work placement activities to support and link the learning experience to real AWD job requirements• increasing the utilisation of project based methodology to engage youth in active learning experiences while attending specialised training at a TAFE SA campus• engaging a whole-of-school community communication strategy to generate broad interest within the AWD Project.TAFE SA and ASC further expanded VET products to address the AWD and defenceindustries’ workforce requirements including School Based New Apprenticeships and theexpansion of Certificate II within VET in SACE.TAFE SA worked closely with ASC, PAMC, the Department for Administrative andInformation Services (DAIS) and lead architects to develop the educational, design andfunctional aspects of the Maritime Skills Centre.TAFE SA submitted a bid to the Army’s HQ Training Command to be included in the Army’sStanding Offer Panel for the provision of VET training over the next six years.Learn to Earn Pre-Employment ProgramLearn to Earn (L2E) is a $1.1 million, 12-month pre-employment program which assistsyoung people at risk into employment or vocational study.The program incorporates strategies to address the needs of participants including thefacilitation of hands-on project-based learning, the creation of youth friendly learning 42
  44. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006environments, the use of individual case management techniques and the construction ofdurable partnerships with committed local businesses and community groups.The program was well received and supported by local communities and industry sponsoredprojects and supported students with work placement and employment opportunities.Students continued to gain employment from the program while others regained confidencein themselves which enabled them to make informed decisions about their future.TAFE SA projects are outlined below.Gawler Campus – Paddock to Plate ProjectThis project was designed to meet the pressing skills need of the meat and poultry industry.Students gained skills in a range of program areas such as horticulture, working withanimals, cooking and hospitality to the final stage of selling and serving.Whyalla Campus – Metals and Mining ProjectThis project had a focus on meeting the needs of the Upper Spencer Gulf industries.OneSteel and other mining companies including Iron Duke mine supported the projectenabling the young participants to gain an insight into the industry. Students gained a rangeof transferable skills in areas such as horticulture, IT, welding and construction whichresulted in a range of smaller projects being completed.Outdoor settings, pergolas and a bird cage were some of the major projects constructed.Students also spent time at the Iron Duke Mine site gaining an understanding of andexperience in forklift driving and front end loader skills.Elizabeth Campus – Super KartsStudents developed and constructed a number of super karts. All students experienced aseries of skill building exercises which were aligned to recognised national units ofcompetence. Each student completed 1000 hours of training involving a combination oftheory and practical CAD applications in a project-based environment.In developing the necessary skills to build the super karts, the students built a BBQ, sacktruck, pot belly stove and a trailer. All of these projects reinforced the skill requirementsneeded to build the super karts. Each student also fabricated a one-third-scale sprint car.Students chose from a variety of units of competence, and from a number of traditionaltrades and vocations including fabrication and welding, fitting and turning, and automotive.The program also covered minor aspects of electrical and electronics. All of these tradeshave been identified as having critical skill shortages of being able to meet the future skillsneeds of South Australia, particularly in relation to upcoming opportunities in the defenceindustry and the huge growth that is taking place in the mining resources sector.Port Adelaide Campus – Marine Fabrication and Wood TradesThis program was centred on multi-faceted projects involving a range of vocational areasand integrating employability skills. The program covered a range of competenciesdepending on the needs of the students including:• marine fabrication – involving the hands on fabrication of a 4.5 metre ply dinghy and trailer• wood trades – the undertaking of wood trade competency units, including construction of an outdoor setting, canoes and fish aquarium and stand. 43
  45. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006Regency Campus - ElectronicsThis program built on the strengths of the Electronics L2E program successfully delivered atTea Tree Gully campus in previous years. Previous experience found that music was acommon area of interest for almost all Electronics L2E students. This knowledge, coupledwith a request from the SA Police, formed the basis for the following major L2E projects:• design, build and install/fit a mobile unit (trailer) with a computer controlled entertainment system to be used by Blue Light SA• construct sound systems and assemble computers to be donated to community organisations.Noarlunga Campus – Youth Peer Education through the Dramatic ArtsThe focus of this project was peer education with students working to develop and present aseries of short plays focussing on issues relevant to youth. These areas included mentalhealth, alcohol and other drug use, bullying, harassment and positive lifestyles. Participantswere involved in the writing of plays, developing and building sets, designing stage, soundand lighting features, and preparing marketing and promotional materials.Adelaide Campus – Self-Defence for WomenParticipants in this project were homeless young women who were accessing youth andhealth services in the city. The focus of the project was on writing, filming and producing aself-defence video disc designed to be made available to women in the community,particularly women in vulnerable situations.This knowledge enhanced participants’ capability for self-defence and at the same timepromoted personal safety. Throughout the course, there was considerable emphasis onpositive lifestyles and the importance of making positive life choices. This project workedclosely with a range of youth and health organisations in the city.TAFE Directors Australia National ConferenceTAFE SA project managed a three-day TAFE Directors Australia National Conference. Amajor theme of the conference was ideas, inspiration and innovation. The conference wasattended by 220 delegates and presenters comprised of directors from TAFE, dignitariesfrom China, leading educators and local and national politicians. Feedback from attendeeswas highly favourable and reflected the quality and professionalism of the conference.60 SOX – A Community of Digital Content CreatorsTAFE SA took part in a national initiative working to create a web space for people to havetheir own online galleries of their work (animations, music, short-films, digital stories,photography, illustrations, writing), receive feedback, share skills and knowledge. With morethan 70 organisations around Australia involved, 60 SOX is investigating methods to deliverqualifications to people through involvement with the network. The focus is to engage peoplein regional and remote areas.Teaching and Learning Development FundsThe focus of the Teaching and Learning Development Funds was the implementation andfurther development of relationships between TAFE SA delivery work teams and industry.Applicants listed innovative ideas to meet this requirement and demonstrated in theirapplications how they would establish or improve these relationships in order to benefitTAFE SA. 44
  46. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006INNOVATIONS PROJECTSA budget of $165 000 was allocated to fund more than 20 TAFE SA innovations projects.They were from a wide range of program areas, a sample of which appear below.TAFE SA and Fire and Rescue Australia - developed a platform of operation for apartnership between TAFE SA and Fire and Rescue Australia to deliver qualifications in themining industry from the Public Safety and Metalliferous Mining Training Packages.VET in Schools CD – a teaching tool consisting of lesson plans and assessments wasproduced for secondary school teachers delivering qualifications in Health Support Servicesin VET for Schools.TAFE SA and Warinilla (Drug & Alcohol Service) – a partnership was created to enableschool students to participate in a program which can assist with the re-establishing of arelationship between parents and their children in a relevant environment.TAFE SA and Bakers Delight – a blended approach to workplace on-job and off-job bakerytraining for Bakers Delight and a number of small bakery businesses in the South Eastregion was piloted with the goal of identifying opportunities to deliver the program toregional/rural clients across the state.Introduction to Certificate III in Dental Assisting – this project identified the need forconsultation with stakeholders in regional South Australia to determine the feasibility ofestablishing an introductory course. This opportunity would increase the chances for regionalstudents to gain entry into a Certificate III in Dental Assisting.Dreamcatcher – a collaborative special effects project for Advanced Diploma Screenstudents across both Tea Tree Gully and Adelaide City campuses, allowed them theopportunity to achieve competencies through a ‘real-life’ location shoot. Students receivedon-job experience of the special effects industry.Student ServicesStudent Services across TAFE SA provide a client focused service that facilitates fair andequitable access by all individuals to TAFE SA Institutes and study options. In addition tothis the network, along with Quality Assurance Groups (QAGs) and course coordinators,works across the state to ensure the accurate production of TAFE SA course publications,both print and web-based information. Student Services staff also support students tosuccessfully complete their studies through career counselling, personal counselling andreferrals, support with such matters as arranging child care, accommodation, finances, andmanaging disabilities.TAFE SA Student Services staff responded to over 80 000 enquiries for course informationand attended events such as the Career Expo, Royal Show, Student CounsellorsInformation Sessions, UniSA open day and Arts Open Day that promote TAFE SA options toprospective students.Social InclusionTAFE SA reviewed how it might best cater for the special needs of children and youngpeople who are or have been under the guardianship of the Minister for Families andCommunities. Options considered included:• automatic entry to literacy, numeracy as well as low demand vocational education programs 45
  47. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006• setting a sub quota of places in all competitive courses• waiving of all fees so that students from this group can access training at no cost to themselves, except their normal living expenses• access to career counselling to enable training plans to be put in place for each student under guardianship to assist them to achieve their career ambitions.The Access and Equity Committee developed a draft TAFE SA Equity Strategy. The EquityStrategic Plan includes strategies which enable links to be made with DFEEST directorateswhere an equity focus is required.Social Inclusion Board Disability Education PanelTAFE SA provides expert advice to the Social Inclusion Board, within the context ofeducation policy and programs and coordinated and integrated system change, to improvethe transitions from school to further education, training, employment and day options foryoung people with disabilities aged 15 to 24 within South Australia.Disability Support Program - Bridging PathwaysThe training program (in partnership with industry) continued to meet the needs of peoplewith a disability, with effective, client focused further education and employmentopportunities. The program for employees of Bedford Industries has been recognised andacknowledged as a model of best practice both nationally and internationally and providesemployees of the company with a broader learning experience and opportunities thatenhance their life skills, self-esteem and employment opportunities.Sixty five students associated with, or were employed by, Bedford Industries. BedfordIndustries publicly advocate that TAFE SA is its preferred training provider.The partnership demonstrated improved pathways to VET for people with a disability andequipped TAFE SA with skills in ‘inclusive’ employment assistance services and supportedefforts in undertaking further education and life long learning. All students developed self-esteem and confidence and recognised themselves as valuable members of the community.TAFE SA Admissions, Offers and EnrolmentsApplications for new enrolments in TAFE SA mainstream award courses were handledthrough the South Australian Tertiary Admissions Centre (SATAC) system for bothsemesters and for those courses that accept applications on a continuous basis, resulting in18 497 applicants and 13 644 offers as at December.High demand courses included:• Diploma of Dental Hygiene• Certificate I in Vocational Education (Plumbing)• Diploma of Nursing (pre-enrolment)• Diploma of Event Management• Certificate III in Children’s Services• Diploma of Fitness• Diploma of Beauty Therapy• Advanced Diploma of Tourism Management• Advanced Diploma of Hospitality Management. 46
  48. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006Enrolment categories exempt from the SATAC application process are re-enrolments,apprentices and trainees, vocational preparation, Aboriginal education and women’seducation, fee-for-service courses and leisure interest courses.Approximately 65 000 students enrolled directly with TAFE SA.Learning WorksA total of 3153 potential students who did not receive an offer in Semester 1 were contactedby ESP Student Services staff to invite them to participate in Learning Works, a programproviding individual learning programs. Of these potential students, 871 accepted the offerof individual case management and career advice by TAFE SA learning brokers.Learning brokers have worked with all Learning Works clients to develop individual learningplans based on their area of interest. These plans included:• gaining access to a suite of accredited units or short courses• job seeking and study skills• participating in community projects• assistance applying for the mid year intake admissions cycle• making valuable contacts and gaining work experience.Schools-TAFE-University Transitions, Pathways and PartnershipsTAFE SA continued to expand opportunities for young people and adult learners bynegotiating and developing study pathways through credit transfer and articulationarrangements between TAFE SA courses, SSABSA courses and the three South Australianuniversities.VET in Schools programs have been successfully operating within TAFE SA for many years,with most public and private schools now participating in formal VET in Schools Agreementsacross a range of programs.TAFE SA developed and initiated a new schools engagement program: the DefenceIndustries Pathways Program to support the workforce development requirements of thedefence industries sector.The program was trialled at the Regency campus and developed through a collaborativepartnership between TAFE SA, the secondary schools sector, schools from the LeFevrePeninsula and the Australian Submarine Corporation (ASC). The 20-day program wasdelivered every Friday for the last half of 2006, to provide training to existing secondaryschool students in the basic skills required to work within the defence industry in SouthAustralia. The program also included a two week placement within the ASC to providestudents with hands on experience in the defence industry environment.TAFE SA and the three South Australian universities operate under Memoranda ofUnderstanding that facilitate credit transfer arrangements for students who have completedTAFE qualifications and who have been accepted into university study.TAFE SA Learning ResourcesESP Production House through the Learning Resources Unit (LRU) provides support toLEARN (the network of South Australian TAFE libraries) via the services of a full-timelibrarian whose activities include centralised original cataloguing for all the TAFE SA librariesand maintenance of several communication facilities for library staff across the network 47
  49. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006including a staff hub hosted on Janison, an email list and a regular newsletter. LRU alsosupports LEARN via the services of the Executive Officer to the network’s planning group.The LEARN librarian facilitates the wider exposure of DFEEST publications by submittingcataloguing-in-publication data for each product to the Bowkerlink and Libraries Australiadatabases, which cater to the international book trade and the Australian library communityrespectively.The TAFE SA Training Resources Register continues to be developed and expanded as arepository of TAFE SA training resources and learning objects which supports sharing ofresources across TAFE SA, avoids duplication and enhances future commercialisationopportunities. It enables compliance with the government’s Intellectual Property Policyreporting requirements.Accessible via www.tafe.sa.edu.au/resources, in excess of 550 items are categorised withinthe TAFE SA program structure with search options including browse by one of the nineprogram (or sub-program) areas, keyword, identifier or National Training Information Service(NTIS) classification. A Learning Management System packaged preview of each item islinked to the full details page and a hardcopy is on display within the DFEEST TrainingResource Centre which is located within the Adelaide City campus.Online sales via credit card, purchase order, journal transfer, cheque or money order aretransacted through a secure e-business capability linking to automated on-demand print anddistribution services. Following a pilot period during June to August, transactions exceed$75 000 per month.LEARNING AND PROMOTIONAL MATERIALS DEVELOPMENTESP Production HouseThe work of the ESP Production House is now guided by the Development, Managementand Commercialisation of TAFE SA Training Resources Policy, endorsed in July. This policyprovides a framework for the continual investment in, and development, management andcommercialisation of training resources for TAFE SA.Product HighlightsSeveral highly sophisticated resources were produced for English Language Servicesincluding Getting Your L’s and Understanding First Aid; Work in Oz; Margo the Cleaner;Nella the Childcare Worker, and Sounds Right, Looks Right, a spelling resource for newmigrants.Other products included printed learning guides for TAFE SA program areas including hairand beauty, community services, children’s services, nursing, tourism, management studies,plumbing, wool handling and welding.Multimedia and DVD products included further additions to the SafeTChem series, an audioCD for taxis describing tourism features of Adelaide and regional South Australia, and aninteractive scenario based CDROM for Indigenous Childcare Workers. 48
  50. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006The following products were produced:Product Type Number ProducedReport, brochure or pamphlet 600Powerpoint presentation 40Video/DVD 42Logo, illustration, cover designs or other special graphic 185design - includes large scale bannersHigh end 3D modelling with animation 14Printed course booklets or study guides 292Updates to printed course booklets or study guides 141Online courses or course update 169Websites or online database 26Single web pages 126Major CDROM resources – includes sound, animations 8and/or videoMinor CDROM resources 55Audio CD or audio project 15Photo shoots (each 1-50 photos taken) 134Instructional design 103International DelegationsTAFE SA has a focused approach in supporting South Australia’s Strategic Plan to doubleSouth Australia’s share of overseas students within ten years. Careful attention is paid toensuring that its Education Services for Overseas Students (ESOS) meets the NationalCode of Practice for Registration Authorities and Providers of Education and Training toOverseas Students.A focus on international education continued through building and maintaining strategicrelationships to increase the recruitment of international students. A crucial aspect has beenthe fostering of international relationships with education agents and agencies, studentrecruitment agents and agencies as well as international consultants.Dedicated efforts were made in the form of half-day and full-day through to two-weekfamiliarisation tours with education and recruitment consultants from France, Korea, Japan,South America, Taiwan, Vietnam, Hong Kong, Turkey, China, Poland and Croatia. Half-dayfamiliarisation tours were conducted with AUSTRADE education officials from India,Pakistan, Russia, Hungary, Czech Republic and Turkey. International visitors also included aBahrain contingent from the UNESCO Centre for Excellence.The Asian region continued to be a major source of international student recruitment. TAFESA Adelaide South International Student Services in conjunction with senior staff ofAustralian Education International facilitated study tours to various academic faculties topromote TAFE SA services in South East Asia.The largest number of international student enrolments derived from the Peoples Republic ofChina. To respond to the demand in the Chinese market, TAFE SA hosted study tours forsenior officials representing high school, technical schools and local government sectorsincluding:• Longmenhao Vocational School in the Chongqing Municipality• Chinese Ministry Officials from Beijing• Representatives of Inner Mongolia Vocational School. 49
  51. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006Significant effort towards transnational delivery was undertaken. Commitment to furtherexplore collaborative activity was made between TAFE SA and three separate educationalinstitutions in China.A senior delegation of Chinese officials visited the TAFE SA Regency International Centre tosign a memorandum for future delivery of trade-based programs in Kaifeng City in China. Aninitial program in meat processing has already conducted the first program for 90 studentsas a trial in China. As a result of this successful program, the Chinese delegation, led by theMayor of the city, Mr Liu Changchun, signed an agreement to expand the range of training inChina to include bakery, engineering and meat processing.The Regency campus of TAFE SA hosted a group of senior executives from the EmiratesAcademy of Hospitality Management in Dubai in October to assist in the preliminary planningfor the development of a major vocational college in Dubai specialising in hospitality andtourism.This project is being undertaken in response to a competitive tender and is based on theRegency International Centre model, but with additional teaching in languages, retail,banking and other service sectors.TAFE SA CAPITAL WORKSDFEEST has a number of TAFE strategic capital projects.TAFE SA Barossa CampusConstruction work on Stage 2 at the Barossa Valley campus commenced in February withthe refurbishment of the hospitality suite (bar and restaurant area), student change rooms,and a classroom. This work was completed in time for the hospitality students to fulfill theireducational requirements and run the restaurant in April. Also commencing in February wasa new building which contains a student lounge, learning resource centre including computerwork stations for students, and office suites for existing staff. Other internal development willprovide offices for existing staff and will free up much needed classrooms. This will becompleted by March 2007.TAFE SA will also benefit from a wine and food tasting specialist teaching facility which willinclude plumbed spittoons. This facility will enable educational programs to deliver specialistcourses in food and wine and wine appreciation. It will be a facility where industryrepresentatives can partner with our lecturing staff to deliver specialist tasting tutorials.TAFE SA Mount Gambier CampusMount Gambier campus has developed into a multi-use site for TAFE SA, the University ofSouth Australia and Southern Cross University. Significant redevelopment work has beenundertaken at the campus to allow for this expansion of educational delivery. TheCommonwealth Government announced further funding to enable the development ofinfrastructure to create a community learning precinct. The construction work for this stagewill commence in 2007, ready for the 2008 academic year. The provision of further andhigher education on the same site provided major advantages for the Mount Gambier andwider Limestone Coast community.TAFE SA Port Augusta CampusThe lease on the Port Augusta campus is being negotiated until December 2009 and may beextended by mutual agreement. The refurbishment will provide an upgraded library area,restructuring of the lecture theatre and the relocation of the video conferencing facility. The 50
  52. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006front car park of the campus is also proposed to be expanded from seven vehicles toapproximately 30, with landscaping and signage included with ATC funding.TAFE SA Gilles Plains Campus (VASC Redevelopment)The $15 million Veterinary and Applied Science Centre (VASC) was completed and will openofficially in 2007. Features of the upgraded centre include:• state of the art Biotechnology labs• pathology demonstration lecture theatres• additional and upgraded labs to enable expansion into biological, environmental and water testing programs• a practice functioning veterinary clinic and grooming facility• industry standard holding and exercise areas for animals.The centre is the only facility in South Australia offering specialised training for the veterinarynursing and animal industries.The new facility will also enable expansion of training in biotechnology. This accreditedtraining for laboratory and research technicians will incorporate leading edge knowledge andskills in biotechnology, bio-informatics and genetic research techniques.All laboratories will be industry standard Physical Containment Level 2 (PC2) and the facilitywill also incorporate a PC Level 3 Laboratory to ensure training continues to compete withthe level of development of techniques in the biotechnology and bio- security areas.PERFORMANCE REPORTSQualityQuality Directorate is the government’s principal source of policy advice in relation tovocational education and training and higher education recognition. The directorate isresponsible for:• policy development and implementation• management of accreditation and registration, record keeping and access to publicly funded VET curricula• development and maintenance of information systems, and analysis and reporting of data for the VET sector and higher education registration and accreditation• advice and support to training providers and other clients on accreditation, registration and training packages and other qualitative aspects of VET.Delivery of higher education (other than that provided by the state universities) vocationaleducation and training, and educational services to overseas students, is regulated underthe Training and Skills Development Act 2003. The Act provides the basis for ensuring theeducation and training providers and the courses that they deliver are quality assured undernational education and training standards.At 31 December there were 261 Registered Training Organisations (RTOs), including TAFESA, registered in South Australia delivering vocational education and training qualifications, 51
  53. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006compared to 257 at the same time last year. Twenty seven new RTOs were approved, 19left the system and four remain suspended and cannot deliver nationally recognised training.Mutual recognition of training providers permits interstate RTOs to deliver in South Australia.The number of interstate RTOs operating in South Australia under mutual recognitionfluctuates and statistics are difficult to gather and therefore have not been provided.At 31 December there were 27 non-university higher education providers registered in SouthAustralia (compared to 29 at the same time last year), delivering more then 240 highereducation qualifications.A total of 36 education and training organisations were registered to provide educationservices to overseas students. Of these, 16 registered training providers delivered in thevocational education sector, nine in the higher education sector and 11 providers deliveredin both the VET and higher education sectors.A complete list of recognition data is provided in the statistical appendices.The State Training Authority endorsed 16 training packages containing 165 qualifications,and made 209 qualifications available as traineeships or apprenticeships.Qualifications in national training packages have replaced many of the state-accreditedcourses. A small number of courses continue to be accredited to meet niche markets, withthe majority containing units of competency from training packages. Nine vocationaleducation and 241 higher education courses were approved for initial accreditation orrenewal of accreditation.Quality AuditsThe registration of training providers and accreditation of courses are managed by thedepartment in accordance with national and state standards.Training providers and courses must demonstrate that they meet the relevant nationalstandards through audit. The conduct of audits is managed by the department and utilisesstaff and contracted external auditors or competent assessors. In addition to audits for initialapproval, the department also scheduled compliance and strategic audits based on a riskassessment. One hundred and twenty audits of training providers were conducted to assesscompliance with state and national standards compared with 108 in 2005.Capacity Building of Training ProvidersIn addition to approving providers and courses under the Training and Skills DevelopmentAct 2003, the department is building the capacity and promoting quality outcomes for theirclients by:• informing students and consumers of their choices, rights and responsibilities• informing and advising training providers about the relevant national and state standards and legislation with which they must comply• contributing to the design, development and implementation of national qualifications• ensuring standards are met and encouraging continuous improvement through audits of training providers• convening professional development workshops and forums on teaching and learning strategies and education management issues• working in collaboration with relevant national and interstate bodies to maintain and improve the national training system. 52
