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Online Instructor Roles
 

Online Instructor Roles

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Presentation to the NUVHS Charter School and Online Teachers on the roles of the online educator.

Presentation to the NUVHS Charter School and Online Teachers on the roles of the online educator.

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  • Role Definition of the classroom
  • Info Grahic about growth of k-12 online schoolsAll pre-service teachers must take an Computer Integration course for teaching credential. http://www.onlineschools.com/in-focus/k-12-blended-learning.html
  • In 2000, roughly 45,000 K–12 students took an online course.† But by 2010,over 4 million students were participating in some kind of formal online-learning program. The preK–12 online population is now growing by a five-year CAGR of 43 percent—and that rateis accelerating.
  • Info Grahic about growth of k-12 online schoolshttp://www.onlineschools.com/in-focus/k-12-blended-learning.html
  • 2011 term, an increase of 570,000 students over the previous year.Thirty-two percent of higher education students now take at least one course online.Seventy-seven percent of academic leaders rate the learning outcomes in online education as the same or superior to those in face-to-face.Only 30.2 percent of chief academic officers believe that their faculty accept the value and legitimacy
  • Info Grahic about growth of k-12 online schools
  • Teach as we have always taught, with a familiar structure, syllabus, expectations, course outcomes, clear expectations for assessment etc. But it is how we achieve those outcomes that defines who we are as instructors and how we provide experiences for our students to achieve those outcomes
  • How do I do?
  • There are thousands of faces in the skyscraper windows in this music video, each a webcam capture of a singer -- 5,905 of them to be exact.
  • Learning Coach (Bull) Role of teacher = role model. Assign Applied ProjectsGreat teachers are lifelong learners, and they can model that learning for their students in a variety of ways in the online classroom. Teaching face-to-face and teaching online are both teaching, but they are qualitatively different. In comparison, driving a car and riding a motorcycle are both forms of transportation, but they have enough differences to warrant additional training and preparation when switching from one to the other. The same is true when faculty move from the traditional classroom to the online classroom. There are some things that the two have in common, but there are also plenty of differences. With this in mind, consider the following eight roles of an effective online teacher.
  • Critical Friends Consultancy ProtocolPresentersEveryoneAudiencePresenters
  • A competent online instructor understands the social nature of the classroom and how it can contribute to the success of the students; he or she applies and promotes interactivity with students and between students. Such an understanding is needed to effectively reduce student feeling of isolation, increase active learning, and develop synergetic relationships in the classroom. (Varvel, 2007)
  • How are you going to encourage engagement, deep learning, and interactivity.

