The Perkins Act
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The Perkins Act

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This PowerPoint provides a comprehensive overview of the Perkins Act, which federally funds Career and Technical Education.

This PowerPoint provides a comprehensive overview of the Perkins Act, which federally funds Career and Technical Education.

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The Perkins Act Presentation Transcript

  • 1. The Perkins ActPresentation Developed by Micah Melling, CRVP for2011-2012
  • 2. Presentation Outline and ObjectivesTo define the Perkins ActTo establish the law’s importanceTo discuss the history of the Perkins ActTo provide an overview of the major components in the Perkins ActTo discuss recent news about the Perkins ActTo explain how the Perkins Act affects Career and Technical Student Organizations
  • 3. What is the Perkins Act?The Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act is the federal law the funds Career and Technical Education (CTE).Currently, the Perkins Act provides approximately $1.13 billion per fiscal year to be shared among states.The programs, funding, and requirements in the Perkins Act affect CTE programs throughout the nation.
  • 4. History of the Perkins ActVocational Education Act of 1963 The modern era of federal funding for CTE began with the passage of this legislation. Congressman Carl D. Perkins was the main advocate for this law.
  • 5. History of the Perkins Act (Cont)Carl D. Perkins Vocational Education Act of 1984 In 1984, Congress revised the Vocational Education Act, and it was renamed for the revered Carl D. Perkins.
  • 6. History of the Perkins Act (Cont)Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Applied Technology Act of 1990 This legislation marked a turning point for CTE. Contextual learning and academic measures became major points of emphasis. Measures were strengthened to assist “special populations” and economically-disadvantaged students.
  • 7. History of the Perkins Act (Cont)Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Education Act of 1998 This legislation provided more flexibility in how funds were spent, required more contextual- learning integration, and enhanced accountability for student achievement.
  • 8. History of the Perkins Act (Cont)Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 The Perkins Act was most recently reauthorized in 2006. The following slides provide an overview of the most recent Perkins Act.
  • 9. The 2006 Perkins ActState and Local Uses of Funds State education departments are allowed to keep 15% of their Perkins funds. The other 85% is given to school districts and postsecondary institutions. For state activities, there are 9 required and 17 permissible uses for Perkins funds. For local activities, there are 9 required and 20 permissible uses for Perkins funds.
  • 10. The 2006 Perkins Act (Cont)State Plan Each state education department was required to submit a State Plan to the U.S. Department of Education. The State Plan explained each state’s strategy for using their Perkins funds. This plan was submitted in the spring of 2008, and it covered Fiscal Year 2008-2012. States can annually revise their State Plan.
  • 11. The 2006 Perkins Act (Cont)Local Plan Each local recipient was required to submit a Local Plan to their state education department. The Local Plan explained the local recipient’s strategy for using their Perkins funds.
  • 12. The 2006 Perkins Act (Cont)Accountability In cooperation with the U.S. Department of Education, each state has set quantifiable performance levels. If these standards are not met, funding may be withheld from the state. Local programs have worked with their state education department to set performance levels. If these standards are not met, local programs may be subject to a series of sanctions.
  • 13. The 2006 Perkins Act (Cont)Programs of Study Programs of Study create a sequence of class- work that helps students attain postsecondary degrees or industry-recognized credentials. The ultimate goal for implementing Programs of Study is to help provide a successful transition between secondary and postsecondary education.
  • 14. The 2006 Perkins Act (Cont)Tech Prep Tech Prep was a program within the Perkins Act until its funding was eliminated in Fiscal Year 2011. The goal of Tech Prep was to connect secondary and postsecondary CTE programs. When it was still funded, states had the option of combining the Tech Prep Grant with the “regular” Perkins Grant.