  54. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006National AQTF Moderation StrategyDFEEST managed the National AQTF Moderation Strategy project that concluded in June.The project engaged auditors from all jurisdictions in a range of activities designed to assessand improve audit practice and consistency in the interpretation of registration standards.The findings and outcomes from the project are being incorporated into the review of theAQTF and the development of nationally consistent outcomes based auditing.National Strategic Hospitality Industry AuditFollowing publication of the report from the 2005 National Strategic Audit of Training for theHospitality Industry the department met with representatives from hospitality industryassociations and RTOs delivering training to the hospitality industry to discuss the findings.The meeting discussed ways in which completion rates for apprenticeships and traineeshipscan be raised as well opportunities for RTOs and industry to work collaboratively to improvethe quality of training outcomes. The Food Tourism and Hospitality Industry Skills Board willdiscuss their proposals with RTOs in the industry.Higher Education ProtocolsIn July the Ministerial Council on Employment, Education, Training and Youth Affairs(MCEETYA) approved revisions to the national regulatory framework for higher educationset forth in the National Protocols for Higher Education Approval Process. The revisionincluded the addition of frameworks for single discipline universities and self-accreditinghigher education institutions MCEETYA also approved a project for the development ofnational guidelines for all types of higher education institutions, such as non-self-accreditinginstitutions, self-accrediting institutions and universities. Work on the development of thenational guidelines has commenced. The Quality Directorate represents South Australia onthe Steering Committee.Educational Services to Overseas Students (ESOS)ESOS has become of fundamental significance to the national economy and the AustralianEducation Systems Officials’ Committee (AESOC) appointed the National Code ActionGroup (NCAG) to undertake work on the National Code of Practice for RegistrationAuthorities and Providers of Education and Training to Overseas Students (The NationalCode), the principal instrument for the quality assurance of ESOS. The Quality Directorate,DFEEST represents South Australia on the NCAG.The work of the NCAG is nearing completion. The Commonwealth minister has approvedthe revised national code and discussions are proceeding between jurisdictions onparticulars for the implementation of the code.Revised Quality Assurance Arrangements for Registration of RTOsA review of the AQTF commenced this year following agreement by the Council of AustralianGovernments (COAG) in February that the current system for regulating RTOs needed tofocus more strongly on quality skills outcomes through the development of outcomes-basedstandards and auditing. In November the Ministerial Council for Vocational and TechnicalEducation agreed to the major features of what will be known as Australian Quality TrainingFramework (2007).The new arrangements will be implemented from 1 July 2007 and comprise essentialstandards for registration and a voluntary excellence level with criteria based uponinternationally recognised business excellence standards. The Ministerial Council alsoagreed to develop a single integrated auditing system covering all regulatory requirements 53
  55. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006that apply to RTOs in the sector and establish a new registering body that RTOs may electto use if they are operating across more than one jurisdiction.Working with Occupational Licensing AuthoritiesAt its meeting in February, COAG agreed to implement full mutual recognition for six prioritytrade occupations characterised by skills shortages and for all licensed occupations by 31December 2008. The department is supporting this initiative by ensuring that satisfactoryquality assurance arrangements exist where licensing is based upon certification ofvocational competence. This includes engaging state occupational licensing bodies in thereview of national qualifications and competencies in training packages and strengtheningcooperative arrangements for the registration and audit of registered training organisations.National ELICOS ProjectDFEEST is leading the national project on the quality assurance of standards for EnglishLanguage Intensive Courses for Overseas Students (ELICOS). Phase 1 of the project hasbeen completed and Phase 2 now has commenced. Phase 2 involves the development ofquality standards for courses and providers and arrangements for their implementation. It isanticipated that the project will be completed by April 2007.Valuing Older Workers ProjectThe Valuing Older Workers Project was a national project funded by ANTA/DEST andmanaged by Quality Directorate. The final report was completed and received by DEST on19 June. The project focussed on the learning and assessment needs of mature-agedworkers and also training facilitators in the sector for the professional development of RTOstaff.The presentation of over 50 workshops nationally to RTO staff and employers saw in excessof 1500 participants recording high satisfaction ratings. The aims of the 2005-06 ValuingOlder Workers national project were aligned to the aims and objectives of Better Skills,Better Work, Better State, a Strategy for the Development of the South Australian Workforceto 2010.Influencing National Policy DevelopmentThe department played a leading role in a number of significant national quality andregulatory initiatives. A working group of states and territories led by South Australiadeveloped the Essential Standards for Registration for the Australian Quality TrainingFramework (2007). The department also took the lead in negotiating with other states andterritories and the Commonwealth Government a suite of proposals for further regulatoryreform in the VET sector. The Ministerial Council for Vocational and Technical Educationagreed in November to recommend these proposals to the Council of AustralianGovernments in 2007.The department also played a leading role in revising the National Protocols for HigherEducation Recognition Approval Processes and the review of the National Code of Practicefor Recognition Authorities and Providers of Education and Training to Overseas Students.The department currently is involved contributing to the development of national guidelinesfor higher education recognition and in managing the national project on developingstandards and implementation arrangements for ELICOS quality assurance.South Australia Works consistently with other states and territories and DEST to developand implement national policy, particularly focussing on the development, review andimplementation of national training packages. Contribution is made to policy statementsincluded within the Training Package Developer’s Handbook and a quarterly meeting with all 54
  56. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006State Training Authorities and DEST provides a platform for negotiation and documentationof national policy directions.PERFORMANCE REPORTSTraineeships and ApprenticeshipsThe department is responsible for regulating, funding and developing policy acrossgovernment for South Australia’s 34 000 trainees and apprentices. This involvesadministering:• the contract of training system for trainees, apprentices and their employers• agreements with private and public registered training organisations ($40 million)• agreements with group training organisations ($2.25 million)• mediation and dispute resolution services for trainees, apprentices and employers• trades recognition processes for migrants and others requiring these services.The department prepares policy and strategic advice in relation to whole of South AustralianGovernment initiatives and Australian Government initiatives such as national trainingsystem reforms.These functions contribute to the department’s strategic objectives of skilling South Australiaand employment and workforce development.The diagram below shows the number of trainees and apprentices has begun to plateauafter showing steady growth in recent years. The number of commencing trainees andapprentices started to decrease. At the same time, the number of trainees and apprenticessuccessfully completing their contract of training has increased, after experiencing a declineduring 2004 and 2005. Trainee and apprentice activity, five years ending 30 June 2006* 40000 35000 Number of trainees and apprentices 30000 25000 20000 15000 10000 5000 0 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Year In training Commencements Completions* In training figures are provided at 30 June of each year, while commencement and completion figures are provided for the 12months ending 30 June of each yearAll figures are based on the National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) Australian vocational education andtraining statistics – Apprentices and trainees June quarter (2006). Figures for 2006 are estimated and may be revised byNCVER in the future 55
  57. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006The number of female trainees and apprentices continues to increase, with 12 400 in trainingat June. This accounted for 36.6 per cent of all trainees and apprentices in training in SouthAustralia and exceeded the national average for female participation (of 33.6 per cent atJune ) for the third consecutive year.Young people are well represented in the uptake of traineeships and apprenticeships, with19 700, or 57.9 per cent, aged less than 25 years.Traineeship and Apprenticeship CommencementsIn the year to 30 June the department approved 20 700 contracts of training for trainees andapprentices. This is 1000 4 fewer than the number approved in the year ending30 June 2005. Despite the overall decrease, traditional apprenticeship 3 commencementsincreased by 7.5 per cent, from 40004 to 4300 during the same period. Traditionalapprenticeships include, for example, the electrical and plumbing trades, butchering, motormechanics and hairdressing.Traineeship and Apprenticeship CompletionsThe department issued Certificates of Competency to 10 400 trainees and apprentices whocompleted their contracts of training in the year ending 30 June, compared with 90004 for the12 months ending 30 June 2005, representing an increase of 13.0 per cent. The number oftrainees and apprentices in training experienced a slight increase from 33 8004 at the end ofJune 2005 to 33 900 one year later.Training SubsidiesThe department provides support to traineeships and apprenticeships through the provisionof training subsidies (known as User Choice training subsidies) to RTOs. One hundred andninety nine funding agreements were signed with TAFE SA and private registered trainingorganisations for the delivery of off and on-the-job training. A total of $39 million wasprovided by the government during the 2005-06 financial year for the delivery of some 1300nationally recognised qualifications to support approximately 27 000 trainees andapprentices.The successful implementation in 2005 of a pilot program to allow User Choice funding forexisting workers undertaking apprenticeships, resulted in the extension of the pilot. Thisinitiative has given existing employees working in traditional trade areas the opportunity toconvert skills to a formal qualification in their chosen trade. Funding was provided for 542existing workers who commenced an apprenticeship.As required by COAG, the Ministerial Council for Vocational and Technical Education andthe Skilling Australian funding agreement, the department participated in a range of activitiesrelated to User Choice. The key activities were:• The department participated in the establishment of a national unit price band for each apprenticeship or traineeship in the Australian Apprenticeships Scheme. South Australia was a member of a Steering Group, led by the Department for Education, Science and Training (DEST), that has agreed on a Price Table, which will allow RTOs and employers in states and territories to access User Choice price information across the various4 Based on revised figures published in December 2006 by the National Centre for Vocational EducationResearch (NCVER)3 Traditional apprenticeships as defined by National Centre for Vocational Education and Research aretrades apprenticeships and traineeships at AQF III qualification or above with more than two yearsexpected duration for full-time contracts and more than eight years expected duration for part-time andschool-based contracts 56
  58. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006 jurisdictions. DEST is preparing a report on the Steering Group’s decision for a national User Choice Price List Template as a framework for meeting the requirements.• In consultation with the Training and Skills Commission, the department developed a set of User Choice funding objectives which will guide decisions in relation to which employers, trainees, apprentices and qualifications will be supported under User Choice arrangements in South Australia. The selection of qualifications funded will also be informed by the State VET Strategic Plan, consultation with appropriate Industry Skills Boards and key industry groups.• The department is participating in the development of a national User Choice template in consultation with other states and the Commonwealth for a national contract that will apply to registered training organisations eligible to receive User Choice funding under the Australian Apprenticeships Scheme.Administrative Improvements for Registered Training OrganisationsWork continued on the Apprenticeship Traineeship Information System (ATIS). Firstreleased to a select group of RTOs in mid-2005, the system has been further developed toallow all registered training organisations and Australian Apprenticeship Centres to gainaccess to the system.RTOs and Australian Apprenticeships Centres can now view, print, and export details of allregistered South Australian contracts of training associated with their organisation.Administrative Improvements to the Traineeship and Apprenticeship SystemSeventy six per cent of contracts of training were approved within 10 working days, up from73 per cent in 2005.The department delivered training to Australian Apprenticeships Centres on the Training andSkills Development Act 2003, the Training and Skills Commission’s guidelines anddepartmental processes governing the administration of the traineeship and apprenticeshipsystem in South Australia.The Traineeship and Apprenticeship Services Directorate had its Quality AssuranceCertification (AS/NZS ISO 9001:2000) renewed for three years until March 2009, after itsuccessfully met audit requirements in May.MarketingAn Information Service provides information to the public on all aspects of traineeships andapprenticeships, as well as a more streamlined service to employers, trainees andapprentices on matters relating to their contract of training. The service is available throughan 1800 telephone number and email.The Information Service received 17 767 calls; an average of 342 per week. This equates toan increase of 3256 calls on the 14 511 received in 2005 or an additional 63 calls eachweek. Of the calls received, 6619 (or 37 per cent) were dealt with by the InformationService, a further 8697 (or 49 per cent) were referred within the department and theremaining 2451 (or 14 per cent) were referred to other agencies or government departments.The Information Service promoted the benefits of traineeships and apprenticeships to thewider public at the Career Expo, Small Business Week and the Royal Adelaide Show.The department also developed and distributed an interactive CD-ROM and DVD promotingthe benefits of trade apprenticeships to young people aged 15 to 24 years, their parents andschool careers counsellors. 57
  59. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006Group TrainingA total of 3510 trainees and apprentices were employed by 13 group training organisationsfunded under the Joint Group Training Program. These organisations received $2.25 millionallocated under the state/Commonwealth program.The department audited nine group training organisations for compliance with the NationalStandards for Group Training. These consisted of eight compliance maintenance audits andone new audit. There are currently 19 group training organisations in South Australia thatcomply with the national standards.The department contributed to a national review of the Joint Group Training Program whichwas instigated by the Commonwealth Department of Education, Science and Training.Stakeholders, including group training organisations and equity and industry groups werealso involved. The final report was presented in December.In May, South Australia hosted a forum of state and territory government officers responsiblefor the operation of group training programs. The forum provided the opportunity fordiscussion regarding the administration of programs and the sharing of information onmatters of mutual concern, such as funding arrangements, brand recognition and promotionof Group Training, and standards for registration of Group Training Organisations.Trades RecognitionThe Trades Recognition Support Service began operation in February. The service assistsIndustry Skills Boards with the establishment of industry based assessment panels in tradeareas. Under Part 5 of the Training and Skills Development Act, 2003, these panels assessthe competency of persons who have acquired trades skills or qualifications other than underthe Australian Qualifications Framework and recommend the issuance of Certificates ofRecognition to those who are able to demonstrate competencies in all areas of a trade.Assessment panels for bakers and cooks were established.The service has three major client groups: overseas qualified/experienced tradespeople;local tradespeople without qualifications or formal training; and industry representativesincluding Industry Skills Boards, employers and registered training organisations.From mid February to December, the Trades Recognition Support Service responded toover 1400 calls, and case managed 208 clients. Sixty per cent of the latter were skilledmigrants seeking trade recognition, and 35 per cent of this group gained recognition.The case managed clients were from United Kingdom (39 per cent), India (37 per cent),Australia (nine per cent), South Africa (eight per cent) and China (seven per cent). Theiroccupations were mainly in the industry areas of electrotechnology, telecommunications,automotive, engineering, construction, and other technical trades.A website was developed to provide information about skills assessment processes topersons migrating to South Australia, and also local people wanting to get their skillsrecognised. The website address is www.work.sa.gov.au.Funding was provided to Pathways Training, an Employment Assistance Program providerthat specialises in supporting skilled migrants into employment. The funding enabled theprovider to:• work with newly arrived tradespeople who are not immediately eligible for a license to work to assist them find employers willing to support them through an apprenticeship program 58
  60. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006• support skilled migrants to gain local work experience in their trade.Policy AmendmentsTraining ReformsAs a result of the COAG communiqué of 6 February, the department undertook to implementreforms relating to traineeships and apprenticeships, and in particular:• the removal of industrial barriers to school-based apprenticeships in collaboration with industry in five priority industry areas, and in further areas where demand is identified by Australian Technical Colleges and Industry Skills Boards• the shortening of traineeship and apprenticeship durations where competency has been achieved.The department worked with Business SA, SA Unions and SafeWork SA to identify the stateawards in the five priority industry areas of metals and engineering, building andconstruction, automotive, commercial cookery and electrotechnology. The stakeholdersagreed to vary awards in metals and engineering, building and construction and automotive,to enable school-based apprenticeships were achieved in these areas.The second reform required the introduction of a competency based traineeship andapprenticeship system. The Training and Skills Commission approved new Guidelines forCompetency Based Traineeship and Apprenticeship Completions, which become effectivefrom 1 January 2007. This means trainees and apprentices may complete their traineeshipor apprenticeship prior to the nominal completion date of the contract term, if the requiredcompetencies have been achieved. The new guidelines, were promoted to stakeholders,with further promotion occurring in 2007.Visa PolicyThe minister approved a new policy in relation to the approval of contracts of traininginvolving visa holders. This policy makes the following groups eligible for an apprenticeshipor traineeship in South Australia: Australian and New Zealand citizens, permanent residents,and all temporary visa holders provided their employment is compliant with the Departmentof Immigration and Multicultural Affairs’ requirements. User Choice policy was also amendedto exclude funding for overseas students, the primary visa holder of a Trade Skills Trainingvisa, and the primary visa holder of a Business Long Stay visa, unless the individual isseeking training in a higher qualification than they currently possess.Skills Shortage InitiativesThe department undertook a variety of projects aimed at increasing the number of traineesand apprentices in areas experiencing or forecast to experience skills shortage.Pre-Apprenticeship ProgramThe department funded six pre-apprenticeship courses in the trade related occupations ofroof plumbing, engineering (mechanical and fabrication), engineering (electrical andelectronics) and carpentry/joinery. The program prepares participants for an apprenticeshipin these vocations by providing training in specific technical skills and organising workexperience with industry employers. Of the 90 participants who commenced training, 79 (or88 per cent) completed, and 42 (or 53 per cent) of completing participants obtained someform of employment. Thirty seven of these were apprenticeships under a contract oftraining.Child CareThe department continued to manage the upskilling program for childcare workers in longday care centres begun in late 2005 to alleviate a shortage of diploma qualified workers in 59
  61. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006the sector. At 31 December there were 68 childcare workers on traineeships in the programworking towards a Diploma of Children’s Services, and four childcare workers in the programwho had successfully completed the Diploma. Six childcare workers had successfullycompleted the Certificate III in Children’s Services.Planning also commenced for a pilot upskilling program for up to 100 existing workers in Outof School Hours Care Services. The pilot program will be undertaken in 2007 to address ashortage of diploma qualified workers in Out of School Hours Care. Both programs areinitiatives of the interagency Child Care Sector Strategy Working Group (Skills Shortages).The Training and Skills Commission amended its policy on minimum hours for part-timecontracts of training to allow existing workers in Out of School Hours Care on a minimum often hours per week to participate in traineeships under the pilot program.Completion RatesPresentations were made to several Industry Skills Boards on the variable completion ratesin their different industry areas, to focus attention on the need to increase the number oftraineeship and apprenticeship completions. The reasons for variable completion rates werediscussed and boards undertook to identify strategies to improve completion rates,especially in skills shortages areas. The department plans to continue its focus oncompletions in 2007.Grievances and DisputesThere was an increase in the number of formal grievances and disputes lodged by trainees,apprentices and employers. Eighty three grievances about contract of training matters wereresolved through formal mediation, and 64 disputes were referred to the Grievance andDisputes Mediation Committee of the Training and Skills Commission for determination.Special ProjectsStrategic Framework for Traineeships and ApprenticeshipsThe Traineeship and Apprenticeship Futures Steering Committee was appointed by theTraining and Skills Commission to prioritise and respond to the recommendations of theTraineeship and Apprenticeship Futures Project Report which was presented in 2005. Thereport examined and recommended future directions for traineeships and apprenticeships inSouth Australia.In response to the report, the steering committee produced the Traineeship andApprenticeship Strategic Framework for South Australia and the User Choice TrainingSubsidies Policy Objectives. Collectively this work outlines the objectives for the traineeshipand apprenticeship system and the criteria for determining eligibility for User Choice trainingsubsidies.ABS survey of School-Based New ApprenticesThe department convened a working group of representatives from Business SA, SAUnions, DECS, Catholic Education, the Association of Independent Schools of SA andSafeWork SA to analyse the detailed survey report provided by the ABS.The survey indicated the importance of information on employment rights and thetraineeship and apprenticeship system being made available to school-based trainees andapprentices before they sign a training contract, at induction sessions, and during the term ofthe training contract. A significant number of survey respondents were not informed abouttheir wages and employment conditions, the probationary period, special equipment, andcontract completion arrangements, while 18 per cent of respondents reported that they werenot always paid for the work they did. Twenty-five per cent of respondents did not receive 60
  62. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006an occupational health, safety and welfare induction, and of the 20 per cent of respondentswho indicated they had been injured at work during their school based apprenticeship, 25per cent did not report it.The department and DECS are collaborating on a range of strategies to ensure schoolstudents who are considering undertaking a school-based apprenticeship or traineeship areprovided with appropriate information and advice about the traineeship and apprenticeshipsystem and associated employment arrangements, and with case management, mentoring,and advocacy if they enter into a school based apprenticeship or traineeship.Passport to SafetyThe department continued its involvement in the Passport to Safety (P2S) Working Groupformed under the leadership of SA unions. The P2S program is a web-based, self-pacedlearning and test program aimed at young people who are preparing to enter the work forcefor the first time for either work experience, work placement, casual or part time work. Thisgeneral occupational health, safety and welfare (OHSW) awareness program was developedby the Safe Communities Foundation in Canada and adapted to meet Australian OHSWrequirements.Working group representatives include the Australian Safe Communities Foundation,Business SA, Minister’s Youth Council, Department of Education and Children’s Services(Futures Connect), Office for Youth, SA Unions, SafeWork SA, Senior SecondaryAssessment Board of SA and WorkCover Corporation.The working group piloted the Passport to Safety program in 35 schools with 4000 studentsin 2005-06. The P2S Showcase was held in November to acknowledge the schools involved,report the results of the pilot and promote the benefits of the program for new and youngworkers. Teachers and students taking part in the pilot were asked to complete pre- andpost-pilot surveys to measure their OHS&W knowledge, as well as provide feedback on theprogram itself. Interim results showed that there was an average increase of 22 per cent inOHSW knowledge for both teachers and students.The findings will inform future policy development for school-based apprenticeship initiatives.Review of Child LabourIn September the South Australian Industrial Relations Commission (SAIRC) commenced areview of six awards pursuant to section 98A(3) of the Fair Work Act 1994. This sectionrequires the SAIRC to commence a review to ensure that state industrial awards reflectappropriate standards with respect to the employment of children. It also enables the SAIRCto make an award specific to the employment of children. A child is defined in the Act as aperson under the age of 18.SA Unions argued that the review should not be restricted to the six awards listed by theSAIRC and has proposed an overarching Child Labour Award to regulate the welfare of allworkers who are children under the age of 18 in South Australia. The draft award coversmatters such as access to transport, availability of records, breaks between shifts,categories of employment, general breaks and rest periods, duties of employers of children,information and support regarding employment matters, minimum age, minimum standards,overtime, prohibition of employment in certain categories of work, industry or sectors ofindustry, prohibition of split shifts, right of entry, rosters, shift arrangements, special limitationon hours of employment, supervision arrangements and trial work and probation.The department provided a detailed response to SA Unions with respect to clauses in thedraft award that specifically affect trainees and apprentices, their employers, and industry. 61
  63. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006PERFORMANCE REPORTSEmployment ProgramsThe Employment Programs Directorate is responsible for developing and delivering theSouth Australia Works initiative which links people with skills and jobs.South Australia Works is a learning, training and work package aimed at increasing learning,training and employment opportunities for all South Australians, particularly those young,mature aged and Aboriginal people who are most disadvantaged.By working in partnership with all levels of government, industry and the community, SouthAustralia Works:• provides training and employment opportunities for people who are having trouble improving their skills or finding a job• assists local communities to address the learning and work needs of individuals within their communities• helps maximise the number of jobs associated with industry and government plans and projects• links business with the skilled workers they need• helps meet the demand for labour, in particular responding to current and future skills demands.South Australia WorksThe South Australia Works – learning to work programs to 2010 initiative brings togetherlearning, training and employment services to ensure all South Australians have theopportunity to develop work skills and get a job.The initiative contributes to the state’s economic development and social inclusion objectivesby linking people with skills and jobs while also addressing the skill and employment needsof industry.This initiative focuses on seven priority areas including regional, young people, mature-agedpeople, Aboriginal people, community, industry, and the public sector.People who are most disadvantaged in accessing training and employment are providedwith more and better opportunities to participate in learning, skill development, training andemployment.In 2005-06, over 28 700 participants were engaged in the program, with over 7300 gainingemployment, demonstrating consistent and successful outcomes for South Australia Works.Expenditure on learning, training and work programs was $27 million. This included $4.4million of externally funded programs, including Commonwealth government funding. 62
