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DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
DFEEST Annual Report 2007
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DFEEST Annual Report 2007

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The Annual Report represents an overview of DFEEST’s achievements, governance, workforce management and financial performance. It also outlines progress made towards achieving our objectives in South …

The Annual Report represents an overview of DFEEST’s achievements, governance, workforce management and financial performance. It also outlines progress made towards achieving our objectives in South Australia’s Strategic Plan.

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  • 1. 2
  • 2. 3
  • 3. 4 For further copies and enquires please contact: Department of Further Education, Employment, Science and Technology (DFEEST) Office of the Chief Executive GPO Box 320 Adelaide SA 5001 Telephone: (08) 8226 3821 Facsimile: (08) 8226 9533 The 2007 Annual Report is available on the DFEEST website at: http://www.dfeest.sa.gov.au ISSN 1449-6437
  • 4. 5Table of ContentsAgency Role and Governance Page Chief executive’s overview 8 Highlights 10 DFEEST vision, mission and values 14 Legislation, role and structure 15 Boards, committees and authorities 15 Governance 18 Structure of reporting arrangement 20Report On Operations Against DFEEST StrategicPlan And South Australia’s Strategic Plan Goal 1 - Ensure South Australians have the necessary education and skills to 22 participate in the high skill economy Goal 2 - Provide high quality employment and workforce development services 42 Goal 3 - Ensure young people are supported in reaching their full potential and 51 actively engaged in learning, training, work and in their communities Goal 4 - Provide a coordinated, whole of government approach to the development 57 of an innovative community Goal 5 - Build a high performance organisation 64Management of Human Resources Workforce data 69 Workforce diversity 71 Occupational health, safety and injury management 75Financial Report Financial overview 78 Audited general purpose financial report 81 Consultancy expenditure 119 Account payment performance 120 Contractual arrangements 120 Fraud 120
  • 5. 6 Table of Contents Profile of VET Activity Profile of VET Activity 121 Other Reporting Items Employees’ overseas travel 132 Disability Action Plan reporting 134 Asbestos management 135 Urban Design Charter 136 Freedom of information statement and statistics 137 Greening of Government Operations reporting 138 Carers Recognition Act 142
  • 6. 7Agency Roleand Governance Agency Role and Governance
  • 7. 8 Chief Executive’s making, processes and structure to enable TAFE SA to operate more successfully in an increasingly competitive Overview training market. The South Australian VET system continues to support I the skill development needs of many South Australians. On am pleased to present the Annual Report of the the latest data available over 121 000 students participated in Department of Further Education, Employment, VET in 2007 and almost 80 000 of these attended TAFE. Science and Technology for 2007. This year has Apprenticeships and traineeships activity was particularly been an exciting and pivotal one for the department, with a strong. There were an estimated 35 100 apprentices and number of major new initiatives developed together with new trainees in-training in South Australia, 2.3 percent higher business practices which have been introduced to improve than the 34 300 recorded at 30 September 2006. The effectiveness and efficiencies. I would like to acknowledge state’s in-training figure is the highest figure on record for the leadership and direction offered by Minister Caica. this state. The department’s activities continued in an evolving There were an estimated 21 700 commencements in environment of reform, both internally and through the South Australia over the year ending 30 September 2007, Council of Australian Governments in the context of meeting a 9.0 percent increase (or 1800) on the 19 900 apprentices skill challenges facing the state. We continue meeting these and trainees who commenced their training in the preceding challenges by delivering on economic, social and environ- twelve months (to 30 September 2006). Nationally, there mental goals set in South Australia’s Strategic Plan. was an increase of 4.8 percent for the same period. With the imprimatur of the Government, DFEEST There were an estimated 11 600 completions in South commenced a major Skills Strategy project during 2007. Australia, over the year ending 30 September 2007, an The Strategy has now been finalised and published. It will increase of 18.4 percent (or 1800) on the 9800 apprentices enable DFEEST to meet the targets of South Australia’s and trainees who completed their training in the preceding Strategic Plan through the creation of a highly skilled work- twelve months (to 30 September 2006). Nationally, there force that will underpin the state’s economic growth and was an increase of 3.7 percent for the same period. increase employment participation, enhance equity, promote innovation and shape the international competitiveness of In 2007, the South Australian VET system achieved high our economy. levels of student and employer satisfaction: 88.4 percent of employers who had jobs that required vocational qualifica- The Strategy is the result of carefully considered work tions were satisfied, 18.3 percent above the 2005 figure (of in this complex area – offering the promise of reducing 70.1 percent) and the highest in the nation. This compares the cost per hour of vocational education and training to 80.8 percent reported nationally and is a great reflection (VET) in South Australia while at the same time increasing of the system’s response to its students and employers. participation in VET, increasing employment outcomes and increasing the number of people with post-school The number of South Australians in work also rose, taking qualifications. Implementation of these initiatives will result the total to a new record high of 775 000 in December 2007. in an invigorated, dynamic VET system for South Australia This exceeded the previous high of 762 100 at the same time that is highly valued by industry and community and will in 2006. Furthermore, the state’s VET students had excellent respond to South Australia’s burgeoning economy including employment outcomes, with 82.7 percent of graduates and the defence and resources sectors which are demanding 78.7 percent of module completers being employed after many skilled workers into the future. training. Not only was this a 2.0 percent increase on our 2006 graduates figure, but both our graduates and module As part of its role in improving training and employment completers rated higher than the national figures. outcomes for South Australian’s, TAFE SA will find new ways of engaging with industry and communities. The Skills Significant infrastructure was added to TAFE SA’s assets Strategy changes will see greater devolution of decision in 2007 with the completion of the $15 million Veterinary and Agency Role and Governance
  • 8. 9Applied Science Centre at the Gilles Plains campus. This to 10 gigabits per second – or 20 000 times faster than mostcentre features the only dedicated teaching laboratory in home broadband connections. This metropolitan basedAustralia built to strict industry standards for the containment optical fibre broadband network links multiple sites in theof contaminants, and it provides the first simulated, industry Adelaide region, including universities, TAFE SA campuses,working environment for the training of technicians skilled schools, teaching hospitals, technology parks and govern-in bio-security protocols and the assessment of biological ment research institutions. It allows large quantities of data torisk. The centre also makes available for the first time be transferred between locations across some 90 kilometresin South Australia, full-time training in veterinary nursing of bundled fibre and is a major innovation for the state.to meet growing skill needs in the veterinary and animal The Premier’s Science and Research Fund was increasedindustry sectors. by $1.2 million a year to facilitate commencement of seven A $1.75 million expansion of the Barossa campus of pivotal science research projects which focus on the defenceTAFE SA was also opened in October to help meet the and advanced manufacturing sectors and innovations in theregion’s growing skill needs in the wine, food and hospitality development of renewable energy.industries, community services and health, engineering Early in the year, the department took up occupancytrades and vocational preparation. in the new environmentally friendly ‘City Central’ building. The South Australia Works program had 25 000 people Six hundred and sixty staff from five CBD locations wereparticipate in learning and work programs with almost 8000 relocated in an exercise which brought together many ofpeople gaining employment as a result. In the inaugural our staff, affording opportunities to become more efficientPremier’s Awards, the South Australia Works in the Regions in our operations.component of the project was awarded the best public Internally 50 percent of staff responded to a surveysector program for building communities in South Australia. about job satisfaction and intention. This response rate isThe innovative Whyalla employment program Create Your very pleasing. The information and opinions is reflectiveFuture: Goal 100 became a role model within the state of a broad range of staff and will be used to shape futurefor successfully skilling local people at risk of long-term workforce development.unemployment to win jobs in heavy industry. I thank all staff for their ongoing support and hard work South Australia’s international education industry is throughout 2007. There are significant challenges aheadnow worth $648 million, with record numbers of overseas as we implement the new Skills Strategy for the state butstudents continuing to choose to study in Adelaide. Latest the rewards are enormous. I look forward to us makingfigures show that Adelaide attracted almost 23 000 interna- further progress as we continue to build and maintain a skillstional students in the 10 months to October 2007, a rise of base for the existing and new economy of South Australia3000 students on the same time last year. China and India to ensure our industries are vibrant and competitive, nownow account for 45 percent of all international students to and into the future.Adelaide and our fastest growing markets for 2007 wereVietnam (up 40 percent); India (up 30 percent); China andSouth Korea (both up 19 percent). Education Adelaide has Brian Cunninghambeen a significant influence in promoting Adelaide as aninternational student destination and the pro-activity of the Chief Executiveuniversities, schools, TAFE SA and private registered trainingorganisations in the wider education sector has fuelled thisstrong growth in numbers. Another highlight was the launch of the South AustralianBroadband research and education Network (SABRENet)in March to deliver ultra high-speed connectivity betweenAdelaide’s key research and education precincts – initially up Agency Role and Governance
  • 9. 10 Highlights 2007 was 4.8 percent • Apprentices and trainees completing qualifications rose by 18.4 percent against a national average of 3.7 percent Awards • The percentage of satisfied employers who required • TAFE SA won the Large Training Provider of the Year vocational qualifications to meet job vacancy criteria in the 2007 South Australian Training Awards increased over the 2005 figure by 18.5 percent • South Australia Works in the Regions program won • Total employment rose to 775 000 people, the ninth the Premier’s Award for the best public sector pro- consecutive monthly rise to a new record level gram for building communities in South Australia • The employment of student graduates and module • Safework SA Employee of the Year was awarded completers increased by 2 percent over 2006 and to Veronica Wilkey, a senior OHS&W consultant also rated higher than national average based at TAFE SA Whyalla campus • Launch of the TAFE SA Aboriginal Access Centre, • Satisfac TAFE SA Excellence Award for Educational an initiative to better meet the training needs of the Delivery Management was awarded to Noel Jensen, Aboriginal community and industry the coordinating lecturer in Children’s Services and • ‘Abilities for All’ launched as a state-wide program Community Services at TAFE SA Gawler campus. involving a consortium of employers of people with Noel was recognised for his innovative work in the a disability, modelled on the successful Bedford development of child care learning materials and Industries program and offering accredited training his support of Indigenous cadetships in his train- for over 215 people in their workplace ing programs • TAFE SA Building and Construction Unit donated • Barbara Workman, Manager of Youth Pathways and six roof constructions to the State Emergency Partnerships at TAFE SA Regency campus won the Services (SES) for training and practical experi- Corporate and Education Services Award. Bar- ence in working safely at heights and for simulating bara’s leadership has fostered quality partnerships storm damage between TAFE SA and government, independent • TAFE SA Regency campus hosted several events and Catholic education systems, with effective during Tasting Australia, supporting the initiative results for the students promoting South Australia as a centre for food, • Restaurant and Catering Australia, Fine Wine Part- wine and other beverages ners and Henschke Lifetime Achiever Award was • Adelaide attracted almost 23 000 international presented to Brian Lawes, Educational Manager at students in the 10 months to October this year, a TAFE SA Regency campus, for his contribution to rise of 3000 students on the same time last year, TAFE SA and the industry for more than 30 years representing a 14.5 percent increase • Australia Day Awards 2007, 33 employees were • TAFE SA recorded a 15.3 percent overall growth in recognised for their outstanding service within International students demonstrating the commit- the department in acknowledgement for their ex- ment to SA Strategic Plan target T1.16 ‘Double SA’s emplary effort. share of overseas students within 10 years’. The 894 international students in award courses and Our education and 203 English Language students studying through training achievements English Language Service (ELS) come from over • Over 121 000 people participated in VET; almost 63 source countries 80 000 of these attended TAFE SA • South Australia Works in the Regions Recognition • There was a 2.3 percent increase in apprentice and and Achievement Award was presented to Create trainee numbers over 2006 results Your Future: Goal 100 as the most outstanding • Nine percent increase in commencements of ap- project in assisting unemployed people into train- prenticeships and traineeships. National average ing and jobs Agency Role and Governance
  • 10. 11• South Australia Works in the Regions support- Regency campus opened. This centre will provide ed employment and training initiatives for re- tradespeople with the skills to install renewable gions affected by the drought. In the Riverland energy systems $200 000 has been re-allocated from 2007-08 funds • Diesel Emissions Training facility at TAFE SA to support drought related initiatives O’Halloran Hill campus opened• South Australia Works for Indigenous People • $15 million redevelopment of the Veterinary and saw 11 Aboriginal apprentices graduate in a Applied Sciences Centre (VASC) completed range of trades. The Aboriginal Apprenticeship • The programs delivered by VASC significantly un- program continues to enjoy great success in retaining derpin the primary industries, biotechnology and apprentices and in achieving completions food production industries across the state• A group of young unemployed South Australians • $1.75 million expansion of TAFE SA, Barossa Valley have turned their dreams of becoming a chef campus completed. The campus has been upgraded into reality through a ‘Jamie Oliver’ type training to meet the region’s growing skill needs in wine, opportunity. The teenagers took part in a joint viticulture, community services and health. $52 000 initiative undertaken by the Hyatt in part- nership with the government, through its highly People successful South Australia Works program and • A Shared Business Services review commenced to TAFE SA meet our challenge of a more cost effective service• Drought Apprenticeship Retention program (DARP) to the community and is part of our goal to build a a $1.5 million program managed by Traineeship high performance organisation and Apprenticeship Services to assist employers in • Staff Survey attracted 50 percent response rate drought designated areas to retain their apprentices and provided valuable information in planning and trainees, delivered needed support DFEEST’s future. The survey reports a committed• South Australia has won $1.2 million in Common- and loyal workforce willing to work hard and see wealth funding for skills development in regional the department succeed areas, the biggest share of any state or territory from a total of $4.1 million • Reduction in the numbers and costs of new workers• ‘Adult Learners’ Week in September was very suc- compensation claims reinforces the efforts under- cessful. Government provided $1.8 million in grants taken to enhance DFEEST’s commitment to providing to organisations across the State to run more than all staff with a safe working environment 80 activities in local communities. The Festival of • DFEEST Executive Leadership Program entered Adult and Community Learning was a community- its third year with development work undertaken based opportunity for people to broaden their on a succession planning strategy to be launched knowledge and skills in 2008• Through additional government funding to the Adult and Community Education (ACE) program, a further • Planning for a revised emerging leaders leader- 8500 South Australians increased their language, ship program for implementation in 2008 com- literacy, numeracy and employability skills over menced. the year through involvement with 100 additional community-learning projects across the state.Assets• Six hundred and sixty employees moved from five sites in the CBD to six floors of the 5 star energy rated City Central building at 11 Waymouth Street• Renewable Energy Centre of Excellence at TAFE SA Agency Role and Governance
  • 11. 12 Science and Innovation Workforce Development • Seven pivotal science research projects were • Workforce Development Good Practice Project awarded grants from the Premier’s Science and commenced - a joint initiative between DFEEST Research Fund and Industry Skills Boards (ISBs), aims to promote • DFEEST was the major sponsor of National the products, tools and models developed for use Science Week in South Australia. Over 60 events by all stakeholders made available through online were held technology and hard copy and funded in part by the • Work was under taken with the Chief DFEEST Workforce Development Fund (WDF) Scientist and Defence SA to provide support for the • Workforce Information Service (WIS) launched - an establishment of a new Defence Future Capability online tool to support better workforce planning Technology Centre. provides the website presence for information on the ISB projects. Higher Education Quality • Assistance was provided to develop the University • DFEEST led work resulting in an amendment to the of Adelaide’s proposal to introduce a veterinary Commonwealth Education Services for Overseas science program at Roseworthy campus Students (ESOS) Act 2000 enabling providers of • A 12.4 percent increase in Commonwealth funded international hospitality courses to increase overseas places for 2008 resulted from support given to bids student enrolments and assist in achieving South from the state’s universities. Australia’s Strategic Plan target of doubling the state’s share of international student numbers Information Economy • Australian Quality Training Framework (AQTF) • Work of the Broadband SA team and key partners 2007 came into operation in July. DFEEST led a recognised following months of lobbying and working group of state and territory officials that negotiation in amending in the way the Australian developed these national outcomes based regula- Broadband Guarantee (ABG) is implemented. The tory arrangements. outcome recognised the value of the state’s regional broadband projects which have been developed with strong community involvement • South Australian Broadband Research and Educa- tion Network (SABRE Net) linking the state’s major research and education sites was extended to include six TAFE SA campuses • Funding was provided under the National Skills Shortages Strategy to up skill employees in the Australian Digital Content Industry, mobile tech- nology sector • Work was undertaken with the Department of Health on the use of broadband for population health and wellbeing and Defence SA in commissioning a telecommunications plan for the Maritime Skills Centre. Agency Role and Governance
  • 12. 13Youth Marketing and International• active8 Premier’s Youth Challenge provided over • Marketing and International focused on providing $500 000 in grants to 51 programs engaging over strategic insights to the business, ensuring key 1100 young people decisions were informed by quality market research.• Forty participants and 18 coordinators took part in Notably, the TAFE SA Product Analysis undertaken the active8 Youth Voice Forum which encouraged provides the empirical basis for reviewing the range continuing networking and further development of programs offered throughout TAFE SA of leadership, decision making and team building • Internal communication throughout DFEEST remained skills a priority with the online newsletter, InsideDFEEST,• Minister for Youth’s Leadership Grants again pro- providing comprehensive weekly updates to staff. A vided financial assistance for innovative projects for program of 16 directorate themed seminars, titled individuals aged 12-25 to promote the development Working Together, gave in-depth information to staff of leadership skills on the operations and priorities of each unit• Two young South Australians as a result of fund- • Marketing and International led the highly successful ing support had the opportunity to take part in an competition and awards programs, WorldSkills and international youth forum held in parallel to the South Australian Training Awards, which identified Asia-Pacific conference outstanding South Australian individuals and busi-• A Youth Parliament was again sponsored by the nesses to showcase at their respective national department and managed by the YMCA. It brings competitions in VET a diverse group of 100 young people together to • A robust promotional schedule, including advertis- learn about parliamentary process and is the only ing, event and media opportunities was undertaken such event in Australia which lets young people with positive results. A combined TAFE SA Open use the chambers of Parliament House Day was conducted on 26 August at Adelaide• Office for Youth delivered record numbers of Duke City campus, and was well received as part of the of Edinburgh award completions with nearly six Universities’ Open Day program      hundred young people receiving their Bronze, Silver • Considerable growth in International students study- or Gold award ing at TAFE SA was achieved through successful• National Youth Week saw 15 000 young South implementation of Marketing and International’s Australians participate. Student Recruitment Plan, as well as product and service enhancements. Initiatives included a dedi- cated website for international students, revised pricing structure, innovative new product offerings and improved front-office service processes such as a new international student database. Agency Role and Governance
  • 13. 14 Vision, Mission Openness in decision making by: • providing supporting reasons and Values • restricting information only where there is a wider public interest • declaring any relevant private interests • resolving conflicts Our Vision • being transparent South Australia has a highly skilled workforce and maximised employment participation that shapes the state’s economic competitiveness, and is distinguished Striving for excellence in: • using public resources efficiently and effectively by a culture of excellence, innovation, continuous • embedding equality of access and opportunity learning and social inclusion. • fairness in our operations • standards of service Our Mission To optimally match workforce skills, training and participation, with current and future employment, Courage in: working with individuals, community and industry to • challenging and being challenged strategically support the state’s development. This • taking risks mission requires creative and integrated policy that • doing things in different ways delivers effective training, employment programs and • taking responsibility for mistakes and learning services. from them • enforcing our code of conduct. Our Values DFEEST is striving to become a high performance learning organisation, which attracts, develops and retains a highly talented workforce. The department will only achieve its vision through a strong commitment to our people and core values. We will show integrity in our: Respect for: • the values, beliefs, customs and cultures of individuals and our community • others’ rights, responsibilities and professional- ism Responsiveness in: • providing timely and caring services generating creative, shared solutions • embracing change where it is appropriate • recognising and celebrating effort and achieve- ment Agency Role and Governance
  • 14. 15Legislation, Role Boards, Committeesand Structure and Authorities within theP ortfolio governance for further education, employment, science, technology and youth is managed through a number of councils,boards and committees. These work in conjunction with Minister’s portfoliothe department to advise the Minister for Employment, Institute Councils ITraining and Further Education, the Minister for Science nstitute councils are established by the Minsterand Information Economy and the Minister for Youth for each of the three Institutes of TAFE SA underon key strategic areas. the Technical and Further Education Act 1975. The Hon. Paul Caica MP took responsibility for The councils advise, monitor performance and providethe Science and Information Economy portfolio from supplementary funding for the Institutes’ operation.6 February 2007. Training and Skills CommissionAgency The Training and Skills Commission was establishedThe Department of Further Education, Employment, under the Training and Skills Development Act 2003.Science and Technology. The Act gives authority to the commission in regulating vocational education and training and non-universityActs Administered higher education in the state and in planning and policy• Technical and Further Education Act 1975 advice on employment, vocational training and adult• Training and Skills Development Act 2003 community education. It gives a strong leadership role• Construction Industry Training Fund Act 1993 to industry in workforce development for the state.• Flinders University of South Australia Act 1966 The commission has nine members (plus deputies)• University of Adelaide Act 1971 appointed by the Governor, the majority from industry• University of South Australia Act 1990. and the balance appointed after consultation with employer associations and the United Trades andRegulations Labor Council.• Technical and Further Education Regulations The commission is formally advised by two refer- 1999 ence groups in the areas of quality and adult community• Technical and Further Education (Vehicles) Regula- education. The Act also sets up a Grievance and tions 1998 Disputes Mediation Committee to adjudicate disputes• Training and Skills Development Regulations between apprentices/trainees and their employers under 2003 contracts of training. These groups are all convened by• Construction Industry Training Fund Regulations commission members, but draw on the wider resources 1993 of industry and the community for specialist advice• Public Corporations (Bio Innovation SA) Regula- through their membership and consultation strategies. tions 2001 The Training and Skills Commission reports annually to• Public Corporations (Education Adelaide) Regula- Parliament on its operations, committees and reference tions 1998 groups.• Public Corporations (Playford Centre) Regulations 1996. Agency Role and Governance
  • 15. 16 Higher Education Council The Premier’s Science The Higher Education Council was established to and Research Council foster collaborative arrangements between the state The Premier’s Science and Research Council was government, universities, industry and the community established to advise the government on strategies for in South Australia to: boosting local science and research capabilities and • expand the size, diversity and influence of the sec- improving levels of innovation. The council is co-chaired tor to contribute to the state’s economy, society by the Premier and the state’s chief scientist and is and culture administratively supported by DFEEST. • provide highly adaptable and skilled graduates The council was responsible for establishing the • improve international recognition of the quality of Premier’s Science and Research Fund in 2003. The higher education in the state fund, through a competitive process has committed • increase research investment and the commer- over $15 million for collaborative science and research cialisation of ideas. projects in South Australia. Austraining International Austraining International Pty Ltd is an international Information Economy development and project management company of Advisory Board the South Australian Government. With the head office The Information Economy Advisory Board provides in Adelaide the company has a registered presence in advice to the Minister on potential benefits of the Asia through its subsidiary company PT Austraining information economy for all South Australians and on Nusantatra, which was established in 1993 in Jakarta, how to maximise these benefits. The board’s member- Indonesia. It has a registered company in Papua New ship brings together prominent individuals from the Guinea and a network of 19 agents throughout Asia and community, academia and industry. It is supported the Pacific region. Austraining is ISO 9001 accredited by, and works closely with, DFEEST to provide advice for a comprehensive range of international development on the state’s current capacity to benefit from the education and training projects. information economy. Education Adelaide Education Adelaide is a subsidiary of the Minister for Employment, Training and Further Education established under the Public Corporations (Education Adelaide) Regulations 1998. It operates as a partnership between the City of Adelaide, the state’s universities, the state government and numerous private colleges and schools. Its strategic direction is to accelerate the growth of South Australia’s education export industry to benefit the state’s education providers, the local economy and community. Education Adelaide works closely with DFEEST to achieve targets in South Australia’s Strategic Plan. Agency Role and Governance
  • 16. 17Bio Innovation SA SABRENet LtdBio Innovation is a subsidiary of the Minister estab- On 9 March 2007 the Premier and the Australianlished by the Public Corporations (Bio Innovation SA) Government Minister for Education, Science andRegulations 2001. Technology officiated at the launch of SABRENet at Mawson Lakes. During 2007 a further extension of Funded by the state government, Bio Innovation the network was constructed, connecting the InstituteSA provides grants to companies and public research of Medical and Veterinary Science and the TAFE SAorganisations to promote company development and Gilles Plains Campus.enable commercialisation of technologies. The organisation also provides mentoring advice on Duke of Edinburgh’s Award,business, product development, financial, marketing State Award Committeeas well as infrastructure development support for the The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award is an internationallocal bioscience industry. self-development program available to young people Adelaide has one of the fastest-growing biotechnol- aged between 14 and 25. The Minister for Youth is theogy industry clusters in Australia and its global position exclusive licence holder to deliver the Award in Southis growing daily. The biotechnology sector contributes Australia and appoints the State Award Committee$45 million in business research and development to maintain quality and support the delivery of theexpenditure annually and has increased employment by Award.100 people per annum over the past four consecutiveyears. The number of biotech companies has doubled Minister’s Youth Councilsince 2001 with now more than 90 biotechnology The Minister’s Youth Council comprises young peoplecompanies in South Australia, employing about 1 aged 12-25 who provide advice to the Minister for200 people and generating more than $180 million in Youth on issues that affect young South Australians.revenue. The Minister’s Youth Council consults and advises the Minister directly through monthly meetings.Playford CentrePlayford Centre is a subsidiary of the Minister estab-lished by the Public Corporations (Playford Centre)Regulations 1996, to contribute to South Australia’seconomic growth, exports, commercialisation ofresearch and entrepreneurial activity, by facilitating theformation and development of innovative ventures.Playford CaptialIn 2001, Playford Centre formed a subsidiary PlayfordCapital Pty Ltd. Playford Capital uses fundingprovided by the Australian Government’s Building onIT Strengths and ICT Incubators Programs to investin South Australian ICT firms which have the potentialand commitment to become high growth companiesexporting interstate and overseas. This has stimulatedthe inflow of private equity into South Australia andsupported ICT company growth. Agency Role and Governance