  • 15. Recent News about the Perkins ActFiscal Year 2011 Reduction From 2002-2011, the Perkins Act was practically flat-funded at $1.27 billion per fiscal year. In February of 2011, Congress voted to cut Perkins funding by $140 million (11%), decreasing the monetary value of the Perkins Act to approximately $1.13 billion. This reduction completely eliminated the Tech Prep Program ($103 million) and cut the Basic State Grant by $37 million.
  • 16. Recent News about the Perkins Act(Cont)Fiscal Year 2012 Appropriation In December of 2011, Congress passed an omnibus funding package that included the appropriation for the Perkins Act for Fiscal Year 2012. In this legislation, the Perkins Act was level- funded at Fiscal Year 2011 levels - approximately $1.13 billion.
  • 17. Recent News about the Perkins Act(Cont)Outlook for Fiscal Year 2013  With the need to need to reduce the federal government’s budget, Perkins funding could potentially be subject to cuts for Fiscal Year 2013. In his Fiscal Year 2013 Budget Proposal, President Obama requested that the Perkins Act be level-funded at approximately $1.13 billion; however, this proposal does not ensure that the Perkins Act will be safe from reductions in Fiscal Year 2013.
  • 18. Recent News about the Perkins Act(Cont)Upcoming Reauthorization The current Perkins Act is authorized through 2012. A reauthorization will not likely occur in 2012, though. Given the slow progress of other reauthorizations, an official timeline is uncertain. As long as the program remains funded, the current law will continue.
  • 19. How Does Funding for CTE ImpactCTSOs?Under the Perkins Act, state education departments and school districts are not required to allocate funding for CTSOs.CTSOs are specifically listed as a “permissible” use of Perkins funds, not a “required” use.However, the Perkins Act still has a large impact on CTSOs (see the next slides).
  • 20. How Does Funding for CTE ImpactCTSOs? (Cont)CTE programs are the basis for CTSOs. Therefore, legislation that affects CTE also impacts CTSOs. If funding for CTE is reduced, CTSOs will be negatively impacted. If funding for CTE is increased, CTSOs will be more likely to thrive.
  • 21. Can Perkins Funds be SpecificallyUsed for CTSOs?State-Level Activities Under the Perkins Act, state education departments are not required to allocate funding for CTSOs. However, many state education departments opt to provide state advisors to administer their CTSOs.
  • 22. Can Perkins Funds be SpecificallyUsed for CTSOs? (Cont)Local-Level Activities Under the Perkins Act, local recipients are not required to allocate funding for CTSO activities. School districts may allocate funding for CTSOs if they believe that action can help improve student achievement and meet accountability requirements. However, Perkins funds cannot be used to pay for conference costs, except when dealing with “special populations.”
  • 23. Points to RememberThe Perkins Act is one of the major driving forces behind the direction and success of CTE and, by association, CTSOs.Under the Perkins Act, the federal government has provided funding for CTE for nearly 50 years.The Perkins Act was most recently reauthorized in 2006.The 2006 Perkins Act includes many programs, requirements, and expectations for state education departments and local recipients.
  • 24. Points to Remember (Cont)In February of 2011, Congress cut the appropriation for the Perkins Act by $140 million (11%), reducing the law’s monetary value to approximately $1.13 billion.The Perkins Act was appropriated at approximately $1.13 billion for Fiscal Year 2012.The current Perkins Act is authorized through 2012. However, an official timetable for a reauthorization is uncertain. As long as the Perkins Act receives an appropriation, the current law will continue.
  • 25. Points to Remember (Cont)CTSOs are listed as a “permissible” use of Perkins funds, not a required use.However, CTE programs are the basis for CTSOs. Therefore, legislation that affects CTE also impacts CTSOs.Many state education departments provide a state advisor to administer their CTSOs.School districts may allocate funding for CTSOs if they believe that action can help improve student achievement and meet accountability requirements.
  • 26. For More Information…Three other political outreach resources can be found on DECA’s SlideShare Account. A “DECA and Politics” document A “Political Outreach Kit” A PowerPoint about “Obtaining Legislators’ Support”
  • 27. Questions?Email Central Region Vice President Micah Melling. decavpmicah@gmail.com.After May of 2012, contact John Fistolera. john_fistolera@deca.org