  64. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006South Australia Works in the RegionsSouth Australia Works in the Regions continued to strengthen the capacity of localcommunities to determine and respond to their learning and work needs.$7.56 million was provided to assist 7682 people to participate in regional initiatives and atotal of 2852 employment outcomes were achieved with 464 741 accredited and 52 780 non-accredited training hours delivered.The collaborative, coordinated and targeted approach to training and employment issues atthe regional and local level:• increased the capacity of communities to respond effectively and quickly to changes in skill needs and employment opportunities• ensured that assistance is directed to South Australians facing the greatest difficulty in accessing training and jobs• helped businesses and industry access skilled labour to meet immediate and longer term needs.The South Australia Works in the Regions three-year Strategic Plan 2006-07 to 2008-09 wasreleased in November. Extensive consultation and planning occurred in 17 regions acrossSouth Australia to identify local and regional employment and training challenges. Followingthis planning, all regions developed 2006-07 Action Plans to achieve their strategic goals.The South Australia Works in the Regions Forum – The Skills Challenge: the future ofemployment in regions was held on 29 November. The day’s highlight was a presentation onthe Whyalla Create Your Future – Goal 100 project which provided an account of the impactof the project on participants, the community and industry. Other South Australia Works inthe Regions case studies were showcased including The Parks project and The NorthernAdelaide / Barossa / Mid North Child Care project.Over 200 guests attended The South Australia Works in the Regions Recognition andAchievements Awards Dinner. The Minister for Employment, Training and FurtherEducation presented awards for the categories of:• outstanding project or activity• outstanding employer or industry representative• outstanding contribution by an employment and skills formation network, and individual achievement by a participant.South Australia Works in the Regions activity included:• a Career Development Centre was opened in February to provide the Limestone Coast region with a career planning service for individuals• over 1200 people attended JobsFest at the Adelaide Entertainment Centre on 4 July where employers offered hundreds of job opportunities for people living in the western and eastern regions of Adelaide• young unemployed people were assisted into training and jobs through the Boystown’s Pathways to the Future program in Port Pirie• Conroys and PACE meat processing workers who were facing retrenchment were assisted into alternative employment• the Create Your Future: Goal 100 Project – Whyalla was developed and implemented. 63
  65. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006The Create Your Future: Goal 100 Project was a best practice and innovative example ofhow local partnerships can address a skills shortage within a community. The WhyallaEconomic Development Board, together with OneSteel Whyalla Steelworks and localtraining organisations, combined efforts to provide 100 work ready people for OneSteel andother local businesses.South Australia Works for Indigenous PeopleThis program has continued to identify and deliver programs that are specifically designed toassist Indigenous people: 1402 participated, exceeding the target of 1160.Eighteen Aboriginal apprentices, including 10 from regional South Australia, graduated fromthe Aboriginal Apprenticeship Program on 3 November. Throughout the year the programconsistently achieved a retention rate of 75 per cent, inducting 50 new Aboriginalapprentices and supporting an average of 115 apprentices in the four-year program.A total of 617 Aboriginal people participated in the Aboriginal Employment Program, and 183gained employment, and 370 Aboriginal people participated in South Australia Works in theRegions projects, with 160 gaining employment.Young Indigenous people aged between 17 and 28 were a recruitment and placementpriority for the Government Youth Traineeship program. Fifty-nine Indigenous placementswere achieved with a further five Indigenous trainees placed through the CommunityshipsProgram.Seventeen Indigenous people from the APY Lands commenced a traineeship through theCommunityships Program.Other highlights included the delivery of a Building and Construction Pre-vocational Programfor severely disadvantaged young Aboriginal residents from The Parks and surroundingareas. Graduates from this program are being offered apprenticeship opportunities.Eight Aboriginal people commenced a six-month pre-employment course with the SouthAustralian Metropolitan Fire Service (SAMFS) which included sitting for light truck driver’slicence, a Senior First Aid Certificate and a challenging fitness training course.Tauondi College delivered over 171 000 accredited training hours and over 24 000 culturaltraining hours to 340 full-time equivalent students.South Australia Works for Young PeopleOver 3870 young people participated in this program with 1706 gaining employment.Projects such as Boystown in the Parks provided work experience through the maintenanceand restoration of South Australia Housing Trust homes, as well as training in building andconstruction, team building and work ethics.A total of 2000 young people participated in South Australia Works in the Regions projectswith up to 1085 gaining employment.Ten Youth Conservation Corps projects provided 213 young people with practical workexperience on a range of conservation projects, with 109 gaining employment, and 100disadvantaged young people developed employment skills through the Learn to Earnprogram. Thirty are expected to gain employment.A total of 685 school aged students participated in Social Inclusion Initiative programs suchas the Alternative Learning Options Program and the Adult Community Education Youth 64
  66. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006Works Program. Of these, 449 returned to school or went onto further training, and 25achieved an employment outcome.The Training Employment Register supported 200 young people with 57 gaining ongoingemployment.A further 600 young people commenced employment through public sector traineeship,apprenticeship and cadetship programs.South Australia Works in the Public SectorSouth Australia Works in the Public Sector continues to expand the range of employmentopportunities available for young people, Aboriginal people, people with a disability andmature aged people within the public sector.A total of 600 young people gained employment through the Government Youth TraineeshipProgram, cadetships, and the Government Apprenticeship Scheme. Of these;• thirty five per cent were placed in regional areas• ten per cent were placed in local government• approximately 20 per cent were disadvantaged young people.The Communityships Program supported the employment of 35 trainees, apprentices andcadets in metropolitan and regional community not for profit organisations.In March South Australia Works in the Public Sector successfully supported the variation ofnine public sector awards through the Industrial Relations Commission to allow for thedelivery of part-time traineeships, including traineeships longer than 12 months and school-based new apprenticeships for government.In October Senior Management Council endorsed the Government Skills RecruitmentStrategy: Delivering Skills for the Future 2006-2009. Underpinned by a new program,CareerStart SA, the strategy introduced a new government recruitment model for trainees,apprentices, cadets and graduates. Public Sector workforce planning is featured in thestrategy as government departments (and non-government entities such as SA Water) arenow required to submit Annual Skills Recruitment Plans.In addition, the Skills Register (formerly the Traineeship Employment Register) now supportsgraduating trainees, cadets and apprentices to find further employment in the public sector.South Australia Works for Mature Aged PeopleThis program continued to develop early intervention strategies to help older workers dealwith the prospect of unemployment. It provided opportunities for mature aged unemployedpeople to learn about today’s labour market so they can improve their chances of findingwork and provided re-training while simultaneously encouraging enterprises to support theemployment of older workers.A total of 5020 mature-aged participants were engaged in a range of programs with 1087gaining employment.A total of 420 mature aged people participated in metropolitan and regionalforums/workshops and 1043 people were assisted through the Employment AssistanceProgram, resulting in 212 employment outcomes. 65
  67. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006The Parents Return to Work Program supported over 960 mature-aged parents to undertaketraining which improved their workforce skills. Demand for the program was overwhelming.Since January 2005, over 9800 parents have registered an interest to obtain a credit, with3651 activating credits by enrolling in training.Existing programs were enhanced by adding a mentoring component, thereby integratinginformation, case management, training and mentoring support as essential elements ofsuccessful programs for mature aged participants.In addition, 105 mature-aged people secured employment through the South AustraliaWorks Primo small goods meat industry project and the Workforce Development FundWestern Adelaide Airport Project.South Australia Works in CommunitiesSouth Australia Works in Communities creates opportunities for people to engage incommunity learning. In addition, people who have experienced disadvantage or barriers tolearning and work are supported to participate in learning programs.Through this program 4764 people were assisted and 1460 gained employment.A total of 1602 parents, under the age of 40 years, participated in the Parents Return toWorks Program and were provided with 764 500 accredited training hours. As a result of thehigh demand for the Parents Return to Work Program and the Adult Community Education(ACE) Program the 1 540 700 accredited hours of training delivered exceeded the 2005-06target by 140 per cent and non-accredited hours of training by 64 per cent.A total of 595 people experiencing barriers to employment were assisted through theEmployment Assistance Program with 204 gaining employment.The Adult Literacy and Numeracy Program provided 600 people with accredited literacy andnumeracy training opportunities. The program delivered 35 000 accredited training hours topeople who wanted to increase their literacy and numeracy skill levels so they couldparticipate in further education, training and/or employment.Over 8500 people participated in ACE programs and 260 000 hours of non-accreditedtraining were delivered, and 1872 disadvantaged people participated in South AustraliaWorks in the Regions projects with 837 gaining employment.ACEThe program continued to provide South Australians with a diverse range of vocational andnon-vocational education and training opportunities, programs and courses in partnershipwith community adult education organisations.In 2005-06, 71 not for profit organisations were funded. These organisations re-connectedadults to learning and training pathways by delivering 260 000 hours of non-accreditedlearning and training in areas such as general adult education, English language, literacyand numeracy programs, employability skills and social and personal development.Community and Neighbourhood Houses and Centres Association represented over 50 percent of grantees. These local organisations were well placed to respond to the needs ofadults who are educationally, socially and economically disadvantaged.Reflecting the consistently high demand for the ACE Program, a budget increase of$963 000 to $2.07 million was allocated for 2006-07 to support 100 projects, ACE workforce 66
  68. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006development, and other ACE initiatives including Adult Learners’ Week and TAFEconcession subsidies.ACE Workforce DevelopmentProfessional development opportunities were provided for staff in ACE organisations throughthe ACE Program Community Learning Promotion and Support Fund, the Literacy andNumeracy Delivery Support Service and Community and Neighbourhood House WorkforceDevelopment Projects. Workforce development highlights included:• twenty six community coordinators graduated with a Diploma or Advanced Diploma in Community Services Management• a focus on regional access to skills development including access to recognition of prior learning processes, training, mentoring, and fostering face to face meetings to build regional network links.Literacy and NumeracyDesignated literacy and numeracy services, and services embedded within other ACEactivities provided opportunities for individuals to develop essential literacy and numeracyskills contributing to vocational and personal pathway development.The Literacy and Numeracy Delivery Support Service provided volunteers, educators,instructors and lecturers working in the ACE and VET sectors with development activitiesand resource information to reinforce high quality delivery.The Support Service increased activity and professional networking in regional areas andsupported the delivery of:• Literacy teaching days• ICT literacy workshops• Volunteer tutor training• Certificate IV in Training and Assessment• Certificate IV in Language and Literacy Assessment and Training• Advanced Diploma in LL&N Practice in VET.Adult Learners’ WeekThe South Australia 2006 Adult Learners’ Week, held 1-8 September, encouraged adultlearning organisations, groups, agencies and communities to celebrate and promote adultand community learning.The week, held in partnership with the Commonwealth Department of Education, Scienceand Technology (DEST), engaged disenfranchised individuals within formal or informallearning processes, and highlighted the contributions of adult and community learning to theprosperity, health and well being of individuals and communities.An estimated 6000 people participated in National Adult Learner’s week activities andcelebrations. Over 360 people attended the state launch and Adult Learners’ Week AwardsPresentation. Awards were presented for:• Adult Learner of the Year• Adult Educator of the Year• Volunteer Tutor of the Year• Adult Learning Program of the Year• Community-based Adult Learning Provider of the Year 67
  69. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006• Indigenous Community Learning Provider of the Year• Learning Community of the Year.South Australia Works with IndustryA total of 1866 businesses participated in South Australia Works with Industry programs toprovide businesses and industry with the skilled workers they need both in the short termand longer term. These initiatives contributed to South Australia’s productivity while meetingthe training and work needs of individuals.The Workforce Development Fund forged closer links with Industry Skills Boards and funded12 industry wide projects across a range of industry sectors including the wine sector,transport and logistics, competitive manufacturing in the automotive industry and civilconstruction sector.Workers facing retrenchment from Mitsubishi Motors and GM Holden Ltd were providedassistance to find alternative employment through the Australian Government/SouthAustralian Government Labour Adjustment Package.Subsequent assistance was also provided to Ion Limited and workers in supplier companiesdirectly impacted by the large manufacturer’s restructure.Tailored assistance was provided to 1002 retrenched workers in the automotive industry,with 506 finding alternate employment.The Ticket to Training and the InSkill SA programs provided training and upskillingopportunities to 1098 businesses and their employees.Forty eight people participated in an integrated workplace skills development program whichalso addressed employer’s values, expectations and work readiness issues. This industry-driven initiative, governed by partnerships and collaborative management, has provided 40people with ongoing, sustainable employment.In the first national project of its kind, South Australia Works partnered with the AustralianGovernment’s Department of Employment and Workplace Relations (DEWR), three otherstate governments and the Australian Manufacturing Technology Institute (AMTIL) to skill upand place job seekers into entry level positions within the precision engineering andmanufacturing sector.PERFORMANCE REPORTSWorkforce DevelopmentDFEEST targets within South Australia’s Strategic Plan are framed within the three prioritiesof the Government’s Workforce Development Strategy Better Skills. Better Work. BetterState:• creation of a high skill economy• access to quality employment• better workforce planning. 68
  70. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006The department’s vision is to see South Australia having a strong workforce developmentand planning culture in its workplaces.Community Learning StrategyIn mid September a Community Learning Strategy Learn, Live, Grow, Prosper waslaunched. The strategy expresses the government’s commitment to investing in learningand skills development. It aims to develop a ‘culture of learning’ in South Australia throughfour main goals:• Proud to be Learning: Promote learning as a social activity that has personal, social, community, economic and environmental benefits• Learning through Living: Improve the general wellbeing of each individual through a lifetime of learning• Learning and Growing Together: Offer learning opportunities in all communities so that the whole state becomes a network of learning communities• Prospering through Learning: Foster learning in organisations, workplaces and industry.The Community Learning Strategy, developed by the Adult Community Education ReferenceGroup of the Training and Skills Commission with the support of the department was shapedby the views of more than 450 people representing the education, community, governmentand business sectors.Skills for South AustraliaTo support the release of the State Budget in September 2006, the directorate led theformulation of Skills for South Australia: Building on Strong Foundations, a package of 24skills initiatives totalling $98 million over four years. The skills initiatives build on the strongfoundations of the state’s education and training system and targets government resourcesin partnership with industry to meet the rapid jobs growth and skills demand in the mineralresources, defence and construction industries.The 24 initiatives cover the following priority areas:• responding to the skills needs of major projects• increasing workforce participation• developing a skilled workforce• increasing science and mathematics study in schools• increasing skilled migration• improving planning and information• fostering career development.Expansion of the Workforce Information ServiceThe Workforce Information Service (WIS) made available a range of information products,including the South Australian Labour Market Profile; several population profiles on peoplewith a disability and mature aged people in South Australia; Career Advisor, which focusedon career pathways for the automotive and electronic industries; and the AnnotatedBibliography: Workforce Development, a comprehensive resource on areas relating toworkforce development, in conjunction with the Australian Institute for Social Research.In addition, the WIS continued to provide regular information through several bibliographicalresources, covering the ageing population and health sector workforce planning, and themonthly, subscriber-based, e.Alert. WIS Online continued to be the central point ofinformation provision for the WIS and will be completely revised for launch in early 2007. 69
  71. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006Occupational MatrixThe directorate developed an Occupational Matrix, an analytical tool which enables detailedoccupational analysis of the jobs in the state labour market, including recent growth,projected future growth, skill shortages, job vacancies and supply trends. The OccupationalMatrix shows that the occupations which have good or very good prospects, that is betterthan average, in South Australia over the next few years are primarily in the higher skilledoccupations.The matrix also includes information on supply trends within occupations in the state labourmarket (based on an extrapolation of recent VET and higher education completions). Thisenables a comparison between supply and demand to estimate gaps and imbalances.Workforce PlanningIn conjunction with the South Australian Centre for Economic Studies and the Departmentfor Trade and Economic Development, DFEEST completed a comprehensive study into thefuture workforce and skill needs of the minerals and resources sector in South Australia.South Australia’s Minerals and Resources Workforce Development Plan draws on literature,research, consultation and a specially commissioned survey of firms to present a range ofstrategies which can be adopted by industry and government to ensure that the expansion ofthe minerals sector is not constrained by a lack of skilled workers. The study incorporates anew approach developed by WDD to model labour market imbalances within an industrysector.The directorate prepared a Vocational Education and Training Plan for the MineralResources Industry. The plan makes recommendations on the range of impacts theworkforce demands in the mineral resources industry will have on the vocational educationand training sectors.SACES was also commissioned by the Defence Skills Institute on behalf of the DefenceTeaming Centre, the state government and the Centre for Excellence in Defence andSystems Capability to aggregate and quantify current workforce capabilities and identifyfuture workforce requirements for the South Australian Defence Industry. The final reportwas forwarded to the department in December.Inter-jurisdictional workshop on workforce planningIn September DFEEST hosted the first inter-jurisdictional workshop on labour marketforecasting. The workshop, facilitated by Professor Sue Richardson from the NationalInstitute of Labour Studies at Flinders University, was attended by state, territory andcommonwealth government representatives and academic staff.The objective of the workshop was to share information about:• approaches to labour market/VET planning• labour market forecasting tools and models• how jurisdictions supplement information from models• learnings, best practice and technical issues.The workshop is informing a number of key national research projects and will also lead tomore collaborative approaches between states, territories and the Commonwealth on howlabour market information can be used to inform policy and program development, andresource allocation (particularly in the area of VET planning and addressing skill shortages). 70
  72. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006Industry Workforce DevelopmentThe Industry Workforce Development Unit supported a range of initiatives to Industry SkillsBoards.Industry Skills Board workforce planning activities were assisted by two Ageing WorkforceDevelopment sessions. These discussed demographic trends affecting the attraction andretention of older workers, and investigated subsequent risks and opportunities for business,while suggesting a framework to meet or offset labour demand.In July the formation of three strategic clusters from the nine existing Industry Skills Boards(including the provision of $150 000 for each cluster through the Workforce DevelopmentFund budget) was announced. The three clusters will assist with emerging workforcedevelopment issues across occupational groupings, dealing with workforce attraction,recruitment, retention and up-skilling programs to meet skill needs and shortages. WorkforceDevelopment Directorate staff have worked closely with each of the clusters to develop theCommunity Infrastructure Project, Defence Industry Project and Minerals Industry Project.Staff worked with the state’s nine Industry Skills Boards to assist industry and thegovernment to respond to the direct and indirect workforce demands (employment,infrastructure, accommodation etc) of specific major industrial developments. This projectwill develop a methodology and reporting format that can be repeated annually.DFEEST participated on the Senior Officers Group of the SA Early Childhood DevelopmentStrategy that is working towards the establishment of 25 new Children’s Centres in SouthAustralia by 2010. There are considerable workforce development implications for allstakeholders, including TAFE SA, Employment Programs and Traineeship andApprenticeship Services in DFEEST. The TAFE SA Health and Community ServicesEducational Managers and the Child Care Sector Strategy Steering Committee (working onchildcare skills shortages) are provided with regular updates on the progress of the Strategyand the opportunity to engage in dialogue on its implications for their work.The Industry Workforce Development Unit was instrumental in attracting Commonwealthfunds from the Targeting Skills in Regions program in South Australia to build skilledworkforces for engineering workplaces ($242 000) in the Upper Spencer Gulf, the seafoodindustry on the Eyre Peninsula ($176 000) and the forestry and transport industries on theLimestone Coast ($275 000).The unit provided executive officer support to the Ministerial Council on Education,Employment, Training and Youth Affairs (MCEETYA) Advisory Group on CareerDevelopment and Employment, the purpose of which is:• to test and refine the draft Australian Blueprint for Career Development (ABCD) with a view to developing a valid, reliable national framework and tools• to provide a focus for cross-jurisdiction collaboration on national career development initiatives and directions.Client Student Voice Action GroupIn late 2005 ministers responsible for training established the first of the Action Groups forthe national VET system, the Client and Student Voice Action Group. This short term groupwas established to develop recommendations on the best mechanisms to support ongoinghigh level advice on the needs of all learners, and develop performance measures andnational priorities for the multilateral and bilateral funding agreements. 71
  73. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006DFEEST convened the action group. It was chaired by the Chief Executive, with a smallsecretariat located in the Workforce Development Directorate. The group reported itsrecommendations to the Ministerial Council on Vocational Training and Education (MCVTE)in October.After extensive national consultation with a wide range of government, training, industry,union, and community stakeholders the action group recommended that three national VETAdvisory Taskforces be established to provide high level advice to the VET system on theneeds of all learners:• Disability Advisory Taskforce• Indigenous Advisory Taskforce• Equity Advisory Taskforce.The establishment of an Advisory Alliance, involving a leaders’ meeting between the Chairsof each of the Taskforces and an NISC member, was also endorsed by MCVTE.The Chief Executive accepted the nomination by the National Senior Officials Committee tolead the new Advisory Alliance and to Co-chair the National VET Disability AdvisoryTaskforce for the next two years. The first Advisory Alliance meeting was held in November.Improving Employment Outcomes for Young PeopleThe Workforce Participation Unit worked closely with Employment Programs, other parts ofthe department, DECS, other state and federal agencies and local community groups toimprove employment outcomes for all young people, with priority for those who are at risk oflong-term unemployment. In an effort to improve transitions from education and training toemployment the Workforce Participation Unit and Employment Programs established aYouth Commitment model trial in the Upper Spencer Gulf and North Western Adelaide. TheYouth Commitment model requires collaborative approaches between government agencies,service providers, industry and communities to develop programs and services that supportyoung people, especially those experiencing barriers to successful learning and workoutcomes.The trials also included the development of tools and resources to support communities andindividuals to improve learning and work outcomes. This trial saw the establishment of anInteragency Forum on Employment, Education and Training (IFEET) to address operationaland policy issues facing state and federal agencies. The Forum has agreed to undertakejoint strategic work in the Upper Spencer Gulf, focusing particularly on a CareerDevelopment Centre in Whyalla.Through the South Australia Works in the Regions Program, a Career Development Centrewas developed in Whyalla to be operational in 2007. The Career Development Centre formspart of the Skills for South Australia response and will offer a range of career services, inaddition to building a community resource centre around career and labour marketinformation. A focus on skills in demand and fostering close connections with the mineralsand resources skills centre is a priority. 72