  • 17. 18 Governance T he department’s principal corporate governance obligations are prescribed in the Public Sector Management Act 1995 and the Technical and Further Education Act 1975. These Acts establish general management aims, personnel management and employee conduct standards. The chief executive is responsible for observance of these aims and standards. The department maintains a governance framework that integrates strategic management, leadership and accountability, with the way it manages its people and resources to achieve best performance of its functions. The framework is supported by a governance structure encompassing: MINISTER AUDIT AND RISK CHIEF EXECUTIVE MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE CORPORATE EXECUTIVE EXECUTIVE FORUM BUDGET AND TAFE SA EXECUTIVE FINANCE EXECUTIVE ASSET STRATEGY COMMITTEE Key: Reporting & Information Exchange Accountability The Corporate Executive is the key high level decision making and leadership group in the department. Its primary role is to ensure the successful achievement of the department’s strategic planning and portfolio outcomes and it has responsibility for maintaining the effectiveness of these governance mechanisms. The Budget and Finance Executive Committee is an expert committee providing financial governance over the department’s resources. It monitors performance against fiscal targets, reviews financial strategies and the allocation of operating and capital budgets and makes decisions on a range of finance related issues. The Agency Role and Governance
  • 18. 19committee considers options and advises on the department’s financial strategies and provides detailed adviceon the allocation of operating and capital budgets to the chief executive through the Corporate Executive. The TAFE SA Executive is an expert committee responsible for the review and coordination of activity acrossthe TAFE sector of DFEEST. The Executive Forum is a broadly based group of executive leaders responsible for the collaborative achieve-ment of departmental objectives across all initiatives and programs. The Asset Strategy Committee provides strategic guidance for the integrated planning and managementof all infrastructure requirements across the portfolio and the development of strategic portfolio infrastructureplans for each TAFE region. The Audit and Risk Management Committee is an integral part of the governance framework and is estab-lished to provide assurance to and assist the chief executive in undertaking his statutory and administrativeresponsibilities. Agency Role and Governance
  • 19. 20 DFEEST Senior Management Structure and Reporting Arrangements As at December 2007Agency Role and Governance
  • 20. 21Report on Operations Report On Operations
  • 21. 22 Report on and government plans and projects • helps meet industry’s demand for labour by respond- Operations ing to current and future skills demands • strengthens partnerships between government, Against DFEEST industry, employment and training stakeholders, and the community – resulting in shared responsibility Strategic Plan for outcomes. This learning, training and work package began with seven priority areas – regional people, young people, Goal 1 Ensure South mature-aged people, Aboriginal people, community Australians have the necessary engagement, working with industry, and the public education and skills to participate sector. During 2007 an eighth priority area was added. in the high skill economy South Australia Works to Recognise Skills - provides high quality services to people who seek recognition D of qualifications and skills (whether gained locally FEEST leads the way in skilling South or overseas) for the purpose of finding meaningful Australia by working with industry, employment in South Australia. business, communities and regions to implement workforce plans and skills development In August, DFEEST presented a report to the programs, while building a quality and competitive Training and Skills Commission on the impact of training market. Better Skills. Better Work. Better State – A Strategy for the Development of South Australia’s Workforce Objectives and key initiatives to 2010. The Commission confirmed its view that the 1.1 Accelerate skills take-up for the current Workforce Development Strategy is a valid framework and emerging workforce for action by government, industry and education (Links to South Australia’s and training providers. The robustness of the vision, Strategic Plan (SASP) Target (T) priorities and 10 focus areas in the Strategy is evident 6.15, T6.19, T6.20 and T6.21) in the way that it encompasses activities across a The department’s program South Australia Works is wide range of arenas, including: training, workplace building South Australia’s workforce for the future by practices, welfare to work programs and so on. The assisting with the retention and upskilling of exist- Strategy has increased South Australia’s research ing workers. In addition a number of South Australia capacity in the field and has resulted in a number of Works programs contribute significantly to the Skills related research projects. Statement – ‘Skills for South Australia, Building on Strong foundations’ initiative. In considering the report, the Commission identified four streams of focussed activity to enable further By collaborating with all levels of government, take-up of workforce development practices and industry and the community, South Australia Works: principles in the state: • provides learning, training and employment oppor- • better engagement with industry tunities for people who are having trouble improving • improved workforce planning their skills or finding a job • better career information for individuals • assists regional communities to address the learn- • better communication of workforce development ing, training and work needs of individuals within messages. their communities • helps maximise the number of jobs from industry Report On Operations
  • 22. 23 Consideration of the future directions of the Strategy that will contribute to the improvement of their cur-positions it as the central strategic framework for rent practice by streamlining activity and increasingthe role and function of the Industry Skills Boards the uptake of RPL within their organisation.(ISBs). This was supported by the outcomes of an These strategies are designed to ensure the Southindependent evaluation of the nine ISBs. The evaluation Australian training system has sufficient and appropri-was undertaken to determine whether the industry ate high quality people and resources to facilitateadvisory arrangements established in 2004-05 have efficient and cost effective RPL services.been successful in enabling industry to exercise aleading role in workforce development and planning. TAFE SA has reviewed and implemented a range of processes to facilitate the increasing delivery of RPL The Evaluation’s recommendations presented to the which included:Minister of Employment, Training and Further Educationtake the current arrangements to the next level of • provision of RPL staff development opportunitiesindustry leadership and commitment to workforce for staff, particularly in regional South Australiadevelopment. They articulate practical approaches to • targeting innovative projects responding to skillsstrengthening the working relationship between ISBs, shortages in the areas of Hospitality and Com-DFEEST and the Training and Skills Commission. mercial Cookery • introduction and training of staff for the use of ‘Com- The Australian government signed an agreement petency Navigator’ – a software package designedwith the department to fund a program to increase the to assist in mapping an individual’s skills and experi-uptake of recognition of prior learning (RPL) in South ence to competencies in Training PackagesAustralia. RPL is the recognition and documentation • Increased access to online delivery particularly inof experience, learning and skills. The project will Bricklaying and Carpentry and Joinery.target employers in skill shortage areas. South Australia Works in Communities creates learn- DFEEST combined its Trades Recognition Services ing opportunities for people and their communities.and Overseas Skills Recognition Service into a newentity, the Skills Recognition Service (SRS), to be in People with a disability, migrants, and disadvantagedone location with a shop front service and an RPL unemployed or under-employed people between 25referral service. An RPL assessor has been appointed and 39 years were supported to participate in learningto the service to increase the knowledge of service programs. Through a range of programs 3129 peoplestaff and to provide information to clients who access were assisted and 1740 gained employment.the service. The Parents Return to Work Program provided To develop knowledge and skills of VET profession- accredited training to 519 parents under the age of 40als to provide streamlined quality RPL services: years, who wished to return to the workforce. Three hundred and thirty five people gained employment and• Eight coaches and mentors were appointed across 107 000 accredited training hours were delivered. a range of industry areas to develop strategies for engagement with RTOs; to promote effective rec- The Employment Assistance Program supported ognition practices and assist with the development jobseekers who experienced barriers to employment of approaches and tools. to become more competitive in the labour market• Thirteen project grants worth $225 000 were ap- and to move into employment. A total of 670 people proved to improve RPL practice and uptake with were assisted through the program, with 285 gaining both public and private training organisations. employment. Consideration has been given to the learning and DFEEST continued its leadership and management sharing of information from individual projects to the of Reframing the Future. This national workforce larger RPL agenda. The RPL projects provide an development initiative of the Australian, state and opportunity for applicants to undertake an activity Report On Operations
  • 23. 24 territory governments assists in building the capacity South Australia won $1.2 million in Commonwealth of the VET sector to implement the national training funding for three skill development projects in regional system and the aims of the COAG national reform areas, the biggest share of any state or territory from agenda. Reframing the Future complements other a total allocation of $4.1 million. The three projects to professional development programs provided by state/ receive funding are a: territory bodies, other agencies and RTOs. • World of Work for the northern Adelaide region. The national reference group for Reframing the This project will upskill people at risk of unemploy- Future was chaired by the chief executive and DFEEST ment due to industry restructuring is responsible for hosting the national secretariat. It • regional skills mobility program linking long-tern has developed new nationally agreed arrangements for unemployed to job opportunities in the Limestone the management and strategic direction of Reframing Coast and the Riverland the Future. • Health Workforce Reform project to support a new approach in the health sector across the regions. 1.2 Ensure a ready supply of qualified South In 2007, the State Government announced a $7.7 Australian workers is available for the State’s million package to support farmers and farming growth sectors communities in drought affected areas. This amount (Links to SASP T6.19, T6.20, and T6.21) was part of an overall $60 million drought relief program DFEEST provided funding and in-kind support for a designed to support farmers and rural communities. project involving a collaborative arrangement with the nine ISBs and Department of Trade and Economic Within this package, the department was made Development (DTED) to assess the workforce impacts responsible for administering $1.5 million through of major projects and develop strategies and responses the Drought Apprenticeship Retention Program. to meet these. This program aims to assist employers in drought designated areas retain their trainees and apprentices. The Joint ISB project, Workforce Impacts South Eligible employers receive two instalments of $750 for Australia (WISA), led to the establishment of an initial each trainee/apprentice in their employment. web based, single point of contact within DFEEST for major projects proponents as an initial entry to the Program funds are prioritised on the basis of broader support available through SA Works, TAFE SA, (1) farmers, (2) small business, (3) Group Training Aboriginal Education and Employment Services, ISBs, Organisations, then (4) large employers. ESF networks and practitioners. DFEEST is working In the six months of operation to 31 December with DTED to develop a more systematic approach to 2007, employers of 580 trainees or apprentices have assessing and responding to the workforce impacts been assisted through the Drought Apprenticeship of major projects. Retention Program. The Resources and Engineering Skills Alliance South Australia continues to achieve strong employ- (RESA) has developed a range of pilot projects to ment outcomes from training as shown in Table 2. build the skilled workforce for the state’s expanding mineral resource sector. These projects will identify and test innovative approaches to training that can then be used as models to scale up training programs on a statewide basis and include supporting TAFE SA to develop on-line courses and the promotion of careers in the resources industry and using advanced simulation technologies for training tailored to the mining industry. Report On Operations
  • 24. 25 Training activity was particularly strong in traineeships and apprenticeships. Figure 1 shows that the numberin training continues to grow. At June 2007, the number of trainees and apprentices in training reached arecord high of 35 200. The number of commencing trainees and apprentices has increased, and the numberof trainees and apprentices successfully completing their contract of training has significantly increased overthe past two years. Trainee and apprentice activity, five years ending 30 June 2007* 40000 35000 30000 25000 20000 15000 10000 5000 0 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 In Training Commencements Completions Figure 1 * In training figures are provided at 30 June of each year, while commencement and completion figures are provided for the 12 months ending 30 June of each year. All figures are based on the National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) Australian vocational education and training statistics – Apprentices and trainees June quarter (2007). Figures for 2007 are estimated and may be revised by NCVER in the future. Report On Operations
  • 25. 26 Table 2: Percentage of graduates by key outcome measures, 2005-2007 2005 2006 2007 % % % All TAFE Employed after training 78.5 79.0 80.2 Not employed before commencing the training and employed after (a) 46.4 44.6 47.6 Employed or in further study after training (b) 88.4 87.4 88.7 Enrolled in further study after training (b) 33.0 31.0 31.2 Fully or partly achieved main reason for doing the training 85.1 85.6 86.4 Satisfied with the overall quality of training 87.9 88.1 89.1 All VET providers Employed after training 79.3 79.6 81.1 Not employed before commencing the training and employed after (a) 52.0 51.1 52.8 Employed or in further study after training (b) 88.7 87.8 89.2 Enrolled in further study after training (b) 31.6 30.2 30.8 Fully or partly achieved main reason for doing the training 86.0 86.5 86.7 Satisfied with the overall quality of training 87.1 88.1 88.8 Notes a ‘Not Employed’ is defined as unemployed (looking for full-time or part-time work), not in the labour force, or not employed (no further information). b These questions are not asked of students from community education providers. Therefore, the percentage reported represents the proportion of graduates, or module completers, respectively, excluding those from community education providers. * The estimate has a relative standard error greater than 25 percent and therefore should be used with caution. ** NCVER does not report on estimates based on less than five respondents because the estimates are unreliable. Report On Operations
  • 26. 27After completing a Master of Engineering in IT Telecommunications at university, Liong Kee Ling turned to TAFESA to study a Vocational Graduate Diploma in Spatial Information Services because of the practical skills hecould gain and the flexibility to learn on and off campus. Report On Operations
  • 27. 28 1.3 Enhance Adelaide’s reputation as a International student intake has increased in: world class city for education, training and • Nursing and Dental higher education • Cookery (Links to SASP T1.16, T6.20, and T6.21) • Bakery TAFE SA is dedicated to the provision of world class • Hospitality Management quality education and training services to local and • Electronics international students alike. Increasing its share of • Horticulture international students is evident in the steady increase • Wine and Food. in student numbers. International licence agreements are now active Total International Student Enrolments by in 11 overseas institutions servicing approximately Category, Jan-Oct 2002-2007 2500 students. Projects for the next three years are for a continued 1600 growth of international students of approximately 12 percent per annum. 1400 Complementary services provided to international students included: 1200 • packaging of qualifications to promote/support pathways to Higher Education • hosting delegations and study tours across TAFE 1000 SA • attending regional educational expos • working with contracted educational recruitment 800 agents. South Australia’s three state universities: The 600 University of Adelaide; Flinders University and the University of South Australia; along with Carnegie Mellon University and Cranfield University continue 400 to provide world class education and contribute to the state’s economic development through its skilled 200 workforce. Over 69 000 students, including 18 500 overseas students were engaged in higher education in South Australia in 2007. 0 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 The Higher Education Council which is chaired by the Minister for Employment, Training and Further TAFE SA Programs (including Award, Education and the Higher Education Directorate Non-Award and Degrees) successfully negotiated to revise the higher educa- TAFE SA ELICOS Programs tion target in South Australia’s Strategic Plan relating to university participation for domestic students. A ICHM (International College number of projects have been established to assist of Hotel Management) universities meet this target including strategies to improve student retention and to better involve industry Figure 2 in supporting student placements. Development of the Premier’s vision for the University City is critical Report On Operations
  • 28. 29to the success of this target. In 2007 SA universities won 12.4 percent of new Australian Government supportedplaces.1.4 Build a fair, quality oriented and competitive training market(Links to SASP T1.16, T6.20, and T6.21)The department provides support for traineeships and apprenticeships via the provision of training subsidies(known as User Choice training subsidies) to registered training organisations. During 2007, 155 registeredtraining organisations (consisting of TAFE SA and privately owned providers) delivered training under User Choicearrangements. A total of $39.13 million was provided by the State Government during the 2006-07 financial yearto support in excess of 25 000 trainees and apprentices undertaking a nationally recognised qualification. As shown in Figure 3 below, the majority of User Choice expenditure occurred in the area of engineeringand mining, whilst the greatest number of trainees and apprentices were supported to undertake business,management, finance and property service qualifications.Figure 3: Expenditure by industry groups Fashion and Footwear Computing and Information Technology Recreation and Sport Arts, Design and Multimedia Hair and Beauty Community Services, Health and Education Hospitality, Travel and Tourism Primary and Allied Industries Food Processing and Wine Business, Management, Finance and Property Service Transport Engineering Building, Furnishing and Plumbing Engineering and Mining 0.0% 5.0% 10.0% 15.0% 20.0% 25.0% 30.0% 35.0% # App/trainees Expenditure Report On Operations
  • 29. 30 As illustrated in Figure 4 below, apprenticeships Figure 5: Funded Training represented 38 percent of total student numbers in Contracts by AQF level receipt of User Choice assistance, whilst trainee- ship funding represented 62 percent of total student numbers. Figure 4: Distribution of funding amongst Student Numbers traineeships and apprenticeships Level 4/5 369 Level 3 1% Student Numbers 8,730 Level 2 34% 16,313 T/ships 65% A/ships 9,695 38% 15,717 62% Sixty five percent of the trainees and apprentices supported by User Choice funding were undertaking qualifications at Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF) level 3 (see Figure 5). This highlights the impor- tance attached to training in higher level qualifications to achieve a more highly skilled workforce. Report On Operations
  • 30. 31 The delivery of higher education, other than that provided by the state universities, vocational education andtraining, and educational services to overseas students is regulated under the Training and Skills DevelopmentAct, 2003. The Act provides the basis for ensuring the education and training providers and the courses thatthey deliver are quality assured under national education and training standards. In addition to approving providers and courses under the Training and Skills Development Act, 2003, thedepartment is building the capacity and promoting quality outcomes for their clients by:• informing students and consumers of their choices, rights and responsibilities• informing and advising training providers about the relevant national and state standards and legislation with which they must comply• contributing to the design, development and implementation of national qualifications• ensuring standards are met and encouraging continuous improvement through audits of training providers• convening professional development workshops and forums on teaching and learning strategies and educa- tion management issues• working in collaboration with relevant national and interstate bodies to maintain and improve the national training system.Vet Recognition Data For 2006 And 2007 VET REGISTRATION 2006 2007 Summary Total Registered Training Organisations (RTOs) registered in SA for 261a 282 domestic delivery Number of RTOs also delivering Higher Education courses 14 14 RTOs registered in South Australia operating in another State/Ter- 93 93 ritory RTOs who remain suspended 4 3 Number of RTOs with delegated powers 1 1 Approvals Initial registrations 27 31 Renewal of registrations 21 55 Extension to scope of registration 103 93 Number of qualifications TAFESA added to scope of registration 148 70 under delegation Refusals, Cancellations and Suspensions RTOs who voluntary withdrew registration 17 8 RTOs who transferred to interstate registering body 2 0 RTOs who had registration cancelled by registration authority 0 0 RTOs who had registration suspended by registration authority 1 0 RTOs who had registration refused by registration authority: Initial registration 1 3 Extension to Scope registration 0 1 Renewal registration 1 1 Audit Activity: Number of audits conducted Initial registration 26 32 Renewal of registration 22 53 Extension to scope of registration 40 50 Compliance 14 34 Complaint 8 13 a Does not include RTOs whose registration is suspended. Report On Operations
  • 31. 32 VET ACCREDITATION 2006 2007 Summary Total accredited courses 241 278 Approvals Courses accredited 9 39 Courses accredited (TAFESA under delegated authority) 18 3 Training package qualifications implemented in South Australia 165 335 New qualifications made available through traineeships or ap- 209 124 prenticeships HIGHER EDUCATION REGISTRATION 2006 2007 Summary Higher education providers registered in SA for domestic delivery 27 28 Higher education providers who also deliver VET courses 14 14 Approvals Initial Registration 0 1 Variation to scope of registration 11 10 Refusals, Revocations and Withdrawals Higher education providers who voluntary withdrew registration 2 0 Higher education providers who had registration cancelled by 0 0 registration authority Higher education providers who had registration suspended by 0 0 registration authority Higher education providers who had registration refused by regis- 0 0 tration authority of registration HIGHER EDUCATION ACCREDITATION 2006 2007 Summary Total accredited courses 242 253 Approvals Number of courses accredited 123 35 Report On Operations
  • 32. 33OVERSEAS RECOGNITION 2006 2007SummaryRegistered providers delivering only VET courses to overseas 16 18studentsRegistered providers delivering only higher education courses to 9 9overseas studentsRegistered providers delivering VET and higher education courses 8 8to overseas studentsRegistered providers delivering only English Language Intensive 4 4Courses (ELICOS) to overseas studentsRegistered providers delivering VET and higher education and 3 3English Language Intensive Courses (ELICOS) to overseas stu-dentsRegistered providers delivering English Language Intensive 1 1Courses (ELICOS) and VET courses to overseas studentsRegistered providers delivering English Language Intensive Cours- 1 1es (ELICOS) and higher education courses to overseas studentsTotal Registered providers approved to deliver to overseas stu- 42 44dentsApprovalsInitial registration 2 2Renewal of registration 2 3Extension to scope of registration 6 13Refusals, Cancellations and SuspensionsRTOs who voluntarily withdrew registration 0 1RTOs who had registration cancelled by registration authority 0 0RTOs who had registration suspended by registration authority 0 0RTOs who had registration refused by registration authority:Initial registrationExtension to scope registration 0 1Renewal of registration 0 0 0 0Audit Activity: Number of audits conductedInitial registration 2 3Renewal of registration 2 3Extension to scope of registration 6 13Compliance 1 1Complaint 1 1 Report On Operations
  • 33. 34 In addition to national qualifications in training pack- approved, 10 withdrew from the system and 3 remain ages, vocational education qualifications are accredited suspended. under the Training and Skills Development Act 2003 A total of 28 non-university higher education provid- provided there is an industry or market need not met ers were registered, compared to 27 at the same time by a training package. Forty two vocational education last year, delivering more than 253 higher education courses were approved for initial accreditation or qualifications. renewal of accreditation and 35 higher education qualifications were accredited. A total of 45 education and training organisations were registered to provide education services to over- Changes to improve administrative systems seas students (an increase of two from December 2006). and processes for the management of accredita- Of these, 18 registered training providers delivered only tion took effect from 1 January 2007. Key changes in the vocational education sector, nine only in the included external assessment of courses by a Course higher education sector, five delivered only English Assessment Panel (CAP) convened by DFEEST for the Language Intensive Courses to Overseas Students delegate’s consideration in accreditation decisions. (ELICOS) and 13 providers delivered in two or more Under delegation from the Training and Skills of these three sectors. Commission, DFEEST manages the registration of The majority of vocational education and training training providers to deliver nationally recognised qualifications are developed and endorsed within qualifications and Statements of Attainment. National Training Packages. Each Training Package DFEEST worked with occupational licensing authori- provides a suite of qualifications for a sector of ties for a number of occupations identified by COAG. industry ranging from entry to para-professional This work was undertaken as part of national initiatives levels. The department made available 36 training to support the full mutual recognition of skills across packages containing 335 qualifications. Of these, 124 Australia by building the confidence of licensing bodies qualifications were made available as traineeships or that certificates issued by RTOs meet their regulatory apprenticeships. requirements. DFEEST is formalising agreements with DFEEST hosted a major VET sector capacity building each relevant licensing body on a range of quality forum for the fifth consecutive year which was attended assurance initiatives including the provision of expert by over 250 participants. The forum was designed to advice in the monitoring of RTOs. develop the VET workforce, promote excellence and In line with DFEEST’s commitment to continuous focus on meeting future skill development needs. improvement, an internal assessment of the operation Twenty four professional development workshops to of its higher education registration and accreditation assist training providers meet registration requirements processes was conducted early in 2007. A senior under the Training and Skills Development Act, 2003 official from another jurisdiction was invited to be and national standards were held and quarterly provider part of the internal assessment panel to provide an forums provided opportunities for the wider VET sector opportunity for benchmarking with another jurisdic- to be kept informed traiing issues and directions. A tion and to bring fresh ideas to the directorate. The total of 280 people attended these forums. outcome was very pleasing. It highlighted potential areas for improvement and provided sound evidence The Australian government’s Education Services of South Australia operating within the requirements for Overseas Students (ESOS) Act 2000 was amended of the national protocols. to remove doubts about the legality of the practice of ESOS providers making course related work placements The training sector in South Australia continued to interstate. The amendment arose from a departmental grow with the number of RTOs approved to deliver VET initiative supported by the Minister, designed to enable qualifications expanding from 261 in 2006 to 282 by South Australian providers of international hospitality the end of 2007. During the year, 31 new RTOs were Report On Operations
  • 34. 35courses to grow overseas student enrolments andassist in achieving the South Australia Strategic Plantarget of doubling South Australia’s share of interna-tional student numbers. National consultation was undertaken on theELICOS standards project and a final draft of thestandards and criteria for ELICOS assessing bodies hasneared completion. The project is being managed byDFEEST for the Australian Education Systems OfficialsCommittee (AESOC). The department undertook considerable researchin order to participate in reviews of junior and trainingwages in the workplace announced by the SouthAustralian Industrial Relations Commission (SAIRC)and the Australian Fair Pay Commission (AFPC). TheSouth Australian Government established an intera-gency committee to coordinate the development ofits submissions, and the department is representedon this committee. The department also undertook researchon apprentice wages and surveyed current andformer apprentices who had withdrawn from theirapprenticeships in their first two years. The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) assistedwith the development and analysis of these postalsurveys, which were designed to ascertain thesocial and economic circumstances of apprentices,patterns of training and the reasons for cancellationof apprenticeships. There was a very good response rate to the surveys,with 27 percent of current apprentices and 17 percentof ex-apprentices responding. The responses arebeing analysed by the ABS and a report summarisingthe main findings will be available in 2008. Departmental officers also met with three AFPCcommissioners and its communications manager aspart of a preliminary consultation process for the reviewof junior and training arrangements wages. Report On Operations
