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Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists
Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists
Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists
Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists
Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists
Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists
Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists
Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists
Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists
Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists
Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists
Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists
Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists
Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists
Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists
Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists
Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists
Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists
Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists
Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists
Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists
Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists
Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists
Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists
Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists
Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists
Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists
Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists
Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists
Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists
Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists
Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists
Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists
Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists
Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists
Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists
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Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists

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Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists …

Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists

The title contains a dodgy archaeology pun based on an album by The Jam.

A presentation by Anthony Beck at the Open Knowledge Conference (OKCon) 2010 on 24th April 2010.

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  • Machining
  • Cleaning
  • Excavating
  • Interpreting
  • Recording
  • Data comes from different sources at different scales and granularities
  • Transcript

    • 1. Dig the new breed how open approaches can empower archaeologists Anthony Beck, Leeds University DART Project Champion
    • 2.  
    • 3. Content MindMap available at: http://antarch.sytes.net/BeckWiki/index.php/OKcon2010
    • 4. What is archaeology
    • 5.  
    • 6.  
    • 7.  
    • 8.  
    • 9. Data
    • 10. In theory: Hermeneutic circle
      • Impacting on
        • Corpus of knowledge
        • Policy
        • Development control
      Interpretation Synthesis
    • 11. Understand complex relationships in the fragmented archaeological record
    • 12.
      • Primary data
        • Excavation records
        • Remote sensing transcriptions
        • NMP
        • Lab Analysis
        • Specialist reports
      • Decoupled synthetic data
        • Site reports
        • SMR
        • NMR
    • 13. In practice
    • 14. Implications of silo-ed data
      • No synergy
      • Cripples the knowledge frameworks
      • Less effective
        • Research
        • Policy
        • Impact
      Interpretation Synthesis X
    • 15. The tree of knowledge
    • 16. What can open approaches do for archaeology?
      • Open Data
      • Open Access
      • Open Science
      • Open Policies
      • Exemplars
        • Grey Literature
        • INSPIRE
        • Linked Dynamic Data
        • DART
    • 17. Grey Literature
    • 18. Grey Literature
      • Archaeology units conduct most excavations in the UK
      • Problem
        • Predominantly paper based recording (still)
        • Primary record is difficult to access
        • Excavations are written up as site reports (interpretative and data summary)
        • These reports are not published: hence Grey Literature
    • 19. Grey Literature
      • Solution
        • OA: http:// library.thehumanjourney.net /
        • WA: http://www.wessexarch.co.uk/reports
      • Prof. Richard Bradley – Reading Uni
        • http://www.nature.com/news/2010/100407/full/464826a.html
        • Visited contract units
        • Collated ‘grey literature’
        • Transformed
          • Theory and interpretative frameworks
          • Understanding of Bronze Age settlement patterns and dynamics
        • He unleashed the potential of Grey Literature
    • 20. When will we unlock the “Grey Data”?
    • 21. INSPIRE
      • INSPIRE (INfrastructure for SPatial InfoRmation in Europe)
        • EU Directive for a general framework describing Spatial Data Infrastructure (SDI).
        • Designed to facilitate European wide sharing of spatial information:
          • public sector organisations
          • public access
          • Improve decision making
          • Improve policy
        • Advocate a schema based implementation
    • 22. INSPIRE and heritage
      • INSPIRE applies to data held by public institutions
      • This includes heritage data. Nominally:
        • Decoupled synthesis:
          • Sites and Monuments Records
          • National Monuments Records
        • National Mapping Programme (national AP dataset)
    • 23.  
    • 24.  
    • 25. Repurposing heritage data I drew this diagram in c. 2002 before I knew about ontology and linked data
    • 26. INSPIRE and heritage
      • INSPIRE conceptual approach
        • Lossy
        • Employs decoupled, synthesised and generalised data
        • Does not change to re-interpretation of the underlying source data
        • Requires digital data  the syntheses exist
        • Dynamic  - source data updates but doesn’t change
      • Linked Data conceptual approach
        • Flexible
        • Generic
        • Requires digital data  most primary data is not digital
        • Dynamic  - can change to reflect the source data
      • Not an either/or approach. BOTH open up heritage data
    • 27. Linked Dynamic Data
      • Archaeological knowledge acquisition is a dynamic process
      • Dynamic feedback allows theories/practice to be tested or revised
      Interpretation Synthesis
    • 28. Pottery Sequences
      • Pottery is important for dating sites and deposits
      • Classification based on form and fabric variations
      • Dates derived from stratified sequences (e.g. wells)
      • Pottery sequences developed locally and integrated –
        • Regionally
        • Nationally
    • 29. Clumping and splitting
      • Periodically sequences are reviewed
        • Clumping (owl:sameas)
        • Splitting
        • Refining date ranges
      • Date changes impact on:
        • Interpretation
        • Knowledge
        • Policy
        • Think “Grey literature” but bigger!
      • Unfortunately the data is decoupled and not linked. The primary and synthetic data is never/rarely re-interpreted
    • 30. An archaeology of dynamic linked data
    • 31. Open Science and archaeology
    • 32. DART Overview
      • What are the best ways to employ the different sensors (a multi-sensor approach) for the greatest heritage return?
        • In particular how do we improve the use of different sensors in regional/national prospection programmes?
        • What are the best conditions (e.g. environmental, seasonal, weather, crop) for deployment?
    • 33.  
    • 34. DART Open Science
      • 25 heritage, industry and academic partners
      • The best way to keep everyone informed is to adopt an open science philosophy
        • Wherever practicable all data will be in the public domain as soon as possible in accessible repositories
        • If successful SHARE-ME (a companion JISC bid) will simplify metadata & RDFgeneration and deposition
        • RDF data will be maintained with Talis.
      • Will allow the science to be dynamically shared with colleagues throughout the world
        • Improve the scientific process
        • Improve results
        • Improve impact
        • More WOW moments 
    • 35. Heritage: a complex tapestry
    • 36. Dig the new breed: how open approaches can empower archaeologists Anthony Beck School of Computing, University of Leeds, UK DART Project Champion Follow DART and its outputs using the following: Website: www.comp.leeds.ac.uk/dart Blog: dartheritage.wordpress.com Twitter: follow DART_Project SlideShare presentations: www.slideshare.net/DARTProject Scribd documents: www.scribd.com/dart_project CCFlickr images from: Wonderlane, Wessex Archaeology, Dmitrij, Thomas Small, MsLaura, Yewenyi, An untrained eye, Jeff Werner

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