  74. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006PERFORMANCE REPORTSIndigenous Training and EmploymentThe vocational education and training sector is increasingly the sector of choice forAboriginal people and the growth potential within this sector is extremely high. Thedepartment recognises that the acquisition of skills and access to training and meaningfulemployment are key factors affecting the social wellbeing and economic position ofAboriginal people in this state. It is committed to providing services and programs that willassist in increasing the health and economic wellbeing of Aboriginal people and contribute tothe long-term sustainability of their communities.Strategic Policy and AdviceThe department has a dedicated unit, Aboriginal Education and Employment Services,(AEES) responsible for providing strategic leadership and policy advice to the ChiefExecutive and the broader department to improve the educational, training and employmentopportunities for Aboriginal South Australians. Key areas of activity for the unit duringincluded:• developing strategies to improve the quality of Aboriginal vocational education and training and student transition pathways into the labour market• compiling the South Australian Government’s submission to the Senate inquiry into Aboriginal training and employment outcomes• monitoring the Aboriginal TAFE SA program leadership model and associated activities for a state-wide program for TAFE SA• negotiating the quadrennial funding agreement (2005-08) with the Commonwealth Government to secure supplementary support for Aboriginal TAFE SA programs• development of departmental Aboriginal Strategy including employment targets and initiatives.Port Augusta/ Whyalla/ Northern and Port Pirie Achievements• Certificate II Mining Operations was a great success. Fifteen students commenced, eleven gained certificates and 13 completed the course. There was a 93 per cent attendance for the six months and six students gained employment.• Certificate II Community Services Work (Health) commenced and progressed steadily. Six students will continue in 2007 and it is anticipated all will continue on to Certificate III.• Whyalla has a large enrolment and 23 students were accepted into the Goal 100 program that trains applicants for employment.• Port Pirie has produced multiple art displays. One in particular was displayed at the Northern Regional Art Centre and depicted art and weaving.• Some of the northern remote areas (Coober Pedy and Oodnadatta) worked with Oxiana mining company and assisted seven students to be employed at the mine.• Funding was sought from ICC to deliver a sport and recreation program and gave young people an alternative direction. This was a great success and activities included aerobics, abseiling, and water sports.• Staff delivered core certificates in IVE, Business Studies and Study Centre programs. 73
  75. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006Eyre Region Aboriginal EducationOverall the Eyre Region Aboriginal Education Program is in a sound position to meet theneeds of community and strategically improve the skills of a number of Aboriginal people infurther education and employment.• The Anagu community’s greatest need is to underpin individuals through the Family Wellbeing program.• The Scotdesco community is focused on enterprise and was guided and assisted by the provision of the Learning Pathways program and is creating a community based project around a bush food enterprise.• The Koonibba community has needed a range of skill-based short courses and in collaboration with the Aboriginal Education Program was successful in gaining funding to enable the provision of skill-based training to meet the needs of emerging employment prospects.• The Ceduna community and Aboriginal Education Program identified a growing concern at the disengagement of youth in learning. An Alternative Learning Options Program has been running for two years and is growing in strength and capacity to re-engage youth in the value of life long learning.• The Pt Lincoln campus in collaboration with all associated agencies, concentrated on a concerted effort to progress the capacity of individual employment prospects by developing numeracy and literacy skills.TAFE SA Aboriginal Education Ceduna campus accessed SA Works funding to providetraining in skill shortage areas. Courses include:• Primary Industries/ Aquaculture (Koonibba)• Introduction to Aquaculture and Boat Licence Training and Assessment• Engineering (Koonibba and Yalata Communities)• Employment Skills Training (Ceduna)• Careers Expo (Ceduna)• Alternative Learning Options Program (Ceduna).TAFE SA Regional – Riverland and Barossa Achievements• TAFE SA Regional Riverland Aboriginal Education Program successfully negotiated a partnership with the Riverland Regional Health Service Incorporated to deliver the Australian Accredited Family Well Being Program. This was in response to the Family Violence Partnership Program and Family Violence Regional Activities Program run through the Department of Finance and Administration. The Family Well Being Program is a counselling skills and personal development program originally developed specifically for Indigenous people and their communities. Due to the overwhelming success and high demand for the program, it is now being offered to the wider community.• The rekindling Indigenous Family Relationships Project was introduced in June. Introduction sessions about the FWB Program were presented to community members. Overwhelming support from the Indigenous population in the region resulted in student attendance being above 90 per cent over the past six months.• As at 30 December 24 students were participating at various stages of the program• Ten students successfully completed Stage 1. 74
  76. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006Study Centre programs• Four Study Centre programs ran in Gawler, Berri, Renmark and Loxton. Study centres for Indigenous students offer a safe learning environment for those who have low numeracy and literacy skills. Staff encourage and support students to develop new skills at the introduction level. Study Centres encouraged students to attain certificates that could further their education through TAFE SA. Ms Brodie Egan, from the Berri Study Centre won the NAIDOC Aboriginal 2006 Student of the Year for South Australia.PERFORMANCE REPORTSHigher EducationSouth Australia’s four universities, including America’s Carnegie Mellon University, play acrucial role in supporting and promoting the state’s economic and cultural prosperity.Universities in South Australia enrolled about 69 000 students. The sector continues tooperate in an increasingly deregulated and globalised market with local, national andinternational competition for students, staff and resources.Recognising the importance of higher education to the South Australian community andeconomy, a Higher Education Directorate was established within DFEEST in 2002. Thedirectorate is responsible for the coordination of activities to support the government’sstrategic directions for higher education as outlined in South Australia’s Strategic Plan, theEconomic Development Board’s Framework for Economic Development and the HigherEducation Council’s Action Plan.The Higher Education CouncilThe Higher Education Council (HEC), created in 2002, is chaired by the Minister forEmployment, Training and Further Education. Its membership comprises the ViceChancellors of South Australia’s three universities, a representative of Carnegie MellonUniversity, the Chief Executives of DFEEST and the Department of Trade and EconomicDevelopment (DTED), two representatives from business, and one community leader.In accordance with a recommendation of the Economic Development Board, a review of theHigher Education Council was undertaken by Professor Don Aitkin and noted by Cabinet inJanuary. The review recommended a more strategic role for the Higher Education Council.The council has approved an Action Plan for the next 12 months. The plan will assist thecouncil to better address higher education targets within South Australia’s Strategic Plan andto better identify collaborative activities between universities and the state government tostrengthen the higher education sector in South Australia.Responding to the National AgendaThe Council has provided advice to the government on a number of higher educationmatters including:• the revision of the National Protocols for Higher Education Approval Processes• improvements to credit transfer and articulation arrangements• the workforce implications from the Council of Australian Government’s (COAG) decision on health workforce planning• the effects of the introduction of voluntary student unionism 75
  77. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006• the impact of the welfare to work reforms on students and in particular those with a disability and single-parent students.University CityThe Higher Education Council was regularly briefed by the University City Project Team toensure South Australian universities would benefit from opportunities arising from proposalsto bring new overseas universities or courses to South Australia.South Australian Certificate of Education ReviewTo ensure that students completing the new South Australian Certificate of Education(SACE) meet the entry requirements of South Australian universities, the Higher EducationCouncil has consulted with DECS to incorporate the universities’ views in the structure of thenew SACE.These consultations are ongoing and the council will be involved through the implementationphase.University Collaboration Brochure and WebsiteAlthough competition between South Australia’s universities is recognised, the work theyundertake together is often overlooked. The Higher Education Council believes it isimportant that university collaboration is acknowledged and promoted. A brochure settingout examples of collaboration between the three universities in South Australia has beendistributed to business, government and community organisations. A website operating inconjunction with the brochure is also being developed at www.collaborate.sa.edu.au.Student Choices and Unmet DemandA research project was commissioned from UniSA to examine whether students areattracted to low-cost courses and whether adjusting the HECS fee will be a usefulmechanism for increasing demand in areas of workforce shortage. The study found that theprice of HECS fees had little bearing on the type of course a student selected.Further research will be pursued to explore whether students are deterred by the price ofHECS.Medical and Health Workforce DevelopmentThe Higher Education Directorate has collaborated across government, with universities andwith the professions in reviewing medical student admission processes and opportunities forSA medical graduates. Over the past two years it has successfully worked towards gainingan additional 60 Commonwealth funded medical student places for the state. The HigherEducation Directorate in consultation with the Higher Education Council also has beensuccessful in encouraging the uptake of additional nursing places by the state’s universities.In concert with the Department of Health further work continues on developing andimplementing COAG Health workforce principles.Joint Committee on Higher Education (JCHE) AchievementsJCHE is a national senior officers’ group that reports directly to the Ministerial Council onEducation, Employment, Training and Youth Affairs (MCEETYA). South Australia chairedthe JCHE and advised MCEETYA on:• revisions to the national objectives of the Australian Universities Quality Agency (AUQA)• best practice in credit transfer and articulation between the vocational education and training and the higher education sectors 76
  78. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006• revisions to the National Protocols For Higher Education Approval Processes and the development of guidelines to support the operation of the protocols• a proposal by the Commonwealth for the development of a national accreditation agency for higher education approval• workforce planning issues in response to COAG decisions• international education developments such as the Bologna process. 5UNIVERSITY ACCESS AND RETENTIONHigher Education Targets in South Australias Strategic PlanThe Higher Education Council and the Higher Education Directorate successfully negotiatedto revise the higher education target in South Australia’s Strategic Plan relating to universityparticipation for domestic students. A number of projects have been established to assistuniversities meet this target including strategies to improve student retention and to betterinvolve industry in supporting student placements. Development of the Premier’s vision forthe University City is critical to the success of this target.LegislationThe Higher Education Directorate has provided advice on the review of several pieces oflegislation. These include:• contributing to the review of the Training and Skills Development Act, 2003 by including the revised Protocols for Higher Education Approval Processes• providing comment and advice on the development of the Adelaide Park Lands Regulations 2006• preparing a departmental submission on the Crown Land Management Bill 2006 which argued for greater flexibility on the use of Crown Land by universities.Monitored Expenditure by Government Agencies on SA UniversitiesAs part of an ongoing commitment to monitoring government expenditure on SouthAustralian universities, a data collection exercise was implemented to determine levels ofexpenditure for the 2004-05 and 2005-06 financial years. The information will be used bydepartments to ensure government expenditure supports the achievement of targetsunder South Australia’s Strategic Plan.PERFORMANCE REPORTSScience and InnovationScience, technology and innovation are key drivers of economic growth and future prosperityfor South Australia. It is vital that the South Australian community becomes excited andengaged in using science and technology and in valuing the role of innovation in derivinggreater economic, social and environmental benefits for the state.The Science and Innovation Directorate supports the ongoing development of SouthAustralia’s knowledge economy by working in partnership with other government agencies, 5 The Bologna Process represents a commitment by 45 European countries to undertake a series of reforms in order to create an integrated European higher education area by 2010. 77
  79. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006and research and educational institutions, industry and community groups to develop andimplement policies and programs with a particular focus on research and innovation.Policy FrameworkThere are a number of targets in South Australia’s Strategic Plan that relate directly toscience and innovation. These targets are also linked to the state’s 10-Year Vision forScience, Technology and Innovation (STI10), which is the government’s main policyframework for building innovation as a central feature of the state’s economy and futureidentity. The vision comprises three interlocking strategies that have been designed to drivechange though major initiatives. The strategies are:• building capability and infrastructure• momentum through collaboration• developing people and communities.Building Capacity and InfrastructureThe availability of strategic research infrastructure is a key driver of the competitiveness ofthe state’s science and research base. It enables local scientists to undertake world-classresearch and increases the state’s capacity to attract high-profile scientists. The Scienceand Innovation Directorate plays a leading role by coordinating the state’s investment inresearch and infrastructure.National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS)In November the government committed $22 million over five years for nine nationallycollaborative infrastructure research projects in South Australia. This was matched by $28million in commonwealth funding provided under NCRIS with further contributions fromindustry and research institutions.The nine successful projects are:• a national plant accelerator designed to fast-track plant growth analysis and help researchers measure the attributes of plants and link these to their genetics, situated at the University of Adelaide Waite Campus• a microfluidics nanofabrication facility to enhance the state’s nanotechnology research capacity at the University of South Australia’s Ian Wark Research Institute• two new state-of-the-art microscopes to be installed at the University of South Australia and University of Adelaide that will link the state into a national microscopy network• a specialist food and beverage facility, to be located at the Australian Wine Research Institute, to research flavour and aroma chemicals in wine to address consumer needs• upgraded imaging facilities that will enable the Institute of Medical and Veterinary Science to become a central node in modelling human disease• an integrated marine observing system linked to a national coastal network monitoring and recording marine environmental changes based at the South Australian Research and Development Institute• a biofuels pilot plant researching the use of microalges for bioldiesel production also based at the South Australian Research and Development Institute• up-grading of BresaGen’s licensing facilities at Thebarton to attain United States Food and Drug Administration compliance• creation of a virtual library of mining samples and the establishment of a state-based geospatial node as part of a national satellite-based network to create an Australian Earth Model. 78
  80. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006Cooperative Research Centres (CRCs)The tenth selection round for funding under the Commonwealth’s CRC program commencedin late 2005 and continued throughout the year. The directorate coordinated the stategovernment’s involvement in the bids by adopting a whole-of-government approach andbringing together the relevant government agencies.South Australian researchers will be involved in five of the nine successful bids into whichthe Commonwealth will invest $157 million over the next seven years with fundingcommencing in July 2007. The CRCs will be involved with research in areas such asseafood, sheep industry, rail industry and agribusiness.Momentum through CollaborationA key role for the directorate is to foster high level collaboration across government agenciesand with the higher education sector, research organisations and the business sector inrelation to science, research and innovation.In providing this focus the directorate is involved in both the management of andparticipation in a range of projects and executive support functions.Premier’s Science and Research Council (PSRC)The PSRC was established in 2002 to provide leadership and independent advice to theSouth Australian Government on a wide range of issues surrounding science, research anddevelopment, and innovation including industry needs, priority areas for state investmentand opportunities for leveraging research and development funding. Executive support isprovided through the directorate.The council’s capabilities were broadened to include a focus on the defence/advancedmanufacturing and ICT sectors. Other areas of activity included:• a SWOT analysis of research in South Australia• providing advice on funding priorities for development and application of science and research across the state• establishing base-line performance data for each of the target areas identified in STI10• on-going support for the development of the Constellation SA concept• attracting greater Commonwealth investment in science and research to South Australia.Premier’s Science and Research Fund (PSRF)The government allocates $3 million per annum each year for the Premier’s Science andResearch Fund to support strategic research projects in South Australia. The fund operateson a competitive basis, with one round being conducted each year. Five projects werefunded in the 2005-06 round, representing a total government commitment of $1.91 millionover three years.Since 2003-04, the Premier’s Science and Research Fund has contributed over $11 millionto a range of research projects, including a robotics mentoring program for students, theSouth Australian Neuroscience Institute, research into a broad range of public healthconcerns such as safer pregnancies for mothers and research into the disposal of waste oilresidues.Chief ScientistThe position of the Chief Scientist was established in 2005 to:• provide strategic advice to the Minister, Premier and Cabinet 79
  81. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006• build the mass of research and development in the state by improving links between government agencies, academia and industry• raise the state’s research and development profile• help position South Australia to maximise Commonwealth funding opportunities.The Chief Scientist also co-chairs (with the Premier) the Premier’s Science and ResearchCouncil.Emeritus Professor Max Brennan was appointed as the state’s first Chief Scientist. He isformer Professor of Physics at Sydney and Flinders Universities; former Chair of both theAustralian Research Council and the CRC Program’s Science and Engineering Panel; and aWorld Bank consultant on higher education and research. His main activities for 2005-06included:• working with the Premier’s Science and Research Council to improve its effectiveness and the quality of strategic advice it provides to the state government• identifying the state’s research strengths, as a basis for provision of advice on optimising the benefits of state investment in research and development and innovation• liaising with the state’s universities in relation to collaboration and strategic development of the state’s research capability, including the attraction of Commonwealth investment• chairing the assessment panel for the 2005-06 round of the Premier’s Science and Research Fund and the selection panel for the Premier’s Science Excellence Awards.Constellation SAThe main initiative to emerge from STI10 is Constellation SA, which is a model forcollaborative innovation that will be delivered through the creation of innovation alliances andprecincts. Established to provide a focus for investment in research, Constellation SA aimsto bring together research, educational and industrial organisations in specific technologyand/or industry sectors. Constellation SA will be further developed in 2007.Mawson Institute for Advanced Manufacturing (MIAM)An important initiative undertaken by the directorate was the development of a businesscase to support the creation of MIAM. State government funding for the institute wasprovided in 2005 totalling $8 million over four years. The first $2 million grant was used topurchase scientific and engineering equipment. The directorate is also assisting theuniversity to obtain capital works approvals to enable building construction work tocommence in 2007.The benefits of the MIAM will include:• significant enhancement of South Australia’s research and development capacity in manufacturing technology – injecting new personnel, new resources, new technologies and a new approach to multidisciplinary research for manufacturing• becoming a significant attractor for world-class researchers• creation of an efficient interface between research and development providers and industry and adoption of an increased industry profile.Health and Medical Research Institute (HMRI)The Health and Medical Research Institute project involves the development of a researchfacility to focus research activity in relation to intergenerational health. 80
  82. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006The objective is to create a world class research facility that will build on the state’s existingresearch strengths in health and medical research. Cabinet approval to fund the conceptualmaster plan and business case was provided in 2005-06.Developing People and CommunitiesAn innovative culture is one that nurtures good ideas, supports entrepreneurship, rewardsenterprise and recognises the key role that science and research play in building a moreprosperous environment. Such a culture is critical for South Australia if it is to position itselfas a key player in science, research and innovation. The directorate supported a number ofprograms and activities aimed at raising awareness of science and innovation and skilldevelopment.Premier’s Science Excellence AwardsThe Premier’s Science Excellence Awards were initiated by the Premier’s Science ResearchCouncil to assist in raising the awareness of the importance of science, technology andinnovation throughout the broader community.Held as part of National Science Week in August the Hon Karlene Maywald, MP, Minister forScience and Information Economy presented the following awards:Research LeadershipLaureate Professor John Ralston FAA FTSE, Ian Wark Research Institute, University ofSouth AustraliaExcellence in Research for Public Good OutcomesAssociate Professor David Cleland Paton, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences,University of AdelaideExcellence in Research for Commercial OutcomesProfessor John J Hopwood, Lysosomal Disease Research Unit, Department of GeneticMedicine, Children, Youth and Women’s Health ServiceScience Education and Communication ExcellenceMarine and Environmental Education, Kangaroo Island Community Education, Departmentof Education and Children’s ServicesScience Technology and Innovation Management ExcellenceDr Leanna Christine Read, CEO and Managing Director, TGR BioSciences Pty Ltd.Innovation AwarenessThis program aims to improve the community’s understanding of the importance of science,technology and innovation to the state’s economic, social and environmental wellbeing.The following initiatives were supported under the Innov8 program:• Australian Innovation Festival• Australian Science and Mathematics Scholarships• Commercialisation Expo• Constellation SA• Entrepreneurs Challenge• International Agriculture Conference• National Science Week• Premier’s Science and Mathematics Teacher Awards• Science Outside the Square• Tall Poppy Campaign• Waite Festival. 81
  83. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006These initiatives provide a combination of awareness raising for the broader community andalso public acknowledgement for the high achievers this state has in science, technologyand innovation.Investigator Science and Technology Centre and CSIROSECThe Investigator Science and Technology Centre (the Investigator) is a not-for-profitassociation, established in 1991 to stimulate an interest in science, technology andengineering in school-aged children. In October, the Investigator announced it would ceasetrading. DFEEST provided assistance to enable it to wind down its operations by the end ofDecember.The government has made a commitment to continue its support for science education andresearch by expanding its existing relationship with the CSIRO Science Education Centre inSouth Australia. This funding will assist CSIROSEC to substantially increase the number ofschool students it currently reaches to nearly 60 000 per year.Nationally CSIROSEC is a network of nine science education providers spread across everystate of Australia. It offers a wide range of science education programs for students,teachers and families. The South Australian node of CSIROSEC is part of the DECS’Outreach Education program and CSIROSEC has been operating in partnership with thestate Government since 1985. PERFORMANCE REPORTS Information EconomyThe Information Economy Agenda for South Australia (IE Agenda) concerns responding toand managing the changes wrought by information and communications technology (ICT)across all portfolios and policy area and ultimately, South Australian society in general.The Information Economy Directorate provides a coordinated whole-of-governmentapproach to the development and implementation of strategic policy advice in relation to theinformation economy to support the government’s goals of economic development andsocial inclusion. The directorate works to maximise the benefits from the state’stechnological and innovation strengths and fosters information economy developmentswithin government, business and community sectors.The government has identified the information economy as providing significant value to thestate, in terms of the direct contribution of the information and communications technology(ICT) sector as well as efficiency gains in other sectors due to the use of ICTs.6The Information Economy Directorate has responsibility for:• leading a cross-government approach to the development and implementation of strategic policy advice in the areas of, information economy and ICT 76 Information economy is the term used to describe changes brought about by the accelerating power andconvergance of computers and telecommunications (collectively known as information and communicationstechnologies [ICTs]) since about the mid-1990s7 Excluding matters regarding government procurement and management of its own ICT service which is theresponsibility of the Department of Administrative and Information Services 82
  84. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006• providing advisory, secretariat and consultative support to advisory bodies concerned with various aspects of the Information Economy Agenda for South Australia, in particular, the Minister for Science and Information Economy’s Information Economy Advisory Board• developing and maintaining effective relations with key stakeholder groups in the public, private, research and community sectors• undertaking or facilitating projects and programs that: o raise awareness and understanding of the information economy among specific target groups o provide physical or social infrastructure support necessary for participation in the global information economy o facilitate bids for significant Australian Government grants.An abridged version of The Information Economy Agenda for South Australia was publishedand officially launched in early 2006.This document develops a basis for responding to the profound change inherent in theinformation economy and presents a framework to recognise and pursue topics that demandpriority attention and position the state to achieve present and future benefits. The priorityareas identified are infrastructure, industry development, social inclusion, skills and onlinecontent and applications.Improving Linkages with the Australian GovernmentThe department was involved in the fostering of collaboration with the AustralianGovernment through:• representation on the National Broadband Strategy Implementation Group• Online and Communications (Ministerial) Council Committee and its various committees and working groups.Information Economy Advisory BoardThe Information Economy Advisory Board (IEAB) was established by the Minister forScience and Information Economy in February 2003. Its role is to provide advice to theMinister for Science and Information Economy on the potential benefits of the informationeconomy to the state and on how to maximise the benefits.Membership of the IEAB brings together prominent individuals from community, industry,research and government sectors. The IEAB is supported by, and works closely with, theInformation Economy Directorate, ensuring that the advice provided to the Minister from bothentities is considered and consistent.The IEAB met four times and its key focus has been the development of an ICT IndustryStrategy. This is a joint initiative of DFEEST and DTED and is expected to be submitted tothe Minister for Cabinet endorsement in the first half of 2007.Broadband SASouth Australia’s Broadband Strategy sets the goal that affordable broadband services willbe available to all South Australians by 2008. A key element of this strategy is theBroadband SA program which includes the Broadband Development Fund (BDF) comprising$7 million (2003-08) for projects to enhance and extend the state’s broadband environment.The City of Salisbury Project was launched on 7 February. 83
