Digital Futures in Teacher Education: Open educational resources  and quality of teaching Project Lead: Richard Pountney, ...
Digital literacy: issues and concerns <ul><li>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aXV-yaFmQNk </li></ul>
Overview of the DeFT: Digital Futures in Teacher Education project <ul><li>Part of a larger  UK Open Educational Resources...
Project partners <ul><li>Sheffield Hallam University (Lead institution) </li></ul><ul><li>University of Sheffield </li></u...
Key terms: Open Educational Resources <ul><li>…  digitised materials offered freely and openly for educators, students and...
Key terms: Digital literacy <ul><li>A blend of ICT, media and information skills and knowledge situated within academic pr...
Digital literacies: ‘stages of development'
Project outputs: Open textbook <ul><li>i) Digital literacies in the context of professional development:  opportunities an...
Key relationships
Case studies/stories of OER (re)use  <ul><li>Partners’ reflections on the process: before, during, after – examination of ...
Key issues: quality in teaching with OERs <ul><li>Focus on the  “why”  rather than the “how” of Open Educational Resources...
For more information: <ul><li>This presentation can be accessed from our slideshare account at:  http://slidesha.re/facult...
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Digital Futures in Teacher Education: Open educational resources

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This presentation has been delivered during the Faculty Forum event at Sheffield Hallam University.

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  • Open Teaching in the Digital Age - How do we create, remix, license, and share Think about what do we mean by open teaching? What could it mean that openness is the default action of the academic – more about this later…
  • An open textbook is an openly-licensed  textbook  offered online by its author(s) or through a non-profit or commercial open-licensed publisher.  It must be licensed in a way that grants a baseline set of rights to users that are less restrictive than its standard  copyright . Generally, the minimum baseline rights allow users at least the following: to use the textbook without compensating the author to copy the textbook, with appropriate credit to the author to distribute the textbook non-commercially to shift the textbook into another format (such as digital or print)
  • What depositors assumed The main users will be knowledge experts Quality control is provided by university procedures Accessibility - also as per university procedures Sustainability - just the short term, but no clear view Prerequisites - not a key issue, assumed resource is adaptable – material offered at diff levels
  • Digital Futures in Teacher Education: Open educational resources

    1. 1. Digital Futures in Teacher Education: Open educational resources and quality of teaching Project Lead: Richard Pountney, Faculty of Development and Society Principal Investigator: Guy Merchant, Faculty of Development and Society
    2. 2. Digital literacy: issues and concerns <ul><li>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aXV-yaFmQNk </li></ul>
    3. 3. Overview of the DeFT: Digital Futures in Teacher Education project <ul><li>Part of a larger UK Open Educational Resources (OER) programme, led jointly by JISC (Joint Information Systems Committee) and the Higher Education Academy on behalf of HEFCE.    </li></ul><ul><li>Builds on previous involvement of the team with the OER programme </li></ul><ul><li>Links with Collaboration Sheffield , the Transformative Change project involving both Sheffield universities </li></ul><ul><li>Key goal is to raise the status and quality of teaching and the level of digital literacies and the (re)use of OERs in the teaching workforce. </li></ul>
    4. 4. Project partners <ul><li>Sheffield Hallam University (Lead institution) </li></ul><ul><li>University of Sheffield </li></ul><ul><li>4 PGCE tutors at SHU and TUOS </li></ul><ul><li>Initial Teacher Education students at SHU and TUOS - PGCE/BA in Education </li></ul><ul><li>8 primary and secondary schools </li></ul><ul><li>Local creative/digital industry partners: </li></ul><ul><li>Learning Connections </li></ul><ul><li>SmartAssess </li></ul><ul><li>Sheffield Children's Festival </li></ul><ul><li>Yorkshire and Humber Grid for Learning </li></ul><ul><li>UK Literacy Association </li></ul>
    5. 5. Key terms: Open Educational Resources <ul><li>… digitised materials offered freely and openly for educators, students and self-learners to use and reuse for teaching, learning and research (OECD, 2007). </li></ul>Create License Remix Share … teaching, learning and research resources that reside in the public domain or have been released under an intellectual property license that permits their free use or re-purposing by others. (Atkins et al. 2007).
    6. 6. Key terms: Digital literacy <ul><li>A blend of ICT, media and information skills and knowledge situated within academic practice contexts while influenced by a wide range of techno-social practices involving communication, collaboration and participation in networks. </li></ul><ul><li>The project embraces a holistic view of digital literacy and engages with a number of different actors involved in/ influenced by issues related to teacher education </li></ul><ul><li>The project works on the assumption that increasingly the skills and experience that learners (and their teachers) have or need is changing and the baseline is being raised . </li></ul>
    7. 7. Digital literacies: ‘stages of development'
    8. 8. Project outputs: Open textbook <ul><li>i) Digital literacies in the context of professional development: opportunities and challenges of embedding digital literacies within teacher education </li></ul><ul><li>ii) Digital literacies for creative learners: a set of tools and resources for embedding OERs within the school sector. </li></ul><ul><li>These materials will be accompanied by pedagogical descriptions with the aim to become incorporated into existing PGCE/PGCert modules </li></ul>
    9. 9. Key relationships
    10. 10. Case studies/stories of OER (re)use <ul><li>Partners’ reflections on the process: before, during, after – examination of assumptions, challenges involved in “opening up” the materials </li></ul><ul><li>Focused around one module - but reflect across the scope of the project </li></ul><ul><li>Supporting materials </li></ul>Evaluating the Practice of Opening up Resources for Learning and Teaching in the Social Sciences www.c-sap.bham.ac.uk/oer
    11. 11. Key issues: quality in teaching with OERs <ul><li>Focus on the “why” rather than the “how” of Open Educational Resources </li></ul><ul><li>Emphasis on the broader cultural and institutional context in which OERs are created and (re)used and any resulting issues and/or tensions  </li></ul><ul><li>Release of OERs at an institutional level provides an opportunity for existing quality measures (technical/pedagogical) to be reconsidered/evaluated </li></ul>
    12. 12. For more information: <ul><li>This presentation can be accessed from our slideshare account at: http://slidesha.re/faculty_forum </li></ul><ul><li>Project blog: http://deftoer3.wordpress.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>Follow us on Twitter @deftoer3 </li></ul><ul><li>Contact details : </li></ul><ul><li>Project manager: Anna Gruszczynska [email_address] ext. 6384 </li></ul><ul><li>Project assistant: Nicky Watts </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul>

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