TELIC conference - Digital Futures in Teacher Education

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TELIC conference - Digital Futures in Teacher Education

  1. 1. Exploring OpenEducational Resources anddigital literacy in the contextof professional educationAnna Gruszczynska and Richard Pountney,Sheffield Hallam University, UK
  2. 2. About the projectLocal teachers and pupils, Partners:teacher educators and teacher • Sheffield Hallam Universityeducations students involved in: • University of Sheffield•sharing and developing goodpractice in teaching • 5 primary and 5 secondary schools in South Yorkshire•understanding more aboutdigital literacy • Creative Industries (Learning Connections and RealSmart)•exploring and sharing thepotential of digital technologies • Yorkshire and Humber Grid for Learning•Project outputs will be shared viaan open textbook and the • Sheffield Children’s Festival"Digital Bloom" installation
  3. 3. Context: Open Educational Resources (OER)Involvement of team members inUK OER movement • exploring tacit aspects of pedagogical practice • exploring the "why" (socio- cultural/institutional context) rather than solely the "how" (technical aspects) of OERs • Issues related to copyright, re- use and re-purposing (www.jorum.ac.uk as a repository)
  4. 4. Context: UK School sector – issues and challenges• Existing research on OERs in the UK focuses primarily on higher education institutions (HEIs)• Little coordinated development of resources for the school sector (regional networks formed around broadband consortia, partnerships with HEIs)• BECTA-funded (British Educational Communications and Technology Agency) project "Repurpose, Create, Share" (demise of BECTA in 2010)• Current debates focusing on issues of ICT in the curriculum ("Shut down or restart?" Royal Society report)
  5. 5. Outputs from the project• Open textbook (watch out for www.digitalfutures.org)• Case studies• Digital bloom• Reflexive methodology• Engagement with digital literacy (DL) frameworks• Guidance on OERs in the school sector• The DeFT movie!
  6. 6. Case studiesMundella primary: Newman special school: A.F.O.R – AlternativeDigital Bloom Forms of Recording
  7. 7. Frameworks for digital literacy• Existing frameworks (FutureLab, JISC)• Digital literacy as a continuum between the purely social and the purely technological• Move from the singular ‘literacy’ to the plural ‘literacies’ to emphasise the sheer diversity of existing accounts (Lankshear and Knobel, 2008).• Digital literacies as "the constantly changing practices through which people make traceable meanings using digital technologies" (Gillen and Barton, 2011).• Critique of the concept of digital natives (Bennet & Maton, 2011; Merchant, 2012)
  8. 8. DL as a communicative practice‘I gained a terrific sense of newopportunities DLs now offering to theclassroom incl[uding] authentic audience,remix, producing where used to be onlyconsumers; endeavours to enhancestudents criticality e.g. re commercialism’ (comment from project evaluator)
  9. 9. DL as a "theory of barriers"‘When it comes to e-safety, we seem to livein a culture of fear where we [might be]teaching road safety but never letting thechild out’ (project meeting, secondary teacher)•Web2.0 filters•Technological barriers•Access to devices
  10. 10. DL as a curricular driver ‘In terms of teaching and digital literacy the ultimate question we constantly need to deal with is - is this going to help the students when they get to an exam? Because what I would like to see happening is the fostering of a community, personal growth etc. but most of the time it is about having to teach "for an exam“’ (focus group with PGCE students).
  11. 11. DL Tensions: sharing resources ‘polished performance’ vs. accounts of ‘real life’’ ‘you have to be sharing with the kids anyway all the time’ (focus group with PGCE students)‘You don’t know what reaction you would get… can you imagine if you put it on you tube and you got loads of thumbs down?’
  12. 12. DL meanings: Stories of a digital divide‘My pupils were shocked to discover that Ididn’t have a mobile phone as a teenagerand when you arranged to meet with yourmates you just agreed on a meeting timeand point and then waited. You wouldactually talk to each other, youknow, rather than keep texting.’(focus group with PGCE students)
  13. 13. DL investigations: new avenues• Methodological approaches: exploring the ways in which understandings around DL are expressed and shared through reflection in action• Re-examining DL in the context of the debate around ICT in the curriculum and the removal of the programmes of study• Exploring the place of DL and OERs in professional development of teachers
  14. 14. For more information• Read our blog: www.deftoer3.wordpress.com• Follow us on Twitter @deftoer3• Have a look at our Slideshare presentations www.slideshare.net/deftoer3• Email us: a.gruszczynska@shu.ac.uk; r.p.pountney@shu.ac.uk
  15. 15. Help the Digital Bloomgrow – plant a flower!

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