  • 35. 36 1.5 Continue to develop fresh approaches 1.6 Promote community learning for the to skills development and system reforms benefit of the individual, the economy and (Links to SASP T6.15, T6.19, social health of the State T6.20, and T6.21) (Links to SASP T6.19) A revised Australian Quality Training Framework came Work continued to promote the role of community into operation during the year. It comprised standards learning in improving the wellbeing of individuals and for vocational education training providers and state communities by boosting the living and employability and territory registering bodies. These standards skills of the state’s potential workforce. This was done meet objectives agreed by COAG for more streamlined in collaboration with the Adult Community Education outcomes based regulatory arrangements. DFEEST Reference Group of the Training and Skills Commission. made a significant contribution to this work by leading Strategies to implement the actions in Community the working group of state and territory officials that Learning: learn, live, grow, prosper have been initi- developed the standards and accompanying national ated in conjunction with a number of state and local resources and guidelines to ensure nationally consist- government, community groups and organisations ent implementation. that support the goals and actions of the Strategy. Specific work included: The Training and Skills Commission confirmed that the Workforce Development Strategy is a valid • cross government collaboration to increase co- framework for action by government, industry and ordination in the delivery and funding of community education and training providers. The vision, priorities learning coordinated by a Senior Officers Working and 10 focus areas in the strategy encompass activities Group on Community Learning across a wide range of arenas, including training, • increased cross sectoral communication to raise workplace practices, welfare to work programs. The participation in community learning. A roundtable strategy has increased South Australia’s research discussion was hosted and explored the specific capacity in the field and has resulted in a number of role of community organisations and community workforce development research projects. leaders in improving the well-being of individuals, families and communities. Thinker in Residence, The Training and Skills Commission identified four Dr Fraser Mustard challenged participants to pro- streams of focussed activity to enable further take-up vide increased support and community learning of workforce development practices and principles in opportunities for parents and families. An Interim the state: Council for Early Childhood Development was • better engagement with industry formed as a consequence with input from the ACE • improved workforce planning Reference Group • better career information for individuals • initiatives to support the development of sustainable • better communication of workforce development communities. A roundtable discussion on the role messages. of local councils in developing learning communi- ties was organised jointly with Playford Council The implementation of these principles will be in March, with Peter Kearns, a leading researcher undertaken in close collaboration with industry through in the area of lifelong learning, as guest speaker. the Commission and ISBs. This initiative acknowledged the importance of closer collaboration with of local government and resulted in specific events convened by the City of the Mawson Lakes Development Project. The Adult Community Education (ACE) program supported over 100 projects delivering more than 300 000 hours of non-accredited learning to over 8500 Report On Operations
  • 36. 37participants. Learning activities focused on the devel- Science and maths skillsopment of personal skills, as well as literacy, numeracy, Under the Innovation Awareness banner of Innov8,information and communication technology. support continued in 2007 for a number of initiatives that raise awareness amongst the community of the Projects were delivered by community-based importance of science, mathematics and innovation innot-for profit organisations which are well placed to everyday life. By promoting and raising this awarenessdeliver non-formal education to disadvantaged target the long-term expectation is that this will increase thegroups in local settings, and meeting local demand. number of people interested in science and mathsOrganisations included community centres and (from a work/study perspective and also generalneighbourhood houses, schools and church groups, understanding of its importance).cultural and arts organisations. The South Australian Science Excellence Awards Eleven new ACE ‘Learning Communities in partner- were held as part of National Science Week for theship with TAFE SA’ projects commenced in 2007. third consecutive year. Over thirty nominations wereThese projects assisted more than 260 people to make received and awards were presented to those in thethe transition from non-formal to formal learning and South Australian Science Community who displayedgain qualifications up to Certificate IV level. Study excellence in the following fields:takes place in supported environments that ensuredisadvantaged participants are well prepared to take Scientist of the Year:the next step into further education, apprenticeships Laureate Professor John Ralston FAA FTSEand work in vocational areas that include: building Ian Wark Research Instituteand construction, hospitality, community services, University of South Australiaand event management. Excellence in Research for At the national level, DFEEST was represented on Public Good Outcomes:the Reference Group of the Ministerial Declaration onAdult Community Education established by MCEETYA. Professor Timothy HughesIn support of the state’s contribution into this proc- Institute of Medical and Veterinary Scienceess, a forum of representatives from state and local Science Education andgovernment, regional development boards, community Communication Excellence:centres, private providers and the university researchsector recommended the need for an appropriate Professor Christopher Danielsframework for positioning ACE to play an enhanced School of Natural and Built Environmentsrole in responding to current social, demographic, University of South Australiaeconomic and labour market challenges. Science Leadership and Management Excellence: Professor Jerzy Filar School of Mathematics and Statistics. Report On Operations
  • 37. 38 1.7 Specially focus on disadvantaged • provide quality Certificates I and II enabling members of society courses • provide a career referral and support process for Bedford Industries completing students in their transition to employ- TAFE SA is in a fifth year of a successful partnership ment or further education with Bedford Industries to provide accredited training • to develop partnerships with local industry and at Certificate II level. The Bedford Group in partnership community to implement programs that meet the with TAFE SA remains the only organisation of its type needs of employers and employees and size to provide opportunities for people with a • to respond to the Aboriginal community and in- disability to gain nationally recognised qualifications dustry needs as measured by training outcomes on this scale. leading to employment, enterprise development In 2007 approximately 215 trainees will graduate and qualitative feedback. from this course compared to 120 in 2006 making AAC in Port Augusta achieved an overall 45 percent it the largest TAFE SA graduation for people with a employment outcome for students with a number disability in Australia. continuing on to further studies. In Ceduna and Port Abilities for All Program is an expanded training Lincoln nine local Aboriginal students commenced program offering employees of Bedford and the the Diploma of Enrolled Nursing whilst working part- disability sector with opportunity to enhance their time with the Ceduna Health Service. Twenty five skills. In 2007 the program spanned 18 delivery sites participants achieved the Certificate I in VET focused and was conducted by lecturers from TAFE SA. The on the mining industry. Ten of these students went program provided accredited training to 190 people on to achieve the Certificate II in Metalliferous Mining at certificate 1 and 3 levels. Participants attend a Operations. TAFE SA session one day a week in their workplace, Across metropolitan Adelaide 33 Aboriginal staff across delivered by an industry trainer experienced in the a range of organisations have undertaken or achieved disability sector. In addition, a designated Workplace studies in the Advanced Diploma in Community Services Coach provides the additional classroom one on one Management, Certificate IV in Front Line Management tutoring or ‘catch-up’ support required to ensure that and the Certificate IV in Training and Assessment. A all learning goals are met. collaborative approach with the Department of Health has seen 13 Aboriginal people undertake cadetships Aboriginal Access Centre in the following areas: The Aboriginal Access Centre (AAC) works closely • nursing with various job networks in regional South Australia • community management to ensure that Aboriginal participants gain access • metal health (non-clinical) into wider TAFE SA offerings, and provide them with • community development. guidance in gaining employment at the completion of their studies. Vocational preparation programs The focus of AAC is on providing access to VET TAFE SA is committed to the delivery of education supported by the development of individual learning and training in an environment that responds to the plans and a case management approach to more effec- needs of all learners. Classes have been delivered and tively lead prospective students from unemployment promoted in community centres to increase access to vocational education, training and employment. and information on career courses and pathways to increase the reach of people in the community. Key objectives for the AAC are: • to be the preferred provider of quality education and training for Aboriginal students and communities Report On Operations
  • 38. 39Regional/ rural located learnersTAFE SA is delivering programs in regional and ruralSouth Australia to bring education and skill develop-ment opportunities to isolated individuals. TAFE SAdelivers courses either by onsite lecturers at APYTAFE or by visiting lecturers with support from theAPY TAFE. Partnerships with key government departmentsfor specific programs are enabling, for example, theDiploma of Interpreting to be delivered in APY Lands.Traineeships were also offered in 2007 and providinga pathway into higher level qualifications for those in aworkplace with a supervisor who has an understandingof a learning environment and offers ongoing supportto the trainee during their two years of training.Newly arrived migrantsThe TAFE SA Adult Migrant English Program (AMEP)continued to provide English language and settlementservices to newly arrived migrants and refugees with a13.3 percent increase between 2006 and 2007.Learners with disabilitiesTAFE SA commitment included the development of aDisability Action Plan and the ratification of the Accessand Equity Policy in 2007 as well as a high level reviewof Vocational Preparation which provides essentialsupport and skills for most disadvantaged membersof community. Education and Training for the Deaf and Auslancourses offered at Adelaide campus and Disabilitycourses offered at both Adelaide and Noarlungacampuses has seen a 30 percent increase in thenumber of students in the deaf education programwith continuing strong interest. Report On Operations
  • 39. 40 Results to be achieved - • Increase the proportion of employers engaged with (by June 2010 unless otherwise noted) the VET system –– In South Australia, the 2007 NCVER Survey of • Approach or exceed the national average for VET Employers’ Use and Views of the VET System participation found that 49.8 percent of employers surveyed South reported that they were engaged with the VET Year Australia % Australia % system in the previous 12 months. 2006 10.9 11.4 Source: 2007 NCVER Survey of Employers’ Use and Views Source: 2006 Annual National Report of the Australian Vocational of the VET System which is conducted every two years. and Technical System. • Increase by 2 percent the enrolments by Indigenous • Increase by 5 percent from June 2006 the propor- Australians at Certificate III and above qualification tion of apprentices and trainees completing their levels training to 57 percent –– subject enrolments increased by 13.8 Progress: 54.6 percent completed. An increase of percent in 2006, from 7465 in 2005 to 8492. 2.6 percent over the base year. Source: 2006 NCVER Data cubes – scope: government For the period commencing 1 July 2006 and ending 30 June funded VET activity. 2007.  Source: VENUS data store. • Decrease by 4 percent the expenditure per nominal • Exceed the national average for the proportion hour of training activity of qualification completions at Certificate III and –– Government recurrent expenditure per publicly above funded nominal hour (2006 prices) –– All VET percentage change (from previous year) South Year Australia % Australia % percentage change 2006 70.1 70.6 (from previous year) Source: 2006 NCVER Data cubes – scope: publication scope (does 2006 $17.84 0.2 not include secondary and other education). 2005 $17.80 -3.2 2004 $18.39 7.0 –– Contracts of Training (Apprentices and Source: 2006 Annual National Report of the Australian Vocational Trainees) and Technical System. Progress South Australia recorded 79 percent of traineeship and apprenticeship completions at Note: DFEEST data adjusted to reflect improved cost allocation Certificate III or above compared to 85.8 percent at the national level. and hours reporting not yet reported by NCVER. Revised cost in 2006 is $17.15. This represents a 3.65 percent reduction in costs Figures based solely on contracts of training data. Source: NCVER over 2005. data cubes, July 1994 to September 2007. • Increase the percentage of graduates unemployed before TAFE course who found work after training to 55 percent –– Not employed before commencing the training and employed after –– Result for 2007 was 47.6 percent. This represents an increase over the national average of 46.9 percent. Source: 2007 NCVER Student Outcomes Survey. Report On Operations
  • 40. 41• Double South Australia’s share of overseas students by 2014 Trends in the growth in South Australia’s overseas student enrolments for calendar years 2003-2007 25,000 6.0 5.0 20,000 No. of Overseas Students 4.0 SA Market Share 15,000 3.0 23,327 10,000 18,012 20,466 2.0 15,490 13,737 5,000 1.0 0 0.0 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Calender Year Actual Overseas Students Table above indicates that South Australian international student enrolments continue to experience strong growth in overall student numbers, reaching 23 327 students in 2007. DATA SOURCE:• Source: Actual overseas student figures is sourced from Australia Education International (AEI), Market Informa- tion Package (MIP) and uses overseas student enrolment figures for South Australia, Dec 2007 Pivot table Report On Operations
  • 41. 42 Goal 2 Provide high quality training and employment needs in ways appropriate to each region. employment and workforce Nine regional coordinators, based across the state, development services D work with the Networks to respond to each region’s FEEST leads the way in supporting indi- unique learning, training and employment challenges. viduals and communities to make informed $8.16 million was provided to assist 8035 people to choices in relation to careers and learning participate in regional projects and a total of 3145 by providing high quality employment and workforce employment outcomes were achieved with 450 000 development services. accredited and 52 000 non-accredited training hours delivered. Objectives and key initiatives In 2007 South Australia Works in the Regions 2.1 Provide access to high quality won the inaugural Premier’s Award in the category of employment Building Communities for significantly improving the (Links to SASP T1.10, T1.11, T1.12, and T1.26) way learning, training and employment programs are TAFE SA is a significant contributor in South Australia’s delivered to regional South Australia. The award is response to the shortage of skilled workers in various a testimony to the outstanding partnerships formed industries. TAFE SA provides all students with a job through the 17 Employment and Skills Formation referral service and attracting employers seeking Networks, regional development boards, local industry nominations for potential employees from TAFE SA and business, community organisations and Local and graduates. Australian governments. TAFE SA increases employability of graduates South Australia Works in the Regions assisted through training in job seeking, developing e-resumes, 1683 mature age participants, of whom 750 found e-portfolios and use of online services to obtain employment. The Employment Assistance Program employment. This is further complemented through provided services for 700 mature age people which the range of student services available and TAFE SA’s resulted in 220 employment outcomes. strong connections with local industry. South Australia Works for Indigenous People In 2006-07, over 25 000 participants were engaged improves learning and employment outcomes for in South Australia Works programs, with over 7940 Aboriginal people by providing support, job training, gaining employment, demonstrating consistent and work placements, recruitment, leadership training, successful outcomes for South Australia Works. career enhancement, traineeships and apprenticeships. People who are most disadvantaged in accessing In the Aboriginal learning and works program 1200 training and employment were provided with more participated with 484 achieving employment. and better opportunities to participate in learning, skill The Aboriginal Employment Program assists development, training and employment. In addition Aboriginal people gain employment in both the private over 787 500 accredited training hours and 391 500 and public sectors through skills development and non-accredited training hours were delivered. increasing employment and career enhancement Expenditure on learning, training and work programs opportunities. The program assisted 350 Aboriginal was $30 million, including $5.04 million of externally people, with 170 gaining employment in both the public funded programs incorporating Australian government and private sectors. funds. The Aboriginal Apprenticeship Program assists South Australia Works in the Regions partners with Aboriginal people gain employment through access regional organisations and the 17 Employment and to trade based apprenticeships in the private sector. Skills Formation Networks to identify and respond to Fifty five apprentices commenced a contract of training Report On Operations
  • 42. 43through the program, 22 were placed in the metropolitan South Australia Works with Industry identifies newarea and 33 in the regions. employment and training possibilities, helps people to develop the skills required by a changing and dynamic During 2006-07, 73 Aboriginal people achieved economy, and assists in meeting current and emergingemployment through the CareerStart SA program, 15 workforce needs.people from the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjantjara(APY) lands commenced a traineeship. The South Australia Works with Industry programs facilitated 2205 businesses taking on the skilled The South Australian Police (SAPOL) Indigenous workers they need both in the short term and longerTraineeship program recruited 10 young Aboriginal term. These initiatives contributed to South Australia’speople into traineeships in both operational and service productivity while meeting the training and work needsdelivery areas. This was the first recruitment strategy of individuals.undertaken by SAPOL that exclusively targeted youngAboriginal people. South Australia Works to Recognise Skills, assists people to have their skills and qualifications recognised Tauondi College provided accredited and culturally for the purpose of finding meaningful employmentappropriate vocational education training to Aboriginal in South Australia. The program provides informa-students. In 2006-07, Tauondi delivered over 90 000 tion, brokerage and referral services in the areasaccredited training hours and 34 500 cultural training of recognition of both overseas and locally gainedhours to 300 full-time equivalent students. qualifications and skills, career development and South Australia Works for Mature Aged People pathways to employment. Nine hundred and forty sixcontinued to develop early intervention strategies by individuals were assisted with recognition of academicproviding training, upskilling and employment programs qualifications and/or trade skills, with 500 people beingfor people 40 years and over. offered employment support. The program provided opportunities for mature The Workforce Development Fund supportedaged unemployed people to learn about today’s industry wide initiatives that focused on developinglabour market to improve their chances of finding high performance workplaces, supported coordi-work. Training and upskilling were provided while nated workforce planning and addressed workforcesimultaneously encouraging enterprises to support issues that restrict growth or service provision. Thethe employment of older workers. A total of 3050 Fund forged closer links with ISBs and funded 7mature-aged participants were engaged in a range of workforce development and planning projects. Overprograms with 1295 gaining employment. 1850 businesses from a range of industry sectors, including hairdressing and beauty, metal fabrication, The Employment 40Plus Program consisted of non-government disability services, defence, mininga series of forums providing mature age jobseek- and community participated in workforce developmenters with an increased understanding of the current projects. Three industry clusters were established tolabour market and information about services and address workforce issues for South Australian majorprograms available to assist them to find work. 400 defence and mining sector projects, contributing tomature aged people participated in metropolitan and identified skill priorities. This included identifying theregional forums/workshops through the program, with implications of these programs on the community120 gaining employment. The two employer forums infrastructure sector.held during the year were very successful with 79employers attending. The women’s forum, held at A joint initiative of the Australian and State govern-TAFE SA Regency Campus, attracted 86 participants ments: the Labour Market Adjustment Initiative,and received positive feedback from both participants provided workers retrenched from Mitsubishi Motorsand employer organisations that attended. Australia, General Motors Holden and Electrolux with assistance in transitioning to alternative employment. Report On Operations
  • 43. 44 Training and skill development activities, particularly 2.2 Increase and improve workforce for skills in demand, were developed to enhance the participation in learning and work support offered to individuals through the Australian (Links to SASP T1.12, T6.20, and T6.21) Government’s Job Network system. Assistance was DFEEST undertook comprehensive research and also provided to displaced workers from AGL, Ion consultation to identify existing barriers to employ- Automotive, Nexus Furniture, Primo Smallgoods, ment and how these could be overcome. The major Conroy’s Smallgoods, TI Automotive and Tenneco. findings from this research indicate that future options In 2006-07 tailored assistance was provided to to increase workforce participation are dependent 866 displaced workers, with 575 gaining alternative upon: employment. • arresting and reversing the decline of male labour InSkill SA fosters workforce development opportuni- force participation, especially of men aged 35-50 ties through the government’s procurement process. with low skill levels. In 2006-07, 350 businesses that tendered or applied • sustaining and increasing female labour force par- for South Australian government works and service ticipation, particularly the participation of women contracts and associated sub contracts valued at of childbearing age. $250 000 or more per annum, registered with InSkill • improving and extending the participation in the SA. labour market of South Australians aged 50 years and over. • improving the skill level of those who face major difficulties gaining employment. • increasing further education and training opportuni- ties for persons with low levels of skill who are on the margins of the labour force. The research also found that low education and skills was one of the most common reasons for reducing a person’s ability to secure work and that this issue was intensified according to age, disability and caring responsibilities. Overwhelmingly the most common barrier to improving education and skills was the cost associated with participating in further education and training. The qualitative and quantitative research data is being used to develop new strategies for increasing the workforce participation of those who are most disad- vantaged in the labour market, including Aboriginal workers, mature age workers, vulnerable workers, women and young people. Access to industry and employers is a primary component of TAFE SA education and training agenda. Through localised networks, customised programs and linkages with industry and employers, TAFE SA is well positioned to transition students into employment and improve the involvement and up take of the workforce in both learning and job security. Report On Operations
  • 44. 45Aaron Bennett of A’nB Constructions, TAFE SA graduate and National Workskills winner in the plastering fibroustrade, is heading off to London to participate in the Corporate Leadership Development Program with otherstudents from around Australia. Report On Operations
  • 45. 46 For example, TAFE SA hospitality and cookery regional areas and often gain jobs as a result of this divisions have specific responsibility to assist students industry involvement. from full time programs to gain employment place- Fashion Retail partnered with IKEA to construct ments either full or part time, both during the course garments from IKEA’s new textile range for an in-store and after the course. All students in the hospitality fashion parade and exhibition. The garments were made program have casual employment to complement their by TAFE SA Fashion Stylist and Visual Merchandising training, within six weeks of course commencement. students and Fashion Event Management students Employment outcomes from Cookery, Hospitality, assisted IKEA with staging of the event, giving them Sport and Recreation programs continue to exceed excellent work experience within the industry. The 98 percent. preview parade was held for media, TAFE SA and IKEA Electronics Programs offer a number of initiatives to staff, industry and contacts. help students connect with industry including industry- TAFE SA Tourism students regularly undertake based scholarships which involve work experience research for the Australian Competition and Consumer and regular industry presentations to existing TAFE Commission (ACCC) at the Adelaide Airport Limited. students to promote employment opportunities to all Now in its eighth year, the Quality Service Survey is Electronics students. conducted and coordinated by the Tourism program at For example, TAFE SA has further responded to Adelaide City Campus in March and September each the need for primary producers to be proactive to year by students in the Diploma of Tourism. the effects of drought. Through Phase seven of the SA Government Drought Response Strategy, TAFE SA will provide $1.5 million of training in machinery operations and logistics training over the current and the next financial year. Training will range from forklift licensing to B Double and Dump Truck operator licens- ing. The net effect will be that primary producers will be increasingly viable through off farm transport and logistics employment, or they will transition away from farming and into industries like mining, transport or forestry. The TAFE SA trainee and apprenticeship program is exceptionally flexible with the vast majority of training done in the workplace or through flexible learning strategies. The Tourism program offers a vocational placement service that links students with industry. Many students either gain a job as a result of the placement at that workplace or this link with industry enables them to network within the industry which then leads to work. The organised placement has employers approaching the program to find students to work with them for up to 8 weeks (either in June/July or Dec/Jan). Event management students regularly participate in events being held in the metropolitan and close Report On Operations
  • 46. 472.3 Foster career development The Community Services and Health Program in(Links to SASP T6.15, T6.19) TAFE SA delivers the Australian Career DevelopmentTAFE SA is committed to fostering career development Studies and has completed extensive training to DECSopportunities and instigated several programs in 2007 and Youth and Regional Partnership staff. The Careerto facilitate the translation of learning into personal and Development trainers provide professional develop-professional development for students and staff. ment opportunities for a wide range of organisations and communities to understand the new world of work The young leaders program encompassed students and strategic workforce development.from Bakery, Cookery and Hospitality programs whowere allocated senior industry mentors and case To better coordinate and expand its commitment tomanagers during the three years of their program. A career development as a fundamental part of Southfocus is on personal career development during this Australia’s Workforce Development Strategy DFEEST,unique program, with excellent results already being in collaboration with DECS, DTED and Departmentachieved. Families and Communities and representatives from the Catholic and Independent schools sectors, is currently The young leaders program is for current employees leading the development of a career developmentin these sectors and designed to increase retention of initiative (provisionally titled CareersSA), that will informskilled workers in the industry through the provision the strategic directions for career development serviceof up skilling opportunities for current employees to provision for all South Australians across the wholeprovide better business outcomes for their employer of their lives.(or themselves if in their own business). TAFE SA is inthe second year of the program, only taking one groupof approximately 20 candidates (who are nominatedby industry) each year. The first group finishes at theend of 2008. Qualitative feedback from employers, mentors andthe students themselves demonstrate the program atthis stage to be highly successful. Several studentshave already stated that it has enabled them to developskills and attitudes that have kept them in this industrysector, many have already been promoted and employ-ers have made extremely positive comments as to thesignificantly increased capacity and ability of their staffwho are in this program. It is however, only a part of a far greater workforcedevelopment strategy in these industry sectors thatTAFE SA has introduced in partnership with the industryskills council, key industry associations and Strategonas a private provider. The other elements of this strat-egy include case management in the apprentice andtrainee areas, development of the new dual qualifica-tions and development of new industry engagementprograms. All initiatives are targeted at changing thenature of TAFE’s relationship with employers and theway employers view training as a vehicle to improvetheir businesses. Report On Operations
  • 47. 48 2.4 Provide high quality workforce requires a workforce of trained compliance and development services to industry and enforcement officers. This venture builds on the the community organisational strengths and capacities of CEMAC (Links to SASP T1.10, T1.11, T1.12, and T1.26) in environmental law and the compliance and en- TAFE SA has strong links with the local public and forcement expertise of Justice Studies. private education providers. These links include As at June 2007, there were 3489 trainees and TAFE SA representation on the Steering Committee apprentices employed by 12 group training organi- for the DECS Trades Schools of the Future, the Board sations jointly funded by the State and Australian of the Australian Technical College – Spencer Gulf Governments through the Joint Group Training Program. and Outback (ATC – SC&O), and the Polly Farmer Collectively, these organisations received $2.25 million Foundation Project in Port Augusta. to support commencement, retention and completion Local links in the industry and community ensure TAFE of trainees and apprentices. SA is engaged in the processes of addressing educa- Throughout the year, the department audited five tion, training and workforce development needs in a group training organisations for compliance with coordinated manner. Outcomes for 2007 included: the National Standards, including two organisations • increased industry pathways developed between that had not previously been assessed against the Southern Flinders Rangers Regional Development standards. This brings the number of group training Board, John Pirie Secondary School and TAFE SA organisations assessed as being compliant with the (Port Pirie) as a conduit into employment National Standards in South Australia to 19. • several Alternative Learning Option Programs (ALOP) An information service promotes traineeships and ran concurrently across the state apprenticeships to the community and assists clients • Youth Pathways program operating across regional with queries relating to their contracts of training. South Australia During 2007 there were 23 285 enquiries (or an average • Taste of TAFE program for secondary students run- of 448 per week) received by the Information Service, ning each year at a number of sites. For Northern representing an increase of 8774 enquiries since the and Yorke regions, this accounted for approximately service’s inception in 2005. This represents a growth 300 secondary school students attending this pro- of 60 percent since 2005 and 31 percent in the past gram for this region 12 months. • a range of projects initiated by TAFE SA in the engineering and skill shortage areas in collabora- The promotion of Training and Skills Commission tion with industry and enterprises and professional Guidelines for competency based traineeship and organisations, which enable seamless career path- apprenticeship completions, which enable trainees ways from school to TAFE SA through school-based and apprentices to complete their contracts of training apprenticeships. These projects in the resource when they are assessed as being competent rather industry and engineering are currently regarded as than once they have served a predetermined period the basis of a future model of collaboration between of time, has played a significant part in increasing the Trade Schools for the Future and TAFE SA as a completions by 40 percent in the March quarter. provider of traineeships and apprenticeships • a collaborative venture established by TAFE SA Justice Studies with the Centre for Environmental Management and Compliance (CEMAC) of the University of South Australia. The venture was designed to deliver environmental compliance and enforcement training. Implementation of state and commonwealth environmental protection legislation Report On Operations