  85. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006Projects in Coorong District Council region and the Barossa and Light region were launchedin September. Both projects will provide wireless broadband coverage over the region, withthe Barossa and Light project also delivering ADSL2+ services in the three townships ofTanunda, Nuriootpa and Kapunda.The Port Lincoln broadband project has commenced construction of optical fibre connectionswithin the town centres of Port Lincoln, Whyalla and Port Augusta with a new high speed linkto Adelaide. The project, managed by DFTEI, is funded through Commonwealthgovernment funds ($1.13 million), the carrier partner ($1.37 million), the AustralianGovernment’s Coordinated Communications Infrastructure Fund ($2 million) and BDF($140 000). The project is due for completion early in 2007.Mapping the state’s broadband capability is essential to determine priorities for the BDF andto provide a context for engaging the telecommunications industry and the community.Coverage maps for broadband in the state have been developed using newly acquired in-house Geographic Information System (GIS) capability, supported by expertise fromPlanning SA. This GIS capability has enabled the Broadband SA team to quickly respond toand provide independent quantitative analysis on broadband coverage, broadband demandand take-up from regions where BDF-supported projects are active, and assist regions withpreparation of Expression of Interest documentation.The State Broadband Demand Aggregation Broker, jointly funded by DFEEST and theCommonwealth Government, worked with regional organisations to raise awareness,stimulate and capture demand, and initiate broadband infrastructure projects. A smallportion of the BDF was allocated towards to these demand aggregation activities, enablingregional organisations to engage additional expertise.Further grants, generally between $20 000 and $40 000 each, were approved for thedemand aggregation projects for the Adelaide Hills, South East, Central Local Governmentand Eyre regions, and the Onkaparinga and Marion Council area and the Outback AreasDevelopment Trust land. All demand aggregation activities facilitated through BDF supporthave now successfully concluded and calls for Expressions of Interest for most regions hasresulted in preferred service providers being appointed.The Broadband SA team and the South Australian Telecommunications StrategyImplementation Group (SATSIG) continued to be involved in the consultation process withthe Department of Communications, Information Technology and the Arts (DCITA),regarding the Commonwealth Government’s Connect Australia program. In January aresponse to the Connect Australia discussion paper issued by DCITA was provided and aresponse to the Broadband Connect Expression of Interest was also provided in July.Feedback to DCITA, provided by the states and territories was used to significantly shapekey aspects of the Connect Australia program.The guidelines to the Clever Networks element of the Connect Australia program werereleased in September and submissions, including many from South Australia were lodgedin December with coordination and advice provided by the Broadband SA team.Submissions to the Broadband Connect Infrastructure Program, a $600 million element ofConnect Australia were also submitted by several service providers with an interest in SouthAustralia, by the December deadline.South Australian Broadband for Research and Education Network (SABRENet)The South Australian Broadband Research and Education Network (SABRENet) is anoptical-fibre telecommunications network constructed in metropolitan Adelaide to link the 84
  86. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006states major research and education sites, including university campuses, researchprecincts and teaching hospitals.The universities and the government formed SABRENet Ltd, a non-profit public companyformed to oversee the development and management of the network.DFEEST has responsibility for the liaison between SABRENet and the government, providesa director to the SABRENet Board, and contributes the membership portion of the annualSABRENet subscription fee.By December, the major backbones and most connections to participants’ sites werecompleted, making SABRENet one of Australias first and largest purpose-built ‘CustomerOwned Fibre networks’. Such networks are increasingly seen as best-practice for large,technically adept organisations with very demanding broadband needs – principally becausethese networks provide an infrastructure base upon which network owners can provisionvery high speed broadband services at very low cost when compared to commercialalternatives.The primary goal of SABRENet Ltd is to make high-speed broadband, and the applications itenables, more readily available to individuals and institutions across the states research andevaluation sector, including:• learning institutions• research institutions• students and their teachers• researchers.E-Business ProgramThe ebizSA Program aims to increase the effective use of online technologies by SouthAustralian small to medium sized (SME) businesses. The program provides funding supporton a dollar-for-dollar basis to help ensure that South Australian small businesses remainedcompetitive within an increasingly global economy.Recent projects include:• a number of e-business related seminars and workshops throughout metropolitan and regional South Australia, run in conjunction with Business Enterprise Centres and Regional Development Boards• as part of the E-Business for Exporters Program - a dollar-for-dollar funding program to improve online presence and transactional capabilities of emerging and existing exporters: o online selling and Marketing Workshops for SMEs within the Adelaide CBD o establishing a web portal for the Southern Business Associations’ Alliance• as part of the E-Business Collaboration Fund - a matching funding program aimed at targeted industry sectors. Projects within this program included: o undertaking a scoping study for a Centralised Ordering and Logistics System for the Wine Industry in the Southern Suburbs of Adelaide o enhancement of a centralised customer relationship management system to be used by Regional Development Boards and Business Enterprise Centres.ICT Industry StrategyThe ICT Industry Strategy is being developed under the guidance of the IEAB in response tothe economic development challenges of the South Australia’s Strategic Plan. Due for 85
  87. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006release in 2007, the strategy identifies priority areas for action that support both thecontribution ICT makes to the development of the state’s major industry sectors and thedevelopment of a strong local ICT sector.Digital Bridge UnitThe continued development of Digital Bridge programs acknowledges the growth of digitaltechnology and its significance to our society. It is imperative to ensure that individuals andcommunities have the opportunity to benefit from the use of online resources and services.The effective use of ICT is one factor to be considered in achieving social inclusion acrossSouth Australian society. To do this, it is necessary to address inequities in:• connectivity access to affordable and effective digital technology for all people• capacity the development of confidence, relevant skills and interest in using ICTs• content ensuring that the specific needs of community sectors and individuals are met by available on-line information and services.The Digital Bridge Unit has identified priority community sectors and is implementingprograms to address inequities. Programs are outlined below.• On-line delivery of government services, focussing on the accessibility of websites. In recognition of the e-accessibility theme of the United Nations Day of People with a Disability, a forum for web managers and other interested people was held in conjunction with the Office for Disability, at which a new Web Accessibility Community of Practice was inaugurated. In addition, a ten point check-list for web sites was launched. The overwhelming interest in this program is an indication of the need to ensure that access to on-line information and services is available to all.• The effective use of ICTs in Aboriginal communities has continued to be a major area of activity for the DBU. Work supported the continued development of the Wangka Wilurrara website to encourage culturally engaging online content and has also funded traineeships in IT for Aboriginal young people. The unit has provided input to national policy development as the South Australian representative on the Indigenous Telecommunications Services Working Group, and coordinated the David Unaipon Innovation Award as a DFEEST Reconciliation activity.• Rural and remote communities were supported by the Outback Connect Program which operates only in very remote regions. Basic IT training and technical support was provided using desktop conferencing. This innovative approach has further emphasised the role of ICT in building capacity in isolated communities through providing accessible and low-cost communication, online meeting facilities and education opportunities. This groundbreaking work of Outback Connect has identified further opportunities, and partner organisations have used desktop conferencing to support their own programs.• The impact and sustainability options for On-Line Access Centres in regional areas have been examined in a major research project which will recommend future strategies for the development and use of these centres as community hubs and service delivery centres.• e-Consultation through virtual meeting spaces was trialled as part of South Australia’s Strategic Plan consultation process, allowing people from very remote and isolated areas to be included in this discussion.• The not-for-profit sector continued to be an area of interest for the unit, with representation on the Board of Management of Community Information Strategies Australia Inc. and funding provided to conduct a survey of ICT capacity in this sector. The DBU continues to promote the crucial role of ICT in encouraging innovation and efficiency in the community sector. 86
  88. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006Support for ICT Industry BodiesThe ICT sector is a major contributor to South Australia’s economic growth both as anindustry in its own right and as an enabler for other industry sectors. The departmentprovided funding under a performance based contract to the Electronics Industry Associationfor its education initiative (ei2) which aims to:• promote University Shared Expertise by building on the current availability of shared courses and escalating the uptake of these courses by university students• implement an industry based Internship Program for senior students• foster TAFE/university and industry collaboration in curriculum development and learning pathways• further develop mentoring, cadetship and work experience programs to prepare students for careers in electronics• promote careers in electronics, particularly to primary and secondary school students• develop postgraduate and workforce development programs for electronics industry professionals and paraprofessionals.ICT SkillsThe department provided funding support to Women in Innovation and Technology as wellas departmental officers who acted as mentors for its mentoring program for females aboutto graduate from ICT studies.e-researche-research is a term used to encapsulate research activities that use a spectrum ofadvanced ICT capabilities.In response to the release by the commonwealth government of a strategic framework fordeveloping Australia’s e-research capability, the department established the E-Research SABoard and a working committee comprising representatives from the state’s universities andpublic research institutions to coordinate South Australia’s interests in e-research.The E-Research SA Board submitted a response to the National E-Research StrategicFramework in June. The department convened an e-research workshop in September towhich members of the state’s research community were invited and which featuredpresenters from key national initiatives in the e-research and middleware space.e-learningThe e-learning landscape in South Australia is a complex one. A clear view of activityoccurring, and the coordination of the activity is crucial. As a first step in moving towards acoordinated approach to e-learning in SA, a mapping exercise was undertaken. It isexpected that this mapping will underpin development of supportive initiatives andcollaborative mechanisms in 2007, such as the development or extension of communities ofpractice.It is anticipated that the final map will be a web-enabled and accessible tool to assist policymakers across the state.Mobile Entertainment Growth Alliance South Australia (mEgaSA)mEgaSA is a collaborative group comprised of private sector, education and governmentbodies operating under one banner, and aims to increase: 87
  89. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006• the size and capability of the mobile applications and content industry in South Australia• exports of mobile entertainment and application products from South Australia.A key component of mEgaSA was the presentation of the inaugural incubator program, inwhich approximately 35 participants were given intensive tuition and mentoring on topicsfrom ideas generation and developing marketing and business plans to fast-tracking newproducts and solutions for the rapidly growing mobile content industry.The department was the main financial sponsor of the incubator program and in kind supportin the form of staff time.PERFORMANCE REPORTSOffice for YouthThe Office for Youth joined DFEEST in April. The directorate’s work supports thegovernment’s vision that South Australia is a place where young people from all walks of lifechoose to live. This is achieved by providing a range of youth programs, policy initiatives andgrants.The work of the Office for Youth is framed by three key commitments:• strengthening partnerships between the directorate and the remainder of government, the youth sector and young people• young peoples engagement with government, their communities and in decision-making which impacts on their lives• the creative leadership of all young people and the celebration and encouragement of these achievements.Strengthening PartnershipsThe directorate continued to work across government to enhance opportunities for youngpeople to achieve their full potential. An example is the development of a Youth Servicesand Programs Directory. The directory provides information on the range of governmentservices and programs currently delivered to young South Australians and aims to assistagencies to avoid duplication of services, and to work more collaboratively.The directorate identified that engagement with young people across government is centralto advancing South Australia’s Strategic Plan objectives. OfY A-Team is a project that bringstogether young people working within the public sector to discuss, analyse and makerecommendations for change on specific issues affecting the community.The project aims to build the policy development capacity of the public sector with a focus ondeveloping or system-wide responses to policy issues that are inclusive of young people.The pilot OfY A-Team worked on youth housing with Adelaide Thinker in Residence, MsRosanne Haggerty. All ten OfY A-Team recommendations were included in Ms Haggerty’sreport on homelessness.The directorate delivered three youth policy forums to encourage innovative thinking anddynamic practice in relation to youth policy. The forums assisted in across agencyunderstanding of youth services and programs and how government and the community canbe more responsive to, and inclusive of, young people. Forums focussed on youth work, 88
  90. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006political perspectives and social policy, human rights, action research, making services moreculturally responsive and inclusive for young migrants and refugees and the activeengagement of students in educational decision-making and curriculum implementationthrough community-based learning.National Youth Week ran from Saturday 1 to Sunday 9 April. A total of 49 councils and 11non-government organisations participated in coordinating 105 events. Activities includedmovie nights, information and leadership forums, aerosol and skating workshops, artexhibitions and sporting competitions.Young Peoples EngagementEight Consumer Advisory Board members from Child, Youth and Women’s Health attendeda youth participation training workshop, held in Adelaide. Two young people participated andspoke about their personal experiences highlighting good practice principles in youthparticipation. These workshops were designed to increase the skills and awareness of theparticipants in the value of youth participation in their everyday business.The directorate conducted a youth participation training workshop for leaders of emergingcommunities at the request of Multicultural Youth SA (MYSA). The workshop aimed toidentify and break down barriers to youth participation within these communities.The active8 Premier’s Youth Challenge is a school based youth development program thatsupports young people’s engagement with their local community. A total of $500 000 ingrants was provided to 50 schools to engage 1191 young people. Participants participatedin leadership training, surf lifesaving, environmental conservation and arts.The Reach Your Dreams program targets young people from regional South Australia toparticipate in the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award. Twenty nine schools and 344 young peoplewere involved in the program, and of these, 84 students completed their Bronze Award and11 completed their Silver Award. Participants earn one South Australian Certificate ofEducation (SACE) unit for completing the program.The program engages young people with their local community and teaches valuable skillswhich help participants to complete their secondary education. Participants were fromdiverse social and economic backgrounds.Young people are engaged through the Youth Participation Register. The register holds thedetails of 157 young people who are between 12-25 years of age and are interested ingetting involved in youth participation activities. It provides an avenue for agencies to accessyoung, passionate people who want to help make decisions that impact on the community.Seventeen Youth Engagement Grants totalling $257 077 were provided to a range ofagencies that work with young people to conduct projects that increase young people’sengagement in the community. Funded projects addressed a range of issues includingparenting skills, settlement issues for refugees, alternative education options for Indigenousyoung people and development of youth space within regional communities.Creative LeadershipThe Duke of Edinburgh’s Award engages young people in a range of activities thatencourage physical activity, community service and skill development. The award consists ofthree levels (Bronze, Silver and Gold) and young people receive formal recognition for theirachievements at each stage. 89
  91. Section C DFEEST Annual Report 2006The total number of people registered in the program was 1598. Of these, 1102 participantscompleted their Bronze, Silver or Gold Award. The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award had a rangeof positive outcomes for participants including the involvement of young people in communityvolunteering, assisting young people to gain employment and helping participants to stayengaged in education and training programs.In partnership with local councils, Youth Advisory Committees (YACS) provide young peoplewith an opportunity to take a leadership role in their local community. YACS are groups ofyoung people who provide their views on youth and community issues that affect them.A total of $162 000 was granted to 54 local councils to support the YAC program. Activitiesincluded establishing youth friendly public spaces, environmental projects, culturalawareness campaigns, positive health promotion programs and transport initiatives.A total of 39 Youth Leadership Grants were provided to support young people’s participationin a range of leadership development activities including. Events included a presentation atthe Annual Australian and New Zealand Adolescent Health conference in Sydney,attendance at the United Nations Youth Association National Youth Conference, attendanceat the World AIDS Conference in Toronto, organisation of an Ethiopian Community SoccerTournament and a free music event for young people in the southern metropolitan region ofAdelaide. 90
  92. Section D DFEEST Annual Report 2006FEATURESDisability Action PlanThis section reflects the department’s performance in relation to the outcomes identified inthe Promoting Independence – Disability Action Plan for South Australia.Portfolios and their agencies ensure accessibility to their services to people withdisabilitiesThe department has a policy on the inclusion of people with disabilities and their accessrequirements.Accessible and inclusive strategiesThe Bridging Pathways State Implementation Committee developed a Strategic Plan for2004-07 to improve accessibility to VET for people with a disability. The committee includesrepresentatives from key disability bodies as well as specialist training service providers. Itswork was guided by national Bridging Pathways Blueprint developed by ANTA andcontinued by the National VET Disability Advisory Taskforce.Access auditing of facilities and servicesTAFE SA is audited under the Australian Qualification Training Framework (AQTF) and hasregistered training organisation status. Audits determine whether issues of disability areconsidered in delivery and assessment practices and selection processes. TAFE hascompleted a risk assessment against the Disability Standards in Education which ensuresstandard requirements have been effectively addressed.Information is provided in student information handbooks on services available for peoplewith a disability. This information was reviewed and improved in the 2006 SATAC Guide forTAFE.The department has a range of programs and projects for people with a disability including:• the Government Apprenticeship Scheme ($9000 subsidy to agencies for placing a person with a disability)• the Government Youth Traineeship Scheme ($10 000 subsidy to an employer)• ACE Community Education (programs that target people with a disability)• the Transitional Works Assistance Program (Disability Works Australia was funded to provide specialist services to jobseekers who have a disability)• Regions at Work.Participation rates of people with disabilitiesReliable statistical information pertaining to people with a disability in employment andtraining for South Australia is not readily available. The primary source of disability data isABS 4446.0 Disability in Australia.From records collected by the department a total of 74 people representing 1.87 per cent ofits workforce have been identified as having ongoing disabilities. Based on data collectedfrom students 6.3 per cent of South Australia’s VET students (or 7923 students) and 6.5 percent (or 5113 students) of TAFE students identified as having a disability. Of these 72.2 per 91
  93. Section D DFEEST Annual Report 2006cent of TAFE students and 55 per cent of VET students were enrolled in a certificate orhigher qualification. A sizable proportion of students in both VET (16.5 per cent) and TAFE(9.78 per cent) did not indicate whether they had a disability.Further statistical information is provided in the appendices to this report.Portfolios and their agencies ensure information about their services and programs isinclusive of people with disabilitiesThe department’s disability policy incorporates the principles of reasonable adjustment andthe provision of appropriate learning materials but does not currently address publications.The TAFE SA website remains priority one compliant in relation to government websitestandards and protocol requirements following upgrade work completed in August. A riskassessment project subsequently identified some technical areas that required further workto minimise barriers or difficulties with access to information. Work continues on ensuringalternative ways of viewing documents on the DFEEST website will enhance overallaccessibility of material.Information is provided to TAFE students in large print and/or with the use of computerassisted technology, translating and the use of Auslan. Where demand is identifiedinterpreters will be accessed, appropriate venues sourced and carers accommodated.Consultation in developing communication strategiesStudent feedback is sought through the TAFE SA website feedback mechanisms. Thefeedback is coordinated by the site administrator and incorporated into ongoingdevelopment.During the year the TAFE SA Access and Equity Committee:• developed and distributed a new information and contacts brochure and a handbook/student guide for students (and potential students) with disability in TAFE SA• contributed to the development of a new resource package for mature aged students with a disability produced by the Regional Disability Liaison Officer and disability co- ordinators across the state• provided input to the Social Inclusion Board project on pathways for students with disabilities into tertiary education• ran a series of student consultation forums• partnered with the university sector to provide Come and Try tertiary education forum for school students with disabilities• provided a large number of school information sessions on TAFE for students with a disability.Percentage of information and web sites accessibleActions are taken to ensure the TAFE SA website remains accessible by ongoingparticipation in accessibility forums. A new web platform will ensure that all departmentalsites when redeveloped over the next 12 months, will be priority one compliant. Furtherinformation on accessibility forums can be viewed at: www.innovation.sa.gov.au. 92
  94. Section D DFEEST Annual Report 2006Portfolios and their agencies deliver advice or services to people with disabilities withawareness and understanding of issues affecting people with disabilities.The department has developed and implemented regular education and training programsfor staff in disability awareness and discrimination issues.Training and resources developedThroughout the past three years TAFE SA has implemented an online workplacediscrimination and harassment training course for all staff including:• training of over 300 staff across in mental health first aid• training sessions on class norms for challenging behaviour and on reasonable adjustment under the Disability Discrimination Act, 1995 (c/w)• development of a toolbox for establishing class norms• development of an online blog for staff to share challenges and ideas in relation to disability issues .Portfolios and their agencies provide opportunities for consultation with people withdisabilities in decision-making processes and regarding service delivery andimplementation of complaints and grievance mechanismsConsultation processes included:• TAFE SA institutes operating a system of client feedback• TAFE SA representation on the Tertiary Education Network on Disabilities• specific customised training programs developed in consultation with relevant clients/organisations.Representation of people with disabilities on advisory committees• The chief executive has taken on the role of co-chair of the new National VET Disability Advisory Taskforce. The taskforce is one of three established by MCVTE to provide ongoing high level advice to the VET system on the needs of learner groups. The other two taskforces are focussed on Indigenous learners and other equity groups respectively. The chief executive is also the chair of the overarching Advisory Alliance comprising the Co-chairs of all three taskforces and a member. The group will advocate for the advice of the taskforces with both NSOC and MCVTE.• This commitment by the chief executive follows from his chairing of a 12 month Action Group project to determine the best mechanisms to provide the ongoing advice (the Client and Student Voice Action Group) which involved a broad based face–to-face consultation process across the country with stakeholder groups including peak bodies and students.Education strategies on customer rightsTAFE SA access and equity managers ensure a network of information sharing includinglegislative updates, professional development forums, information on websites and inductioninformation.Complaints processesTAFE SA has a formal grievance procedure in place that is available in print and on the web. 93
  95. Section D DFEEST Annual Report 2006Compliance with Disability Discrimination Act 1992 and Equal Opportunity Act 1984In relation to the development, implementation and evaluation of draft Disability Action Plans(DAPs):• TAFE SA institutes have developed DAPs and while complying with AQTF standards have been adapted to suit local campuses• lecturing staff are designing and implementing delivery and assessment plans and ensure inclusive practices.Programs and services being made inclusiveCompliance with the Disability Discrimination Act 1992 in vocational education and trainingterms ensures that reasonable adjustment processes and procedures are in place asrequired. This included:• instalment of hearing systems in all libraries and client service counters across a number of campuses• purchase of literacy/numeracy online package for staff and student access across a number of campuses• continuing upgrade of facilities and equipment such as purchase of adjustable desks and chairs, upgrading disability car parks and installation of automatic doors in response to feedback from students.Relationship of DAPs to Strategic PlansWork teams are required to address institute DAPs when formulating annual plans. A broadconsultation process was undertaken to assist in the development of a policy on access andequity. Equity and diversity are also addressed as a component of the department’sstrategic plan with specific reference to improving participation in the workforce for peoplewith a disability.FEATURESReconciliationDFEEST continued to actively progress the government’s commitment to Aboriginalreconciliation through a number of initiatives aimed at increasing cultural awareness,improving Aboriginal employment opportunities within the department and increasingvocational education and training outcomes for Aboriginal South Australians.Aboriginal EmploymentIn response to South Australia’s Strategic Plan target to increase the percentage ofAboriginal people in the public sector, the department continued the implementation of itsAboriginal Employment Strategy. By 2010, Aboriginal people will comprise 2.1 per cent ofthe DFEEST workforce and have a higher level of:• sustainable employment• non-school qualifications• representation in decision-making positions.This target was reached December 2006. An explanation of activity against the AboriginalEmployment Strategy is provided in the workforce section of this report. 94