Online Instructor Roles Online Instructor Roles Presentation Transcript

  • Role Change: The Ever Changing Role of the Online Instructor Cynthia Sistek-Chandler, Associate Professor, National University Hoppy Chandler, Educator, iHigh Virtual Academy, San Diego Unified School District
  • Introductions Cynthia Sistek-Chandler, Ed D http://bit.ly/18VDiiU cchandler@nu.edu Mr. Hoppy Chandler hoppyc1@netscape.net
  • Online education should be built on a highly interactive model, one that promotes social presence, helps establish relationships among all stakeholders, and encourages the creation of a learning community. (Sistek-Chandler & Serdyukov, 2012)
  • Role Change The focus of this presentation and subsequent paper is focused on the roles of an online educator. Based on definitions by Stephen Downes (2010) and T. C. Smith (2005), there are a myriad of roles and responsibilities for the online educator.
  • Key Points  Brief Demographics in Online Learning (US and Worldwide)  Four Roles (Downes, 2012)  Theoretical Framework and Categorization of Online Educator's Roles  Research  Activity: Best Practices in Online Facilitation
  • FTF versus Online versus Blended  Teaching face-to-face and teaching online are both teaching, but they are qualitatively different. In comparison, driving a car and riding a motorcycle are both forms of transportation, but they have enough differences to warrant additional training and preparation when switching from one to the other. The same is true when faculty move from the traditional classroom to the online classroom.  Commonalities, unique attributes, differences?
  • FTF versus Online versus Blended What are unique attributes, commonalities, what are the distinct differences?
  • Blended Versus Online
  • Teacher Forecast by 2015 http://www.edudemic.com/2013/0 5/how-many-teachers-will-we- need-by-2015/
  • Online Students  Number of Online students  K12 (2000) 45,000 students  2010, 4 million- formal online learning  Since 2010, Pre-K through 12 online population growth 43 percent  Higher Education (Half of all Post-secondary students will take at least one online course in their college experience by 2014).
  • Online Educators Projections K12 http://www.onlineschools.com/in- focus/k-12-blended-learning.html Online and Blended Learning: A Survey of Policy and Practice of K-12 Schools Around the World, International Association for K-12 Online Learning, November 2011
  • Online Education Higher Ed Over 6.7 million students were taking at least one online course during the fall 2011. Thirty-two percent of higher education students now take at least one course online. Babson Survey Research Group & the College Board U.S.
  • Agency for Standards iNacol International Association for K12 Online Learning Online instructors  Keeping Pace with K-12 Online and Blended Learning (2012)  Held to standards through quality assurance measures  Pedagogical strength and hold professional qualifications
  • Quality Online Teaching http://vimeo.com/channels/qualityonline teaching  Key Points Discussion Board Synchronous Discussion
  • What are the roles of the Online Instructor?
  • Four Roles (Downes, 2010) 1.Instructor 2. Social Director 3. Program Manager 4. Technician
  • Four Roles (Downes) 1. Instructor 2.Social Director 3. Program Manager 4. Technician
  • Four Roles (Downes) 1. Instructor 2. Social Director 3.Program Manager 4. Technician
  • Four Roles (Downes) 1. Instructor 2. Social Director 3. Program Manager 4.Technician
  • Attributes of an Online Instructor Smith (2005) identifies and describes 51 competencies needed by online instructors, among them:  Create a warm and inviting atmosphere that promotes the development of a sense of community among participants  Develop reciprocity and cooperation among students  Develop relationships  Encourage contacts between students and faculty  Mandate participation. Step in and set limits if participation wanes or if the conversation is headed in the wrong direction  Model good participation  Teach students about online learning  Most of all have fun and open yourself to learning as much from your students as they will learn from one another and from you!
  • How the Roles are Changing?  Reliance on content quality and updating of resources  Instructional designer, the instructor in many cases needs to be able to curate content from a variety of sources.  Facilitation skills  Planned Synchronous Discussions  Building your flat classroom with Global Connections
  • Purveyor of Content Online Facilitator Online Orchestral Director  The online instructor orchestrates more than assessment of student work, they masterfully coordinate, curate, construct, and create the experience between instructor and student, student to student, student to text, and student to community.  Virtual Choir by Eric Whitacre, Water Nighthttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V3rRaL-Czxw
  • 5 Roles (Sistek-Chandler & Chandler, 2013) 1. Orchestral Director 2. Psycho-Social Director 1. Empathy and cultural understanding 2. Relationship development 3. Understand the basis of social division (Stuart, 2013) 3. Online Instructor Co-Learner (Bull, 2013) 4. Coach (Bull, 2013 and Bray, 2002) 5. Mentor of Applied Learning and Knowledge Construction
  • What Works in Online Education? Knowledge Construction
  • Online Community of Inquiry Relationships (Research Serdyukov & Sistek-Chandler, 2012)  85% of respondents believe that relationships in the class affect the outcome of student learning.  67% agree online learning promotes relationships in the class, while 31% disagree; this reflects previous opinions of the social/asocial character of this educational format.  88% believe online classes should be personalized in the way that students develop more personal relationships in the class with the peers and with the instructor;  86% believe instructors need to establish empathy, emotions, and personal relationships in an online class. This is an important recommendation for practicing online educators.
  • Points to Remember about the Online Instructional Role  Social Emotional Environment  Role of Relationships  Move from Impersonal to more Personal  Interactivity is the Key  Communication needs to be clear and concise
  • Teacher Roles in the Blended Classroom (e2020)  Monitor  Coach  Mentor  Teach
  • How are you going to encourage engagement, deep learning, and interactivity? 1. One technique to try 2. A second 3. A third
  • COI Model Communication (Rourke, Anderson, Garrison, & Archer, 2001).
  • Online education should be built on a highly interactive model, one that promotes social presence, helps establish relationships among all stakeholders, and encourages the creation of a learning community. (Sistek-Chandler & Serdyukov, 2012)
  • References  Babson Research Group and the College Board (2012). Changing Course: Ten Years of Tracking Online Education in the United Stateshttp://sloanconsortium.org/publications/survey/changing_course_2012  Barbour, M.K., Brown, R., Waters, L.H., Hoey, R., Hunt, J., Kennedy, K., Ounsworth, C., Powell, A., & Trimm, T., iNACOL,Online and Blended Learning: A Survey of Policy and Practice of K-12 Schools Around the World, International Association for K-12 Online Learning, November 2011.  Bull, B. (June 3, 2013). Higher Ed Teaching Strategies Newsletter/Blog. Magna Publications,http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/online-education/eight-roles-of-an-effective-online- teacher/  Christensen, C.M., Horn, M. B. & Johnson, C. W. Disrupting Class: How Disruptive Innovation Will Change the Way the World Learns, (New York: McGraw-Hill, 2008), 91.  Downes, S. (2012). http://www.huffingtonpost.com/stephen-downes/the-role-of-the- educator_b_790937.html  e2020, Role of Online and Blended Instructor.  Garrison, D. R., Anderson, T., & Archer, W. (2000). Critical inquiry in a text-based environment: Computer conferencing in higher education. The Internet and Higher Education, 2(2-3), 87-105. pdf Full Text  Sistek-Chandler, C. M. & Serdyukov, P. (2012). Online Learning, Less Personal, More Social? Published Abstract, WCCE, 2013.  Smith, T. C., “Fifty-One Competencies for Online Instruction”, Journal of Educators Online, (2)2, (2005)