  • 48. 492.5 Improve workforce planning and As part of the South Australian Wine Industryinformation Employment Strategy, a workforce profile of the state’s(Links to SASP T1.10, T1.11, T1.12, and T1.26) wine industry was developed. This profile will informThe DFEEST Workforce Information Service website, the further development of the Employment StrategyWIS Online is an important means of providing a range and is expected to be updated with more recent (2006)of workforce information and planning tools relating to Census data in early 2008. The profile also appearsSouth Australia’s workforce and its development. These in WIS Online.support and engage a range of workforce development Workforce action plans for the mineral and defencepractitioners in government, industry, and the wider sectors are currently underway, based upon compre-community. New functionality has been introduced to hensive workforce planning undertaken with majorimprove delivery and content to a variety of audiences enterprises in 2006. The Defence Workforce Actionthrough a free user subscription facility. Plan will be developed in conjunction with the Defence WIS Online content covers several broad themes Skills Cluster initiative and the recently completedrelating to workforce development and industry infor- Defence Workforce Survey.mation; workforce planning and tools; and provides a Construction, agri-food, health and advanced manu-resource gateway to current and topical information. facturing workforce action plans have commenced, Regular products profiling demographic groups and in conjunction with relevant ISBs and governmentindustries in the state, research on barriers to workforce agencies.participation, and interactive discussion forums havealso been developed. By early December, there hadbeen over 7500 visits to the site (50 percent of thesebeing new visitors), with over 27 000 page views ofthe site’s content. As part of the implementation of the WorkforceDevelopment Strategy Better Skills Better WorkBetter State, DFEEST commissioned three researchreports from the Workforce Development ResearchConsortium:• High Performance Workplaces: Developing Standards and Reporting Tools• Workforce Planning Tools and Practitioners: Preva- lence, Scope and Quality• Mapping the Life-Course Experiences of SA Men and Women in the Labour Market. DFEEST was an industry partner to the threeyear Australian Research Council Industry Linkageresearch project (Demographic change, ageing and theworkforce: An integrated model to inform workforcedevelopment and planning in Australia). The projectwas concluded in September and has raised the aware-ness of strategies to meet the workforce challenges andstrengthened the network of workforce practitionersin South Australia. Report On Operations
  • 49. 50 Results to be achieved – –– I n d i g e n o u s People from 29 (by June 2010 unless otherwise noted) percent in June 2006 to 41 percent Twelve hundred Aboriginal people participated in • Increase the number of participants in SA Works learn- learning and work programs, with 484 achieving ing and work programs to 25 000 or more per annum employment. This resulted in an increase in the In 2006-07, over 25 000 participants were engaged proportion of employment outcomes for South in South Australia Works initiative, with over 7940 Australia Works for Indigenous People from 29 gaining employment and met the annual target of percent in June 2006 to 40 percent in June 2007. 25 000 participants. The employment outcomes The program is on track to reach the target of 41 were in addition to opportunities gained for further percent in June 2008. learning arising from participation in SA Works –– Labour Market Adjustment Program from programs. 65 percent in June 2006 to 67 percent • Maintain the number of Aboriginal Apprentices in In 2006-07 tailored assistance was provided to training above 170 with a further 1300 participants 866 displaced workers, with 575 gaining alternative in SA Works for Indigenous People per annum employment. This resulted in an increase in the The total number of apprentices in training peaked proportion of employment outcomes for the above 170, and is contributing to the target of 1300 Labour Market Adjustment Program from 65 participants in South Australia Works for Indigenous percent in June 2006 to 66 percent in June 2007. People in 2007. The program is on track to reach the target of • Increase the proportion of employment outcomes 67 percent by 2010. for the total number of participants in SA Works • Increase the proportion of work outcomes for SA Works from 28 percent in June 2006 to 33 percent in the Regions from 34 percent in 2006 to 41 percent The proportion of employment outcomes for the $8.16 million was provided to assist 8035 people to total number of participants increased from 28 participate in regional projects and a total of 3145 percent in June 2006 to 32 percent in June 2007, employment outcomes were achieved. In addition, demonstrating consistent and successful outcomes 450 000 accredited and 52 000 non-accredited for South Australia Works. The initiative is on track training hours were delivered. This effort resulted to reach the target of 33 percent in 2008. in an increase in the proportion of work outcomes • Increase the proportion of employment outcomes for South Australia Works in the Regions from 34 in SA Works for: percent in June 2006 to 39 percent in June 2007. –– M a t u r e Aged People from 30 The program is on track to reach the target of 41 percent in June 2006 to 44 percent percent in 2008. Three thousand and fifty mature-aged participants were engaged in a range of programs with 1295 gaining employment. This resulted in an increase in the proportion of employment outcomes for South Australia Works for Mature-Aged People from 30 percent in June 2006 to 43 percent in June 2007. The program is on track to reach the target of 44 percent by June 2008. Report On Operations
  • 50. 51Goal 3 Ensure young people an apprenticeship or traineeship, training at TAFE, or employment.are supported in reaching their Work commenced on the development of a web-full potential and actively based resource to promote labour market information,engaged in learning, training, analysis and related career resources. A priority waswork and in their communitiesD achieving accessibility for a range of users, including FEEST has a pivotal role in supporting school teachers, vocational and career counsellors, young people to make informed choices students, parents, employers and businesses. At the about their lives and career pathways and completion of the design phase the website will offerto be actively engaged in their communities, in educa- a range of labour market information, resources andtion, training and/or work. products providing analysis and interpretation of the labour market, skills requirements, and other, relatedObjectives and key initiatives occupational, industry, training and career information. The site will link to updated career and occupational3.1 Ensure South Australians aged 15 to information on related websites, including the TAFE SA24 have the skills and opportunities to website which is being expanded to integrate informa-make successful transitions from school or tion from the South Australian Occupational Matrix.unemployment to education, training The website will also provide a forum for discussionor work on related issues, for example, the social and “soft”(Links to SASP T6.15, T 6.19, skills required for particular occupations which canT6.20, and T6.21) form the basis for curriculum-based approaches toTransitions through learning and employment and informing and educating young people about planningtailored responses form the basis of a proposal to their careers.establish an Inter-Ministerial Committee on Learning DFEEST supports the Minister’s Youth Council, aand Work focusing on young people 15 to 24, particularly group of young people, aged 14-25, who provide thethose facing multiple barriers to participation in learn- Minister for Youth with firsthand advice about howing and work. As part of its commitment to meeting young people are engaging with a range of issues.SASP targets, DFEEST has developed a learning and In 2007 the council strengthened its research focus,work package for young people aged 15-19 who have exploring the challenges newly arrived refugees anddisengaged from school, work or further education/ migrants are up against, providing input into thetraining. The package is designed to facilitate the implementation of future SACE and discussing howengagement of young people in learning and work the issues that led to the Cronulla riots can be avoidedby providing them with the necessary skills, support in South Australia.and resources. Considerable work has been undertaken on youth It provides young people with case management, policy issues particularly early childhood development,accredited training, and an individual learning and recruitment and retention of Generations X and Y inwork plan, based around individual needs, aspirations the public service and succession planning in familyand goals. Elements of the package include an initial business.assessment of the young person’s language, literacyand numeracy needs, their social, medical and other In 2007 DFEEST provided $168 000 in grants to 56needs, and referrals to appropriate service providers. local councils to support the Youth Advisory CommitteeA case manager will assist with the development of a (YAC) program designed to assist local councils workpersonal profile and individual learning and work plan with young people aged 12-25 to plan and mangewhich will map out the young person’s pathway to a activities and projects that encourage young people’smeaningful outcome – a return to full-time schooling, active engagement in their local communities. Further, Report On Operations
  • 51. 52 $31 871 YAC Diversity Funds were allocated to 23 on a range of conservation projects, with 110 gain- councils to help engage marginalised young people ing employment. Learn to Earn provided training in the program. to 117 disadvantaged young people and 30 gained employment. A pilot program of youth consultations was held in late 2007 to begin the development of the next stage 882 school aged students participated in two of the Youth Action Plan. The pilot program saw 200 Social Inclusion Initiatives, the Alternative Learning young people in the Mount Gambier area consulted. Options Program and the Adult Community Education Youth Works Program. Of these, 729 returned to Getting young people to be part of the decisions school, 29 went on to further training, and 36 achieved that affect their lives was the theme of Involve, a three employment. day event that placed a youth lens on South Australia’s Strategic Plan. Involve aimed to get agencies thinking The Skills Register supported 341 young people about how young people can best be involved in the who had successfully completed a traineeship to find decision making process and how both young people ongoing employment in the public sector. Sixty of these and the agency can be positively influenced by the gained an ongoing employment placement through outcomes of those decisions. the register. The active8 Premier’s Youth Challenge is a school This resulted in an increase in the proportion of based youth development program that supports employment outcomes for South Australia Works for young people’s engagement with their community. Young People from 38.4 per cent in June 2006 to 40.7 In 2007 over $500 000 was provided to 51 active8 percent in June 2007. The program is on track to reach programs that engaged 1,152 young people. The the target of 41 per cent in June 2008. program provides young people with a connection to South Australia Works in the Public Sector supports their local community and personal and skill develop- the creation of a highly skilled and responsive govern- ment opportunities. ment sector, by providing opportunities to train and Each active8 participant undertakes first aid training work in the public sector, especially for people who with cardio pulmonary resuscitation and at least eight are disadvantaged in the job market. hours of volunteering. As a result, the active8 program The government’s Skills Recruitment Strategy, participants volunteered for approximately 9 200 hours ‘CareerStart SA’ and the Skills Register programs, in 2007. In addition the participants undertake a wide facilitated a work force planning approach to the recruit- range of activities such as outdoor adventure activi- ment of trainees, apprentices, cadets and apprentices ties, conservation work, surf lifesaving and leadership across public sector agencies. State government training. departments developed an Annual Skills Recruitment South Australia Works for Young People assists Plan which will guide the activity of the CareerStart young people by giving them the skills and opportuni- SA program in 2008. ties to move successfully from school, further education Annual targets of approximately 600 per annum and training or unemployment into stable, rewarding were set to ensure an accumulative total of 1950 over work. These projects and activities contribute to three years. initiatives 1, 2 and 6 of the Skills Statement. The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award engages young Over 4240 young people participated in programs people in a range of activities that encourage physical with 1726 gaining employment. Of these, 2200 partici- activity, community service and skill development. The pated in South Australia Works in the Regions projects Award consists of three levels: Bronze, Silver and Gold, with 1265 of them gaining employment. and young people receive formal recognition for their Seven Youth Conservation Corps projects provided achievements at each stage. The total number of young 200 young people with practical work experience people registering for the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award Report On Operations
  • 52. 53during 2007 was 1,382. Of these, 633 participants Dreams to Reality Projectcompleted their Bronze, Silver or Gold Award. This Hospitality program reported successful outcomes for the 2007 Dreams to Reality project which involved The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award had a range of partnering of South Australia Works, TAFE SA, Savepositive outcomes for participants including the involve- the Children and Hyatt Regency Adelaide. Eleven outment of young people in community volunteering, of work and disadvantaged teenagers were involvedassisting young people to gain employment and help- in the program and were provided with a two-weeking participants to remain engaged in education and intensive introduction to knowledge and skills requiredtraining programs. In May the 44th Anniversary Gala to be a chef, including cooking techniques, nutrition,Dinner raised over $50 000 to support participation kitchen hygiene and occupational health and safety atin the Award. the Hospitality program at Adelaide Campus.TAFE SA is a significant contributor in South Australia’s Training was complemented by on-the-job workresponse to the shortage of skilled workers in various experience at the Hyatt Regency Adelaide hotel.industries. TAFE SA is seen as a major recruiting agency, Participants completed their training program byproviding all students with a job referral service and using their new skills in a real life scenario at theattracting respected employers seeking nominations Save the Children Gala Dinner with 300 plus guestsfor potential employees from TAFE SA graduates. in attendance. Dreams to Reality program resulted in 11 students completing the program and receiving parchments, nine students had apprenticeship offers. Kickstart Program TAFE SA Adelaide South won $60 000 funding from the SA Works Alternative Learning Options Program (ALOP). The ‘Kickstart’ program enables TAFE SA to link with several schools, industry partners, parents and young people in the southern districts to provide key vocational skills development. Skills areas included advanced manufacturing, building and construction, retail, health and hospitality. Putting learners at the centre of a model for engaged and motivated learning, the program supports disengaged youth to re-engage with school, TAFE or work through individualised and mentoring programs. Report On Operations
  • 53. 54 Stacy Miller recently completed Certificate III in Laboratory Skills and is now studying the Diploma of Laboratory Technology and works for the Institute of Medical and Veterinary Science. Report On Operations
  • 54. 55Disadvantaged youth Results to be achieved -TAFE SA has been trialling an industry-led program (by June 2010 unless otherwise noted)that works with disadvantaged youth which creates • Increase the number of 15-19 year olds engaged fullopportunities for workplace learning on the job and time in school, work or further education / trainingincreasing young people’s confidence and self-esteem. (or a combination thereof) to 90 percentThis has involved a partnership with The Smith Family Progress: The department is on track to reach itsand Department of Education and Children’s Services 2010 target. The 2006 result is 82.7 percent/ independent schools in the southern metropolitanarea, in the areas of manufacturing / engineering and • Increase by 5 percent the number of youngcommunity services. people aged 15–24 in traineeships and appren- ticeships from 19 900 at June 2006 to 20 900 The ‘Learn to Earn’ program has demonstrated Progress: As at 30 June 2007, the number of younghow TAFE SA implements strategies for delivering people aged 15-24 in traineeships and appren-equity among under-represented groups. TAFE SA ticeships increased to 20 223. This equates to anhas worked hard to provide equity of learning to this increase of 1.6 percent on the 19 900 that weregroup by creating a youth friendly environment and reported one year earlier. The department is ona student-centred hands-on approach to learning target to reach its goal of 20 900 young people agedthrough task-based projects. 15-24 in traineeships and apprenticeships by 2010. Eight hundred and eighty two school aged studentsparticipated in two Social Inclusion Initiatives, theAlternative Learning Options Program and the AdultCommunity Education Youth Works Program. Of these,729 returned to school, 29 went on to further training,and 36 achieved employment. The Skills Register supported 341 young peoplewho had successfully completed a traineeship to findongoing employment in the public sector. Sixty of thesegained an ongoing employment placement throughthe register. Formal mechanisms are in place to address griev-ances and disputes that may arise in the traineeship andapprenticeship system. In 2007, 60 complaints aboutcontract of training matters by employers, apprenticesor trainees were resolved through formal mediation,while 82 matters were referred to the Grievances andDisputes Mediation Committee of the Training andSkills Commission for determination. Report On Operations
  • 55. 56 3.2 ensure many more young to young people leaving the juvenile justice system, people are engaged in political and providing young people from the Anangu Pitjantjara civic life in their communities Yankunytjatjara (APY) lands with appropriate access to Seventy seven Minister for Youth’s Leadership Grants further training and work options and a peer education valued at $35 486 were provided to young people aged program to educate young people on the prevention 12-25 in 2007. Funding is provided to support and of violence by and against young people. encourage young people to contribute to their local community and develop or enhance their leadership Results to be achieved - skills. Activities funded included participation in the • Increase by 27 percent the number of young people One and All sailing voyage, attending the 2007 Young volunteering in their local communities through youth Leaders’ Day conference and organising a conference programs from 3296 at June 2007 to 4200 volunteers for young women focusing on health, fitness and self Increase of 42 percent to 4684 young people vol- esteem. unteering in their local communities through youth programs National Youth Week (NYW) is the single largest • A minimum of 30 percent of all Office for youth event in Australia. It celebrates the contribution Youth grant funding to initiatives which young people make to Australian lives and communi- e ngage di s adva nt age d young pe ople ties and is delivered through a collaboration between 32.1 percent of Office for Youth Grant funding DFEEST and local councils. Grants of $1 500 were to initiatives which engage disadvantaged young made available to local councils to fund NYW activi- people ($457 760) ties. Free event management and media training is • Increase by 43 percent the number of young people also provided to young people involved in organising involved in government and community decision- NYW activities. Eighty young people attended this making processes from 1400 in June 2007 to 2000 training and 15 000 young people attended a vast Increase of 52 percent to 2131 young people array of events hosted by 57 local councils across involved in government and community decision the state. Events included a battle of the bands making process. contest, leadership forums, art exhibitions and sporting competitions. In 2007, a new initiative was introduced, the Minister for Youth’s Community Engagement Grants. This provides grants of $750 to organisations for projects that support young people to engage with and contrib- ute to their community and to undertake leadership opportunities. Nine Minister for Youth’s Community Engagement Grants worth $6 315 were provided to organisations for projects including working with young people under the Guardianship of the Minister to develop leadership skills, and developing participation and leadership skills with a group of young people with disabilities. A further scheme provided 2007, 17 Youth Engagement Grants totalling $268 100 to a range of organisations that work with young people to increase their community participation. Projects which were funded addressed a range of issues including mentoring Report On Operations
  • 56. 57Goal 4 Provide a coordinated, Wine Innovation Cluster has received support from Constellation SA to create a focal point for researchwhole of government approach and knowledge transfer that addresses significant chal-to the development of an lenges facing the Australian wine industry.  Participantsinnovative communityD in the cluster include the Australian Wine Research FEEST provides a coordinated, whole-of- Institute, CSIRO, the SA Research and Development government approach to the development Institute, Provisor and the University of Adelaide. and implementation of strategic policy A mapping project of the defence research andadvice in science, innovation and the information development capabilities of the state’s 3 establishedeconomy to support the Government’s goals of universities was undertaken. It also surveyed the R&Deconomic development, environment protection, needs of the state’s large and small-to-medium enter-social inclusion and enhancing state-wide community prises engaged in the defence sector. Survey resultsprosperity. identified the strategic research strengths and enabled DFEEST has committed to this via the state’s 10 advice to be provided to Defence SA regarding optimalyear vision for science, technology and innovation STI10, collaborative arrangements involving state, industry andwhich is the government’s main policy framework for research institutions in bidding for a Commonwealthbuilding innovation as a central feature of the state’s defence research funding centre program announced ineconomy and future identity. late 2007. Arising from this, 2 major funding applications were submitted to the Commonwealth.Objectives and key initiatives: As a result of funding committed from the 2006 round the Government committed $4.2 million to co-invest4.1 Build science, technology and in five new cooperative research centres (CRCs).innovation capability and infrastructure This funding is in addition to the state government’s(Links to SASP T4.6, T4.9, T4.10, T4.11) co-investment in previous CRC selection rounds.Constellation SA is an initiative to enhance collaborationand knowledge transfer from researchers to end- The Australian Seafood CRC is to be headquar-users such as industry and the broader community.  tered in South Australia. The five CRCs will attract aThe initiative will serve as a decision and investment total investment across Australia of $156m from theframework to focus resources on research capabilities Australian Government over seven years.that help drive innovation in areas of state strategic The four other CRCs that will attract funding to thepriority.   state are for: Key alliances identified under Constellation SA • Sheep Industry Innovation – aims to improve woolinclude defence and advanced manufacturing, health and meat quality as well as the efficiency of sheepand medical science and minerals and energy.  To productionunderpin the alliances  and clusters, effort will be • Future Farm Industries – represents a unique co-focused on building the state’s capacity in the enabling investment between the meat, grains and wooltechnologies such as biotechnology and Information industry research corporations to develop perennialand Communication Technology (ICT). DFEEST will plant production that transforms dry land agriculturework in conjunction with other agencies to estab- across southern and eastern Australialish and facilitate the Constellation SA framework. • Rail CRC – will research new rail engineering Funding was also provided to support the develop- technologies, safety improvements and businessment and establishment of clusters where research- processes to benefit Australia’s rail industryers and end-users of research will come together totackle specific industry problems.  As an example, the Report On Operations
  • 57. 58 The South Australian Broadband Research and Education Network (SABRENet) is an optical-fibre telecom- munications network constructed in metropolitan Adelaide to link the state’s major Research and Education sites, including university campuses, research precincts and teaching hospitals. Report On Operations
  • 58. 59• Biomarker Translation - will develop diagnostic and samples at Glenside, as part of a national geoscience antibody-based therapeutic agents that target cells data base, complemented by the establishment of involved in major diseases, including autoimmune South Australian-based geospatial nodes as part diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. This CRC of a national satellite-based network to develop a also has two large US biotechnology companies; BD model of the Earth’s crust. Biosciences and Amgen as commercial partners. As part of the 2007 NCRIS funding round, significant assistance was provided to establishing a consortiumNational Collaborative Research of state government agencies in the health, safety andInfrastructure Strategy (NCRIS) education sectors to develop a proposal for a stateNCRIS is a $542m five-year Commonwealth-funded clinical data linkage unit (for a share of $20m to benational program, operating from 2006-07 until 2010-11, announced in 2008) which will also be integrated withto establish major scientific research infrastructure a national unit.for Australia’s research community. It is the onlyCommonwealth source of funding available to the 4.2 Support the implementation of thestates for large-scale scientific infrastructure for the Information Economy Agenda (Linksnext five years. to SASP T4.6, T4.9, T4.10, T4.11) During 2007 contract finalisation was achieved The Industry Blueprint titled Information andfor eight recipients. New facilities which are being Communications Technology – Driving Growth for Southfunded are: Australia was developed under the guidance of the Information Economy Advisory Board, in consultation1. Specialised Microfluidics Fabrication Facility (at the with a wide range of industry and research stakeholders Ian Wark Research Institute) in response to the economic development challenges2. Food and Beverage Node of Australian Metabo- of South Australia’s Strategic Plan. lomics Facility (at the Australian Wine Research Institute, Waite campus) Released in December 2007, the document proposes3. South Australian Regional Microscopy and Microa- actions to strengthen the role of ICT in ensuring the nalysis node (across all three South Australian continuing growth of all SA industry. universities, with new equipment to be located at the Ian Wark Research Institute and the Adelaide ICT Skills Microscopy unit at the University of Adelaide) The restructured IEAB has turned its focus to issues4. Mouse Phenomics and Large Animal Imaging of ICT skills shortages in the state’s economy. Research Facilities at the Institute of Medical and The IEAB will make recommendations for govern- Veterinary Science’s (IMVS) Gilles Plains Field ment policy action, and will align its work with that Station being conducted in other jurisdictions - in particular5. Creation of a South Australian-based permanent the Industry Leadership Group being hosted at a high frequency radar system (SAIMOS) as part of national level by the Australian Information Industries a national coastal marine environment monitoring Association and the Australian Computer Society, and network auspiced by the Australian government - but with a6. South Australian BioFuels pilot plant node at West focus on the specific needs of the local economy. Beach to demonstrate micro-algal biodiesel ca- pability7. upport of Hospira Adelaide Limited’s cell manufac- S turing facility at Thebarton to assist the company in pursuing US Food and Drug Administration compli- ance for its microbial cell manufacturing services8. Development of a Virtual Core Library of mining core Report On Operations
  • 59. 60 Digital Bridge e-Business The continued development of digital bridge programs The e-Business program (eBizSA) aims to increase the acknowledges the growth of digital technology and its effective use of online technologies by South Australian significance to our society. It is imperative to ensure small to medium sized enterprises (SMEs). The program that individuals and communities have the opportunity provides funding support on a dollar-for-dollar basis to benefit from the use of online resources and services to help ensure that South Australian SMEs remain for economic development, environment protection competitive within an increasingly global economy. and state-wide community prosperity. Recent projects supported by the department ICT support for rural and remote communities contin- include: ued as a priority. The Outback Connect Program • staging a number of e-business related seminars provides basic ICT training and technical support and workshops throughout metropolitan and regional via a virtual classroom to very remote regions. As of South Australia, in conjunction with Business Enter- December 2007 the project had 803 clients, including prise Centres and Regional Development Boards 146 Aboriginal clients and had delivered over 5800 • as part of the E-Business for Exporters Program - a hours of training. dollar-for-dollar funding program to improve online The innovative project model and success of the presence and transactional capabilities of emerging Outback Connect Project team has been recognised and existing exporters with the project winning the inaugural Australian • online selling and marketing workshops for SMEs Community ICT Award for the Government Agency in the western suburbs and the Adelaide CBD. of the Year. Support for ICT Industry Association Digital Literacy The ICT sector is a major contributor to South Australia’s The implementation of a Digital Literacy project economic growth both as an industry in its own right extended opportunities in regional areas for the and as an enabler for other industry sectors. The access and use of social networking technologies department during the reporting period, provided that increased the technological literacy of regional funding under a performance-based contract to the South Australians. Electronics Industry Association for its education initiative (ei2) which aims to: e-Learning • promote University Shared Expertise by building A series of workshops provided technical and pedagogi- on the current availability of shared courses and cal background, which assisted 25 participating private escalating the uptake of these courses by university RTOs to develop a business case and scope a small students e-learning project. Ten of these undertook targeted • implement an industry based internship program e – learning projects. The model was commended by for senior students, the Australian Flexible Learning Framework and funding • foster TAFE/university and industry collaboration in for another round has been secured for 2008. curriculum development and learning pathways • further develop mentoring, cadetship and work ex- perience programs to prepare students for careers in electronics • promote careers in electronics, particularly to pri- mary and secondary school students • develop postgraduate and workforce development programs for electronics industry professionals and para-professionals. Report On Operations