  96. Section D DFEEST Annual Report 2006David Unaipon AwardsA review of the David Unaipon Awards was undertaken. Approval and funding was grantedfor the continuation of the awards which were established to:• increase awareness of the work of David Unaipon in the South Australian community• promote understanding of the interaction of science with traditional Aboriginal culture• increase awareness in young Aboriginal people of the value of science and technology for general interest or career development• generate innovative images to be used by DFEEST and other government departments for communications projects targeted at young Aboriginal people.Other InitiativesDuring the reporting year, DFEEST continued to encourage staff to participate in NationalAboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Day Observance Committee celebrations. Featurearticles and staff profiles appeared within editions of InsideDFEEST. Departmentalrepresentation was maintained on the Indigenous Telecommunications Working Group. TheOutback Connect initiative continued to deliver ICT training and awareness to Aboriginalcommunities in remote areas of South Australia. As part of this initiative several youngAboriginal young people were offered IT traineeships. A grant was also provided to the PortAugusta Youth.FEATURESEnergy Efficiency Action PlanThe following table provides the energy consumption data for departmental facilities for thefinancial year 2005-06: Energy Use (GJ) Expenditure ($) GHG Emissions CO² Base Year 2000-01 156 156 N/A 51 445 2005-06 162 966 5 371 523 34 249* Target for 2005-06 144 085 N/A 50 227 Target for 2010 132 733 N/A 42 396* *GHG Emissions based on December 2005 coefficient factorsThis represents an 11.65 per cent increase in energy consumption from 2004-05.Influences that have contributed to this result included:• seasonal fluctuations, as the state experienced two very cold winters and a prolonged and at times very hot summer which has placed additional demand on our air- conditioning services• increased usage capacity at various TAFE campuses: mechanical engineering and arts- related programs are currently experiencing strong demand and subsequent higher energy usage• increased collaboration with three universities to use TAFE campuses to deliver several higher education programs on their behalf• similar arrangements are in place with focused third parties with particular programs such as aquaculture and forestry for various TAFE campuses for delivery of their programs 95
  97. Section D DFEEST Annual Report 2006• electricity meters not previously recorded due to third party process issues• the cogeneration plant at Regency Park campus has been inoperative due to ongoing repairs, thereby not contributing to reducing that sites energy usage.The long term vehicle-fleet has increased in numbers; however, it consumed 9.27 per centless fuel than that consumed in the base year 2000-01, which is a positive result. The fleethas 26 per cent or 61 vehicles that are LPG capable.The following table provides a summary of our long-term vehicle fleet through Fleet SA for2005-06: Number of Fuel Usage Emissions Estimated Year Fuel Cost $ Vehicles (Litres) t/CO² Total Kms 2000-01 Base 147 656 111 494 185 1539 N/A year 2005-06 239 600 398 593 485 1559* 5 297 754 *GHG Emissions based on December 2005 coefficient factorsThe department’s initiatives included:• investigation of an Energy Performance Contract for our largest site to identify and implement energy initiatives that should guarantee substantial energy consumption savings and subsequent reduced greenhouse gas emissions and cost• investigation of further funding options to implement energy efficient capital/minor works for identified DFEEST sites• consolidation and relocation of the corporate sector of the department to the new five- star energy rated building, City Central in early 2007• an increase of the environmental awareness of our staff through focus groups, presentations and other media within the department• inclusion of energy management as a component of procurement policy and as a criterion of the prioritisation of funding through the minor works program• an increase in the use of LPG capable vehicles in the department’s long term hire fleet.Note: The greenhouse gas emissions in the department do not represent the same percentage change as the energy,primarily due to variations in the CO² emissions coefficient of the electricity supply system. The emissions coefficient isdependent upon a number of factors, most importantly, the mix of primary fuels used to generate electricity that is supplied inSouth Australia. Decisions about the mix of fuels are made as a function of the National Electricity Market and are thereforebeyond the control of the department.The department has endeavoured to provide the most accurate information from all possible sources available to it, and anyunintentional inconsistencies in these figures are beyond the department’s control. 96
  98. Section D DFEEST Annual Report 2006FEATURESContractsDFEEST’s internal purchasing and disposal delegations were reviewed and revised toreflect the increased $4.4 million delegation as approved by the State Procurement Boardlate in 2005.The role and composition of the Accredited Purchasing Unit (APU) was also reviewed. Asa result, the APU was superseded by the strategically focussed Strategic ProcurementCommittee (SPC). The SPC oversees strategic procurement operations within DFEESTand is responsible for the approval of acquisitions of between $220 000 and $4.4 million.The SPC is chaired by the Deputy Chief Executive, Employment and Training Serviceswho was previously the Chair APU.The following table depicts the procurements progressed in 2006: Maximum contract Departmental Procurements 2006 Approx Value period including ($’000) extension option Personal computers and laptops for whole of DFEEST 9 900 5 years Print control software 1 900 5 years Timber and panel board products 1 500 5 years Print and distribution of Childrens and Community Services learning materials 1 500 5 years Leadership development program 1 500 5 years Corporate livery 1 350 5 years Youth Conservation Corps 1 100 1 year Cash collection and banking services 900 7 years Printing of hair and beauty learning materials 700 5 years Budget and financial process implementation 350 One off purchase Supply of a printing and despatch service (SBTC) 325 5 years Approved storage provider 320 7 years Auslan interpreting services for the hearing impaired 300 5 years Printing and delivery of TAFE student enrolment forms 300 5 years Aviation purchase 220 One off purchase Digital print equipment 160 One off purchase Computer to plate (CTP) platemaker for Croydon Campus 145 One off purchase Removalist services 112 3 years ELICOS Phase 2 100 One off purchase Tractor for TAFE SA Adelaide South 85 One off purchase Energy audit 80 One off purchase 97
  99. Section D DFEEST Annual Report 2006FEATURESExternal ConsultanciesThe department’s expenditure on consultancies for 2005-06 was $668 154 (GST exclusive) andis detailed below. Consultant Purpose for Consultancy Less than $10 000 Total of 4 Various Subtotal $20 907 $10 000 - $50 000 Swinburne University Community Innovation Awareness survey. Adelaide Research & Innovation Pty Work/Life Balance Project: Presentation of the literature review and Ltd benchmarking analysis findings and delivery of survey (Associate Professor John Spoehr, Centre for Labour Research) Examining trends in women’s employment Professor Maxwell H Brennan Independent advice to the government in relation to policy matters dealing with science, research and innovation and is a leader in promoting strategic development of the State’s science and research sector Joan Russell Provides advice on the future directions for the Women’s Studies Resource Centre Toscana Consulting Facilitate and advise on whole-of-State eResearch proposal Eckerman Associates Establish policy and market developments for the provision of broadband infrastructure and services in the context of land management and development Australian National University Bibliometric analysis for Premier Science and Research Council SWOT working party Subtotal $156 639 Above $50 000 Colmar Brunton Intelligence Traineeship Apprenticeship Futures Project - examines proposals for improvements the system and make recommendations designed to enhance State ability to develop skills base, promote equity of access to skills and workforce development, and to reduce skills shortages The Teleran Group DFEEST Leadership Development Program - Assessment including supply and administration for 45 nominees - coach ready, leadership profile, leadership competency and program application forms PKF Organisation Development Independent advice for the budget and financial processes implementation project Subtotal $490 608 Total $668 154 98
  100. Section D DFEEST Annual Report 2006FEATURESAsbestos Management in Government BuildingsThe government has adopted guidelines for asbestos management in government buildings,which includes the requirement that agencies must report on their asbestos risk reductionprograms. As part of its asset management DFEEST, through the Department of Transport,Energy and Infrastructure (DTEI) is undertaking a programmed assessment of its sites.Details are recorded and maintained in on site and central registers and standard workprocedures are in place to manage asbestos items. DFEEST participated in a review ofreporting arrangements led by DTEI in 2006. It is expected that review outcomes will beimplemented for incorporation into the 2007 report.DFEEST manages 83 sites some some having six to ten buildings. None of these sites hasan asbestos item that has been recommended for immediate removal. Asbestos found to bein an unstable or unsafe state is removed immediately. Stable low risk asbestos containingmaterials are inspected annually and if any works are required to them the asbestos in thearea is removed as part of the works.The table below provides a summary of asbestos risk and removal activities: ASBESTOS – PRIORITY AND REMOVAL ACTIVITIES No of sites Quantification Site Asbestos Priority for in Priority of Activities Presence Risk for Risk Reduction Program: Activities (By item/By Status Assessment Assessment conducted during 2005-06 Area/By $) category 2 sites built post prohibition of use of asbestos - deemed low risk Insufficient data Urgent 4 2 jointly shared sites in remote areas - 0 coordinated approach agreed to assess – deemed low risk Unstable, Accessible; or Unstable, Urgent 6 0 Damaged or Decayed Unstable, Inaccessible; or 2 High 7 1 (41m ) Unstable, Partly Accessible Stable, Stable low risk asbestos containing Accessible; or materials are inspected annually and if 2 Stable, Medium 16 6 (764.1m ) any works are required, asbestos is Accessible, Initial removed as part of that work Signs of Decay Stable, Inaccessible; or 2 (480l/mts – Low 1 2 Stable, Partly 0.78m ) Accessible Not Asbestos Free 14 No activity required 0 applicable 99
  101. Section D DFEEST Annual Report 2006ASBESTOS RISK REDUCTIONA risk assessment template is maintained categorising risk into a six level hierarchy.This template provides a perspective on asbestos management to ensure high risk instancesare identified and appropriate remedial action taken. It is also used to facilitate crossgovernment comparisons in collaboration with the DTEI Asbestos Management Unit andprovides a percentage assessment of risk categories against the preceding year.The table below depicts this comparison for the reporting year. Site performance 1 2 3 4 5 Not score assessed Site risk level Severe Major Moderate Minor No risk Percentage of sites in category year’s 0.5 1.9 44.7 28.9 23.1 0.9 commencement Adjusted percentage after annual reduction 0.4 1.6 44.0 27.4 25.6 1.0 activityFEATURESAccount Payment PerformanceThe following table depicts the account payment performance for January to December 2006 Number of Percentage of Percentage of Accounts Value in $A of Particulars Accounts Accounts Paid (by Paid (by Number) Accounts paid Paid Value) 8 Paid by due date 83 251 79 185 455 021 79 Paid within 30 days 13 032 13 34 607 475 15 or less from due date Paid more than 30 8 093 8 16 096 897 6 days from due dateFEATURESFraudFraudThe department’s Internal Audit and Risk Management Review Unit provides assurance ofthe effectiveness of agency governance processes, control systems and review of riskmanagement initiatives. The unit coordinates its review activities in line with thedepartment’s governance framework.8 The due date is defined as per 11.2 of the Treasurer’s Instruction. Unless there is a discount or a written agreement betweenthe public authority and the creditor, payment should be within thirty days of the date of the invoice or claim 100
  102. Section D DFEEST Annual Report 2006One allegation of fraud was referred by the unit to South Australia Police. As a result of theaudit investigation, the officer concerned left the department.FEATURESOverseas TravelThe following table depicts overseas travel by employees during 2006, includingdestinations, costs and reasons for travel.Employee Cost to Destination/s Reasons for Travels Involved department ($)* 1 Austria Business Development 18 825 1 Bangkok Participate in Promotional Exhibitions e.g. International 5 059 Careers Exhibition, Austrade - Study in Australia Exhibition, etc. Recruitment of International Students 10 China Participate in Promotional Exhibitions e.g. International 63 476 Careers Exhibition, Austrade - Study in Australia Exhibition, etc. Recruitment of International Students Discussion with Tertiary Institution(s) of country visited Business Development Off-shore delivery of course/program 1 Denmark Attendance at workshop / conference 2 083 Presenting papers at conference 2 Dubai Discussion with Tertiary Institution(s) of country visited 15 086 Business Development Project Management 4 Hong Kong Participate in Promotional Exhibitions e.g. International 36 642 Careers Exhibition, Austrade - Study in Australia Exhibition, etc. Recruitment of International Students Business Development 3 India Participate in Promotional Exhibitions e.g. International 18 121 Careers Exhibition, Austrade - Study in Australia Exhibition, etc. Recruitment of International Students Business Development 1 Italy Attendance at workshop / conference 3 018 Presenting papers at conference 1 Japan Participate in Promotional Exhibitions e.g. 9 358 International Careers Exhibition, Austrade - Study in Australia Exhibition, etc. Recruitment of International Students Business Development 1 Korea Participate in Promotional Exhibitions e.g. 6 909 International Careers Exhibition, Austrade - Study in Australia Exhibition, etc. Recruitment of International Students Business Development 3 Malaysia Business Development 13 303 Off-shore delivery of course/program 2 New Zealand Attendance at workshop / conference 5 442 Presenting papers at conference 1 Philipines Business Development 2 770 Project Management Off-shore delivery of course/program 1 Serbia Business Development 18 825 101
  103. Section D DFEEST Annual Report 2006 4 Singapore Recruitment of International Students 22 011 Business Development Facilitating at workshop Off-shore delivery of course/program 1 Singapore and Malaysia Participate in Promotional Exhibitions e.g. 4 093 International Careers Exhibition, Austrade - Study in Australia Exhibition, etc. Facilitating at workshop Off-shore delivery of course/program 1 South Africa Recruitment of International Students 3 953 Off-shore delivery of course/program 2 Sudan Off-shore delivery of course/program 39 073 1 Taiwan Recruitment of International Students 12 997 Other reason not listed 2 Thailand Participate in Promotional Exhibitions e.g. 21 834 International Careers Exhibition, Austrade - Study in Australia Exhibition, etc. Recruitment of International Students Business Development Attendance at workshop / conference 1 United Kingdom Attendance at workshop / conference 11 302 Presenting papers at conference 1 Vietnam Participate in Promotional Exhibitions e.g. 11 765 International Careers Exhibition, Austrade - Study in Australia Exhibition, etc. Recruitment of International Students Business Development*Note that the cost to the department is gross expenditure and not net of incomeFEATURESUrban Design CharterThe department recognises the important role the institutes and campuses play in the localcommunity. The institute/campus structure provides significant input into social networksand reinforces local character. They are a physical resource and a landmark place ofactivity. The departments facilities management and capital works processes includeconsideration of urban design concepts. This helps support the building of communitycapacity and social capital through safe, accessible and welcoming facilities.Integrating Urban Design with our Core Systems and Procedures Consultant, contractortenders and contracts are managed on behalf of DFEEST by the Department of Transport,Energy and Infrastructure (DTEI). 102
  104. Section D DFEEST Annual Report 2006DFEEST has supported DTEI in the preparation of policies, including environmentallysustainable development (ESD) in major works that must be addressed for all major capitalworks projects. This policy details mandatory requirements and issues for consideration.This policy includes reference to the requirements of the Energy Action Plan.To initiate the engagement of consultants to undertake design work, a request to DTEI forconsultant engagement is completed by the Asset Management Unit. This providesDFEEST with the opportunity to define and /or request specific urban design principlesassociated with the project or request their investigation, including:• ESD initiatives to be considered• specific site issues such as cultural, political and heritage issues• corporate parameters (relevant policies, standards and guidelines)• specific consultant services required (for example tree audits, traffic management surveys, disability access, Indigenous/cultural issues).DFEEST interacts and communicates with the community through the institutes andcampuses. With respect to major projects, cabinet submissions, the Public WorksCommittee process and DAIS on behalf of DFEEST help ensure exposure to a wide range ofcommunity views and scrutiny.FEATURESFreedom of InformationThe Freedom of Information Act, 1991 confers on each member of the public a legallyenforceable right to be given access to documents held by the government, subject only tosuch restrictions as are reasonably necessary for the proper administration of thegovernment. It also enables members of the public to apply for the amendment of recordsconcerning their personal affairs if the records are incomplete, incorrect, out of date ormisleading.The structure and functions of the department are described elsewhere in this report. Thesefunctions affect the public through the direct delivery of the education, training, employmentand youth-related services provided, as well as through the purchase of such services fromprivate and community providers, the accreditation of training courses, the registration oftraining providers, the investigation of complaints about training organisations and accreditedcourses, the management of contracts of training, facilitation and development of the skillsbase in the State, the encouragement of the growth of science, technology and innovationbased industries and the uptake and usage in the community of online technologies andother ways of enhancing the economy of South Australia. The public can participate in thedepartment’s policy development in a number of ways. These include membership of TAFEcouncils and other boards and committees as well as by responding to calls for publicconsultation on particular issues.The department holds correspondence and administrative records including:• personnel records• accounts records• payroll records• supply records• facilities management records 103
  105. Section D DFEEST Annual Report 2006• students’ records in TAFE institutes• student services records• records relating to accredited training courses• complaints made about registered training providers and accredited courses• records relating to registered training providers and contracts of training• contracts• records relating to grants of funding• surveys and statistics.Records are held in a variety of media including paper, microfiche and electronic formats.Information and explanatory documents about courses, contracts of training, courseaccreditation and training organisation registration, youth services, science, innovation andinformation economy are available free of charge from the following websites.• TAFE: http://www.tafe.sa.edu.au/• Information on accreditation/registration and contracts of training: http://www.training.sa.gov.au/• Higher education accreditation: http://www.aqf.edu.au/• Adult Community Education Grants: http://www.training.sa.gov.au/OVETstudents/pages/default/fundace/• User Choice policy located under the User Choice submenu: http://www.training.sa.gov.au/OVETorgs/• Training and Skills Commission guidelines: http://www.employment.sa.gov.au/employ/ o Click on the Traineeships/Apprenticeships submenu o Now click on the ‘downloadable documents’ submenu o Scroll to the bottom of the page and click on ‘Training and Skills Commission guidelines.’• Office for Youth: http://www.officeforyouth.sa.gov.au• Science, Innovation and Information Economy information: http://www.innovation.sa.gov.au• General DFEEST website: http://www.dfeest.sa.gov.auHard copies of documents are available from: Freedom of Information and Copyright Officer Legislation and Delegations Unit Department of Further Education, Employment Science and Technology GPO Box 320 ADELAIDE SA 5001 Telephone inquiries can be made on (08) 8226 3276.Public Access to DocumentsApplications under the Freedom of Information Act 1991 (FOI Act) must be made in writing,specifying that they are made under the FOI Act, include an address in Australia to whichcorrespondence may be sent, be accompanied by either the prescribed application fee orproof of financial hardship and should be addressed to: 104
  106. Section D DFEEST Annual Report 2006 The Accredited FOI Officer Legislation and Delegations Unit Department of Further Education, Employment Science and Technology GPO Box 320 ADELAIDE SA 5001 Telephone inquiries can be made on (08) 8226 3276.Access RequestsThe department received seven and processed six applications under the FOI Act. Twoother applications were carried forward from 2005 and processed in 2006.Policy DocumentsDepartmental policy documents are available via the internet at: http://www.tafe.sa.edu.au/about/pages/About http://www.saworks.sa.gov.au/ http://www.youthworks.sa.gov.au http://www.officeforyouth.sa.gov.au FEATURESICT ReportICT Strategic PlanThe Strategic ICT Plan was completed and will set a broad direction and trends in ICT for2006-08. Its development was in response to targets set in the DFEEST Strategic Plan. TheICT Plan was informed by global trends in ICT and education and aligns with whole ofgovernment client-centric and shared services initiatives. The five main objectives addressICT in teaching and learning, workforce skilling, ICT services, information management andinnovation. A number of exciting goals and initiatives are identified in the ICT Strategic Planthat will pave the way for future growth and development of DFEEST and its business goals.ICT ProjectsA number of significant projects were undertaken with affect upon the whole agency. TheEnterprise Directory Project, completed in 2005, is now supported by an Enterprise BackupSolution. This initiative provides transparency across the department in terms of file transferand access for staff and students at sites other than their base work area. The backupsolution reduces risk of data loss at a system level. A project dealing with development ofan Employee Self Service product has enabled staff to lodge leave forms and view theirleave entitlements through a web portal. This has resulted in a significant reduction ininquiries to Human Resources staff and Payroll Services. The TAFE Information Systemprovides course information to the TAFE SA website and SATAC. It has already provenbeneficial to students and staff across DFEEST with increased applications through SATACfor 2007 enrolments. The completion of the Online Enrolment System ready for fee forservice courses will be of long-term benefit and increases the flexibility in our enrolmentprocesses. The Records Management Project has put in place electronic recordsmanagement across Corporate DFEEST. TAFE SA will receive training and access to theRM software in 2007. 105
  107. Section D DFEEST Annual Report 2006Tele Learning Connections (TLC)Using the Tandberg Management Suite (TMS), registered DFEEST users and the externalusers of this service, are able to book video-conference sessions using TMS OnLine Access.An audio-conference system is also operational. This system allows multiple phone users tobe connected together in a multi-point conference phone conversation.TLC supports 42 educational and 26 meeting facilities across 44 TAFE SA campuses andcentral office locations. A total of 1074 students received all or part of their learning by videoconference with 214 enrolled at the Adelaide South Institute, and 860 enrolled at theRegional Institute. There has been an increase of 514 students over those using VCfacilities in 2005. The completion rate for the year of students using VC training was 80.06per cent.TMS records show that there are 1724 confirmed active bookings in the system, of which557 are for DFEEST staff meetings. This gives us an indication of the utilisation of thistechnology for departmental meetings, as well as for educational sessions in 2007. InSemester 2, there were 2275 bookings, inclusive of 290 Non DFEEST TLC client bookings.TAFE SA InitiativesThe future vision for TAFE SA is set out in TAFE Space. The report provides the brief thatwill steer decision making relating to capital infrastructure and ICT architecture for both e-business and e-learning in TAFE SA over the next five to 10 years. The vision was testedwith senior leaders and practitioners to identify the business process needs that were criticalto achieve the student/client centric environment of the learning community. Input from theconsultation process resulted in the report titled The Future Business Needs of TAFE SAand the Implications to Project Nova and other ICT Systems. This has been an essentialpiece of work to ensure the planning for a new a student information system was buildingrequirements for the future.Work commenced on determining the impact this future setting focussed on the impact thiswill have on ICT infrastructure and applications, so that DFEEST is building the ICTenvironment that will ensure the flexibility and service to students, industry and communitiesthat is fundamental to achieving the State strategic targets for Skilling South Australia.Recommendations identify areas for immediate action along with strategies for a longer termcoordinated approach to ICT infrastructure and application development for TAFE SA andthe broader VET system. 106
  108. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 2006FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE Income Statement for the Year Ended 30 June 2006 2006 2005 Note $000 $000EXPENSES Employee benefits 6 254,679 231,714 Supplies and services 7 133,865 140,271 Grants and subsidies 8 58,354 46,700 Depreciation 9 14,324 13,865 Net loss from the disposal of assets 16 - 127 Other 10,11 85 1,011 Total Expenses 461,307 433,688INCOME Commonwealth grants 12 100,772 91,026 Student and other fees and charges 13 69,711 73,076 Other grants and contributions 14 9,516 7,455 Interest 15 2,976 3,271 Net gain from the disposal of assets 16 479 - Other 17 6,276 6,288 Total Income 189,730 181,116NET COST OF PROVIDING SERVICES 271,577 252,572REVENUES FROM/PAYMENTS TO SA GOVERNMENT Revenues from SA Government 18 247,709 239,748 Payments to SA Government 18 3,589 55 Total Government Revenues 244,120 239,693NET RESULT BEFORE RESTRUCTURE (27,457) (12,879)NET EXPENSES FROM RESTRUCTURING 28 (335) -NET RESULT AFTER RESTRUCTURING (27,792) (12,879)THE NET RESULT AFTER RESTRUCTURE IS ATTRIBUTABLE TO THESA GOVERNMENT AS OWNER 109
  109. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 2006 Balance Sheet as at 30 June 2006 2006 2005 Note $000 $000CURRENT ASSETS Cash 19 47,382 52,734 Receivables 20 15,034 17,415 Inventories 23 1,952 1,439 Total Current Assets 64,368 71,588NON-CURRENT ASSETS Receivables 20 222 274 Investments 21 1,442 1,019 Property, plant and equipment 22 448,400 450,721 Total Non-Current Assets 450,064 452,014TOTAL ASSETS 514,432 523,602CURRENT LIABILITIES Payables 24 28,442 20,325 Employee benefits 25 17,068 13,227 Provisions 26 2,455 1,220 Other 27 5,761 2,611 Total Current Liabilities 53,726 37,383NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES Payables 24 3,348 3,729 Employee benefits 25 38,457 36,306 Provisions 26 6,557 6,048 Other 27 499 499 Total Non-Current Liabilities 48,861 46,582TOTAL LIABILITIES 102,587 83,965NET ASSETS 411,845 439,637EQUITY Retained earnings 388,161 415,953 Asset revaluation reserve 23,684 23,684TOTAL EQUITY 411,845 439,637The Total Equity is attributable to the SA Government as owner.COMMITMENTS 29CONTINGENT ASSETS AND LIABILITIES 30 110
  110. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 2006 Statement of Changes in Equity For the Year Ended 30 June 2006 Asset Revaluation Retained Reserve Earnings Total $000 $000 $000Balance at 30 June 2004 12,480 428,833 441,313Restated Balance at 30 June 2004 12,480 428,833 441,313Gain on revaluation of property during2004-05 11,204 - 11,204Net result for 2004-05 - (11,977) (11,977)Balance at 30 June 2005 23,684 416,856 440,540Error correction - (903) (903)Restated Balance at 30 June 2005 23,684 415,953 439,637Net Result before restructure for 2005-06 - (27,457) (27,457)Net result after restructure for 2005-06 - (335) (335)Balance at 30 June 2006 23,684 388,161 411,845The Total Equity is attributable to the SA Government as owner. 111
  111. Section EDFEEST Annual Report 2006 112
  112. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 2006 Cash Flow Statement for the year ended 30 June 2006 2006 2005 Note $000 $000 Inflows Inflows (Outflows) (Outflows)CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES CASH OUTFLOWS Employee benefits (245,781) (229,505) Supplies and services (131,868) (147,523) Grants and subsidies (58,354) (46,700) Other 2,903 (7,038) Cash used in Operating Activities (433,100) (430,766) CASH INFLOWS Commonwealth grants 100,772 91,026 Student and other fees and charges 68,312 71,979 Other grants and contributions 4,189 7,454 Interest received 3,033 3,354 GST receipts from taxation authority 7,624 4,347 Other 5,282 12,087 Cash generated from Operating Activities 189,212 190,247 CASH FLOWS FROM SA GOVERNMENT: Receipts from SA Government 247,709 239,748 Payments to SA Government (3,589) (55) Funds from other Government entities 5,327 - Cash generated from SA Government 249,447 239,693 Net Cash provided by (used in) Operating Activities 31 5,559 (826)CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES Cash Outflows Purchase of non-current assets (12,924) (2,951) Cash Inflows Sales of non-current assets 2,013 1,635 Net Cash used in Investing Activities (10,911) (1,316)NET DECREASE IN CASH HELD (5,352) (2,142)CASH AT 1 JULY 2005 52,734 54,876CASH AT 30 JUNE 2006 19 47,382 52,734 113
