• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Creating
 

Creating

on

  • 3,653 views

A short example of how to design an effective presentation, using images- and very little text - to convey meaning

A short example of how to design an effective presentation, using images- and very little text - to convey meaning

Statistics

Views

Total Views
3,653
Views on SlideShare
3,651
Embed Views
2

Actions

Likes
9
Downloads
196
Comments
3

1 Embed 2

http://www.slideshare.net 2

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel

13 of 3 previous next Post a comment

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Creating Creating Presentation Transcript

    • CREATING EFFECTIVE PRESENTATIONS
      • Effective Communication
      • Visual Thinking
      • Breaking “it” Down
      • Putting “it” All Together
      • References
    • effective communication
      • What’s ahead...
      Four Main Goals of Communication Keys to Effective Communication How to Know You’re Communicating Effectively
    • " You can't not communicate. Everything you say or do or don't say and don't do sends a message to others.“ – John Woods
    • The Four Main Goals of Communication
    • Inform
    • Request a specific action
    • Persuade
    • Build relationships
    • Keys to Effective Communication
      • Know Your Subject Matter
      • Know Your Audience
      • Know Yourself
      • Develop a Theme
      • Prepare Your Script
      • Select the Proper Visual Aids
      • Prepare a Story Board
      • Produce the Visuals
      • Rehearse – Rehearse - Rehearse
      • How to know when you are communicating
      • effectively
    • visual thinking
      • What’s ahead...
      What is “visual thinking?” Deadly Sins of Visual Presentations
      • Visual thinking?
      • Visual thinking refers to a group of generative skills
      • that, when practiced with rigorous discipline,
      • results in the production of novel and original
      • graphic ideas.
    •  
      • When you communicate clearly, people understand.
      • When they understand, they make decisions which lead to actions and create results.
      • 1993-2007 XPLANE Corp.
      • SOME DEADLY SINS OF VISUAL PRESENTATION
      • The Illegible Image
      • The Useless Image
      • The Overly Complex Image
      • Chart Junk
      • Chartoons
      • Ransom Note Design
      • Calico or Crazy Quilt Graphics
      • Mixed Visual Metaphors
    • breaking “it” down
      • What’s ahead...
      Simple steps Short suggestions Decent images
      • Communication is about the transfer of emotion…
      • Tell your audience what they need to know
      • Tell a story…but not “War and Peace”
      • Make – and use – cue cards
      • Use consistent design standards – make slides that reinforce your words, not repeat them
      • Create a leave-behind
      • Create a feedback cycle
      • FOCUS ON CONTENT
      • Bullets kill.
      • No cheesy transitions, dissolves, goofy sounds, etc.
      • Don’t use handouts of your slides
      • Choose a plain font and stick to it
      • Minimize text per slide
      • Use font sizes large enough to view from
      • anywhere in the room
      • try NOT to use fonts smaller than 28
      • Choose a consistent background and keep it
      • throughout the presentation
      • If you want a different background it should be used to bring attention to ONE slide
      • Choose one type of transition (this is not a movie)
      • Use complementary
      • colors
      • (colors that are opposite
      • on the color wheel)
      • … if you do it right, every time they think of what you said, they’ll see the image (and vice versa).
      • Seth Godin
    •  
      • Stephen Eggleston, “The Key Steps to An Effective Presentation”, 2006
      • “ Really Bad PowerPoint”, Seth Godin’s Blog, January 29, 2007