  • 60. 614.3 Stimulate the state’s economy through platforms. In addition to sponsorship, the IE Directoratebetter application of research encouraging contributes project support.transfer and application of knowledge Due to the success of the mEgaSA, other states(Links to SASP T4.6) expressed interest in the program being run in theirSince its establishment in 2003, as a result of recom- states. To make this possible, funding was sought, andmendations by the Premier’s Science and Research was granted, from the Department of Education, ScienceCouncil (PSRF), a total of $15 million has been and Training (DEST) of the Australian Government, andcommitted through four rounds of the PSRF to support the program has been extended to VIC and NSW. Thestrategic research projects in South Australia. The mEgaAU incubator program will commence in the threefund operates on a competitive basis, with one round states in February 2008.being conducted each year. Investments made by thegovernment through the fund are aimed at developingresearch infrastructure and capabilities and applyingnew knowledge for the strategic benefit – economic,environmental and/or social – of the state. In the 2006-07 round, the fund invested a total of$3.8 million in five research projects. Projects that have been supported through thePSRF since its inception are distributed across theConstellation SA Alliance areas of:• health and medical sciences• defence• minerals and energy• agriculture, food and wine• visual and performing arts• natural resource management and climate change• society and the citizen.4.4 Exploit advanced communicationtechnologies to benefit learning, skillsand training for all South Australians(Links to SASP T4.8)mEgaSA (Mobile Enterprise Growth Alliance SouthAustralia) is a collaboration between DFEEST, universi-ties, Department of Premier and Cabinet and industrywhich aims to increase the size and capability of themobile content and applications industry in SouthAustralia. The initiative comprises an incubator programwhich is open to both students and professionals.Participants work in cross discipline teams to developentrepreneurial skills and new business ideas for mobile Report On Operations
  • 61. 62 4.5 Improve accessibility of broadband to In all aspects of broadband development within the improve quality of work and life for all South state, the overarching principle has been that the most Australians effective solutions for the deployment of broadband will (Links to SASP T4.8) be achieved through collaborative action by communi- The provision of future services and the need for analy- ties, providers and all levels of government. This has sis and design to address future needs was progressed been particularly important in regional areas of the state through investigative activities such as the survey of where low population density presents a challenge to broadband adoption and attitudes within the Yorke the introduction of broadband. Peninsula region. An extensive survey was conducted Many aspects of national programs have been and the results will enable informed decision-making redesigned and the resultant changes have been about the nature and location of demand for broadband. accommodated by Broadband SA. Some existing In a similar vein, the South Australian data from the South Australian regional broadband projects received 2006 Australian Census was used to determine many considerable support to ensure that the original goal of the factors that influence the adoption of broadband of widespread regional broadband coverage could still in South Australian communities. be achieved under the changed conditions. As a result Access to geographic information system (GIS) exper- of substantial negotiations with the national program tise within the department enabled highly specific managers, communities in the Yorke Peninsula and investigations into the barriers to broadband access the Coorong District will be among the first regions that exist within many regions including the Adelaide in Australia to have access to region-wide WiMAX metropolitan areas. This analysis provides important wireless broadband services. information to identify the particular locations where the Community support for future broadband activity telephone system inhibits the provision of Asymmetric has been strengthened through the appointment in Digital Subscriber Line (ADSL) broadband services October 2007 of a Broadband Development Project and causes frustration for residents and business Manager, jointly funded by the South Australian in such areas. Ongoing negotiation with providers Government and the Australian Government’s Clever and the development of suitable solutions to address Networks program, with a specific role to assist regional these issues is a vital aspect of the Broadband SA communities gain benefit from improved access to program. broadband services. In three regions, Yorke and the Support for new forms of service delivery was also Lower North, the Adelaide Hills and the Murraylands, the demonstrated through several projects. Broadband SA Project Manager will liaise with local project officers. contributed to the design phase of projects to provide optical fibre connections for the Techport Australia precinct at Osborne and the Land Management Corporation’s new housing development at Lochiel Park. Throughout 2007, broadband has been the focus of discussion and activity at both national and state levels. The high level of national interest in broadband as an essential component of modern infrastructure rein- forces the role of Broadband SA and South Australia’s Broadband Development Fund. It has also highlighted the necessity to ensure that South Australia’s interests and those of its communities are represented in the plans for national broadband projects. Report On Operations
  • 62. 63Results to be achieved – (by June 2010 unless otherwise noted)• Approach or exceed the national average of broadband as a percentage of internet connections to: –– households within 5 percent of national average % South Australia % Australia 2005-06 36 47Source: SASP target T4.8 Fact Sheet.• The rate of public expenditure on research and development as a proportion of Gross State Product (GSP) matches or exceeds the national average rate state SA NSW Vic Qld WA Tas avg 2004-05 1.12 0.57 0.74 0.70 0.64 1.22 0.83Source: SASP target T4.9 Fact Sheet.• To secure Australian government research and development resources to 10 percent above South Australian’s per capita share by 2010 and increase this share to 25 percent by 2014, for both public and private spheres. In 2005, South Australia’s per capita share of population was 7.7 percent. Research and development resourcesreceived was 8.28 percent. Data for subsequent years is yet to be released. Report On Operations
  • 63. 64 Goal 5 Build a high 5.3 Strengthen the publicly owned TAFE SA system performance organisation D The Skills Strategy is the result of the work undertaken FEEST will become a highly skilled and high as part of the Skills Reform process conducted by performance organisation to ensure we DFEEST over 2007. The Strategy was presented to have the capacity to achieve our goals. government and endorsed in February of 2008. A key element of the strategy is the strengthening of the South Objectives and key initiatives Australian TAFE system through the implementation of an integrated and considered set of measures. 5.1 Provide all staff with a safe working environment A key driver of these measures is the need to be The DFEEST three year Occupational Health, Safety customer focused and improve the levels of client and Injury Management strategic plan complements satisfaction. (SASP T1.7) One of the changes that the government’s new Safety in the Public Sector will enable this is to streamline decision making and 2007-2010 strategy. Findings from the WorkCover devolve responsibility and accountability within a TAFE gap analysis have been incorporated into the plan, SA Network. The network to consist of three distinct providing direction for further improvements in the Institutes. A target has been set to reduce the cost of a implementation of the department’s safety manage- unit of training by 10 percent, by 2011. (SASP T1.9) ment system. Reduction in the number of new workers A feature of the strategy is that the target above is compensation claims and overall cost of new claims but one of five goals of the strategy. Achieving all of the is a measure of achievement. goals is the primary aim. As well as reducing the cost The move from five CBD locations to the City of training the new TAFE SA system is geared to: Central building has improved working conditions for • increase employment participation all staff involved and also provided the opportunity to • VET participation (SASP T6.21) consolidate the Strategic OHS Committee for more • labour productivity effective consultation and communication. • skilled workforce (SAP T6.19). Some of the measures to be employed in the pursuit 5.2 Develop the people within DFEEST of these goals will include: and improve working conditions The development of people has continued to be • a renewed focus on enabling systems a high priority within DFEEST and broad range of • learning precincts organisational development activities have been and • partnerships and networks are being undertaken to support this. • diversification of teaching and learning approaches Priority work has been undertaken to develop DFEEST’s • e-learning Workforce Development Platform to 2010 and has • commercially capable TAFE business activities focussed on: • e stablishme nt of lead institute s and • Leadership and Development specialist centres • Workforce Planning • enhancing the workforce culture and capacity. • Workforce Development These measures for TAFE SA will be accompanied • People and Cultural Development. by a series of changes in demand planning, policy A fuller explanation of these initiatives appears in the frameworks and financial management and infrastruc- Management of Human Resource Section commencing ture planning. It is the combination of all the new page 68. measures that will assist in the achievement of the SASP targets. Report On Operations
  • 64. 65Ms Veronica Wilkey, Senior OHS&IM Consultant won the SafeWork SA Employee of the Year Award for outstandingcontributions to OHS&W. Veronica has also been selected as South Australia’s representative in the NationalSafe Work Australia Awards. Report On Operations
  • 65. 66 5.4 Increase the flexibility and 5.7 A high focus on customer service responsiveness of business systems, A range of initiatives has been implemented to increase processes and practices the focus on customer service within DFEEST, includ- DFEEST is committed to systemic reform to increase ing the endorsement of a DFEEST Customer Service flexibility and responsiveness of business systems by Charter, with service standards now in place in all looking for opportunities to remove duplication and areas of DFEEST’s operations. The development of standardise business practices. One such reform an intranet site has provided all staff with information was the implementation of Shared Services for ICT and resources. Recognition awards introduced for Service Desk and Accounting Transaction Services. staff showing exemplary customer service. The internal The scope of this project was organisation wide and BULB staff survey asked staff to rate their satisfaction affected every business unit. The long term benefits with the level of internal customer service. Sixty percent include substantial savings projected over five years. of respondents reported that they were satisfied or very The next phase of this initiative will see the introduction satisfied with colleagues’ customer service. This sets of electronic workflow (invoice scanning and smart a benchmark of internal satisfaction that we will seek forms) which will add to operational efficiency. to increase through the continued implementation of strategies. 5.5 Improve the cost effectiveness of DFEEST’s services A reduction by four percent in the expenditure per nominal hour of training activity is a priority for DFEEST. A result figure for 2007 is not currently available. A comparative table depicting the percentage change from 2004-2006 appears on page 40. 5.6 Improve environmentally sustainable and eco-efficient practices in DFEEST’s operations The move to the City Central building in early 2007 consolidated staff from five existing sites to one. The building is the first purpose built five star Greenstar design in Adelaide. It has resulted in a significant reduction in CO2 emissions, waste to landfill and a reduction in our overall ecological footprint of 3.8 percent. Report On Operations
  • 66. 67Results to be achieved - a focus. Currently the percentage of women in• 20 percent or more reduction in OHS new claims PSM Act Executive positions in DFEEST is 50 Injury management reports are compiled by financial percent (as a 31 December 2007). year. There has been a decline in the number of new • Increase the ratio of operational to administrative ex- claims each year for the past three years. penditure, and maintain or better that ratio thereafter• I m p r o v e the Wor ker s Compensa- A reduction by four percent in the expenditure per tion liability by 15 percent by 2010-2011 nominal hour of training activity is a priority for The liability has reduced by $450 000 each year DFEEST. A result figure for 2007 is not currently for the past two years which represents an annual available. improvement of almost five percent. • Improve the energy efficiency of buildings• Increase the percentage of employees with a cur- by 25 percent from 2000-01 levels by 2014 rent individual development plan to 80 percent Energy efficiency was adversely impacted by sea- There has been a focus on implementing a model sonal influences and a strong utilisation of facilities. of continuous improvement including discussing For actual performance against targets see table individual performance strengths and develop- page 139. ment needs in the agency. The success of this • R e d u c e waste to landfill from emphasis was a highlight of the recent staff survey. 2002– 03 by 25 percent by 2 014 There has been a steady increase to 65 percent A significant 20 percent reduction of waste to landfill of respondents to the staff survey indicating they was achieved in the City Central site. Overall we have a development plan. This continues to be an reduced our ecological footprint by 3.8 percent. area of priority. Investigation of an organic recycling trial in col-• Increase employee diversity by: laboration with ZeroWaste SA commenced. –– increasing participation of Aboriginal people, • I n c r e a s e c u s to m e r satisfaction wi t h spread across all classifications, to 2 percent DFEEST ser vices by 10 percent As at December 2007 the percentage of Aboriginal Many parts of DFEEST conduct regular surveys with staff in DFEEST was 1.94 percent. Implementation their customers to determine satisfaction ratings. A of the DFEEST Aboriginal Employment Strategy, project has been commenced to undertake further aimed at increasing the numbers and classification market research to benchmark DFEEST’s progress spread of Aboriginal employees and retaining in line with the SASP target T1.7 and the DFEEST existing employees continues. Customer Service Charter based on staff and cus- –– d o u b l i n g the number of people tomer experiences (local and international). This will with dis abilities employed by 2014 include an online survey with staff and customers, Work continues on improving the capture and follow–up in-depth interviews with customers and recording of the number of staff with disabilities. focus groups. The implementation of the DFEEST Disability Action Plan which has a range of strategies aimed at increased employment of people with disabilities will be a focus for 2008. December 2007 data indicated 1.84 percent of agency staff have been recorded as having a disability. –– maintaining the propor tion of women comprising half of the employees in the executive levels at 50 percent or more Succession planning and leadership development activities within the agency keep this target as Report On Operations
  • 67. 68 Management of Human Resources Management of Human Resources
  • 68. 69Management Of The following table depicts the total staff and gender composition of departmental employees. AHuman Resources person is the head count and FTE is the full-time equivalent of full-time and part-time staff.D uring 2007 the department made significant progress in meeting the objectives of its 2007-2010 Strategic Plan for deliveringbetter opportunities for South Australians throughworkforce development, training and education, and Male Female 1447 2267 % Gender  Persons Persons 38.96 61.04 FTEs 1407.60 1994.20 %FTEs 41.38 58.62science and innovation. Totals  3714 100.00 3401.80 100.00 One specific goal identified in its strategic plan relates The following table depicts the total staff whoto staff - build a high performance organisation. separated from and who were recruited to the agency during 2007.Workforce Data Number of Persons who wereThe following data is based on records from the Human recruited to and separated fromResource Information System - Empower for persons DFEEST as at 31 December 2007 identified as being employed on 31 December 2007. Separated from DFEEST 449 Recruited to DFEEST 389 Hourly Paid Instructors (HPIs) are excluded from Ninety two of these people started and completedthe data tables as they are employed under different their term of employment within 2007.conditions and reported accordingly. To combineHPI data with regular staff information would resultin data distortion. Number of Persons on Leave Without Pay as at 31 December 2007Employee numbers, gender and On Leave Without Pay 41status (excluding HPIs)The following table depicts the total number ofemployees including persons and full-time equivalent Hourly Paid Instructorsemployees (FTEs). DFEEST augments its teaching force by employing casual HPIs to provide specialist and back up supportTotal Number of Employees  Workforce to lecturers. In total, 2076 individual HPIs providedPersons 3714 269 258 hours teaching at a cost of $13 135 689.FTEs 3401.8 Management of Human Resources
  • 69. 70 Number of employees by salary bracket (excluding HPIs) This graph depicts the total staff by gender and salary bracket. Number of Employees by Salary Bracket 800 Females 700 Male 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 $0-43 999 $44 000-56 999 $57 000-72 999 $73 000-91 999 $92 000+ Males 185 212 572 412 66 Females 767 448 674 324 54 Status of employees in current position (excluding HPIs) The following two tables show the total staff and the full time equivalent staff by employment status in their current position. Short term contracts are under two years; long term contracts are over two years. Persons Ongoing Short-Term Long-Term Other Total Contract Contract (Casuals) Male 1134 258 56 15 1463 Female 1794 416 60 82 2352 Total 2928 674 116 97 3815 *Some staff have more than one part time position therefore are counted more than once in the head count but are not double counted in the FTE figure. FTEs Ongoing Short-Term Long-Term Other Total Contract Contract (Casuals) Male 1112.2 240.9 55.4 1.2 1409.7 Female 1603.5 339.8 47.4 1.4 1992.1 Total 2715.70 580.70 102.80 2.61 3401.8 Management of Human Resources
  • 70. 71Executive Profile Workforce DiversityThis table shows the number of executive employees DFEEST recognises the value of workforce diversityearning $92 414 per annum or more in their current and the benefits inherent in a workforce that is repre-positions. sentative of the broader community. The followingNumber of Executives by Gender, Classification section outlines the department’s profile.and Status at 31 December 2007Classification Tenure Female Male Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Tenured 33 34 Islander EmployeesEM-B This table depicts the staff who reported being ofEM-C Tenured 5  6 Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander descent withEXEC BIO Untenured   1 comparison to the target in South Australia’s StrategicEXEC Level A Tenured 2  1 Plan.EXEC Level A Untenured 3 6EXEC Level B Tenured 1 2 Aboriginal and/or Torres StraitEXEC Level B Untenured 5  2 Islander EmployeesEXEC Level C Tenured 1   % ofEXEC Level C Untenured 1 2 Male Female Total Agency %Target*EXEC Level D Untenured 1 1 26 46 72 1.94 2.00EXEC Level F Untenured   1SAES Band 1 Untenured 3  1 *Target set by South Australia’s Strategic Plan     55 57 Aboriginal Employment StrategyLeave Management An Aboriginal Senior Consultant was appointed duringThe following table depicts the average days taken the year to implement the Aboriginal Employmentper FTE (excluding HPIs). Strategy. As a component of the strategy the following programs have been developed for roll out:Leave Management as at 31 Decembereach year (Average Days) • Aboriginal Staff Network, including forums andLeave Type 2004 2005 2006 2007 newslettersSick Leave 2.44 2.97 3.90 3.27 • training for managers and supervisorsFamily Carer’s Leave         • raising staff awareness, respect and support forSpecial Leave with Aboriginal culture and people through the:Pay 1.48 2.27 3.08 4.63*Note: Family Carer’s Leave may be taken as part of an em- –– on-line induction program which includes theployee’s entitlement to Sick Leave or Special Leave with Pay. Statement of Reconciliation and the AboriginalThus it cannot currently be reported upon as aseparate leave type. Employment Strategy –– Employee Assistance Program which provides culturally appropriate support for Indigenous staff. Management of Human Resources
  • 71. 72 Number Of Employees By Age Bracket And Gender This table shows the total staff by gender and age bracket. The age bracket total is expressed as a percentage of total staff and compared to the state’s workforce benchmark. Current statistics reveal a significant difference between the DFEEST workforce and the workforce benchmark for those employees aged 45 years and over. DFEEST is currently addressing this disparity through its workforce development strategy which aims to ensure a balance in its age profile. Female Male Total % of Total Workforce Age Bracket Benchmark 15 - 19 years 9 3 12 0.32 6.70 20 - 24 years 74 39 113 3.04 10.50 25 - 29 years 190 58 248 6.68 10.20 30 - 34 years 202 111 313 8.43 9.90 35 - 39 years 266 112 378 10.18 11.20 40 - 44 years 282 140 422 11.36 11.90 45 - 49 years 355 238 593 15.97 12.30 50 - 54 years 426 278 704 18.96 11.30 55 - 59 years 302 279 581 15.64 8.60 60 - 64 years 144 161 305 8.21 5.00 Over 65 Years 17 28 45 1.21 2.40   2267 1447 3714 100.00 100.00 Cultural And Linguistic Diversity This table depicts the number of staff who reported being born overseas or who speak another language other than English at home. The variation between the departmental figure and the general community figure can be attributed to the fact that these fields are not mandatory to collect at the time of recruitment. The department will draw on the results of staff surveys to improve the accuracy of this information in future. Cultural and Linguistic Diversity   Male Female Total % of Agency % SA Community* Number of employees born 157 238 395 10.6 20.3 overseas Number of employees who 78 85 163 4.4 15.5 speak language(s) other than English at home *Benchmarks from ABS Publication Basic Community Profile (SA) Cat No. 2001.0 Management of Human Resources
  • 72. 73Number Of Employees With Ongoing Leadership And Management DevelopmentDisabilities Requiring Workplace Adaptation • DFEEST’s Executive Leadership Program enteredThis table depicts the number of staff who reported its third year with development work undertakenhaving an ongoing disability. DFEEST is reviewing how on a succession planning strategy to be launchedit records information on the number of workplaces that in 2008may need adaptation to assist those with disabilities • planning for a revised emerging leaders leader-being able to undertake their work responsibilities. ship program for implementation in 2008 com-Number of Employees with Ongoing Disabilities menced % of • a competency based management development Male Female Total Agency program was developed for implementation in 33 36 69 1.84 2008.Note: Unable to state whether they need Workplace Adaptation Workforce PlanningVoluntary Flexible Working Arrangements Manufacturing, Engineering andAs part of DFEEST’s commitment to attracting Transport Workforce Planning Projectand retaining the best possible staff and to assist • project planning and data gathering commencedemployees to balance work and family life, a number and a steering committee established along withof Voluntary Flexible Working Arrangements (VFWA) practical coaching following the appointment ofare made available to DFEEST employees. a national workforce planning coach. The project aims to: A recent staff survey indicated that most staff within –– identify areas of skills shortages within TAFE SADFEEST access various components of the voluntary and to develop workforce development strategiesflexible working arrangements. to ensure TAFE SA has adequate employeesVoluntary Flexible Working now and in the futureArrangements by Gender –– ensure that TAFE SA has the ‘right’ people with   Male Female Total the ‘right’ skills at the ‘right’ time and place to cope with the growth of these industry areas.Purchased Leave 0 7 7Flexitime 354 617 971 Careers in DFEEST WebsiteCompressed Weeks • planning and development for a careers website 4 6 10 was undertakenPart-time Job Share 93 871 964 • the website will showcase the employment benefitsWorking from Home 2 6 8 for working in DFEEST, career opportunities, culture, values and recruitment processes. Management of Human Resources
  • 73. 74 Workforce Development Equal Employment Opportunity Programs This table depicts the number of apprentices and Traineeships trainees within the department. Graduates recruited • planning commenced for the implementation of a during the year have been included in general staffing rotational traineeship program numbers reported earlier. Youth Advisory Group Apprentices, Trainees and Cadets as at 31 December 2007 • DFEEST signed up to the Premier’s Memorandum on   Male Female Youth Participation and a DFEEST Youth Advisory Apprentices  2 1 Group was established Trainees 12 28  • the inaugural ‘kickstart’ workshop was held in   14 29 October at which DFEEST youth representatives met with senior executives to discuss the purpose and intent of the group. Industrial Relations Issues • Public Sector Management Act – finalisation of the Wages Parity Enterprise Bargaining (EB) Agree- PEOPLE AND CULTURAL DEVELOPMENT ment Staff Perspectives Survey (BULB) • negotiation of EB outcomes and in particular the • this is the second time this survey has been con- TAFE Act proposed lecturer structure ducted within DFEEST • implementation of the option to provide individual • in 2007 the response rate was 49.5 percent com- contract arrangements, a requirement of Skilling pared to 19 percent in 2006 Australia Workforce Act to TAFE Act employees • the survey contained 88 questions covering the • TAFE Act – Implementation of the Statutes Amend- following categories: ment (Public Sector Employees) Act 2006 – the Chief –– Workforce Commitment Executive is the new employing authority • approval of a three year EB bargaining agreement –– Health and Wellbeing for weekly paid employees. –– Organisational Direction –– Satisfaction Systems Are Being Developed to –– Collection of Workforce Profile • implement Special Leave with Pay Policy for TAFE • executive summary reports have been released Act employees whilst further analysis is being undertaken. • implement a TAFE SA Purchased Leave Policy • capture information regarding voluntary flexible Customer Service working arrangements and disability data • following the implementation of the Customer Service • evaluate payroll processes to ensure mandatory Charter there was a focus on the identification and reporting fields are captured. implementation of customer service standards • workgroups across DFEEST were asked to develop customer services standards specifically for their work area. • in the 2007 BULB Survey 60.35 percent of respondents reported that they are satisfied with the overall level of customer service. Management of Human Resources
  • 74. 75Employee Assistance Program (EAP) Occupational Health, Safety And• the EAP, established in 2005, continued to be Injury Management (OHS&IM) available to staff. It offers confidential, impartial DFEEST has achieved significant savings in both injury and culturally sensitive counselling support to prevention (OHS&W) and injury management (Workers employees and their families 24 hours a day, seven Rehabilitation and Compensation) during 2007. Total days a week cost of workers compensation reduced by $1.3 million• a total of 198 new referrals were made to the from the previous financial year. DFEEST’s outstand- service which provided 350 hours of counselling. ing workers compensation liability has reduced by Ninety seven percent of the time was dedicated $450 000 dollars each year for the past two years. to new referrals and 2.9 percent was dedicated to ongoing cases Injury management continues as a key business• services used were trauma services, manager consideration, when an injury does occur, the matter assistance, mediation and consultancy advisory is dealt with quickly and with compassion. services.Child Protection A new Corporate OHS&IM Strategic Plan was• DFEEST has continued to implement child protec- developed and approved. A new direction in OHS and tion initiatives in line with the amendments to the IM has been mapped for the next three years which Children’s Protection Act 1993 complements the government’s Safety in the Public• mandated notification training continued to be Sector 2007 – 2010 Strategy and the targets set by undertaken by employees the South Australia Strategic Plan.• police checks continued to be undertaken through- Ms Veronica Wilkey, Senior OHS and IM Consultant, out 2007 by employees and volunteers won the the SafeWork SA Employee of the Year Award• DFEEST and other government and non-government for outstanding contributions to OHS and W. Ms Wilkey organisations continued to work with the Depart- has also been selected as South Australia’s repre- ment of Families and Communities to assist in sentative in the National Safe Work Australia Award developing standards for criminal history screening category Best Individual Contribution to Workplace and child safe environments Health and Safety.• a Volunteer’s Policy was developed and promul- gated. Management of Human Resources
  • 75. 76 Occupational Health, Safety * Calendar year costs divided by fiscal year. ** Based on Lost Time Flag (i.e. ≥ 1day or shift). Improved and Injury Management process for recording hours worked. 2006 / 2007^ 2005 / 2006^ 2005 OHS Legislative Requirements (includes incidents 1 with students not included in 2005 figures) 8 (2 from stu- 4 (1 from student) 4 Number of notifiable occurrences pursuant to OHS&W dents & 2 from Regulations Division 6.6 contractors) 3 (2 from stu- 7 (2 from stu- 6 Number of notifiable injuries pursuant to OHS&W Regula- dents & 1 from dents) tions Division 6.6 contractor) 6 (1 from student 2 3 Number of notices served pursuant to OHS&W Act s35, & 2 from contrac- s39 and s40 tors) 2 Injury Management Legislative Requirements Total number of new claimants who participated in the 26 41 35 rehabilitation program Total number of employees rehabilitated and reassigned 1 3 7 to alternative duties Total number of employees rehabilitated back to their 12 33 32 original work 3 WorkCover Action Limits Number of open claims as at 30 June 2007 176 181 209 Percentage of workers compensation expenditure over 0.0112 0.0159 0.016%* gross annual remuneration 4 Number of Injuries Number of new workers compensation claims in the 95 105 (4 withdrawn) 108 (4 withdrawn) financial year Number of fatalities, lost time injuries, medical treatment only 0 0 0 (F) 30 36 (2 withdrawn) 58 (3 withdrawn) (LTI) 69 (2 withdrawn) 50 (1 withdrawn) 65 (MTO) Total number of whole working days lost 7,679 9,659 10,126 5 Cost of Workers Compensation Cost of new claims for the financial year $329,072.21 $377,798.87 $234,808.00 Cost of all claims excluding lump sum payments $2,039,529.31 $2,357,033.57 $2,526,077.00 Amount paid for lump sum payments (s42, s43, s44) $338,865.38 $1,308,079.72 $747,874.00 Total claims expenditure $2,378,394.69 $3,665,113.29 $3,273,951.00 Total amount recovered from external sources (s54) $0.00 $8,391.12 $20,004.00 Budget allocation for workers compensation $3,000,000.00 $3,750,000.00 $3,300,000.00 Actuarial (Outstanding) Liability $8,830,931.00 $9,265,194.00 $9,718,038.00 6 Trends **Injury frequency rate for new lost-time injury/disease for 5.30 11.50 10.28 each million hours worked Body Stressing Falls, Trips and Falls, Trips and Most frequent cause (mechanism) of injury Slips Slips Mental Stress Mental Stress Falls, Trips and Most expensive cause (mechanism) of injury Slips ^ From 2006 all future OHS&IM Reporting will be based on financial year as determined by the Australian Standard. Previous reporting was based on Calendar Year as determined by the TAFE Act. Management of Human Resources
