Libraries, Archives, and Museums Use of Social Media Sites, by Cyndi Shein, 2012

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As part of a larger presentation on Libraries, Archives, and Museums' (LAMs) use of social metadata, Cyndi Shein discusses some ways that Libraries, Archives, and Museums are using popular social networking platforms to engage users and/or harvest descriptive metadata and some lessons learned from OCLC's related surveys and research.

This slide deck was part of a larger presentation. To view or listen to the entire presentation, go to:
Cheryl Gowing, Marja Musson, Cyndi Shein, Karen Smith-Yoshimura, Ken Varnum, and Elizabeth Yakel. 2012. Social Metadata for Libraries, Archives, and Museums Webinar.
http://www.oclc.org/research/publications/library/2012/2012-01r.htm

The reports mentioned in this presentation are available online:
Karen Smith-Yoshimura and Cyndi Shein. 2011. Social Metadata for Libraries, Archives and Museums Part 1: Site Reviews. Dublin, Ohio: OCLC Research. http://www.oclc.org/research/publications/library/2011/2011-02.pdf

Karen Smith-Yoshimura, et al. 2011. Social Metadata for Libraries, Archives and Museums Part 2: Survey Analysis. Dublin, Ohio: OCLC Research.
http://www.oclc.org/research/publications/library/2011/2011-03.pdf ‎

Karen Smith-Yoshimura and Rose Holley. 2012. Social Metadata for Libraries, Archives and Museums Part 3: Recommendations and Readings. Dublin, Ohio: OCLC Research.
http://ww.oclc.org/research/publications/library/2012/2012-01.pdf

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  • Google+ is a social networking site that was launched in June of 2011.
  • Many LAMs have created Google+ profiles,
  • but Google+ has yet to reach critical mass as far as social networking sites are concerned.
  • Pinterst is a relatively new site designed for sharing and collecting images and ideas. Pinterest users copy images from all over the web to create groups of images on “pinboards,” which are displayed as virtual bulletin boards. Individual images can (and should) be linked to their site of origin, directing users to the institution’s website. The Indianapolis Museum of Art is one of a few LAMs currently experimenting with Pinterest. The museum has created thematic pinboards, featuring items from its collections.
  • The Darien Library in Connecticut has created a Pinterest profile, including various boards with book-related themes.
  • The Darien has also has added the “Pin it” button to the social media features in its library catalog.
  • This enables a Pinterest user to directly pin images of audio, video, and books from the Darien OPAC to their own boards.
  • Booklovers with profiles on Pinterest can pin images directly from Darien Library’s catalog to their own boards and can also re-pin images from the library’s Pinterest boards to their own boards.
  • The final site I’d like to share is Historypin, a site for sharing historic visual material within its geographic context. This tool asks users to "pin" their own digital audiovisual and photographic materialsto a world map. Participants are encouraged to add descriptive information and personal recollections associated with the materials they contribute.
  • Historypinismanaged by the British nonprofit project “We Are What We Do” in partnership with Google. The site is designed to be an online, user-generated archives. Naturally, LAMs are among the community of users who are creating tours and collections and contributing historic materials.
  • This is a screenshot of a “Tour” on Historypin. This particular tour displays various Chinatowns in North America. Users can create thematic tours and collections and open them to public contributions of images and personal narrative. This is an example of how user-contributed photos of yesteryear are superimposed upon a current Google map, placing historic photos in context geographically and allowing visual comparison between then and now.
  • Libraries, Archives, and Museums Use of Social Media Sites, by Cyndi Shein, 2012

    1. 1. Social Metadata for LAMs, 2012-03 LAMs’ use of third-party sites Cyndi Shein Getty Research Institute
    2. 2. Social Metadata for LAMs, 2012-03 Social metadata social media • Most of the institutionally-based sites were only attracting moderate user participation • Popular sites were attracting a great deal of participation How did our research on social metadata expand to include the study of social media and other third-party sites?
    3. 3. Social Metadata for LAMs, 2012-03 Social metadata on popular sites • What can we learn from third-party sites? • How are LAMs leveraging the popularity of blogs, LibraryThing, Flickr, YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Wikipedia? While projects such as PennTags and Mtagger were struggling to attract participants, users of sites like LibraryThing and Good Reads were tagging books by the millions.
    4. 4. Social Metadata for LAMs, 2012-03 Lessons learned
    5. 5. Social Metadata for LAMs, 2012-03 Lessons learned 1. Don’t reinvent the wheel 2. Look before you leap 3. Keep your finger on the pulse
    6. 6. Social Metadata for LAMs, 2012-03 Don’t reinvent the wheel
    7. 7. Social Metadata for LAMs, 2012-03 • Build user communities • Share collection content and promote special events • Harvest user-contributed images and metadata for incorporation into their own websites • Create interactive walking tours/maps featuring historic collection images • Bring historic news, diaries, and correspondence to life by delivering info chronologically as a serial • Display user-generated metadata in OPACs alongside LC headings Survey the landscape to see how others are using blogs and social media sites to:
    8. 8. Social Metadata for LAMs, 2012-03 Look before you leap Before you jump headlong into the social media arena • Identify a clear goal • Survey available resources • Create a plan
    9. 9. Social Metadata for LAMs, 2012-03 Plan must consider... • Who is your audience? • What type of content will you deliver? • What type of user contribution do you seek? • What will you do with the user contribution? • What is your exit strategy? • How will you define and measure success?
    10. 10. Social Metadata for LAMs, 2012-03 Measuring success Portrait of Ruth Nomura
    11. 11. Social Metadata for LAMs, 2012-03 Keep your finger on the pulse
    12. 12. Social Metadata for LAMs, 2012-03 Interesting developments
    13. 13. Social Metadata for LAMs, 2012-03
    14. 14. Social Metadata for LAMs, 2012-03
    15. 15. Social Metadata for LAMs, 2012-03
    16. 16. Social Metadata for LAMs, 2012-03
    17. 17. Social Metadata for LAMs, 2012-03 <#>
    18. 18. Social Metadata for LAMs, 2012-03 <#>
    19. 19. Social Metadata for LAMs, 2012-03 <#>
    20. 20. Social Metadata for LAMs, 2012-03 <#>
    21. 21. Social Metadata for LAMs, 2012-03 <#>
    22. 22. Social Metadata for LAMs, 2012-03 <#> Managed by: “We are what we do”
    23. 23. Social Metadata for LAMs, 2012-03 <#>
    24. 24. Social Metadata for LAMs, 2012-03 Growing possibilities

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