  113. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 2006 Program Schedule - Expenses and Income for the year ended 30 June 2006 Employment and Skills Formation Youth Science,Income/Expenses Vocational Higher Regulatory Employment Technology Total Education Education Services Development and and Training Innovation Youth Policy $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000ExpensesEmployee benefits 238,978 504 5,094 6,599 3,132 213 159 254,679Supplies and services 128,464 143 876 2,366 1,750 211 55 133,865Grants and subsidies 19,520 0 9 17,446 20,407 955 17 58,354Depreciation 14,324 0 0 0 0 0 0 14,324Other 81 0 1 2 1 0 0 85Total Expenses 401,367 647 5,980 26,413 25,290 1,379 231 461,307IncomeCommonwealth grants 99,295 0 18 1,186 273 0 0 100,772Student and other fees and charges 69,511 0 200 0 0 0 0 69,711Other grants and contributions 6,026 0 0 703 2,772 15 0 9,516Interest income 2,976 0 0 0 0 0 0 2,976Gain on disposal of assets 479 0 0 0 0 0 0 479Other 5,948 0 168 37 26 97 0 6,276Total Income 184,235 0 386 1,926 3,071 112 0 189,730Net Cost of Providing Services 217,132 647 5,594 24,487 22,219 1,267 231 271,577GovernmentRevenues from SA Government 194,753 677 5,567 25,313 21,354 27 18 247,709Payments to SA Government (3,589) 0 0 0 0 0 0 (3,589)Net (Loss) from Restructure 0 0 0 0 0 (289) (46) (335)Net Result After Restructure (25,968) 30 (27) 826 (865) (1,529) (259) (27,792) Program Schedule - Expenses and Revenues for the year ended 30 June 2005 Science, Technology and Employment and Skills Formation InnovationExpenses/Revenues Vocational Higher Regulatory Learning Total Education Education Services Workforce Development and Training and Employment $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000Expenses from Ordinary ActivitiesEmployee benefits 216,353 440 4,778 6,136 3,104 230,811Supplies and services 131,414 232 1,024 6,219 1,382 140,271Grants and subsidies 17,729 - 2 13,140 15,829 46,700Depreciation 13,865 - - - - 13,865Other 2,766 1 8 13 5 2,793Total Expenses from Ordinary Activities 382,127 673 5,812 25,508 20,320 434,440Revenues from Ordinary ActivitiesCommonwealth grants 89,730 - 1,084 212 91,026Student and other fees and charges 73,076 - - - - 73,076Other grants and contributions 4,959 - - - 7 4,966Interest income 3,271 - - - - 3,271Other 7,487 - 358 - 98 7,943Total Revenues from Ordinary Activities 178,523 - 358 1,084 317 180,282GovernmentRevenues from SA Government 195,266 623 4,011 22,083 20,253 242,236Payments to SA Government (55) - - - - (55)Net Result from Ordinary Activities (8,393) (50) (1,443) (2,341) 250 (11,977) 114
  114. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 2006Financial instrumentsCredit risk exposuresThe Department does not have any significant credit risk exposure to any single creditor. The carrying amountof financial assets recorded in the Balance Sheet net of provision for doubtful debts represents the Departmentsmaximum exposure to credit risk.Interest rate risk exposuresThe Departments exposure to interest rate risk and the effective weighted average interest rate for each classof financial assets and financial liabilities is set out as follows: 2006 2005 Weighted Average Floating Interest Non Interest Interest Rate Rate Bearing Total Total (%) $000 $000 $000 $000Financial AssetsAccrual Appropriation Excess Funds 5.71% 36,936 - 36,936 26,231Cash 5.37% 9,780 666 10,446 26,503Receivables - 15,256 15,256 17,689Investments - 1,442 1,442 1,019 46,716 17,364 64,080 71,442Financial LiabilitiesTrade and other creditors - 26,130 26,130 18,300Other liabilities - 2,084 2,084 1,028 - 28,214 28,214 19,328Net Financial Assets/(Liabilities) 46,716 (10,850) 35,866 52,114Net fair value of financial assets and financial liabilitiesThe net fair value of financial assets and financial liabilities of the Department approximates their carrying value.Credit standby arrangementsThe Department has a $2.8 million ($4.4 million) credit card facility with ANZ bank. The unused portion of this facilityas at 30 June 2006 was $2.3 million ($4.0 million). 115
  115. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 2006 Notes to the Income Statement for the Year Ended 30 June 20066 Employee benefits 2006 2005 $000 $000 Salaries and wages (including annual leave) 204,165 184,299 Superannuation 22,003 20,576 Payroll tax 12,792 11,636 Long service leave 6,455 11,499 Workers’ compensation 4,475 2,846 Targeted voluntary separation payments 3,496 34 Other employee related costs 1,293 824 254,679 231,714 Targeted Voluntary Separation Packages (TVSPs) Amount Paid to these employees: TVSPs 3,496 34 Annual Leave and long service leave accrued over the period 1,031 - 4,527 34 Recovery from the Department of Treasury and Finance 3,496 - Number of Employees who were paid TVSPs during the reporting period 33 - Remuneration of Employees The number of employees whose remuneration received or receivable falls within the following bands: 2006 2005 Number of Number of Employees Employees $100,000 - $109,999 58 56 $110,000 - $119,999 13 22 $120,000 - $129,999 4 9 $130,000 - $139,999 7 11 $140,000 - $149,999 7 6 $150,000 - $159,999 6 3 $160,000 - $169,999 4 1 $170,000 - $179,999 - 1 $190,000 - $199,999 1 - $200,000 - $209,999 1 1 $210,000 - $219,999 2 2 $220,000 - $229,999 1 - $230,000 - $239,999 2 - $250,000 - $259,999 - 1 $260,000 - $269,999 1 - $290,000 - $299,999 1 - 108 113 The total remuneration received or receivable by employees whose remuneration exceeded $100,000 was $13.7 million ($13.5 million). The remuneration includes salaries, employer superannuation costs, salary sacrifice amounts, and associated fringe benefits tax. It also includes eligible termination payments where the employees normal remuneration exceeded $100,000. For 2006, the above figures include 8 employees (7 in 2005) who resigned or retired during the year. 116
  116. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 20067 Supplies and Services 2006 2005 Supplies and services provided by entities within the SA Government $000 $000 Printing and consumables - 153 Minor works, maintenance and equipment 11,766 21,246 Information technology infrastructure and communication 10,642 7,121 Fees - contracted services (including consultants) 3,677 2,314 Trainee Reimbursements - 2,637 Utilities 787 1,683 Cleaning 7,484 6,349 Vehicle and travelling expenses 2,905 2,495 Rentals and leases 2,890 2,335 Other 557 565 Total Supplies and Services - SA Government Entities 40,708 46,898 Supplies and Services provided by entities external to the SA Government 2006 2005 $000 $000 Funding to non-TAFE providers for Vocational Education and Training 20,745 18,867 Printing and consumables 15,083 13,045 Minor works, maintenance and equipment 4,896 4,004 Information technology infrastructure and communication 8,944 17,681 Fees - contracted services (including consultants) 13,925 11,806 Trainee Reimbursements 992 2,556 Utilities 5,819 4,625 Cleaning 1,208 1,014 Vehicle and travelling expenses 4,670 3,533 Rentals and leases 1,158 1,744 Other 15,717 14,498 Total Supplies and Services - Non SA Government Entities(1) 93,157 93,373 Total Supplies and Services 133,865 140,271 (1) The total includes supplies and services paid or payable to SA Government entities where the amount paid or payable to the SA Government entity was less than $100,000. Consultancy The number and dollar amount of Consultancies paid/payable (included in supplies and services) that fell within the following bands: 2006 2005 Number $000 Number $000 Below $10,000 4 21 1 9 Between $10,000 and $50,000 7 156 9 198 Above $50,000 3 491 3 242 Total paid/payable to the consultants engaged (GST exclusive) 668 4498 Grants and subsidies 2006 2005 Grants and subsidies paid/payable to entities within the SA Government $000 $000 Employment Programs 3,734 487 Vocational Education and Training Programs 150 2,211 Science and Technology Programs 854 8,911 Tertiary Student Transport Concessions 6,737 6,147 Skill Centre Programs 180 - Other specific grants 9,533 70 Total Grants and Subsidies - SA Government Entities 21,188 17,826 117
  117. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 20068 Grants and subsidies continued Grants and subsidies paid/payable to entities external to the SA Government 2006 2005 $000 $000 Employment Programs 13,284 12,160 Vocational Education and Training Programs 9,755 7,101 Science and Technology Programs 11,340 6,994 Skill Centre Programs 1,942 829 Other specific grants 845 1,790 Total Grants and Subsidies - Non SA Government Entities(1) 37,166 28,874 Total Grants and Subsidies 58,354 46,700 (1) The total includes grants and subsidies paid or payable to SA Government entities where the amount paid or payable to the SA Government entity was less than $100,000.9 Depreciation 2006 2005 $000 $000 Depreciation expense for the reporting period was charged in respect of: Buildings and improvements 12,147 12,161 Plant and equipment 2,177 1,704 Total Depreciation 14,324 13,86510 Other expenses paid/payable to entities external to the SA Government 2006 2005 $000 $000 Reduction in the value of investments - 36 Allowance for doubtful debts and debt write-offs (204) 666 Settlement of personal injury claims 42 - Total Other Expenses - Non SA Government entities (162) 70211 Auditors Remuneration 2006 2005 $000 $000 Audit Fees paid/payable to the Auditor-Generals Department 232 248 Audit Fees paid/payable to entities external to the SA Government 15 61 Total Auditors Remuneration 247 309 Other services No other services were provided by the Auditors.12 Commonwealth grants 2006 2005 Recurrent grants $000 $000 VET Funding Act 75,935 71,417 Specific Purpose 8,236 5,612 84,171 77,029 Capital grants VET Funding Act 13,600 13,600 Specific Purpose 3,001 397 16,601 13,997 Total Commonwealth Grants 100,772 91,026 118
  118. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 200613 Student and Other Fees and charges 2006 2005 Fees and charges received/receivable from entities within the SA Government $000 $000 Sales/fee for service revenue 1,479 1,755 Student enrolment fees and charges 551 640 Other user fees and charges 144 60 Total Fees and Charges - SA Government entities 2,174 2,455 Fees and charges received/receivable from entities external to the SA Government 2006 2005 $000 $000 Sales/fee for service revenue 37,924 36,038 Student enrolment fees and charges 27,215 31,875 Other user fees and charges 2,398 2,708 Total Fees and Charges - Non-SA Government entities 67,537 70,621 Total Student and Other Fees and Charges(1) 69,711 73,076 (1) The total includes user charges received or due from SA Government entities where the amount received or due from the SA Government entity was less than $100,000.14 Other Grants and Contributions 2006 2005 $000 $000 Grants and Subsidies Revenue 3,807 4,523 Miscellaneous Contributions 166 376 Donations 216 68 Grants from entitites within the SA Government 5,327 2,488 Total Other Grants and Contributions 9,516 7,45515 Interest 2006 2005 $000 $000 Interest from entitites within the SA Government 2,958 3,253 Interest from entitites external to the SA Government 18 18 Total Interest 2,976 3,27116 Net Gain/(Loss) on Disposal of Non-Current Assets 2006 2005 $000 $000 Land and Buildings Proceeds from disposals 2,000 1,635 Less: written down value 1,249 1,714 Gain (loss) on disposals 751 (79) Plant and Equipment Proceeds from disposals 13 20 Less: written down value 285 68 Loss on disposals (272) (48) Total Assets Total proceeds from disposal 2,013 1,655 Less: total written down value 1,534 1,782 Total net gain/(loss) on disposals 479 (127) 119
  119. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 200617 Other income 2006 2005 $000 $000 Targeted voluntary separation package recoveries (SA Government) 3,496 - Assets recognised for the first time - 99 Share of net gains from investments 21 - Sundry income 2,759 6,189 6,276 6,28818 Revenues from/Payments to SA Government 2006 2005 Revenues from SA Government $000 $000 Appropriations from Consolidated Account pursuant to the Appropriation Act 247,709 239,748 Total Revenues from SA Government 247,709 239,748 Payments to SA Government Return of Surplus Cash pursuant to cash alignment policy 3,589 55 Total Payments to SA Government 3,589 55 120
  120. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 200619 Cash 2006 2005 $000 $000 Deposits with the Treasurer 36,936 26,231 Special Deposit Account with the Department of Treasury and Finance 9,780 25,854 Imprest account/cash on hand 666 649 47,382 52,734 Deposits with the Treasurer Includes funds held in the Accrual Appropriation Excess Funds Account and Surplus Cash Working Account balances. The balance of these funds are not available for general use (ie funds can only be used in accordance with The Treasurers/Under Treasurers approval).20 Receivables 2006 2005 Current $000 $000 Fees and charges receivable 13,715 13,633 Less: provision for doubtful debts 474 13,241 841 12,792 Prepayments 775 488 GST recoverable from ATO 876 3,759 Other receivables 142 376 15,034 17,415 Expected to be recovered more than 12 mths after reporting date Workers compensation receivable 222 274 222 274 Total receivables 15,256 17,689 Government/Non Government Receivables 2006 2005 Receivables from SA Government Entities $000 $000 Receivables 2,429 794 Workers compensation receivable 222 274 Other Receivables 100 241 Total Receivables from SA Government entities 2,751 1,309 Receivables from Non SA Government Entities Receivables 10,812 11,998 Prepayments 775 488 GST recoverable from ATO 876 3,759 Other 42 135 Total Receivables from Non SA Government entities(1) 12,505 16,380 Total Receivables 15,256 17,689 (1) The total includes receivables from SA Government entities where the amount received or due from the SA Government entity was less than $100,000. 121
  121. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 200621 Investments 2006 2005 Non-Current $000 $000 Shares in associated company (refer below) 1,442 1,018 Shares - 1 1,442 1,019 Associated Company Austraining Austraining International International Pty Ltd Pty Ltd $000 $000 Interest in associated company 400 400 Share of retained profit 1,042 618 Equity accounted amount of investment in associated company 1,442 1,018 Retained profits attributable to associated company: Balance at 1 July 611 * 706 Share of operating profit/(loss) after income tax 431 (88) Balance at 30 June 1,042 618 * Austraining International Pty Ltd Austraining International Pty Ltd, which has a reporting date of 30 June, is controlled by the Minister for Employment, Training and Further Education. Its principal activity is to secure international contracts for work in vocational education and training. The current investment value is based on unaudited financial statements as at 30 June 2006. The figures are not consolidated as they were considered to be immaterial and unaudited at the time of preparing these statements. *The comparative closing balance as at 30 June 2005 was unaudited and, when subsequently audited, was revised to $611,000.22a Property, plant and equipment 2006 2005 Land and Buildings $000 $000 Land at Fair Value* 49,734 50,534 Buildings and Improvements at Fair Value*/Cost 621,109 625,622 Accumulated Depreciation (284,872) (276,787) Construction work in progress 10,307 1,118 Total Land and Buildings 396,278 400,487 Plant and Equipment Plant and Equipment at cost (deemed fair value) 31,795 28,822 Accumulated Depreciation (16,044) (14,959) Total Plant and Equipment 15,751 13,863 Libraries Libraries at valuation* 36,371 36,371 Total Libraries 36,371 36,371 Total Property, Plant and Equipment 448,400 450,721 *Valuations of land were performed at 30 June 2005 by the Valuer-General, buildings and improvements at 31 March 2004 respectively by the Department for Administrative and Information Services and libraries at 30 June 2005 by VALCORP Aust Pty Ltd. Impairment There were no indications of impairment of property plant and equipment, infrastructure and intangible assets at 30 June 2006. 122
  122. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 2006 Notes to The Balance Sheet as at 30 June 200622b Reconcilations Reconciliations of the carrying amount of each class of non-current assets at the beginning and end of the current financial year are set out below: Net revaluation 30 June 2006 30 June 2005 Increment/ Other Carrying Carrying amount Additions Disposals (decrement) Movements Depreciation amount $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 2006 Land at fair value 50,534 - 800 - - - 49,734 Land at cost - - - - - - - Buildings and improvements at fair value 282,919 449 - (2) 10,961 271,507 Buildings and improvements at cost 65,916 - - - - 1,186 64,730 Computing, communication equipment furniture and equipment at cost 13,863 4,350 285 - - 2,177 15,751 Construction work in progress 1,118 9,189 - - - - 10,307 Libraries at valuation 36,371 - - - - - 36,371 Total 450,721 13,539 1,534 - (2) 14,324 448,400 Net revaluation 30 June 2005 30 June 2004 Increment/ Other Carrying Carrying amount Additions Disposals (decrement) Movements Depreciation amount $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 2005 Land at fair value 49,012 - 1,575 87 3,010 - 50,534 Land at cost 3,010 - - - (3,010) - 0 Buildings and improvements at fair value 294,053 - 139 - - 10,995 282,919 Buildings and improvements at cost 66,669 413 - - - 1,166 65,916 Computing, communication equipment furniture and equipment at cost 13,812 1,823 68 - - 1,704 13,863 Construction work in progress 285 833 - - - - 1,118 Libraries at valuation 25,254 - - 11,117 - - 36,371 Total 452,095 3,069 1,782 11,204 0 13,865 450,721 123
  123. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 200623 Inventories 2006 2005 Current $000 $000 Inventories held for sale 1,377 1,439 Inventories held for distibution 575 - Total current inventories 1,952 1,43924 Payables 2006 2005 Current $000 $000 Creditors 22,409 17,050 Accrued Expenses 3,563 1,070 Employment On-Costs 2,312 2,025 Other 158 180 28,442 20,325 Expected to be paid more than 12 months after reporting date On-costs on employee benefits 3,348 3,729 3,348 3,729 Total Payables 31,790 24,054 Government/Non Government Payables 2006 2005 Payables to SA Government Entities $000 $000 Creditors 2,922 4,430 Accrued expenses - 488 Employment On-costs 5,662 5,754 Total Payables to SA Government entities 8,584 10,672 Payables to Non-SA Government Entities Creditors 19,487 12,620 Accrued expenses 3,563 582 Other 156 180 Total Payables to Non-SA Government entities(1) 23,206 13,382 Total Payables 31,790 24,054 Total Payables (1) The total includes payables due to other SA Government entities where the amount due to the SA Government entity was less than $100,000.25 Employee Benefits 2006 2005 Current $000 $000 Annual leave 7,738 6,674 Short-term long service leave 3,829 3,325 Accrued salaries and wages 1,520 630 Non-attendance days 3,981 2,598 17,068 13,227 Expected to be paid more than 12 months after reporting date Long-term Long Service Leave 38,457 36,306 38,457 36,306 Total Employee Benefits 55,525 49,533 The total current and non-current employee expense (ie aggregate employee benefit plus related on costs) for 2006 is $19.4 million and $41.8 million respectively. 124
  124. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 200626 Provisions 2006 2005 Current $000 $000 Workers compensation 2,455 1,220 Non-Current Workers compensation 6,557 6,048 Total Provisions 9,012 7,268 Carrying amount at 1 July 7,268 7,053 Additional provisions recognised 1,744 215 Carrying amount at 30 June 9,012 7,26827 Other Liabilities 2006 2005 Current $000 $000 Deposits 1,547 487 Unearned revenue 4,134 2,082 Unpaid personal injury claims 42 - Other liabilities 38 42 5,761 2,611 Non-Current Advances 499 499 499 49928 Net Revenues/Expenses from Restructuring During the 2005-06 financial year, the Department assumed responsibility for the Office for Youth from the Department of Families and Communities effective 1 April 2006. The following assets and liabilities were transferred resulting in a net expense from restructuring of $335,000. 2006 2005 $000 $000 Assets: Property, plant and equipment 19 - Liabilities: Employee benefits 354 - Net expense from restructuring 335 - The following amounts were recorded for the Office for Youth. Transferor Transferee Entity Entity Total Income 41 18 59 Expense 2,400 1,552 3,952 Net Result (2,359) (1,534) (3,893) 125
  125. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 200629 Commitments Remuneration Commitments At the end of the reporting period the Department had the following remuneration commitments: 2006 2005 $000 $000 Payable no later than one year 2,528 1,554 Payable later than one year and not later than five years 7,214 4,351 Total 9,742 5,905 Amounts disclosed include commitments arising from executives and other service contracts. The Department does not offer remuneration contracts greater than 5 years. Capital Commitments At the end of the reporting period the Department had entered into the following capital commitments: 2006 2005 $000 $000 These amounts are due for payment: Not later than one year 10,478 785 Total (including GST) 10,478 785 GST included in capital expenditure commitments 953 71 Operating Leases Commitments At the reporting date, the Department had the following obligations as lessee under non-cancellable operating leases. These are not recognised as liabilities in the Balance Sheet. 2006 2005 $000 $000 Payable no later than one year 3,109 3,243 Payable later than one year and not later than five years 1,185 2,720 Payable later than five years 93 142 Total (including GST) 4,387 6,105 GST included in operating lease commitments 399 55530 Contingent Assets and Liabilities The Department has no items which meet the definition of contingent assets. There are, however, a number of outstanding personal injury claims not settled as at 30 June 2006 with an estimated settlement value of $287,000. In addition, the Minister for Employment, Training and Further Education has provided a $3 million guarantee to Austraining International Pty Ltd which has not been invoked as at 30 June 2006. 126
  126. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 200631 Reconciliation of Net Cash provided by Operating Activities to Net Cost of Services 2006 2005 $000 $000 Net cash provided by Operating Activities 5,559 (826) Depreciation (14,324) (13,865) Bad and doubtful debts 204 (666) Net assets recognised for first time - 99 Gain/(Loss) on sale of assets 479 (127) (Increase) in employee benefits (7,422) (1,440) (Decrease) in receivables (2,214) (1,645) (Decrease)/Increase in Inventories 513 (1,004) (Increase) in payables (7,101) (135) Decrease/(Increase) in other liabilities (3,150) 6,730 Revenues from Government (244,120) (239,693) Net cost of providing services (271,576) (252,572) 127
  127. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 2006NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS1. AGENCY OBJECTIVES AND FUNDING(a) ObjectiveThe Department of Further Education, Employment, Science and Technology (theDepartment) serves the Government and people of South Australia by creating anenvironment in which all South Australians prosper as a result of having an equal opportunityto share in more and better jobs and learning opportunities by developing the scientific,research and innovative capacity of the State and developing the State’s workforce andcommunities.The Department undertakes a range of functions in order to meet its objective;• provision of strategic policy advice for developing the State’s workforce• ensuring high-quality vocational education and training is delivered by TAFE Institutes, private registered training organisations and adult community education providers• regulation of vocational education and registered training organisations, non-university higher education providers, and providers of English language intensive courses for overseas students• regulation, administration and funding of apprenticeships and traineeships• managing state-funded employment and community development programs• support the government’s strategic direction in the higher education sector• provision of strategic advice for science, technology, information economy and innovation policy development that links government with business, industry and education sectors• provide programs, grants and initiatives, and advocate and facilitate policies and strategies that create opportunities for positive outcomes for all young people in South Australia.(b) FundingThe Department is predominantly funded by State Government appropriationssupplemented by Commonwealth grants. In addition revenues are generated from salesand/or a fee for service basis. These include:• student fees and charges;• training for various organisations;• sale of curriculum material;• hire of facilities and equipment.The financial activities of the Department are primarily conducted through a Special DepositAccount with the Department of Treasury and Finance pursuant to Section 8 of the PublicFinance and Audit Act 1987 and to comply with the Skilling Australia’s Workforce Act 2005.The Special Deposit Account is used for funds provided by State Government appropriation,Commonwealth grants and revenues from fees and charges.(c) Administered FundsThe Department is responsible for the administration of the Minister for Employment,Training and Further Education’s, salary and allowances funded by Special ActsAppropriation. These appropriations are not controlled by the Department and hence do not 128
  128. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 2006form part of the controlled financial statements. Salary and allowances paid to the Ministertotalled $214,241.On 1 April 2006, the Department also became responsible for administering the Duke ofEdinburgh Awards which is an international youth development program available to allyoung people aged between fourteen and twenty-five. No assets or liabilities weretransferred to the Department. Since the transfer date the Duke of Edinburgh Awardsrecognised income of $139,000 and expenses of $13,000. Prior to the transfer date, theDuke of Edinburgh Awards had recognised income of $99,000 and expenses of $156,000.2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES(a) Basis of AccountingThe financial report is a general purpose financial report. The accounts have been preparedin accordance with applicable Australian Accounting Standards and Treasurers Instructionsand Accounting Policy Statements issued pursuant to the Public Finance and Audit Act 1987and other mandatory professional reporting requirements in Australia.These financial statements are the first statements to be prepared in accordance withAustralian Equivalent to International Financial Reporting Standards (AIFRS). AASB 1 Firsttime adoption of AIFRS has been applied in preparing these statements. Previous FinancialStatements were prepared in accordance with Australian Generally Accepted AccountingPrinciples.The financial statements have been prepared on the accrual basis of accounting and inaccordance with the historical cost convention, except as otherwise stated.The financial report has been prepared based on a twelve month operating cycle andpresented in Australian currency.In relation to liquidity/funding risk, the continued existence of the Department in its presentform, and with its present programs, is dependent on Government policy and on continuingappropriations by Parliament for the Department’s administration and programs.(b) Reporting EntityThe financial statements reflect the use of assets, liabilities, revenues and expensescontrolled or incurred by the Department in its own right.(c) Transferred Function as a result of restructuringOn 1 April 2006, the Office for Youth was transferred from the Department for Families andCommunities to the Department of Further Education, Employment, Science and Technology(see Note 28).(d) Comparative FiguresComparative figures have been restated on an AIFRS basis except for financial instrumentinformation as permitted by AASB1.(e) Income and ExpensesIncome and expenses are recognised in the Income Statement when the flow orconsumption or loss of economic benefits has occurred and can be reliably measured. 129
  129. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 2006Income and expenses have been classified according to their nature in accordance withAccounting Policy Framework (APF) II General Purpose Financial Reporting Framework.Income from fees and charges is derived from the provision of goods and services to otherSA government agencies and to other clients.Income from disposal of non-current assets is recognised when control of the asset haspassed to the buyer.Resources received/provided free of charge are recorded as income and expenses in theIncome Statement at their fair value.Grants are amounts provided by the Department to entities for general assistance or for aparticular purpose. Grants may be for capital, specific or recurrent purposes and the nameor category reflects the use of the grant. The grants given are usually subject to terms andconditions set out in the contract, correspondence, or by legislation.(f) Revenues from/Payments to SA GovernmentAppropriations for program funding are recognised as revenues when the Departmentobtains control over the funding. Control over appropriations is normally obtained upon theirreceipt and are accounted for in accordance with Treasurer’s Instruction 3 Appropriation.Payments include the return of surplus cash pursuant to the cash alignment policy paid to theDepartment of Treasury and Finance Consolidated Account.(g) Current and Non-Current ItemsAssets and liabilities are characterised as either current or non-current in nature. TheDepartment has a clearly identifiable operating cycle of twelve months. Assets and liabilitiessold, consumed or realised as part of the normal operating cycle even when they are notexpected to be realised within twelve months after the reporting date have been classified ascurrent assets or current liabilities. All other assets and liabilities are classified as non-current.(h) CashFor the purposes of the Cash Flow Statement, cash includes cash at bank and otherdeposits at call that are readily converted to cash and are used in the cash managementfunction on a day-to-day basis.(i) Employee Benefits and Employment Related ExpensesLiabilities have been established for various employee benefits arising from servicesrendered by employees to balance date. Employee benefits include entitlements to wagesand salaries, long service leave, annual leave and non-attendance days.Non-attendance days are accrued annually for employees engaged under the Technical andFurther Education Act 1976 but are non-cumulative. Employment related expenses includeon-costs such as employer superannuation and payroll tax on employee entitlementstogether with the workers’ compensation insurance premium. These are reported underPayables as on-costs on employee benefits (refer Note 24). 130