  • 76. 77Financial Report Financial Report
  • 77. 78 Financial Overview T here was a significant improvement in the financial performance of the agency in 2006-07 compared to the previous year due to a number of measures implemented by management for the tight monitoring and control of the department’s finances, in particular over the filling of vacancies that arose during the year.   The tables provided in this section set out a summary of the actual results for the 2006-07 financial year. Summary of Financial Information Actual Actual 2006-07 2005-06 $’000 $’000 Financial Performance: Operating Expenses 469 157 462 032 Operating Revenues 191 113 189 241 Net Cost of Providing Services 278 044 272 791 Revenues from Government 285 372 244 120 Net Result before Restructure 7328 (28 671) Net Expenses from Restructure 0 (335) Net Result After Restructure 7328 (29 006) Net Result after Restructure The improvement in the Net Result after Restructure from 2005-06 to 2006-07 is principally due to higher revenue from the SA Government and the containment of costs in particular employee expenses as a result of a decrease in the number of full-time equivalents within the department during 2006-07. Operating Revenues Actual operating revenues for 2006-07 were $476.5 million. The principal source of funding for the department is State Government appropriation which totalled $285.4 million. Other operating revenues included Commonwealth grants of $100.9 million and $76.6 million from student and other fees and charges. Financial Report
  • 78. 79The chart below depicts an overview of revenue sources for 2006-07Operating ExpensesActual Employee benefits of $259.5 million for 2006-07 constituted 55 percent of the total operating expensesof $469.2 million. Grants and subsidies expenses totalled $57.3 million including $17 million for employmentprograms, $16.7 million for science and technology programs, $11.3 million for vocational education and trainingprograms and $7.8 million for Tertiary Student Transport Concessions. The other major component of operating expenses (Supplies and Services) amounted to $134.4 million.Included in this category were $23.7 million for information technology infrastructure and communication, $19.2million for funding to non-TAFE providers for vocational education and training, $18.0 million for minor works,maintenance and equipment, $15.0 million for printing and consumables and $14.9 million for fees for contractedservices. A further $15.4 million was charged to depreciation expense.The chart below depicts an overview of operating expenses for 2006-07 Financial Report
  • 79. 80 Overview of Operating Expenses 2006-07 The following table depicts how expenditure was applied to the following programs in accordance with approved strategic priorities: Employment and Skills Formation – Vocational Education & Training. Provision of vocational $412.3m education and training by TAFE institutes and other providers outside the school sector (including publicly funded Adult Community Education), including contestable and non-contestable sources of funding; policy advice and support for post-secondary education. Employment and Skills Formation – Learning, Workforce Development & Employment. Addressing $24.0m the disadvantaged by providing opportunities to participate in employment, training, skills develo- pment, adult community education and assisting industry to meet current and future skills needs. (Includes funding for SA Works) Science, Technology and Innovation – Science & Innovation. Provision of high level strategic $17.4m advice to the Minister on maximising economic, environmental and social benefits from the state’s scientific research and innovation by: - identifying strategic priorities for State Government investment; - raising awareness and understanding of the importance and benefits of science and innovation amongst government, business and the community; - facilitating coordinated and strategic bids for Commonwealth grants; and - facilitating coordination of education and research activity with end-user (industry) requirements to maximise the benefits of South Australia’s science and innovation activities and to drive eco- nomic development for the state. (Includes funding for Bio Innovation SA, Premier’s Science and Research Fund, Playford Capital) Employment and Skills Formation – Regulatory Services. Provision of registration, accreditation $6.1m and approval services for registered training organisations, and the regulation and administration of apprenticeships and traineeships. Science, Technology and Innovation – Information Economy. Provision of high level strategic $4.0m policy advice to the Minister and Government on the information economy and the ICT sector and undertaking or facilitating programs and projects that: - raise awareness and understanding of the information economy among government, business, industry and education providers; - contribution to greater understanding of the information economy and its effects; and - facilitate bids for significant Commonwealth grants. (Includes funding for Broadband Development) Office for Youth – Young People’s Engagement. Support for all young people to be actively $1.9m engaged in their communities in learning and decision-making and specific support to engage disadvantaged young people. Office for Youth – Strengthened Partnerships. Strengthen partnerships across government, the $1.7m department and the youth sector to support young people’s engagement within their community. Office for Youth – Creative Leadership. Promotion of creative leadership opportunities for young $1.2m people, celebration of young leaders’ achievement, encouragement of innovative community lead- ership and support for equity and diversity amongst emerging leaders. Employment and Skills Formation – Higher Education. Provision of advice to the Minister on higher $0.6m education policy and planning. Total $469.2m Financial Report
  • 80. 81Financial Report
  • 81. 82 Financial Report
  • 82. 83Financial Report
  • 83. 84 Income Statement for the Year Ended 30 June 2007 Note 2007 2006 $’000 $’000 EXPENSES Employee Benefits 6 259,538 254,679 Supplies and Services 7 134,400 134,598 Grants and Subsidies 8 57,313 58,354 Depreciation 9 15,360 14,316 Loss from the Disposal of Assets 16 337 0 Other 10,11 2,209 85 Total EXPENSES 469,157 462,032 INCOME Commonwealth Grants 12 100,858 100,772 Student and Other Fees and Charges 13 76,575 69,711 Other Grants and Contributions 14 7,101 9,516 Interest 15 77 2,976 Gain from the Disposal of Assets 16 0 479 Other 17 6,502 5,787 Total INCOME 191,113 189,241 NET COST OF PROVIDING SERVICES 278,044 272,791 REVENUES FROM/PAYMENTS TO SA GOVERNMENT Revenues from SA Government 18 285,372 247,709 Less Payments to SA Government 18 0 3,589 Total REVENUES FROM/PAYMENTS TO 285,372 244,120 SA GOVERNMENT NET RESULT BEFORE RESTRUCTURE 7,328 (28,671) NET EXPENSES FROM RESTRUCTURE 0 (335) NET RESULT AFTER RESTRUCTURE 7,328 (29,006) THE NET RESULT AFTER RESTRUCTURE IS ATTRIBUT- ABLE TO THE SA GOVERNMENT AS OWNER Financial Report
  • 84. 85Balance Sheet as at 30 June 2007 Note 2007 2006 $’000 $’000CURRENT ASSETSCash 19 58,960 47,270Receivables 20 19,724 14,499Inventories 23 928 1,952Total CURRENT ASSETS 79,612 63,721NON-CURRENT ASSETSReceivables 20 262 222Investments 21 1,849 1,442Property, Plant and Equipment 22 513,490 457,968Total NON-CURRENT ASSETS 515,601 459,632TOTAL ASSETS 595,213 523,353CURRENT LIABILITIESPayables 24 25,627 28,146Employee benefits 25 17,365 17,068Provisions 26 2,325 2,455Other 27 11,505 6,122Total CURRENT LIABILITIES 56,822 53,791NON-CURRENT LIABILITIESPayables 24 3,832 3,348Employee benefits 25 44,845 38,457Provisions 26 6,356 6,557Other 27 499 499Total NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES 55,532 48,861TOTAL LIABILITIES 112,354 102,652NET ASSETS 482,859 420,701EQUITYRetained Earnings 404,007 396,679Asset revaluation reserve 78,852 24,022Total EQUITY 482,859 420,701The Total Equity is attributable to the SA Gov-ernment as owner.COMMITMENTS 29CONTINGENT ASSETS AND LIABILITIES 30 Financial Report
  • 85. 86 Statement of Changes in Equity For the Year Ended 30 June 2007 Asset Note Revaluation Retained No. Reserve Earnings Total $’000 $’000 $’000 Balance at 30 June 2005 23,684 416,856 440,540 Error Correction - (903) (903) Restated Balance at 30 June 2005 23,684 415,953 439,637 Net income/expense recognised directly in equity for 2005-06 - (27,457) (27,457) Net Result before restructure for 2005-06 23,684 388,496 412,180 Net expenses from restructure - (335) (335) Net result after restructure for 2005-06 23,684 388,161 411,845 Error Correction 28 338 8,518 8,856 Restated balance at 30 June 2006 24,022 396,679 420,701 Gain on revaluation of land during 2006-07 9,059 - 9,059 Gain on revaluation of buildings during 2006-07 45,771 - 45,771 Net Result for 2006-07 - 7,328 7,328 Balance at 30 June 2007 78,852 404,007 482,859 All changes in equity are attributable to the SA Government as owner. Financial Report
  • 86. 87Cash Flow Statement for the year ended 30 June 2007 2007 2006 Note $’000 $’000 Inflows (Outflows) Inflows (Outflows)CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES CASH OUTFLOWS Employee benefits (251,494) (245,781) Supplies and services (138,207) (132,145) Grants and subsidies (57,313) (58,354) Other 5,147 3,264 Cash used in Operating Activities (441,867) (433,016) CASH INFLOWS Commonwealth grants 100,858 100,772 Student and other fees and charges 73,151 68,312 Other grants and contributions 4,239 4,189 Interest received 77 3,033 GST receipts from taxation authority (2,539) 7,500 Other 6,137 5,210 Cash generated from Operating Activities 181,923 189,016 CASH FLOWS FROM SA GOVERNMENT: Receipts from SA Government 285,372 247,709 Payments to SA Government - (3,589) Funds from other Government entities 2,862 5,327 Cash generated from SA Government 288,234 249,447 Net Cash provided by Operating Activities 32 28,290 5,447CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES Cash Outflows Purchase of non-current assets (16,618) (12,924) Cash Inflows Sales of non-current assets 18 2,013 Net Cash used in Investing Activities (16,600) (10,911)NET INCREASE/ (DECREASE) IN CASH HELD 11,690 (5,464)CASH AT 1 JULY 2006 47,270 52,734CASH AT 30 JUNE 2007 19 58,960 47,270 Financial Report
  • 87. 88 Program Schedule - Expenses and Income for the year ended 30 June 2007 Employment and Skills Formation Science, Technology Office for Youth Vocational and Innovation Streng- Education Learning, thened YoungFinancial Report and Higher Regulatory Workforce Dev & Science and Information Partner- People’s Creative Expenses/Income Training Education Services Employment Innovation Economy ships Engagement Leadership Total $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 Expenses Employee benefits 243,242 483 5,140 5,535 1,256 1,794 863 621 604 259,538 Supplies and ser- 127,497 88 974 3,265 673 869 452 328 254 134,400 vices Grants and subsidies 23,813 3 1 15,178 15,434 1,280 328 938 338 57,313 Depreciation 15,360 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 15,360 Loss on disposal of 337 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 337 assets Other 2,082 3 33 48 11 15 7 5 5 2,209 Total Expenses 412,331 577 6,148 24,026 17,374 3,958 1,650 1,892 1,201 469,157 Income Commonwealth grants 100,060 0 0 470 206 122 0 0 0 100,858 Student and other fees 76,603 0 (28) 0 0 0 0 0 0 76,575 and charges Other grants and con- 5,670 0 0 1,326 66 0 20 19 0 7,101 tributions Interest income 77 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 77 Other 5,298 15 391 112 82 224 249 93 38 6,502 Total Income 187,708 15 363 1,908 354 346 269 112 38 191,113 Net Cost of Provid- 224,623 562 5,785 22,118 17,020 3,612 1,381 1,780 1,163 278,044 ing Services
  • 88. Employment and Skills Formation Science, Technology Office for Youth Vocational and Innovation Streng- Education Learning, thened Young and Higher Regulatory Workforce Dev & Science and Information Partner- People’s Creative Expenses/Income Training Education Services Employment Innovation Economy ships Engagement Leadership Total $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 Government Revenues from SA 231,260 616 5,019 22,650 17,877 3,871 1,182 1,791 1,106 285,372 Government Net Result After 6,637 54 (766) 532 857 259 (199) 11 (57) 7,328 RestructureFinancial Report 89
  • 89. 90 Program Schedule - Expenses and Income for the year ended 30 June 2006 Employment and Skills Formation Science, Office for Youth Expenses/Income Vocational Higher Regulatory Employment Technology Youth Young Policy Creative Total Education Education Services Development People’s LeadershipFinancial Report and and Engagement Training Innovation $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 Expenses Employee benefits 238,976 504 5,093 6,601 3,132 213 0 160 0 254,679 Supplies and services 129,197 143 876 2,366 1,750 211 0 55 0 134,598 Grants and subsidies 19,520 0 9 17,446 20,407 955 0 17 0 58,354 Depreciation 14,316 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 14,316 Other 81 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 85 Total Expenses 402,090 647 5,979 26,415 25,290 1,379 0 232 0 462,032 Income Commonwealth grants 99,295 0 18 1,186 273 0 0 0 0 100,772 Student and other fees 69,511 0 200 0 0 0 0 0 0 69,711 and charges Other grants and 6,026 0 0 703 2,772 15 0 0 0 9,516 contributions Interest income 2,976 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2,976 Gain on disposal of assets 479 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 479 Other 5,459 0 168 37 26 97 0 0 0 5,787 Total Income 183,746 0 386 1,926 3,071 112 0 0 0 189,241 Net Cost of Providing 218,344 647 5,593 24,489 22,219 1,267 0 232 0 272,791 Services
  • 90. Employment and Skills Formation Science, Office for Youth Expenses/Income Vocational Higher Regulatory Employment Technology Youth Young Policy Creative Total Education Education Services Development People’s Leadership and and Engagement Training Innovation Revenues from 194,753 677 5,567 25,313 21,354 27 0 18 0 247,709 State Government Payments to (3,589) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 (3,589) SA Government Net Loss from 0 0 0 0 0 (289) 0 (46) 0 (335) Restructure Deficit for the year (27,180) 30 (26) 824 (865) (1,529) 0 (260) 0 (29,006)Financial Report 91
  • 91. 92 Notes to the Income Statement for the Year Ended 30 June 2007 Notes to the Income Statement for the Year Ended 30 June 2007 No. 2007 2006 6 Employee Benefits $’000 $’000 Salaries and Wages (including Annual Leave) 208,701 204,165 Superannuation 23,463 22,003 Payroll Tax 13,449 12,792 Long Service Leave 10,412 6,455 Workers’ Compensation 2,158 4,475 Targeted Voluntary Separation Payments 0 3,496 Other Employee Related Costs 1,355 1,293 259,538 254,679 Targeted Voluntary Separation Packages (TVSPs) TVSPs 0 3,496 Annual Leave and Long Service Leave Accrued Over the 0 1,031 Period 0 4,527 Recovery from the Department of Treasury and Finance 0 3,496 0 3,496 Number of Employees who were paid TVSPs during 0 33 the reporting period Financial Report
  • 92. 93Notes to the Income Statement for the Year Ended 30 June 2007 Remuneration of Employees The number of employees whose remuneration received or receivable falls within the following bands: 2007 2006 Number of Number of Employees Employees $100,000 - $109,999 67 58 $110,000 - $119,999 32 13 $120,000 - $129,999 10 4 $130,000 - $139,999 4 7 $140,000 - $149,999 6 7 $150,000 - $159,999 6 6 $160,000 - $169,999 3 4 $170,000 - $179,999 4 0 $180,000 - $189,999 2 0 $190,000 - $199,999 0 1 $200,000 - $209,999 2 1 $210,000 - $219,999 0 2 $220,000 - $229,999 2 1 $230,000 - $239,999 1 2 $240,000 - $249,999 1 0 $260,000 - $269,999 0 1 $290,000 - $299,999 1 1 141 108 The table above reflects all employees who received remuneration of $100,000 or more during the year. For 2007, it includes 1 employee (8 in 2006) who resigned or retired during the year. Remuneration of employees includes salaries, salary sacrifice amounts, superannuation con- tributions and fringe benefits tax. The total remuneration received or receivable by the employees included in the above table for 2007 was $17.4 million (included in employee benefits), ($13.7 million in 2006). Financial Report
  • 93. 94 Notes to the Income Statement for the Year Ended 30 June 2007 2007 2006 $’000 $’000 7 Supplies and Services Supplies and Services Provided by Entities Within the SA Government Minor Works, Maintenance and Equipment 13,398 12,121 Information Technology Infrastructure and Communication 8,852 10,642 Fees - Contracted Services (Including Consultants) 4,347 3,677 Utilities 1,009 787 Cleaning 6,459 7,484 Vehicle and Travelling Expenses 2,708 2,905 Rentals and Leases 3,630 2,890 Other 516 557 40,919 41,063 Supplies and Services Provided by Entities External to the SA Government Funding to Non-TAFE Providers for Vocational Education and 19,194 20,745 Training Printing and Consumables 14,959 15,083 Minor Works, Maintenance and Equipment 4,584 4,949 Information Technology Infrastructure and Communication 14,821 8,944 Fees - Contracted Services (Including Consultants) 10,590 13,925 Trainee & Apprenticeship Reimbursements 1,543 992 Utilities 5,625 5,819 Cleaning 1,070 1,208 Vehicle and Travelling Expenses 3,854 4,670 Rentals and Leases 1,596 1,158 Other 15,645 16,042 93,481 93,535 Total Supplies and Services 134,400 134,598 The total supplies and services amount disclosed includes GST amounts not-recoverable from the ATO due to the department not holding a valid tax invoice or payments relating to third party arrangements. Financial Report
  • 94. 95Notes to the Income Statement for the Year Ended 30 June 2007 Consultancy The number and dollar amount of Consultancies paid/payable (included in supplies and services) that fell within the following bands: 2007 2006 Num- $’000 Num- $’000 ber ber Below $10,000 7 16 4 21 Between $10,000 and $50,000 5 86 7 156 Above $50,000 0 0 3 491 Total paid/payable to the consultants engaged (GST 102 668 exclusive) 2007 20068 Grants and Subsidies $’000 $’000 Grants and Subsidies Paid/Payable to Entities Within the SA Government Employment Programs 3,835 3,734 Vocational Education and Training Programs 1,751 150 Science and Technology Programs 8,605 10,248 Tertiary Student Transport Concessions 7,834 6,737 Skill Centre Programs 283 180 Other Specific Grants 572 139 22,880 21,188 Grants and Subsidies Paid/Payable to Entities External to the SA Government Employment Programs 13,145 13,284 Vocational Education and Training Programs 9,580 9,755 Science and Technology Programs 8,105 11,340 Skill Centre Programs 2,214 1,942 Other Specific Grants 1,389 845 34,433 37,166 Total Grants and Subsidies 57,313 58,354 2007 2006 $’000 $’0009 Depreciation Buildings and Improvements 12,973 12,139 Plant and Equipment 2,387 2,177 Total Depreciation 15,360 14,316 Financial Report
  • 95. 96 Notes to the Income Statement for the Year Ended 30 June 2007 2007 2006 10 Other Expenses Paid/Payable to Entities External to the $’000 $’000 SA Government Allowance for Doubtful Debts and Debt Write-offs 1,763 (204) Settlement of Personal Injury Claims 0 42 Asset Revaluation Reserve Decrement 209 0 Total OtherExpenses Paid/Payable to Entities 1,972 (162) External to the SA Government 2007 2006 $’000 $’000 11 Auditor’s Remuneration Audit Fees Paid/Payable to the Auditor-General’s Department 223 232 Audit Fees Paid/Payable to Entities External to the SA Govern- 14 15 ment Total Auditor’s Remuneration 237 247 No other services were provided by the Auditor-General’s Department. 2007 2006 12 Commonwealth Grants $’000 $’000 Recurrent Grants VET Funding Act 77,850 75,935 Specific Purpose 7,641 8,236 85,491 84,171 Capital Grants VET Funding Act 13,600 13,600 Specific Purpose 1,767 3,001 15,367 16,601 Total Commonwealth Grants 100,858 100,772 Financial Report
  • 96. 97Notes to the Income Statement for the Year Ended 30 June 2007 2007 2006 $’000 $’00013 Student and Other Fees and Charges Fees and Charges Received/Receivable from Entities Within the SA Government Sales/Fee for Service Revenue 1,436 1,479 Student Enrolment Fees and Charges 956 551 Other User Fees and Charges 116 144 2,508 2,174 Fees and Charges Received/Receivable from Entities External to the SA Government Sales/Fee for Service Revenue 43,234 37,924 Student Enrolment Fees and Charges 28,813 27,215 Other User Fees and Charges 2,020 2,398 74,067 67,537 Total Student and Other Fees and Charges 76,575 69,711 2007 2006 $’000 $’00014 Other Grants and Contributions Grants and Subsidies Revenue 2,795 3,807 Miscellaneous Contributions 1,330 166 Donations 114 216 Grants from Entities Within the SA Government 2,862 5,327 Total Other Grants and Contributions 7,101 9,516 2007 2006 $’000 $’00015 Interest Interest from Entities Within the SA Government 43 2,958 Interest from Entities External to the SA Government 34 18 Total Interest 77 2,976 Financial Report
  • 97. 98 Notes to the Income Statement for the Year Ended 30 June 2007 2007 2006 16 Net (Loss)/Gain on Disposal of Non-Current Assets $’000 $’000 Land and Buildings Proceeds from Disposals 0 2,000 Less: Written Down Value (82) (1,249) (82) 751 Plant and Equipment Proceeds from Disposals 18 13 Less: Written Down Value (273) (285) (255) (272) Total Assets Total Proceeds from Disposal 18 2,013 Less: Total Written Down Value (355) (1,534) (337) 479 2007 2006 $’000 $’000 17 Other Income Targeted Voluntary Separation Package Recoveries (SA Gov- 0 3,496 ernment) Share of Net Gains from Investments 407 21 Sundry Income 6,095 2,270 Total Other Income 6,502 5,787 2007 2006 $’000 $’000 18 Revenues from/Payments to SA Government Revenues from SA Government Appropriations from Consolidated Account Pursuant to the 268,802 232,348 Appropriation Act Accrual Appropriation 1,137 8,828 Appropriation Transfers from Contingency 15,433 6,533 285,372 247,709 Payments to SA Government Return of Surplus Cash Pursuant to Cash Alignment Policy 0 (3,589) 0 (3,589) Total Revenues from/Payments to SA Government 285,372 244,120 Financial Report
  • 98. 99Notes to the Balance Sheet as at 30 June 2007 Notes to the Balance Sheet as at 30 June 2007 2007 200619 Cash $’000 $’000 Deposits with the Treasurer 32,042 36,936 Special Deposit Account with the Department of Trea- 25,902 9,780 sury and Finance Imprest Account/Cash on Hand 554 554 External Bank Account 462 0 Total Cash 58,960 47,270Deposits with the TreasurerIncludes funds held in the Accrual Appropriation Excess Funds Account and Surplus Cash Working Account balances. Thebalances of these funds are not available for general use (ie funds can only be used in accordance with The Treasurer’s/UnderTreasurer’s approval).External Bank AccountInterest is calculated based on the average daily balances. The account earned a floating interest rate between 0.01 percent and6.10 percent.Interest rate riskCash on hand is non-interest bearing. Deposits with the Treasurer and the Special Deposit Account are non-interest bearing from 1July 2007. The carrying amount of cash and cash equivalents represents fair value.Credit standby arrangementsThe department has a $3.3 million ($2.8 million) credit card facility with ANZ bank. The unused portion of this facilityas at 30 June 2007 was $2.7 million ($2.3 million). 2007 200620 Receivables $’000 $’000 Current Fees and Charges Receivable 16,727 13,714 Less: Provision for Doubtful Debts (2,112) (474) Prepayments 2,009 359 GST Recoverable from ATO 2,971 759 Other Receivables 129 141 Total Current Receivables 19,724 14,499 Non-Current Workers compensation receivable 262 222 Total Non-current Receivables 262 222 Total Receivables 19,986 14,721 Receivables from SA Government Entities Receivables 630 2,429 Workers Compensation Receivable 262 222 Other Receivables 0 100 892 2,751 Financial Report
  • 99. 100 Notes to the Balance Sheet as at 30 June 2007 Receivables from Non SA Government Entities Receivables 13,985 10,811 Prepayments 2,009 359 GST Recoverable from ATO 2,971 759 Other 129 41 19,094 11,970 Total Receivables 19,986 14,721 Interest Rate and Credit Risk Receivables are raised for all goods and services provided for which payment has not been received. Receivables are nor- mally settled within 30 days. Fees and charges are non-interest bearing. Other than recognised in the provision for doubtful debts, it is not anticipated that counterparties will fail to discharge their obligations. The carrying amount of receivables approximates net fair value due to being receivable on demand. There is no concentration of credit risk. Bad and Doubtful Debts The department has recognised a bad and doubtful debts expense of $1.8 million in the Income Statement. 2007 2006 21 Investments $’000 $’000 Non-Current Shares in Associated Company 1,849 1,442 1,849 1,442 Associated Company Austraining Austraining International International Pty Ltd Pty Ltd $’000 $’000 Interest in associated company 400 400 Share of retained profit 1,449 1,042 Equity accounted amount of investment in as- 1,849 1,442 sociated company Retained profits attributable to associated company: Balance at 1 July 1,042 611 Share of operating profit/(loss) after income tax 407 431 Balance at 30 June 1,449 1,042 Austraining International Pty Ltd Austraining International Pty Ltd, which has a reporting date of 30 June, is controlled by the Minister for Employment, Training and Further Education. Its principal activity is to secure international contracts for work in vocational education and training. The current investment value is based on unaudited financial statements as at 30 June 2007. The figures are not consolidated as they were considered to be immaterial and unaudited at the time of preparing these statements. Financial Report
  • 100. 101 Notes to the Balance Sheet as at 30 June 2007 2007 200622 Property, Plant and Equipment $’000 $’000 Land and Buildings Land at Fair Value 58,794 49,734 Buildings and Improvements at Fair Value/Cost 740,753 632,823 Accumulated Depreciation (340,214) (287,018) Construction Work in Progress 1,172 10,307 460,505 405,846 Plant and Equipment Plant and Equipment at Cost (Deemed Fair Value) 33,599 31,795 Accumulated Depreciation (16,985) (16,044) 16,614 15,751 Libraries Libraries at Valuation 36,371 36,371 36,371 36,371 Total Property, Plant and Equipment 513,490 457,968 - Valuations of land were performed as at 30 June 2007 by the Valuer-General. - Valuations of Buildings and Improvements were performed as at 30 June 2007 by the Department for Transport, Energy and Infrastructure. - Valuations of Libraries were performed as at 30 June 2005 by VALCORP Aust Pty Ltd. Impairment There were no indications of impairment of property plant and equipment, infrastructure and intangible assets at 30 June 2007. Financial Report
  • 101. 102 Notes to The Balance Sheet as at 30 June 2007 Notes to The Balance Sheet as at 30 June 2007 22 Reconcilations Reconciliations of the carrying amount of each class of non-current assets at the beginning and end of the current financial year are set out below:Financial Report 1 July Additions Disposals Net revaluation Other Depreciation 30 June 2007 2006 Increment/ Movements Carrying Carrying (decrement) amount amount $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 2007 Land at fair value 49,734 - - 9,059 - - 58,793 Buildings and improvements at fair 281,075 22,230 82 45,560 64,194 12,876 400,101 value Buildings and improvements at cost 64,730 - - - (64,194) 97 439 Computing, communication equip- 15,751 3,523 273 - - 2,387 16,614 ment and furniture and equipment at cost Construction work in progress 10,307 316 - - (9,451) - 1,172 Libraries at valuation 36,371 - - - - - 36,371 Total 457,968 26,069 355 54,619 (9,451) 15,360 513,490
  • 102. Notes to The Balance Sheet as at 30 June 2007 22 Reconcilations 1 July Additions Disposals Net revaluation Other Move- Depreciation 30 June 2006 2005 Increment/ ments Carrying Carrying (decrement) amount amount $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 2006 Land at fair value 50,534 - 800 - - - 49,734 Buildings and improvements at fair 292,493 - 455 - (2) 10,961 281,075 value Buildings and improvements at cost 65,916 - - - - 1,186 64,730 Computing, communication equip- 13,863 4,350 285 - - 2,177 15,751 ment and furniture and equipment at cost Construction work in progress 1,118 9,189 - - - - 10,307 Libraries at valuation 36,371 - - - - - 36,371 Total 460,295 13,539 1,540 0 (2) 14,324 457,968Financial Report 103
  • 103. 104 Notes to the Balance Sheet as at 30 June 2007 2007 2006 23 Inventories $’000 $’000 Current Inventories Held for Sale 680 1,377 Inventories Held for Distribution 248 575 Total Inventories 928 1,952 2007 2006 24 Payables $’000 $’000 Current Creditors 16,882 22,410 Accrued Expenses 5,126 3,282 Employment On-costs 3,559 2,312 Other 60 142 Total Current Payables 25,627 28,146 Non-Current Employment on-costs 3,832 3,348 Total Non-current Payables 3,832 3,348 Total Payables 29,459 31,494 Payables to SA Government Entities Creditors 3,511 2,922 Accrued Expenses 2,223 0 Employment On-costs 7,391 5,660 13,125 8,582 Payables to Non-SA Government Entities Creditors 13,371 19,488 Accrued Expenses 2,903 3,282 Other 60 142 16,334 22,912 2007 2006 25 Employee Benefits $’000 $’000 Current Annual Leave 8,313 7,738 Long Service Leave 3,064 3,829 Accrued Salaries and Wages 1,479 1,520 Non-Attendance Days 4,509 3,981 Total Current Employee Benefits 17,365 17,068 Financial Report
  • 104. 105 Notes to the Balance Sheet as at 30 June 2007 Non-Current Employee Benefits Long Service Leave 44,845 38,457 Total Non-Current Employee Benefits 44,845 38,457 Total Employee Benefits 62,210 55,525 The current and non-current employee expense (ie aggregate employee benefit plus related on costs) for 2006-07 is $20.9 million and $48.7 milion respectively. In the 2006-07 financial year, the long service leave benchmark has been revised from 9 years to 8.5 years based on an actuarial assessment. 2007 200626 Provisions $’000 $’000 Current Workers Compensation 2,325 2,455 2,325 2,455 Non-Current Workers Compensation 6,356 6,557 6,356 6,557 Total Provisions 8,681 9,012 Carrying amount at 1 July 9,012 7,268 Additional provisions recognised (331) 1,744 Carrying amount at 30 June 8,681 9,012 2007 200627 Other Liabilities $’000 $’000 Current Deposits 2,754 1,547 Unearned Revenue 7,952 4,489 Unpaid Personal Injury Claims 0 42 Other Liabilities 799 44 11,505 6,122 Non-Current Advances 499 499 499 499 Total Other Liabilities 12,004 6,621 Financial Report
  • 105. 106 Notes to the Balance Sheet as at 30 June 2007 28 Adjustments to Equity 2007 2006 $’000 $’000 Adjustments against retained earnings Asset recognition adjustments 9,229 0 Recognition of revenue relating to a previous period 281 0 Reversal of prepaid expense relating to a previous period (411) 0 Accounts receivable adjustments (123) 0 Other adjustments (458) 0 Long service leave adjustment 0 (903) 8,518 (903) Asset recognition adjustments Asset recognition adjustments reflect buildings and building improvements that have been recognised in the 2006-07 financial year, which were purchased or constructed in previous years. The adjustments are a result of more accurate and complete information, being recorded in subsidiary asset systems, which better reflects the department’s asset base. Accounts receivable adjustments Work undertaken in 2006-07 revealed discrepancies in Accounts Receivable accounts that related to prior accounting periods. These adjustments have corrected these misstatements, and better reflect a more accurate balance of the department’s receivables. 29 Commitments Remuneration Commitments At the end of the reporting period the department had the following remuneration commitments: 2007 2006 $’000 $’000 Payable no later than one year 3,898 2,528 Payable later than one year and not later than five years 8,124 7,214 Total 12,022 9,742 Amounts disclosed include commitments arising from executives and other service contracts. The department does not offer remuneration contracts greater than 5 years. Financial Report
  • 106. 107 Notes to the Balance Sheet as at 30 June 2007 Capital Commitments At the end of the reporting period the department had entered into the following capital commitments: 2007 2006 $’000 $’000 These amounts are due for payment: Not later than one year 1,077 10,478 Total (including GST) 1,077 10,478 GST included in capital 98 953 expenditure commitments Operating Leases Commitments At the reporting date, the department had the following obligations as lessee under non-cancellable operating leases. These are not recognised as liabilities in the Balance Sheet. 2007 2006 $’000 $’000 Payable no later than one year 5,169 3,109 Payable later than one year and not later than five years 16,673 1,185 Payable later than five years 18,396 93 Total (including GST) 40,238 4,387 GST included in operating lease commitments 3,658 399 The primary operating lease commitment relates to head office accomodation charges.30 Contingent Assets and Liabilities The department has no items which meet the definition of contingent assets. There are, however, a number of outstanding personal injury claims not settled as at 30 June 2007 with an estimated settlement value of $295,850. In addition, the Minis- ter for Employment, Training and Further Education has provided a $3 million guarantee to Austraining International Pty Ltd which has not been invoked as at 30 June 2007. Financial Report
  • 107. 108 Notes to the Balance Sheet as at 30 June 2007 31 Remuneration of Board and Committee Members Training and Skills Commission Premier’s Science Research Council P Wright Dr R Head F Trent Prof R Blandy M Smith Prof T Monro P Johns Prof C Marlin K Thiele Prof J Ralston T MacDonald Dr P Crook A Smith M Davis B Mowbray H Winchester Minister’s Youth Council D Strain R Barry G Peak A King (resigned 2 June 2007) G Rayner K Klein T Phillips H McEwen I Curry K Gbla S Schrapel S Lee S Frazer J McKenzie E Thornton I Mawa T Cruickshank J McCafferty T Swanson Information Economy Advisory Board A Solomon-Bridge G Foreman A Campbell Prof C Marlin L Smeaton Dr D Egan C Wanganeen J Grieve D Wilkins (appointed 1 Feb 2007) T Whiting S Scott (Appointed 1 Feb 2007) L DeBoer (Appointed 1 Feb 2007) R Dixon (Appointed 1 Feb 2007) J Parasiers (Appointed 1 Feb 2007) Budget and Finance Committee I McLachlan Audit and Risk Management Committee I McLachlan Total remuneration received, or due and receivable, by Board Members was $144 000 ( $128 000 ). The number of Members whose income from the entity falls within the following band is: 2007 2006 No. of members No. of members $0 - $9 999 44 25 $10 000 - $19 999 3 6 $20 000 - $29 999 1 0 48 31 Financial Report
  • 108. 109 Notes to the Balance Sheet as at 30 June 2007 2007 200632 Reconciliation of Net Cash Provided by Operating $’000 $’000 Activities to Net Cost of Providing Services Net Cash Provided by Operating Activities 28,290 5,447 Depreciation (15,360) (14,316) Investments - share of operating gains (losses) 407 21 (Loss)/Gain on Sale of Assets (337) 479 Asset Revaluation Decrement (209) 0 (Increase) in Employee Benefits (6,685) (7,648) Increase/(Decrease) in Receivables 5,265 (2,563) (Decrease)/Increase in Inventories (1,024) 513 Decrease/(Increase) in Payables 2,033 (5,858) (Increase) in Other Liabilities (5,383) (3,511) Decrease/(Increase) in Provisions 331 (1,235) Revenues from Government (285,372) (244,120) Net Cost of Providing Services (278,044) (272,791) Financial Report
  • 109. 110 Notes to and development programs; • supporting the Government’s strategic direction forming part of the in the higher education sector; • initiating, advocating and facilitating policies and Financial Statements strategies, including appropriate programs and grants, that create opportunities for positive out- comes for all young people in South Australia; and 1.  Agency Objectives • raising the profile of South Australia in the interna- and Funding tional education market place. (a)  Objective T (b)  Funding o build the breadth and depth of workforce The department is predominantly funded by State skills in South Australia, complemented by Government appropriations supplemented by leading science and technology develop- Commonwealth grants. In addition income is gener- ment, and building community education and capacity, ated from sales and/or a fee for service basis. These social inclusion and continuous learning into the culture include: of the state. • student fees and charges; The portfolio plays a central role in achieving • training for various organisations; South Australia’s Strategic Plan objectives Growing • sale of curriculum material; Prosperity, Fostering Creativity, and Expanding • hire of facilities and equipment. Opportunity; and makes a substantial contribution to Improving Wellbeing, Attaining Sustainability and The financial activities of the department are prima- Building Communities. rily conducted through a Special Deposit Account with the Department of Treasury and Finance pursuant to The department undertakes a range of functions Section 8 of the Public Finance and Audit Act 1987 in order to meet its objectives and contribute to the and to comply with the Skilling Australia’s Workforce achievement of South Australia’s Strategic Plan objec- Act 2005. The Special Deposit Account is used for tives and targets: funds provided by State Government appropriation, • provision of strategic policy advice for developing Commonwealth grants and revenues from fees and the state’s workforce; charges. • provision of strategic advice for science, technol- ogy, information economy and innovation policy (c) Administered Funds that links government with business, industry and The department is responsible for the administration education sectors; of the Minister for Employment, Training and Further • ensuring high quality vocational education and Education’s, salary and allowances funded by Special training (VET) delivered by TAFE institutes, private Acts Appropriation. These appropriations are not registered training organisations and adult com- controlled by the department and hence do not form munity education providers; part of the controlled financial statements. Salary • regulation of VET organisations, university and and allowances paid to the Minister in the 2006-07 non-university higher education providers, and financial year totalled $225,145 ($214,241). providers of English language intensive courses for overseas students; • regulation, administration and funding of appren- ticeships and traineeships; • managing state funded employment and community Financial Report
  • 110. 1112.  Summary of Significant (d) employees whose normal remuneration is $100 000 or more (within $10 000 bandwidths) and theAccounting Policies aggregate of the remuneration paid or payable or otherwise made available, directly or indirectly by(a)  Basis of Accounting the entity to those employees; andThe financial report is a general purpose financial (e) board/committee member and remunerationreport. The accounts have been prepared in accord- information, where a board/committee member isance with applicable Australian Accounting Standards entitled to receive income from membership otherand Treasurer’s Instructions and Accounting Policy than a direct out-of-pocket reimbursement.Statements issued pursuant to the Public Financeand Audit Act 1987. The Department’s Income Statement, Balance Sheet and Statement of Changes in Equity have beenStatement of Compliance prepared on an accrual basis and are in accordanceAustralian Accounting Standards include Australian with the historical cost convention, except for certainequivalents to International Financial Reporting assets that were valued in accordance with the valu-Standards and AAS 29 Financial Reporting by ation policy applicable.Government Department. The department has early- The Cash Flow Statement has been prepared onadopted the amendments to AASB 101 Presentation a cash basis.of Financial Statements (refer to note 4 ‘Changes inAccounting Policies’). The financial report has been prepared based on a twelve month operating cycle and presented inThe preparation of the financial report requires: Australian currency.• the use of certain accounting estimates and re- quires management to exercise its judgement in the (b)  Reporting Entity process of applying the Department’s accounting The financial report reflects the use of assets, liabilities, policies. The areas involving a higher degree of revenues and expenses controlled or incurred by the judgement or where assumptions and estimates Department in its own right. are significant to the financial reports are outlined in the applicable notes; and (c)  Transferred Function as a• compliance with Accounting Policy Statements is- result of restructuring sued pursuant to section 41 of the Public Finance No restructures occurred in 2006-07. and Audit Act 1987, by authority of Treasurer’s Instruction 19 Financial Reporting. For comparative purposes, on 1 April 2006, the Office for Youth was transferred from the Department for In the interest of public accountability and transpar- Families and Communities to the Department of Furtherency the Accounting Policy Statements require the Education, Employment, Science and Technology.following note disclosures, that have been includedin this financial report: (d)  Comparative Figures (a) revenues, expenses, financial assets and li- The presentation and classification of items in the abilities where the counterparty/transaction is with financial report are consistent with prior periods an entity within the SA Government as at reporting except where a specific Accounting Policy Statement date, and greater than $100 000 are separately or Australian accounting standard has required a identified and classified according to their nature; change. (b) expenses incurred as a result of engaging con- Where presentation or classification of items in sultants (as reported in the Income Statement); the financial report has been amended comparative (c) employee targeted voluntary separation pack- age information; Financial Report
  • 111. 112 amounts have been reclassified unless reclassification for in accordance with Treasurer’s Instruction 3 is impracticable. Appropriation. The restated comparative amounts do not Payments to the SA Government include the replace the original financial report for the preceding return of surplus cash pursuant to the cash alignment period. policy. (e)  Income and Expenses (g)  Current and Non-Current Classification Income and expenses are recognised in the Income Assets and liabilities are characterised as either current Statement when the flow or consumption or loss of or non-current in nature. The Department has a clearly economic benefits has occurred and can be reliably identifiable operating cycle of twelve months. Assets measured. and liabilities sold, consumed or realised as part of the normal operating cycle even when they are not Income and expenses have been classified expected to be realised within twelve months after the according to their nature and have not been offset reporting date have been classified as current assets unless required or permitted by a specific accounting or current liabilities. All other assets and liabilities are standard. classified as non-current. The following are specific recognition criteria: • Income from fees and charges is derived from (h)  Cash the provision of goods and services to other SA For the purposes of the Cash Flow Statement, cash government agencies and to other clients and is includes cash at bank and other deposits at call that recognised when invoices are raised. are readily converted to cash and are used in the cash • Income from disposal of non-current assets is management function on a day-to-day basis. recognised when control of the asset has passed to the buyer. (i)  Employee Benefits and • Grants are amounts provided by the Department Employment Related Expenses to entities for general assistance or for a particu- Liabilities have been established for various employee lar purpose. Grants may be for capital, specific benefits arising from services rendered by employees or recurrent purposes and the name or category to balance date. Employee benefits include entitle- reflects the use of the grant. The grants given are ments to wages and salaries, long service leave, annual usually subject to terms and conditions set out leave and non-attendance days. in the contract, correspondence. The grants are Non-attendance days are accrued annually for paid when the conditions set out in the contract employees engaged under the Technical and Further or correspondence are met. Income from grants Education Act 1976 but are non-cumulative. is recognised upon receipt of funding. • Contribution income is recognised when control of Employment related expenses include on-costs the contribution or the right to receive the contribu- such as employer superannuation and payroll tax tion and the income recognition criteria are met. on employee entitlements together with the workers’ compensation insurance premium. These are reported under Payables as on-costs on employee benefits (f)  Revenues from/Payments (refer Note 24). to SA Government Appropriations for program funding are recognised as revenues when the Department obtains control over the funding. Control over appropriations is normally obtained upon their receipt and are accounted Financial Report
  • 112. 113Salaries, wages, annual leave (j)  Provisionsand non-attendance days Provisions are recognised when the Department hasLiabilities for salaries, wages, annual leave, non- a present obligation as a result of a past event, it isattendance days and leave loading are measured probable that an outflow of resources embodyingand recognised at their nominal amount in respect of economic benefits will be required to settle the obliga-employees’ services up to the reporting date. tion and a reliable estimate can be made of the amount of the obligation. The annual leave liability is expected to be payablewithin twelve months and is measured at the undis- When the department expects some or all of acounted amount expected to be paid. In the unusual provision to be reimbursed, the reimbursement isevent where salary and wages and annual leave are recognised as a separate asset but only when thepayable later than 12 months, the liability will be reimbursement is virtually certain. The expense relatingmeasured at present value. to any provision is presented in the Income Statement net of any reimbursement.Long service leave Provisions are measured at the present valueThe liability for long service leave is recognised after of management’s best estimate of the expenditurean employee has completed eight and a half years of required to settle the present obligation at the Balanceservice. An actuarial assessment of long service leave Sheet date. If the effect of the time value of money isundertaken by the Department of Treasury and Finance material, provisions are discounted for the time valuebased on a significant sample of employees throughout of money and the risks specific to the liability.the South Australian public sector determined that the A liability has been reported to reflect unset-liability measured using the short hand method was tled workers compensation claims. The workersnot materially different from the liability measured compensation provision is based on an actuarialusing the present value of expected future payments. assessment performed by the Public Sector WorkforceThis calculation is consistent with the Department’s Wellbeing Group of the Department of the Premierexperience of employee retention and leave taken. and Cabinet.Sick leaveSick leave is not provided for in the financial report, as it (k)  Receivables Receivables include amounts receivable from trade,is non-vesting. However, entitlements are accumulated prepayments and other accruals.and any sick leave is considered to be taken from theemployees’ current entitlement. Trade receivables arise in the normal course of providing goods and services to other agencies and toSuperannuation the public. Trade receivables are generally receivableThe Department makes contributions to several super- within 30 days after the issue of an invoice or theannuation schemes operated by the State Government. goods/services have been provided under a contractualThese contributions are treated as an expense when arrangement.they are incurred. There is no liability for payments Collectibility of trade receivables is reviewed onto beneficiaries as they have been assumed by the an ongoing basis. Debts that are known to be uncol-Superannuation Funds. The liability outstanding at lectible are written off when identified. An allowancebalance date relates to any contribution due but not for doubtful debts is raised when there is objectiveyet paid to the Superannuation Schemes. evidence that the Department will not be able to collect the debt. Financial Report
  • 113. 114 (l)  Inventory when its fair value at the time of acquisition is greater Inventories held for sale and/or distribution are meas- than $1 million and estimated useful life is greater ured at the lower of cost (as determined by the latest than three years. purchase price) or their net realisable value. Every three years, the Department revalues its land, Inventories comprise of learning modules, food and buildings and leasehold improvements. However, if wine, wine making equipment, books, stationery, hair at any time management considers that the carrying and beauty products and timber supplies. amount of an asset materially differs from its fair value, then the asset will be revalued regardless of when the The amount of any inventory write-down to net last valuation took place. Non-current assets that are realisable value/replacement cost or inventory losses acquired between revaluations are held at cost until the are recognised as an expense in the period the write- next valuation, where they are revalued to fair value. down or loss occurred. Any write-down reversals are recognised as an expense reduction. Any revaluation increment is credited to the asset revaluation reserve, except to the extent that it reverses (m)  Leases a revaluation decrement of the same asset class The Department has entered into a number of operat- previously recognised in the Income Statement, in ing lease agreements, as lessee, for buildings and which case the increase is recognised in the Income other facilities where the lessors effectively retain all Statement. risks and benefits incidental to ownership of the items Any revaluation decrement is recognised in the held under the operating leases. Income Statement, except to the extent that it offsets Operating lease payments are recognised as an a previous revaluation increment for the same asset expense in the Income Statement on a straight-line class, in which case the decrease is debited directly basis over the lease term. The straight-line basis is to the asset revaluation reserve to the extent of the representative of the pattern of benefits derived from credit balance existing in the revaluation reserve for the leased assets. that asset class. The benefit of lease incentives received by the The valuation methodology applied to specific Department in respect of operating leases have been classes of non-current assets under revaluations is recorded as income for the financial year. as follows: Details of commitments of current non-cancellable Land operating leases are disclosed at Note 29. Land is recorded on the basis of best use market value obtained from the South Australian Valuer-General. (n)  Property, Plant and Equipment The most recent valuation was conducted as at 30 Assets are initially recorded at cost plus any incidental June 2007. cost involved with the acquisition. Where assets are acquired for no consideration, or minimal value, they Buildings and Improvements are recorded at their fair value in the Balance Sheet. Information was obtained from the Strategic Asset Componentisation of complex assets is only Management Information System (SAMIS), main- performed when the complex asset’s fair value at tained by the Department for Transport, Energy and the time of acquisition is greater than $1 million. Infrastructure. Buildings and improvements are valued at current replacement cost. Replacement costs have Revaluation of non-current assets been established by reference to Quantity Surveyors’ All non-current assets are valued at written down estimates. The building data provided in the statements current cost (a proxy for fair value); and revaluation of relates specifically to buildings and paved areas. The non-current assets or group of assets is only performed Financial Report
  • 114. 115most recent valuations for buildings and paved areas Depreciation/amortisation is calculated on a straightwere conducted as at 30 June 2007. line basis over the estimated useful life of the following classes of assets as follows: Buildings under construction are recorded as workin progress and are valued at cost. Useful life (Years)Library Collection Transportable buildings 30 - 50The library collection is recorded at valuation. The Fixed construction buildings 40 - 149most recent valuation was carried out as at 30 June2005 by VALCORP Aust Pty Ltd, on the basis of written Improvements 10 - 20down current cost. Paved areas 15 - 48Plant and Equipment Computing and communication 3 - 10Items of plant and equipment are recorded at fair value equipmentless accumulated depreciation. Other plant and equipment 7 - 40 All Plant and Equipment assets with a value of$10,000 or greater are capitalised. (q)  Payables Items under $10,000 are recorded in the Income Payables include creditors, accrued expenses andStatement as an expense in the accounting period in employment on-costs.which they are acquired. Creditors represent the amounts owing for goods and services received prior to the end of the reporting(o)  Impairment period that are unpaid at the end of the reporting period.All non-current assets are tested for indication of Creditors include all unpaid invoices received relatingimpairment at each reporting date. Where there is an to the normal operations of the Department.indication of impairment, the recoverable amount isestimated. An amount by which the asset’s carrying Accrued expenses represent goods and servicesamount exceeds the recoverable amount is recorded provided by other parties during the period that areas an impairment loss. unpaid at the end of the reporting period and where an invoice has not been received. For revalued assets an impairment loss is offsetagainst the asset revaluation reserve. All payables are measured at their nominal amount, are unsecured and are normally settled within 30 days(p)  Depreciation of Non-Current Assets from the date of the invoice or date the invoice is firstNon-current assets are systematically depreciated received.using the straight-line method of depreciation over their Employment on-costs include superannuationuseful lives. This method is considered to reflect the contributions and payroll tax with respect to outstand-consumption of their service potential. The Department ing liabilities for salaries and wages, long service leavereviews useful lives of assets annually. and annual leave. Payroll tax is a State tax levied on total gross salary paid plus (non-cash) benefits and employer superan- nuation contributions. The estimated amount of payroll tax payable in respect of employee benefits liabilities is also shown as a payable in the Balance Sheet. Any increase or decrease in the level of required payroll tax provision is charged as an increase or decrease Financial Report
  • 115. 116 in the payroll tax expense in the Income Statement. 3.  Financial Risk Management The payroll tax liability is only payable when employee The Department has significant non-interest bear- benefits are paid. ing assets (cash on hand and receivables) and liabilities (payables) and interest bearing assets. The (r)  Investments Department’s exposure to market risk and cash flow Investments are carried in the Balance Sheet at the interest risk is minimal. lower of cost or recoverable amount. The Department has no significant concentra- tion of credit risk. The Department has policies and (s)  Accounting for Taxation procedures in place to ensure that transactions occur The Department is not subject to income tax. The with customers with appropriate credit history. Department is liable for payroll tax, fringe benefits tax, goods and services tax (GST), emergency services In relation to liquidity/funding risk, the continued levy, land tax equivalents and local government rate existence of the Department in its present form, and equivalents. with its present programs, is dependent on Government policy and on continuing appropriations by Parliament Income, expenses and assets are recognised net for the Department’s administration and programs. of the amount of GST except: • when the GST incurred on a purchase of goods 4.  Changes in or services is not recoverable from the Australian Accounting Policies Taxation Office, in which case the GST is recognised Except for the amendments to AASB 101 Presentation as part of the cost of acquisition of the asset or as of Financial Statements, which the department has part of the expense item applicable; and early-adopted, the Australian Accounting Standards • receivables and payables, which are stated with and Interpretations that have recently been issued the amount of GST included. or amended but are not yet effective, have not been The net amount of GST recoverable from, or payable adopted by the Department for the reporting period to, the Australian Taxation Office is included as part of ending 30 June 2007. The Department has assessed receivables or payables in the Balance Sheet. the impact of the new and amended Standards and Interpretations and considers there will be no impact Cash flows are included in the Cash Flow Statement on the accounting policies or the financial report of on a gross basis and the GST component of cash flows the Department. arising from investing and financing activities, which is recoverable from, or payable to, the Australian Taxation Office is classified as part of operating cash flows. Commitments and contingencies are disclosed net of the amount of GST recoverable from, or payable to the Australian Taxation Office. If GST is not payable to, or recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office, the commitments and contingencies are disclosed on a gross basis. (t)  Rounding All amounts are rounded to the nearest thousand dollars ($’000). Financial Report
  • 116. 1175.  Programs and Sub-programs Sub-program - Science and InnovationThe programs and sub-programs presented in this Provision of high level strategic advice to the Ministerreport are: on maximising economic, environmental and social benefits from the State’s scientific research and innovation by:Program - Employment and Skills FormationDescription/Objective: To strengthen the economic • identifying strategic priorities for State Governmentprosperity and social well-being of South Australia investment;through strategic employment, skills formation and • raising awareness and understanding of the impor-further education activities. tance and benefits of science and innovation amongst government, business and the community;Sub-program - Vocational • facilitating coordinated and strategic bids for Com-Education and Training monwealth grants; andProvision of vocational education and training by TAFE • facilitating coordination of education and researchinstitutes and other providers, outside the school sector activity with end-user (industry) requirements to(including publicly funded Adult Community Education), maximise the benefits of South Australia’s scienceincluding contestable and non-contestable sources of and innovation activities and to drive economicfunding; policy advice and support for post-secondary development for the State.education. Sub-program - Information Economy Provision of high level strategic policy advice to theSub-program - Higher Education Minister and Government on the information economyProvision of advice to the Minister on higher education and the ICT sector and undertaking or facilitatingpolicy and planning. programs and projects that: • raise awareness and understanding of the infor-Sub-program - Regulatory Services mation economy among government, business,Provision of registration, accreditation and approval industry and education providers;services for registered training organisations, and the • contribution to greater understanding of the infor-regulation and administration of apprenticeships and mation economy and its effects; andtraineeships. • facilitate bids for significant Commonwealth grants.Sub-program - Learning, WorkforceDevelopment and EmploymentAddressing the disadvantaged by providing oppor-tunities to participate in employment, training, skillsdevelopment, adult community education and assistingindustry to meet current and future skills needs.Program - Science, Technologyand InnovationDescription/Objective: Provides the Government’sprincipal strategic focus for science, technology, infor-mation economy and innovation policy developmentand program delivery in South Australia that links thegovernment with business, industry and educationsectors. Financial Report
  • 117. 118 Program - Youth Description/Objective: To support the Government’s vision that South Australia is a place where people from all walks of life choose to live, the Office for Youth provides a range of programs, policy initiatives and grants that enable young people to contribute to decisions that impact on their lives and access opportunities that enable them to reach their full potential while making a positive contribution to their communities. Sub-program - Strengthened Partnerships Strengthen partnerships across government, the Department and the youth sector to support young people’s engagement within their community. Sub-program - Young People’s Engagement Support for all young people to be actively engaged in their communities in learning and decision-making and specific support to engage disadvantaged young people. Sub-program - Creative Leadership Promotion of creative leadership opportunities for young people, celebration of young leaders’ achieve- ment, encouragement of innovative community leader- ship and support for equity and diversity amongst emerging leaders. Financial Report
  • 118. 119DFEEST CONSULTANCY EXPENDITURE - 2006 - 07 FINANCIAL YEAR - inclusive of accrualsCONSULTANT REPORT AMOUNT (EXCL GST)RP WALLACE Professional services required for edit of draft discussion paper Train- $130.00 ing and Skills Development Act ReviewENTERPRISE DEVELOP- Development and facilitation of the Business Development Workshops $1000.00MENT NETWORK PTY LTDGRAHAM WINTER Provides independent advice on the Skills Reform Reference Group $2375.00CONSULTING and the Business Intelligence Team Building GroupE-INFO SOLUTIONS PTY Implementation and customisation of InfraEnterprise TAS System $6000.00LTDRAY DUNDON Consulting Services for the DFEEST establishment of the Seafood $11 062.50 Training Centre of ExcellenceTAYLOR MANAGEMENT Provides independent advice on the Professional Development Pro- $2562.50CONSULTING gramGIBSON QUAI - AAS PTY Adelaide - Melbourne Broadband Backhaul Infrastructure Study $21 620.00LTDJEFROB PTY LTD Provides independent advice on the Marketing & Communication $2813.13 ManagementPKF ORGANISATION Provides independent advice for the Budget & Financial processes $24 785.00DEVELOPMENT implementation projectBRIGHT COOKIE Consulting services for the tender of the Water Toolbox 07 $14 720.45LLOYDS REGISTER Provide independent advice and assessment of the management $1575.00QUALITY system used in Traineeship and Apprenticeship Services.SQUARE HOLES PTY LTD Research into the potential “next generation” leaders of family busi- $13 500.00 nesses, indicating likely interest in undertaking business leadership training using an e-learning methodology. $102 143.58DFEEST CONSULTANCY EXPENDITURE 2007 Calendar Year (continued) Number of Amount (Excl GST) consultanciesBelow $10,000 $16 455.63 7Between $10,000 and $50,000 $85 687.95 5Above $50,000 - 0 $102 143.58 12 Financial Report
  • 119. 120 Account Payment Performance Number of Percentage Value in $A of Percentage of Accounts of Accounts Accounts Paid Accounts Paid Paid Paid (by (by Value) Particulars Number) Paid by due date 1 83 013 82 202 398 328 83 Paid within 30 days or less 12 349 12 29 033 435 12 from due date Paid more than 30 days from 5872 6 13 457 853 5 due date The due date is defined as per 11.2 Treasurer’s Instruction. Unless there is a discount or a written agreement between the public authority and the creditor, payment should be within thirty days of the date of the invoice or claim. Contractual Arrangements DFEEST did not enter into any contractual arrangements that exceeded $4 million and that require inclusion in line with the reporting requirements of this annual report. DFEEST did, however, progress in excess of thirty procurement projects for the provision of goods, services and/or consultancies that individually exceeded $55 000 throughout the year. Twenty-nine contracts were executed during 2007. The total value of these contracts across their full terms is in the vicinity of $18 million. Fraud The department’s Internal Audit and Risk Management Review Branch undertakes reviews and provides assurance in relation to agency control systems and risk management processes. The unit coordinates its review activities in line with the department’s risk management and governance frameworks. The annual internal audit program includes testing of compliance with controls over the resources and assets of the department. No instances of fraud were suspected or found within the department during the year. Financial Report
  • 120. 121Profile of VET ActivityT he annual figures for 2007 were not available at the time this report was prepared. Unless otherwise stated, all VET data is related to the 2006 calendar year and includes all activity, including VET in Schools Agreements (VISA), using the NCVER’s publication scope.Number of VET StudentsIn 2006, 121 713 students undertook vocational education and training in South Australia. There was 50.7 percent(or 61 712 students) female students and 49.1 percent (59 765) male students, with a further 0.2 per cent (236)of students who did not specify their gender. In South Australia, 10.9 per cent of the working age (15-64 years) population participated in VET in 2006. The figure below shows that 65.1 per cent (79  296) of VET students in South Australia attended TAFEinstitutes. Source: NCVER (2007) PowerPlay Data CubesVETClient 2006 Profile of VET Activity
  • 121. 122 VET Students by Age Groups The figure below shows that the largest proportion of students undertaking vocational education and training in South Australia were aged between 20 to 29 years, with 25.0 per cent (or 30 423 students) of total students, followed by those aged 19 years or under, with 24.9 per cent (30 297). Source: NCVER (2007) PowerPlay Data CubesVETClient 2006 The largest share of male students were aged between 20 to 29 years, with 28.1 percent (16 776) of total male students, followed by those aged 19 years or under, with 27.2 percent (16 249). The largest share of female students were aged 19 years or under, with 22.6 percent (13 966) of total female students, followed by those aged 20 to 29 years, with 22.0 percent (13 581). Profile of VET Activity
  • 122. 123Student HoursIn 2006, South Australia delivered 23 178 019 hours of VET delivery, an increase of 0.2 per cent (or 47 238 hours)on 2005 levels. The figure below shows the distribution of VET hours by the AQF. The largest share of VET provision for 2006was at the Certificate III level, which accounted for 28.6 percent (6 631 576) of total VET hours. Source: NCVER (2007) PowerPlay Data CubesVETClient 2006 Profile of VET Activity