  130. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 2006Salaries, wages, annual leave and non-attendance daysLiabilities for salaries, wages, annual leave, non-attendance days and leave loading aremeasured and recognised at their nominal amount in respect of employees’ services up tothe reporting date.Long service leaveLong service leave is recognised on a pro-rata basis in respect of services provided byemployees up to the reporting date. In calculating long service leave entitlements theDepartment takes into account, as a benchmark, an actuarial assessment prepared by theDepartment of Treasury and Finance based on a significant sample of employeesthroughout the South Australian public sector. This benchmark is the number of years ofservice that produces a value equal to the actuarially calculated net present value.Long service leave liability entitlements have been calculated using an Education specificbenchmark of nine years, advised by the Department of Treasury and Finance, based oncurrent salaries and wages.Sick leaveSick leave is not provided for in the financial report, as it is non-vesting. However,entitlements are accumulated and any sick leave is considered to be taken from theemployees’ current entitlement.Fringe benefits taxThe Commonwealth Government levies a tax on certain non-cash salary related benefitsafforded to employees. Any fringe benefits tax which is unpaid at period end is shown as aliability in the Balance Sheet.SuperannuationThe Department makes contributions to several superannuation schemes operated by theState Government. These contributions are treated as an expense when they are incurred.There is no liability for payments to beneficiaries as they have been assumed by theSuperannuation Funds. The liability outstanding at balance date relates to any contributiondue but not yet paid to the superannuation schemes.Payroll taxPayroll tax is a State tax levied on total gross salary paid plus (non-cash) benefits andemployer superannuation contributions. The estimated amount of payroll tax payable inrespect of employee benefits liabilities is also shown as a liability in the Balance Sheet. Anyincrease or decrease in the level of required payroll tax provision is charged as an increaseor decrease in the payroll tax expense in the Income Statement. The payroll tax liability isonly payable when the employee benefits are paid.(j) ProvisionsA liability has been reported to reflect unsettled workers compensation claims. The workerscompensation provision is based on an actuarial assessment performed by the Public SectorWorkforce Relations Branch of the Department for Administrative and Information Services. 131
  131. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 2006(k) ReceivablesReceivables are shown at their recoverable value and reflect fees and charges which aredue for settlement within 30 days of the reporting date. At the end of each reporting periodthe receivable balances are reviewed and an allowance is raised in respect of any balancewhere recovery is considered doubtful.The allowance for doubtful debts is established based on a review of outstanding amounts atyear-end. Bad debts are written off when they are identified as irrecoverable.(l) InventoryInventories held for distribution are measured at the lower of cost (as determined by thelatest purchase price) and replacement cost. Inventories held for sale are measured at thelower of cost or their net realisable value.(m) LeasesThe Department has entered into a number of operating lease agreements, as lessee, forbuildings and other facilities where the lessors effectively retain all risks and benefitsincidental to ownership of the items held under the operating leases. Equal instalments ofthe lease payments are charged to the Income Statement over the lease term, as this isrepresentative of the pattern of benefits to be derived from the leased property.Details of commitments of current non-cancellable operating leases are disclosed at Note 29.(n) Property, Plant and EquipmentThe Balance Sheet includes all property, plant and equipment controlled by the Department.Assets are initially recorded at cost except for property, plant and equipment which isdonated, gifted or bequeathed is recorded at fair value at the time control passes to theDepartment. Assets received in this way are disclosed as revenue in the Income Statement.All classes of physical non-current assets with fair values at the time of acquisition equal toor greater than $1million and estimated useful lives equal to or greater than five years arerevalued at intervals not exceeding three years. The relevant classes are shown at revaluedamounts in the Balance Sheet.In accordance with APF III Asset Accounting Framework issued by the Department ofTreasury and Finance, the Department has elected to measure each class of non-currentasset on the fair value basis.LandLand is recorded on the basis of best use market value obtained from the South AustralianValuer-General as at 30 June 2005.Buildings and ImprovementsInformation was obtained from the Strategic Asset Management Information System(SAMIS), maintained by the Department for Administrative and Information Services.Buildings and improvements are valued at current replacement cost less accumulateddepreciation. Replacement costs have been established by reference to Quantity Surveyorsestimates. The valuations for buildings and paved areas are current as at 31 March 2004. 132
  132. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 2006The building data provided in the statements relates specifically to buildings and pavedareas.Buildings under construction are recorded as work in progress and are valued at cost.Library CollectionThe library collection is recorded at valuation. The most recent valuation was carried out asat 30 June 2005 by VALCORP Aust Pty Ltd, on the basis of written down current cost.Plant and EquipmentItems of plant and equipment are recorded at fair value less accumulated depreciation. Onlyindividual items costing $10,000 or more are capitalised and recorded in the Balance Sheet.Items under $10,000 are recorded in the Income Statement as an expense in the accountingperiod in which they are acquired.(o) ImpairmentAll non-current assts are tested for indication of impairment at each reporting date. Wherethere is an indication of impairment, the recoverable amount is estimated. An amount bywhich the asset’s carrying amount exceeds the recoverable amount is recorded as animpairment loss.For revalued assets an impairment loss is offset against the asset revaluation reserve.(p) Depreciation of Non-Current AssetsNon-current assets with an acquisition cost individually equal to or greater than $10,000 aresystematically depreciated using the straight-line method of depreciation over their usefullives. This method is considered to reflect the consumption of their service potential. TheDepartment reviews depreciation rates annually. Major depreciation periods are: Years Improvements Buildings Transportables 30 - 50 Fixed construction 40 - 106 Paved areas 15 - 45 Computing and communication equipment 3-7 Other plant and equipment 7 - 40(q) PayablesThese amounts represent liabilities for goods and services provided to the Department priorto the end of the financial year, which are unpaid. The amounts are unsecured and areusually paid within 30 days of recognition.(r) InvestmentsInvestments are carried in the Balance Sheet at the lower of cost or recoverable amount. 133
  133. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 2006(s) Financial InstrumentsFinancial AssetsCash deposits are recognised at their nominal amounts. Interest is credited to revenue as itaccrues. Interest is earned on the daily balance rates based on the applicable 90 day bankbill rate.Trade accounts receivable are generally settled within 30 days and are carried at amountsdue. Credit terms are net 30 days. A provision is raised for any doubtful debts based on areview of all outstanding amounts at balance date. Bad debts are written off in the period inwhich they are identified.Financial LiabilitiesTrade accounts payable, including accruals not yet billed, are recognised when theDepartment becomes obliged to make future payments as a result of a purchase of assets orservices at their nominal amounts. Trade accounts payable are generally settled within 30days.All Assets and liabilities are unsecured.(t) Accounting for TaxationThe Department is liable for payroll tax, fringe benefits tax, goods and services tax and theemergency services levy.Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of the amount of GST except that:• the amount of GST incurred by the Department as a purchaser that is not recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office is recognised as part of the cost of acquisition of an asset or as part of an item of expense; and• receivables and payables are stated with the amount of GST included.(u) RoundingAll amounts are rounded to the nearest thousand dollars ($’000).3. FINANCIAL RISK MANAGEMENTThe Department has significant non-interest bearing assets (cash on hand and receivables)and liabilities (payables) and interest bearing assets. The Department’s exposure to marketrisk and cash flow interest risk is minimal.The Department has no significant concentration of credit risk. The Department has policiesand procedures in place to ensure that transactions occur with customers with appropriatecredit history.In relation to liquidity/funding risk, the continued existence of the Department in its presentform, and with its present programs, is dependent on Government policy and on continuingappropriations by Parliament for the Department’s administration and programs. 134
  134. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 20064. CHANGES IN ACCOUNTING POLICIESExplanation of Transition to AIFRSIn accordance with the requirements of AASB 1, an assessment of the impacts of adoptingAIFRS has been completed by the Department and an adjustment has been included in theStatement of Changes in Equity to recognise a correction to the long service leave provisionin 2005.OtherA number of Australian Accounting Standards have been issued or amended and areapplicable to the Department but are not yet effective. The Department has assessed theimpact of the new and amended standards and there will be no impact on the accountingpolicies of the Department.5. PROGRAMS AND SUB-PROGRAMSThe programs and sub-programs presented in this report are:Program - Employment and Skills FormationDescription/Objective: To strengthen the economic prosperity and social well-being of SouthAustralia through strategic employment, skills formation and further education activities.Sub-program - Vocational Education and TrainingProvision of vocational education and training by TAFE institutes and other providers, outsidethe school sector (including publicly funded Adult Community Education), includingcontestable and non-contestable sources of funding; policy advice and support for post-secondary education.Sub-program - Higher EducationProvision of advice to the Minister on higher education policy and planning.Sub-program - Regulatory ServicesProvision of registration, accreditation and approval services for registered trainingorganisations, and the regulation, administration and funding of apprenticeships andtraineeships.Sub-program - Employment DevelopmentAddressing disadvantage by providing opportunities to participate in employment, training,skills development, adult community education and assisting industry to meet current andfuture skills needs.Program - Science, Technology and InnovationDescription/Objective: Provides the Government’s principal strategic focus for science,technology, information economy and innovation policy development and program delivery inSouth Australia that links the government, business, industry and education sectors. 135
  135. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 2006Program - YouthDescription/Objective: The Office for Youth initiates, advocates and facilitates policies andstrategies that create opportunities for positive outcomes for young people in South Australia.Sub-program - Youth ProgramsDevelopment of innovative policies and proactive strategies to further promote youthdevelopment and youth engagement within the community.Sub-program - Policy and Resource ManagementImplementation of efficient and effective client service and resource management practiceswhich optimise positive outcomes for young people. 136
  136. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 2006STATISTICAL APPENDICESAppendix 1: Vocational Education and TrainingThe annual figures for 2006 were not available at the time this report was prepared. Unlessotherwise stated, all VET data are related to the 2005 calendar year and includes all publiclyfunded VET activity, including VET in schools auspicing VISA.Number of VET StudentsIn 2005, 125 219 students undertook vocational education and training in South Australia.They comprised 51.3 per cent (or 64 281) of female students and 48.5 per cent (60 758) ofmale students with a further 0.2 per cent (180) of students who did not specify their gender.In South Australia, 11.4 per cent of South Australia’s working age (15-64 years) population 9participated in VET in 2005.The figure below shows that 63.1 per cent (79 054) of VET Students in South Australiaattended TAFE Institutes. VET Students by Provider Type, South Australia, 2005 VISA 7.6% Private Providers 14.5% TAFE 63.1% ACE 9.2% WEA 5.6% Source: NCVER (2006) PowerPlay Data CubesVETClient 2005.VET Students by Age GroupsThe figure below shows that the largest proportion of students undertaking vocationaleducation and training in South Australia were aged 19 years or under, with 26.3 per cent (or32 904 students) of total students, followed by those aged 20 to 29 years, with 24.7 per cent(30 874).9 ABS (2006) Population Estimates by Age and Sex, South Australia, Cat No 3201.0. As at June 2005 137
  137. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 2006 VET Students by Age Groups, South Australia, 2005 Not Stated Age 60 or over 3.6% 4.2% Age 50-59 Age 19 or under 9.2% 26.3% Age 40-49 15.4% Age 20-29 24.7% Age 30-39 16.7%Source: NCVER (2006) PowerPlay Data CubesVETClient 2005The largest share of male students were aged 19 years or under, with 28.4 per cent (17 235)of total male students, followed by those aged 20 to 29 years, with 27.8 per cent (16 913).Similarly, the largest share of female students were aged 19 years or under, with 24.3 percent (15 613) of total female students, followed by those aged 20 to 29 years, with 21.6 percent (13 908).Student HoursIn 2005, South Australia generated 22 764 134 hours of VET delivery, an increase of 1.3 percent (or 289 452 hours) on 2004 levels.The figure below shows the distribution of VET hours by the Australian QualificationsFramework (AQF). The largest share of VET provision for 2005 was at the Certificate IIIlevel, which accounted for 29.5 per cent (6 718 122) of total VET hours. VET Hours by AQF Level, South Australia, 2005 Subject only - no Other education qualification 13.5% 2.2% Non award Diploma or higher courses 18.1% 0.04% Certificate I 5.9% Certificate IV 15.5% Certificate II 15.2% Certificate III 29.5%Source: NCVER (2006) PowerPlay Data CubesVETClient 2005 and unpublished data. 138
  138. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 2006Field of EducationField of education defines the subject matter of an educational activity.The following figure shows the distribution of South Australia’s 2005 VET hours by field ofeducation. The field of education with the largest share of hours was management andcommerce with 23.0 per cent (or 5 238 126 hours). This was followed by engineering andrelated technologies, with 16.8 per cent (3 818 813) and society and culture, with 16.7 percent (3 803 561). VET Hours by Field of Education, South Australia, 2005 Health Education Management and Agriculture, Society and Culture 4.1% 1.3% Commerce Environmental and 16.7% Related Studies 23.0% 5.3% Creative Arts Architecture and 5.0% Building 5.1% Food, Hospitality and Engineering and Personal Services Related 8.6% Technologies 16.8% Mixed Field Information Programmes Technology 7.7% 3.9% Subject only - no Natural and Physical Sciences field of education 0.3% 2.2% Source: NCVER (2006) PowerPlay Data CubesVETClient 2005 and unpublished data.Training Package ActivityVET activity can be classified as training package activity or non-training package activity.In 2005, training package activity in South Australia accounted for 42.3 per cent of allstudents (or 52 956 students) and 62.0 per cent of total VET hours (or 14 121 541 hours). Incontrast, non-training package activity generated 57.7 per cent of all students (72 263) and38.0 per cent of VET hours (8 642 593).Of the more than 60 training packages used in South Australia in 2005, 15 training packagesalone accounted for over 76 per cent of training package student numbers (41 958 students)and nearly 75 per cent of hours (10 428 924 hours) – see the table below.The community services training package had the largest share of training package hourswith 14.4 per cent (2 037 976), followed by business services with 12.0 per cent (1 688 148)and hospitality with 7.6 per cent (1 073 299).When considering students, the business services training package had the largest sharewith 14.0 per cent (or 7439), followed by community services 11.3 per cent (5998), and retailwith 8.5 per cent (4498). 139
  139. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 2006 Top Fifteen Training Packages, VET Hours, South Australia, 2005 Training Package Hours Community Services 2 037 976 Business Services 1 688 148 Hospitality 1 073 299 Information Technology 852 654 Retail 799 958 Automotive Industry Retail, Service and Repair 593 082 Financial Services 516 062 Metal and Engineering Industry 477 744 General Construction 476 268 Tourism 424 426 Australian Meat Industry 336 522 Food Processing Industry 330 626 National Outdoor Recreation Industry 325 245 Transport and Distribution 283 031 Assessment and Workplace Training 213 883 Total (top 15 training packages) 10 428 924 Total (all training packages) 14 121 541 Total (all VET) 22 764 134 Source: NCVER (2006) PowerPlay Data CubesVETClient 2005 and unpublished data.VET Students by Country of BirthThe figure below shows that 68.7 per cent (or 86 069 students) of South Australia’s VETstudents were born in Australia, with another 6.0 per cent born in an English speakingcountry; 10.1 per cent (12 643) were born in a non-English speaking country; and a further15.1 per cent (18 945 ) did not state their background. VET Sudents Born in English Speaking Background (ESB) Countries, South Australia, 2005 Not Stated 15.1% Non English Australia Speaking 68.7% Background countries 10.1% Other ESB countries 6.0% Source: NCVER (2006) PowerPlay Data CubesVETClient 2005. 140
  140. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 2006VET Students by Disability StatusThe figure below shows that 6.3 per cent of South Australia’s VET students (or 7923students) stated they had a disability. The split between males and females with a disabilitywas roughly equal with 49.7 per cent of females (3938) and 50.3 per cent (3983) reporting adisability. Two students did not state their gender.In 2005, 77.2 per cent (or 96 691 students) of South Australia’s VET students reported nodisability and 16.5 per cent of students (20 605) did not state whether or not they had adisability. VET Sudents by Disability Status, South Australia, 2005 Disability 6.3% No Disability 77.2% Not Stated 16.5% Source: NCVER (2006) PowerPlay Data CubesVETClient 2005 141
  141. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 2006VET students by Aboriginal/Torrens Strait Islander statusThe following figure shows that in 2005, 3.5 per cent (or 4321 students) of South Australia’sVET students identified themselves as having an Indigenous background. Of these students,54.4 per cent (2349) were female and 45.6 per cent male (1971).In 2005, 80.6 per cent (or 100 887) of South Australia’s VET students reported that theywere non-Indigenous and 16.0 per cent of students (20 011) did not state their status. VET Sudents by Indigenous Status, South Australia, 2005 Indigenous 3.5% Non indigenous 80.6% Not Stated 16.0% Source: NCVER (2006) PowerPlay Data CubesVETClient 2005Provider Type and Funding SourceThe figure below shows the distribution of training activity (hours) by VET provider type.TAFE remains the largest provider with 76.7 per cent of total VET hours (or 17 454 848hours). Other registered private providers accounted for 17.2 per cent of VET hours(3 908 965), followed by VISA (4.1 per cent or 924 265), ACE (1.6 per cent or 363 790) andWEA (0.5 per cent or 112 266). 142
  142. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 2006 VET Hours by Provider Type, South Australia, 2005 VISA 4.1% Private Providers 17.2% TAFE 76.7% ACE 1.6% WEA 0.5%Source: NCVER (2006) PowerPlay Data CubesVETClient 2005 and unpublished data.The figure below shows that 86.4 per cent of total VET hours (or 19 792 275 hours) werefunded by Commonwealth and State recurrent funding in 2005. The next largest fundingsource was fee for service with 9.2 per cent of hours (2 092 601), followed by overseas full-fee-paying students with 3.3 per cent of hours (758 085) and Commonwealth and State-specific funding with 0.5 per cent (121 173). VET Hours by Funding Source, South Australia, 2005 Overseas full fee paying 3.3% Fee for service 9.2% Cw lth & state recurrent funding 86.9% Cw lth & state specific funding 0.5%Source: NCVER (2006) PowerPlay Data CubesVETClient 2005 and unpublished data. 143
  143. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 2006STATISTICAL APPENDICESAppendix 2: VET Recognition Data for 2005 and 2006Table 1 VET Registration 2005 2006 Summary • Total RTOs registered in SA for domestic delivery 257 261 a • Number of RTOs delivering to overseas students 23 27 • Number of RTOs also delivering Higher Education 16 14 courses • Number of RTOs operating in another State/Territory 108 93 • RTOs that remain suspended 3 4 • Number of RTOs with delegated powers 1 1 Approvals • Initial registrations 23 27 • Renewal of registrations 7 21 • Extension to scope of registration 92 103 • Number of qualifications TAFESA added to scope of 187 148 registration under delegation Refusals, Cancellations and Suspensions • RTOs that voluntarily withdrew registration 9 17 • RTOs that transferred to interstate registering body n/a 2 • RTOs that had registration cancelled by registration 0 0 authority • RTOs that had registration suspended by registration 1 1 authority • RTOs that had registration refused by registration authority: Initial registration 1 1 Extension to scope registration 1 0 Renewal registration 0 1 144
  144. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 2006 Audit Activity: Number of site audits conducted • Initial registration 23 26 • Renewal of registration 7 22 • Extension to scope of registration 44 44 • Compliance 17 14 • Overseas 9 6 • Complaint 8 8 TOTAL 108 120Table 2 VET Accreditation 2005 2006 Approvals • Number of courses accredited 10 9 • Number of courses accredited (TAFESA under 19 18 delegated authority) • Number of training package qualifications implemented n/a 165 in South Australia • Number of new qualifications made available trough n/a 209 traineeships or apprenticeships Summary • Total number of current accredited courses b 495 241Table 3 Higher Education Registration 2005 2006 Summary • Total number of providers registered in SA for 29 27 domestic delivery • Number of providers delivering to overseas students 19 20 • Number of providers which also deliver VET courses 16 14 Approvals • Initial Registrations 5 0 • Variation to Scope 9 11 145
  145. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 2006 Refusals, Revocations and Withdrawals • Number of providers who voluntary withdrew 0 2 registration 0 0 • Registration authority cancelled registration • Registration authority suspended registration 0 0 • Refusal of registration 1 0Table 4 Higher Education Accreditation 2005 2006 Approvals • c Number of courses accredited 47 123 Summary • Total number of current accredited courses 226 242Table 5 ELICOS Recognition 2005 2006 Summary • Number of providers who deliver English Language Intensive Courses to Overseas Students (ELICOS) 7 9 • Number audited for compliance 0 0 • Registration authority initiated cancellation of 0 0 registration a Does not include RTOs that remain suspended. Mutual recognition of training providers permits interstate providers to deliver in South Australia. The number of interstate organisations operating in South Australia under mutual recognition fluctuates and statistics are difficult to gather and therefore have not been reported. b Number has decreased due to continued implementation of National Training Packages, which ultimately reduces the need for State-based accreditations. c Number is higher this period due to a large number of courses requiring re-accreditation which occurs every Five years. 146
  146. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 2006 STATISTICAL APPENDICES Appendix 3: TAFE SA Data Educational Programs 2005 and 2006 This table depicts the student numbers, annualised hours curriculum (AHC – curriculum hours per subject) and the per centage success rate (module load completions (MLC – curriculum hours for successful results only) divided by the AHC) Educational Programs within TAFE SA comparing 2005 and 2006. Programs 2005 2006 Students Annualised Success Individual Annualised Success Hours Rate % Students Hours Rate % Curriculum CurriculumAboriginal Education 2 061 437 639 82 2 364 649 586 90Building & Furnishing 5 463 1 222 302 90 6 534 1 354 532 91Business Services 16 594 2 979 123 84 16 371 2 864 552 84Community Services 7 774 2 439 969 92 8 803 2 738 536 93Design, Arts and Information Technology 5 798 2 118 523 80 6 173 2 079 686 81Manufacturing, Engineering & Transport 11 410 2 135 453 88 12 759 2 370 771 90Primary & Allied Industries 6 340 1 227 277 92 6 817 1 259 364 94Tourism, Hairdressing & Beauty Therapy, 13 368 3 085 028 86 13 209 3 082 892 88Recreational SportVocational Education 15 641 1 817 502 80 9 560 1 282 104 79Total TAFE SA Programs 84 449 17 462 816 86 82 590 17 682 023 88Total Reconciled* 79 477 77 624 *Total TAFE SA student numbers are reconciled to allow for students enrolled in more than one educational program Fund Source Indicator Groups 2005 and 2006 This table depicts the student numbers, annualized hours curriculum (AHC) and the per centage success rate (MLC divided by AHC) by Fund Source Groups funding TAFE SA in 2005 and 2006 Fund Source Indicator 2005 2006 Students Annualised Success Individual Annualised Success Hours Rate % Students Hours Rate % Curriculum CurriculumState Recurrent 42 250 10 741 764 83 42 108 10 553 814 84Aboriginal Education 1 733 410 789 81 1 801 343 612 78User Choice 10 115 2 440 703 93 10 002 2 524 128 94VET in Schools 1 021 113 388 91 1 152 123 897 94Other Government 3 420 652 225 83 1 901 558 275 92Fee for Service (FFS) – 25 953 2 346 108 92 26 391 2 782 781 94Australian StudentsFFS - Overseas Students Studying in 1 099 697 637 86 1 204 740 456 86AustraliaFFS - Overseas Students Studying Off 333 60 202 85 114 55 060 90ShoreTotal TAFE SA all FSI 85 924 17 462 816 86 84 673 17 682 023 87Total Reconciled* 79 477 77 624 *Total TAFE SA student numbers are reconciled to allow for students enrolled under more than one fund source indicator group. 147
  147. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 2006Students by Age Group and Gender 2005 and 2006This table depicts the number of students by age groups and gender of two years, 2005 and2006 within TAFE Age Ranges 2005 2006 Female Male Total Female Male Total Under 15 years 110 99 209 58 39 97 15 - 19 years 5 903 8 173 14 076 3 628 5 250 8 878 20 - 29 years 10 900 13 582 24 482 11 358 15 394 26 752 30 - 39 years 7 840 7 981 15 821 7 279 7 770 15 049 40 - 59 years 12 081 10 259 22 340 12 727 10 632 23 359 Over 60 years 1 095 1 252 2 347 1 498 1 598 3 096 Age unknown 102 100 202 84 309 393 Total Students 38 031 41 446 79 477 36 632 40 992 77 624Student CategoryThis table depicts the number of students who reported at enrolment they had an ongoingdisability. Student Category 2005 2006 Students Annualised Success Students Annualised Success Hours Rate % Hours Rate % Curriculum Curriculum Students with a 5 137 1 214 652 80.48 5 539 1 303 993 82.32 Disability Total 79 477 17 462 816 86.00 77 624 17 682 023 87.00Level of Awards issued 2005 and 2006This table depicts the number of students who were issued with a parchment under variouscourse award levels from 2005 to 2006. Level of Award 2005 2006 Variation (%) Advanced Diploma 596 579 (2.85) Bachelor Degree (Pass) 88 91 3.41 Bridging and Enabling Courses 1 (100.00) Certificate I 1 579 1 483 (6.08) Certificate II 3 480 3 505 0.72 Certificate III 5 914 5 690 (3.79) Certificate IV 4 172 3 837 (8.03) Diploma 2 508 2 365 (5.70) Graduate Certificate 23 1 (95.65) Not Elsewhere Classified 2 20 900.00 Statement of Attainment 233 149 (36.05) Total 18 596 17 720 (4.71) 148
  148. Section E DFEEST Annual Report 2006STATISTICAL APPENDICESAppendix 4 – Glossary of TermsSTATISTICAL ANNEX AAP Aboriginal Apprenticeship Program ACE Adult Community Education ANTA Australian National Training Authority APY Anangu Pitjantatjara Yankunytjatjara AQF Australian Qualifications Framework AQTF Australian Qualification Training Framework BDF Broadband Development Fund BITS Building on IT Strengths CDEPs Community Development Employment Programs CRC’s Cooperative Research Centres CSIRO Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation DAPs Disability Action Plans DECS Department of Education and Children’s Services DEWR Department of Employment and Workplace Relations DFEEST Department of Further Education, Employment, Science and Technology DSTO Defence, Science and Technology Organisation EAP Employee Assistance Programs ELICOS English Language Intensive Courses for Overseas Students ESOS Educational Services to Overseas Students HEC Higher Education Council HPC High Performance Computing HPI Hourly Paid Instructor ICDL International Computers Drivers’ Licence ICT Information and Communications Technology MCEETYA Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training and Youth Affairs MCVTE Ministerial Council on Vocational Training and Education NCVER National Centre for Vocational Education and Research OHS&IM Occupational Health, Safety and Injury Management OHSW Occupational Health, Safety and Welfare RTOs Registered Training Organisations SABRENet South Australian Broadband for Research and Education Network SACE South Australian Certificate of Education SACITT South Australian Consortium for Information Technology Telecommunications SATAC South Australian Tertiary Admissions Centre STI Science Technology and Innovation STI10 10 year Vision for Science Technology and Innovation TAFE SA Technical and Further Education South Australia VET Vocational Education and Training VFWA Voluntary Flexible Working Arrangements VISA VET in Schools Agreements WEA Workers Education Association 149

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