  • 123. 124 Field of Education Field of education defines the subject matter of an educational activity. The following figure shows the distribution of South Australia’s 2006 VET hours by field of education. The field of education with the largest share of hours was management and commerce with 22.7 percent (or 5 264 937 hours). This was followed by engineering and related technologies, with 17.5 percent (4 066 554) and society and culture, with 14.7 percent (3 417 345). Source: NCVER (2007) PowerPlay Data CubesVETClient 2006 Profile of VET Activity
  • 124. 125Training Package ActivityVET activity can be classified as training package activity or non-training package activity. In 2006, training package activity in South Australia accounted for 41.8 percent of all students (or 50 820students) and 61.0 percent of total VET hours (or 14 141 015 hours). In contrast, non-training package activitygenerated 58.2 percent of all students (70 893) and 39.0 percent of VET hours (9 037 0044). Of the more than 60 training packages used in South Australia in 2006, 15 training packages alone accountedfor over 75 percent of training package hours and student numbers (10 699 198 hours and 38 952 studentsrespectively) – see the table below. The community services training package had the largest share of training package hours with 15.1 percent(2  135  291), followed by business services with 11.9 percent (1  686  123) and hospitality with 6.6 percent(931 740). When considering students, the business services training package had the largest share with 14.0 percent(or 7 134), followed by community services 11.5 percent (5 867), and retail with 7.6 percent (3 872).Top Fifteen Training Packages, VET Hours, South Australia, 2006 Training Package Hours Community Services 2 135 291 Business Services 1 686 123 Hospitality 931 740 Information Technology 876 599 Retail 816 202 Automotive Industry Retail, Service and Repair 681 585 General Construction 535 590 Metal and Engineering Industry 484 765 Financial Services 481 505 Tourism 469 308 Australian Meat Industry 412 247 Food Processing Industry 353 694 Amenity Horticulture 285 070 Transport and Distribution 275 311 Rural Production 274 168 Total 10 699 198 Total (all training packages) 14 141 015 Total (all VET) 23 178 019 Source: NCVER (2007) PowerPlay Data CubesVETClient 2006 Profile of VET Activity
  • 125. 126 VET Students by Country of Birth The figure below shows that 70.6 percent (or 85 970 students) of South Australia’s VET students were born in Australia, with another 6.2 percent born in an English speaking country; 10.6 percent (12 882) were born in a non-English speaking country; and a further 12.6 percent (15 342) did not state their background. Source: NCVER (2007) PowerPlay Data CubesVETClient 2006 Profile of VET Activity
  • 126. 127VET Students by Disability StatusThe figure below shows that 6.8 percent of South Australia’s VET students (or 8 255 students) stated they had adisability. The split between males and females with a disability was roughly equal with 50.1 percent of females(4 136) and 49.8 percent of males (4 112) reporting a disability. Seven students who reported a disability didnot state their gender. Source: NCVER (2007) PowerPlay Data CubesVETClient 2006 Profile of VET Activity
  • 127. 128 VET students by Aboriginal /Torrens Strait Islander status The following figure shows that in 2006, 4.0 percent (or 4 912 students) of South Australia’s VET students identified themselves as having an Indigenous background. Of these students, 52.2 percent (2 563) were female and 47.6 percent were male (2 336). Thirteen students who reported their Indigenous status did not state their gender. Source: NCVER (2007) PowerPlay Data CubesVETClient 2006 Profile of VET Activity
  • 128. 129Provider Type and Funding SourceThe figure below shows the distribution of training activity (hours) by VET provider type. TAFE remains the largest provider with 77.0 percent of total VET hours (or 17 839 286 hours). Private provid-ers accounted for 15.6 percent of VET hours (3 615 028), followed by ACE (2.6 percent or 599 985) and WEA(0.5 percent or 118 358). Source: NCVER (2007) PowerPlay Data CubesVETClient 2006 The figure below shows that 84.9 percent of total VET hours (or 19 686 010 hours) were funded by Commonwealthand state recurrent funding in 2006. The next largest funding source was fee for service with 10.9 percentof hours (2 522 582), followed by overseas full fee paying students with 3.8 percent of hours (890 691) andCommonwealth and state specific funding with 0.3 percent (78 736). Profile of VET Activity
  • 129. 130 Source: NCVER (2007) PowerPlay Data CubesVETClient 2006 Profile of VET Activity
  • 130. 131Other Reporting Items Other Reporting Items
  • 131. 132 Employees’ Overseas Travel Overseas Travel Annual Report 2007 Report Type Categories Of Travel Consolidated Report for all Travellers Employees Cost to Involved Destination/s Reasons for Travel department ($) * 3 Canada - Business Development $26 260.76 - Attendance at workshop / conference - Presenting papers at conference 1 Chile Business Development $10 285.34 10 China - Participate in Promotional Exhibitions e.g. International Careers $98 563.00 Exhibition, Austrade - Study in Australia Exhibition, etc. - Recruitment of International Students - Discussion with Tertiary Institution(s) of country visited - Business Development - Attendance at workshop / conference - Presenting papers at conference - Project Management - Off-shore delivery of course/program 1 France - Attendance at workshop / conference $7 810.00 3 Hong Kong - Participate in Promotional Exhibitions e.g. International Careers $22 606.00 Exhibition, Austrade - Study in Australia Exhibition, etc. - Recruitment of International Students - Business Development - Attendance at workshop / conference - Project Management 3 India - Business Development $19 564.27 - Participate in Promotional Exhibitions e.g. International Careers Exhibition, Austrade - Study in Australia Exhibition, etc. - Recruitment of International Students 2 Indonesia - Business Development $4 125.00 2 Japan - Participate in Promotional Exhibitions e.g. International Careers $8 800.00 Exhibition, Austrade - Study in Australia Exhibition, etc. 2 Korea - Participate in Promotional Exhibitions e.g. International Careers $10 008.09 Exhibition, Austrade - Study in Australia Exhibition, etc. - Recruitment of International Students - Business Development - Attendance at workshop / conference - Presenting papers at conference - Facilitating at workshop 1 Laos - Off-shore delivery of course/program $12 882.00 2 Malaysia - Project Management $3 892.00 1 Mauritius - Facilitating at workshop $6 700.00 - Project Management 7 New Zealand - Attendance at workshop / conference $22 120.39 3 Samoa - Off-shore delivery of course/program $15 643.00 1 South Africa - Participate in Promotional Exhibitions e.g. International Careers $3 453.00 Exhibition, Austrade - Study in Australia Exhibition, etc. - Business Development - Attendance at workshop / conference - Presenting papers at conference - Facilitating at workshop 1 Singapore - Recruitment of International Students $4 512.00 - Discussion with Tertiary Institution(s) of country visited - Off-shore delivery of course/program 3 Sri Lanka - Business Development $13 165.00 - Project Management Other Reporting Items
  • 132. 133Overseas Travel Annual Report 2007Report Type Categories Of Travel Consolidated Report for all TravellersEmployees Cost to Involved Destination/s Reasons for Travel department ($) * 2 Thailand - Recruitment of International Students $13 536.34 - Business Development 1 Taiwan - Business Development $3 563.00 - Project Management 1 The Netherlands - Recruitment of International Students $4 981.00 - Discussion with Tertiary Institution(s) of country visited - Attendance at workshop / conference - Teacher/Student Exchange 1 Tibet - Business Development $5 558.00 1 United Arab - Participate in Promotional Exhibitions e.g. International Careers $6 642.45 Emirates Exhibition, Austrade - Study in Australia Exhibition, etc. - Discussion with Tertiary Institution(s) of country visited - Business Development - Project Management 2 United Kingdom - Recruitment of International Students $38 779.00 - Discussion with Tertiary Institution(s) of country visited - Attendance at workshop / conference - Teacher/Student Exchange 2 Vietnam - Participate in Promotional Exhibitions e.g. International Careers $9 571.00 Exhibition, Austrade - Study in Australia Exhibition, etc. - Recruitment of International Students - Business Development - Off-shore delivery of course/program*Please note that the cost to the department is gross expenditure and not ‘net of income’. It includes the salary costs of individualsas well as travel and accommodation costs.# Costs are calculated based on aquitted travel reports. Other Reporting Items
  • 133. 134 Disability DFEEST continued to provide training to staff in disability awareness through numerous forums includ- Action Plan ing a series of community of practice workshops, staff development sessions and is preparing an on line D disability awareness training package. FEEST consolidated its policies on acces- DFEEST delivered a community training package sibility and inclusion for people with a specifically on working with people with a disability disability into a Disability Action Plan (DAP) which accredits students with a qualification to work which was endorsed by DFEEST executive and is in this area. being rolled out across the department, with assigned Three training sessions were also conducted by responsibilities. DFEEST for RTOs in 2007 to enable them to better TAFE SA students were provided with information understand their compliance responsibilities with in handbooks on services available for people with a people with a disability. disability. The TAFE SA website has been upgraded to The chief executive continued as chair, of the be W3C (see W3C.org) accessibility compliant. National VET Disability Task Force which has devel- Support officers were available in each Institute for oped a range of projects to increase opportunities for people with a disability. people with a disability to participate in training and The department has a range of programs and employment. projects for people with a disability including: To support this, the task force is working with NCVER • South Australia Works in the Public Sector: to scope and consolidate existing VET and diversity research. This research will identify existing knowledge –– CareerStart SA (funds agencies for placing a and assist with the development of principles and person with a disability into an apprenticeship, priorities for future research directions. traineeship or cadetship).  The BULB survey of staff satisfaction asked staff –– Disability Works Australia (DWA) has been funded to voluntarily report any disabilities to enable the to administer the government’s State Public department to establish a base line of staff with a Sector Strategy for the Employment of People disability. with Disabilities • South Australia Works in Communities: –– Adult Community Education Program (projects target people with a disability) –– Employment Assistance Program (Disability Works Australia was funded to provide specialist services to jobseekers who have a disability) –– The Abilities for All project, a consortium of disability service providers, led by Bedford Industries, provided accredited training to people with a disability • South Australia Works in the Regions: delivered spe- cific projects targeting people with a disability. Other Reporting Items
  • 134. 135Asbestos ManagementM anagement of asbestos is a health risk management issue and requires a professional risk manage- ment approach. ANNUAL ASBESTOS MANAGEMENT REPORT, 2006-07 Category Number of Sites Category Interpretation Description One or more item(s) at At start At end these sites… of year of year 1 0 0 Remove should be removed promptly 2 8 8 Remove as soon as should be scheduled for removal practicable at a practicable time 3 10 10 Use care during main- may need removal during main- tenance tenance works 4 16 14 Monitor condition has asbestos present. Inspect according to legislation and policy 5 12 13 No asbestos identified / (All asbestos identified as per identified asbestos has OHS&W 4.2.10(1) has been been removed removed) 6 9 9 Further information (These sites not yet categorised) requiredIn the previous three years DFEEST has removed from its sites the following:• 2004/05 - 65 m2 and 8 items• 2005/06 - 480 l/mts and 883 m2• 2006/07 - 1400m2 and 116 items. DFEEST continues to work towards making all its sites asbestos free.Definitions:Category: The site performance score, determined by the lowest item performance score at each site.Number of Sites in Category: A count of how many sites have the corresponding site performance score, withseparate counts done at the start and the end of each year.Category Description: Indicates the recommended action corresponding to the lowest item performance score(recorded in the asbestos register by a competent person, as per OHS and W Regulations (SA) 1995, 4.2.10).Interpretation: A brief real-world example of what each category implies for a site. Other Reporting Items
  • 135. 136 Urban Design are 30 percent more efficient. The air conditioning incorporates 100 percent fresh air to assist in greater Charter productivity of staff. External shading, natural venti- lation and high performance glazing also assist in T creating a comfortable, productive and efficient work he department recognises the important environment. Water usage is reduced through the role the TAFE SA institutes and campuses installation of waterless urinals, ultra efficient dual play in the local community. The institute/ flush toilet cisterns (which use recycled water), and campus structure provides significant input into social low flow tap ware. Water efficiency is further enhanced networks and reinforces local character. They are a by incorporating solar panels on the buildings roof physical resource and a landmark place of activity. to assist in pre heating the hot water required for the The department’s facilities management and capital building. Waste is pre sorted in the building to enhance works processes include consideration of urban design its waste recycling capabilities. concepts. This helps support the building of community capacity and social capital through safe, accessible and welcoming facilities. Integrating urban design with our core systems and procedures consultant, contractor tenders and contracts are managed on behalf of DFEEST by the Department of Transport, Energy and Infrastructure (DTEI). To undertake design work, the department can define and/or request specific urban design principles associated with the project which and can include: • environmentally sustainable development initia- tives • specific site issues such as cultural, political and heritage issues • corporate parameters (relevant policies, standards and guidelines) • specific consultant services required (for example tree audits, traffic management surveys, disability access, Indigenous/cultural issues). DFEEST Corporate Services consolidated its staff from five existing locations to one location at City Central in Waymouth Street Adelaide in 2007. This building is the first purpose built 5 star greenstar design in Adelaide. DFEEST occupies six levels, and as a result reduced our urban footprint by approximately 4 percent from our previous multiple locations. As part of the 5 star greenstar design, City Central is designed to reduce the CO² emissions by 20 percent, which is assisted by using T5 fluorescent lamps which Other Reporting Items
  • 136. 137Freedom Of The Accredited FOI Officer Legislation and Delegations UnitInformation Department of Further Education, Employment Science and Technology GPO Box 320T he department holds correspondence and ADELAIDE SA 5001 administrative records including: Telephone Enquiries can be made on (08) 8226 3276.• personnel records Policy documents• accounts records Departmental policy documents are available via the• payroll records internet at:• supply records • http://www.saworks.sa.gov.au/• facilities management records • http://www.youthworks.sa.gov.au/• students’ records in TAFE institutes • http://www.officeforyouth.sa.gov.au/• student services records• records relating to accredited training courses Websites• complaints made about registered training provid- • TAFE ers and contracts of training http://www.tafe.sa.edu.au/• contracts • Information on accreditation / registration and• records relating to grants of funding contracts of training:• surveys and statistics. http://www.training.sa.gov.au/ Records are held in a variety of media including • Higher Education accreditation:paper, microfiche and electronic formats. Information http://www.aqf.edu.au/and explanatory documents about courses, contracts • Adult Community Education Grants:of training, course accreditation and training organisa- http://www.training.sa.gov.au/OVETs-tion registration, youth services, science, innovation tudents/pages/default/fundace/and information economy are available free of charge • User Choice Policy located under the Userfrom the following websites. Choice submenu: http://www.training.sa.gov.au/OVETorgs/Access requests • Training and Skills Commission guidelines:The department received 14 and processed 14 applica- http://www.employment.sa.gov.au/employ/tions under the Freedom of Information Act 1991 (FOI • Office for Youth:Act). http://www.officeforyouth.sa.gov.au/ • Science, Innovation and Information EconomyPublic access to documents: information: http://www.innovation.sa.gov.au/Application under the FOI Act must be made in writing, • General DFEEST website:specifying that they are made under the FOI Act, include http://www.dfeest.sa.gov.au/dfeest/an address in Australia to which correspondence maybe sent, be accompanied by either the prescribedapplication fee or proof of financial hardship and shouldbe addressed to: Other Reporting Items
  • 137. 138 Greening Of Government Operations T he department has endeavoured to progress our environmental commitments under South Australia’s Strategic Plan, and present the following information as an indication of our impact on the environment The following table provides the relevant energy data for our facilities for the 2006-07 financial year. Energy Efficiency in our facilities (MJ/m²) Target for Base year 2006-07 & Actual for SASP Plan & Target 2000-01 2010-11 2006-07 Result 376 331 382 1.6%6 from base year T3.13 311 13.3%6 from 2006-07 target & 18.6%6 from 2010-11 target Greenhouse Gas Emissions (t/CO²) T3.5 Base year 2005-06 2006-07 Result 49 878 34 249 30 722 38.4%6 from base year & 10.3%6 from 2005-06 Comments 2007 Highlights: • seasonal fluctuations including a very cold winter, and a prolonged and at times very hot summer have placed additional demand on our air conditioning services • increase in third party utilisation at various TAFE SA campuses for delivery of additional programs such as aquaculture and forestry • greenhouse gas emissions are down by 38 percent from the base year which represents an excellent result • DFEEST has approved an environmental procurement policy which focuses on the environmental considerations and impact on our procurement. Proposed Improvements For 2008: • initiate a lighting upgrade at Gawler TAFE SA Campus • initiate a rolling power factor correction program across eight identified TAFE campuses • undertake energy audits to three targeted TAFE SA campuses • continually identify opportunities to increase our energy efficiencies across the department • investigate possibilities to increase our transparency in reporting on our impacts socially and environ- mentally as well as financially. Other Reporting Items
  • 138. 139 The following graph illustrates our performance to date in relation to the energy efficiency of our facilities:450 Actual410 Target370330290250210170130 90 50 2000-01 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2010-11DFEEST Long Term Fleet Carbon NeutralFor Second Successive YearDFEEST, for the second consecutive year has offset the carbon emissions from our entire long term fleet throughan initiative administered through Greenfleet. Native trees are planted with the aim of creating a forest whichwill absorb the greenhouse gas emissions that each of our long term fleet vehicles produce. This equates toapproximately 4700 native trees in South Australia. Approximately 18 percent of our vehicles are carbon neutral through a whole of government initiative.Mitsubishi offsets the estimated carbon emissions that each Fleet SA vehicle is expected to generate over thethree year lease period. Holden is currently in talks with government regarding a similar arrangement for all Fleet SA leasedvehicles. Other Reporting Items
  • 139. 140 The following table provides a summary of our long term vehicle fleet and the resultant saving from the previous period of 2005-06 and the base year 2000-01. Long Term Vehicle Fleet 2006-07 % Compared % Compared to Plan & Target Vehicles $ to 2005-06 2000-01 Base year Number of vehicles 235 1.76 37.45 Total cost of fuel 579 949 2.36 14.15 Distance travelled kms (estimated) 4 938 821 7.26 N/A SASP Target T3.5 Number of duel fuel /LPG vehicles/ Hybrid 85 365 42.15 Tonnes CO² 1485 4.76 3.56 Fuel usage (Litres) 578 015 4.36 11.9 6 Comments These are excellent results for DFEEST. If this trend continues, we will exceed the 2010-11 target of 50 percent for alternate fuelled vehicles. Note the greenhouse gas emissions (CO²) can vary year to year due to the changes in the CO² co-efficient, which is determined yearly and is outside our control Proposals and continuing initiatives to improve on this result include: • fleet is carbon neutral for the second successive year through collaboration with Greenfleet Australia. Es- timated cost is $5 per vehicle per month. We are the only government department to fully neutralise our vehicle emissions • continue to enforce our fleet policy that mandates the leasing of alternate fuelled and four cylinder Australian manufactured vehicles for metropolitan Adelaide and alternative fuelled and six cylinder vehicles for regional South Australia whenever possible (excluding APY Lands where diesel vehicles must be used) • continue to focus on duel fuelled vehicles with a target of 50 percent of our fleet to be alternate fuelled by 2010. Other Reporting Items
  • 140. 141City Central Adelaide’s First 5 Star Greenstar Rated BuildingDFEEST consolidated five existing sites in the CBD to the one location at City Central. This move:• reduced our ecological footprint by 3.8 percent• has reduced waste to landfill has reduced from 67 percent in March 2007 to 47 percent in June 2007. The reduction in waste to landfill for June 2007 equates to the saving of greenhouse gas emissions that are emitted from the consumption of 12 barrels of oil• removed 118 IT items, of which 74 were printers. These excess items were processed through the self funded Computer Recycling Scheme (CRS), originally established in 1994. CRS refurbish decommissioned IT items and offers them to schools and community groups at 15 -20 percent of the cost of a new PC, and represents excellent value for money as well as reducing IT waste to landfill.• Energy data for City Central has only recently been received and is yet to be confirmed as being accu- rate.Disclaimer.The greenhouse gas emissions in the department do not represent the same percentage change as the energy,primarily due to variations in the CO² emissions coefficient of the electricity supply system.  The emissionscoefficient is dependent upon a number of factors, most importantly, the mix of primary fuels used to generateelectricity that is supplied in South Australia. Decisions about the mix of fuels are made as a function of theNational Electricity Market and are therefore beyond the control of the department. The department has endeavoured to provide the most accurate information from all possible sourcesavailable. Other Reporting Items
  • 141. 142 Carers Recognition Other policy vehicles that raise awareness and understanding of carer and related issues include our Act 2005 Disability Action Plan and Critical Incident policy. Within TAFE SA, access and equity committees 2 monitor, report and recommend actions to assist with 007 is the first year DFEEST has reported issues impacting on carers. on the Carers Recognition Act which was 2. (a) What specific information does your organisation proclaimed in 2005. The objects of the Act provide to carers (including employees) to assist are to ‘recognise and support carers and their role in them to make choices for their caring role? the community’ and to ‘provide reporting of actions taken to reflect the principles of the Carers Charter A coordinated approach is being developed to in the provision of services relevant to carers and the assess the adequacy of related policies, the appro- persons they care for’. priateness of our communication strategies, and the effectiveness of our reporting of our information DFEEST is one of five departments required to sources for carers. report on compliance with our obligations relating to the Carers Charter. This Charter requires DFEEST to ‘take (b) What information do you plan to make available all practical measures to ensure that the organisation to carers in 2007-08? and its officers, employees or agents have an aware- Further development work will be undertaken to ness and understanding of the Carers Charter and take formalise the consultation process with carer repre- actions to reflect the principles of the Charter in the sentatives to assist with determining delivery services provision of relevant services of the organisation.’ and the impact of decisions on carers. Work will also The information provided is prescribed in the act be undertaken to continue to raise a level of awareness and is required for incorporation in the annual report. and understanding across the department and identify As this is the first year that DFEEST has undertaken staff with carer roles and responsibilities. To assist the obligations of the Charter much of the work done in this, we intend to examine the establishment of a to date has been introductory and it is anticipated consultation group and evaluate the ACE destination that in 2008 there will be considerable progress in survey. the provision of relevant services as reflected by the Act. 3. (a) What opportunities do you provide which will 1. Describe briefly the strategies you have used to assist carers to sustain or improve their health and promote the Carers Recognition Act throughout your wellbeing? (Refers to Principle 2: Carers health and organisation. (Refers to Section 6 (1) of the Act) wellbeing are critical to the community) At the strategic policy level, the DFEEST Workforce The adoption of Voluntary Flexible Working arrange- Development Platform 2010 identifies and supports the ments and the development and alignment of family needs of carers. The voluntary flexible working hours friendly polices as a priority provide, at a corporate arrangements which includes compressed hours, flexi- level support for the general wellbeing of carers. time, and working from home have been incorporated into enterprise bargaining arrangements. (b) What plans do you have in relation to this Principle for 2007-08? Line managers are encouraged to support employ- ees who may be carers and facilitate a flexible approach An assessment of policy and program effective- to work at the unit level to meet the personal demands ness will be undertaken as part of developing a more and issues impacting on carers. integrated approach to carers in 2008. Other Reporting Items
  • 142. 1434. (a) What workplace policies and practices do you 5. Do your policies and practices specifically relat- have which assist carers to balance their work and ing to carers address Aboriginal and Torres Strait caring roles? (Refers to Principle 3: carers play a Islander carers? (Refers to Principle 5: Carers in critical role in maintaining the fabric of society) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities need specific consideration). To assist carers in balancing their work and caringroles, a number of flexible work practices are available Initial consultation has taken place to identify poli-for individuals directly involved. A range of leave options cies and practices specifically related to Aboriginalare also available and line managers are encouraged and Torres Strait Islander carers and it is intended toto support and mentor all employees in maintaining a further this work in 2008.work life balance. 6. Do you specifically consider young carers in poli- For schools, the question will relate to young carers: cies and practices which relate to carers? (RefersDo you have policies and practices to assist young to Principle 6: All children and young people havecarers to balance their caring and learning roles? the right to enjoy life and reach their potential). Students who may be carers will be provided Young staff and students who may be carerswith information at the time of enrolment relating to are covered by the policies and practices outlinedsupport offered through student service support staff. above.This information will also be provided through our 7. What resources have you made available to carers?website. (Refers to Principle 7: Resources are available to (b) What plans do you have in relation to this Principle provide timely, appropriate and adequate assist-for 2007-08? ance to carers). It is intended to ensure in the coming year, that It is intended to undertake an analysis of ourspecific effort will be placed on raising the level of strategies in order to more appropriately respond toawareness of carers and the support services offered the needs of carers, both staff and students. Furtherto them. consideration will be given to the development of effective information management systems and of (a) How does your organisation ensure that carers performance measures to assess the effectivenessare involved in decisions about service arrangements of our strategies.that affect them? Please specify the strategies used toachieve this. (Refers to Principle 4: Service providerswork in partnership with carers). Existing consultation strategies provide someavenues of interaction between the department andcarers, but it has been identified that a more formalisedapproach may be needed to enhance the consulta-tion with carers and their representatives. Raisingawareness within the department will also improveopportunities for feedback between parties to betteridentify strategies to address the needs of carers. Other Reporting Items
  • 143. 144 8. How does your organisation receive feedback from carers and involve carers in improving the way your services are delivered? (Refers to Section 6 (2) of the Act). The establishment of a consultation group and a formal process of engaging with carer representatives will assist in dealing with feedback from carers and help shape support and service and delivery plans. There is a need to ensure that we have a complaints handling mechanism that addresses the concerns of carers. 9. What are the challenges for your organisation to implement the Carers Recognition Act? Challenges arise in determining what information or data is required, what we have already got and what we expect to need in the future. Information data collection is based on self disclo- sure and further strategies for improving this collection (like including questions in staff and student surveys) need to be considered. Subsequent analysis of resource implications and impact on carers must be determined. The development of effective measures to determine success must also be established. Other Reporting Items
  • 144. 145AcronymsAAP Aboriginal Apprenticeship ProgramACE Adult Community EducationAPY Anangu Pitjantatjara YankunytjatjaraAQF Australian Qualifications FrameworkAQTF Australian Qualification Training FrameworkBDF Broadband Development FundBITS Building on IT StrengthsCDEPs Community Development Employment ProgramsCRC’s Cooperative Research CentresCSIRO Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research OrganisationCOAG Council Of Australian GovernmentsDAPs Disability Action PlansDECS Department of Education and Children’s ServicesDEST Department of Employment Science and TechnologyDEEWR Department of Education Employment and Workplace RelationsDFEEST Department of Further Education, Employment, Science and TechnologyDSTO Defence, Science and Technology OrganisationEAP Employee Assistance ProgramELICOS English Language Intensive Courses for Overseas StudentsESOS Educational Services to Overseas StudentsHEC Higher Education CouncilHPC High Performance ComputingHPI Hourly Paid InstructorICDL International Computers Drivers LicenceICT Information and Communications TechnologyIEAB Information Economy Advisory BoardMCEETYA Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training and Youth AffairsMCVTE Ministerial Council on Vocational Training and EducationNCVER National Centre for Vocational Education and ResearchOHS&IM Occupational Health, Safety and Injury ManagementOHSW Occupational Health, Safety and WelfarePSM Act Public Sector Management ActRTOs Registered Training OrganisationsSABRENet South Australian Broadband for Research and Education NetworkSACE South Australian Certificate of EducationSACITT South Australian Consortium for Information Technology TelecommunicationsSATAC South Australian Tertiary Admissions CentreSTI Science, Technology and InnovationSTI10 10 year Vision for Science Technology and InnovationTAFE SA Technical and Further Education South AustraliaVET Vocational Education and TrainingVFWA Voluntary Flexible Working ArrangementsVISA VET in Schools AgreementsWEA Worker’s Education Association Other Reporting Items

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