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SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012
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SATIN Sustrans/Cycling Scotland - Signage Course 2012

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Cycle route signs help route users find their way, they advertise the presence of route and make people aware that routes are part of wider networks. Poor signage is a (the) major cause of frustration …

Cycle route signs help route users find their way, they advertise the presence of route and make people aware that routes are part of wider networks. Poor signage is a (the) major cause of frustration with cycle routes and has even been cited in coroners' reports* - when lost cyclists have ended up on trunk roads. Despite this, signage is often an afterthought.

This workshop will give participants a good understanding on what effective signage can look like, and how it can be achieved. As well as presentations, participants will cycle on parts of the National Cycle Network to see examples of signage in different (Urban and Rural) environments.

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  • 1
  • 1
  • Each trainer is to complete this section for the specific training activity
  • Each trainer is to complete this section for the specific training activity
  • Each trainer is to complete this section for the specific training activity
  • These are the subjects we will be covering today
  • Transcript

    • 1. A tailor made localauthority trainingpackage WELCOME 1
    • 2. Glasgow Cycle Route Signage – Training DayProviding training todeliver solutions 2
    • 3.  September 2012 Glasgow – CS Office Simon Philips, Campbell McCall, Tom Bishop Providing training to deliver solutions 3
    • 4. www.satinonline.org Sharing Information Promoting Good Practice 4
    • 5. Aims on Website SATIN will add value to the work of membership organisations delivering outdoor access and active travel infrastructure management through the following aims: to encourage, identify, co-ordinate and promote the sharing and dissemination of technical information/knowledge to promote and encourage the adoption of good practice standards in design, procurement, construction, contract management, construction safety [CDM 2007] and maintenance to develop and share an improved evidence base of good practice through research, experience and collaboration to provide an opportunity to develop and demonstrate new, and modify existing, ideas, for innovative approaches and techniques, and, where required, produce good practice guidance to provide networking opportunities to view and discuss practical infrastructure issues and exchange tried and tested solutions via conferences, workshops and outdoor site visits to provide details of specific training opportunities to increase capacity building and skills development in industry areas to link with relevant advisory groups 5
    • 6. WHAT WILL YOU LEARN TODAY? 6
    • 7. LEARNING OUTCOMESBe aware of and be able to: Learn to understand the role of directional signs – not just as basic way finding tools for existing route users, but to advertise the presence of a route to new users and to enhance the experience and utility of routes.  Understand appropriate sign types for a variety of scenarios. By considering the needs of route users you will ensure that the correct signs are used. Learn aspects of best practice – and how to avoid common mistakes.  Learn different methods for scheduling signs for correct manufacture and installation. 7
    • 8. Questions?NameJob DescriptionAchievement in the last monthQuestion on Learning Point 8
    • 9.  National Cycle Network 2000+ miles in Scotland 75% on road 5% owned-managed by Sustrans 7000 signs 9
    • 10. KILLIN 10 CALLANDER
    • 11. 11
    • 12. KILLINCRIANLARICH 12
    • 13. 13
    • 14. Airdrie – Bathgate Cycle Path 14
    • 15. Airdrie – Bathgate Signage 15 mile route 3 – 4 years planning £7 million – the most costly single cycle route construction project in Scotland Funded by government agencies International consultants and contractors 15
    • 16. 16
    • 17. 17
    • 18. Regulations Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions 2002 Amendment in February 2012 http://assets.dft.gov.uk/publications/tal-1-12/tal-1- 18
    • 19. Regulations Advice within known guidelines Cycling by Design 2010 http://www.transportscotland.gov.uk/strategy-and-research/publicatio Local Transport Note 2/08 http://assets.dft.gov.uk/publications/local-transport-notes/ltn-2-08.pdf Paths Signage Guidance http://www.pathsforall.org.uk/component/option,com_docman/Itemid,1 TFL London Design Standards http://www.tfl.gov.uk/assets/downloads/businessandpartners/lcds_cha 19
    • 20. TSRGD Compliance? 20
    • 21. The Uses of Directional Signage 5 min Group Exercise What are the direct and indirect uses of directional signage? 21
    • 22. Direct and Indirect Uses of Directional SignageFor Existing Users For Potential Route Users Way-finding. Navigating from A to B Helps us prepare for manoeuvres – letting us  Route advertising. assume good positioning on roads. For example  Encouragement signs in advance of a junction where we must  Good signage suggests that routes are well cross oncoming traffic allow us to take the maintained. appropriate position on the road.  Good signage suggests that the route is current. Informs us of places of interest and facilities off the Not some relic. route. Speeds up journey. No need to stop to check map. No getting lost. For Motorised Traffic Creates awareness of a wider network. Even if  Awareness of an on road cycle route to motorised you’re only using a short section of the route – you vehicles will see signs displaying destinations of perhaps 20 miles in either direction. Mileages (or time) help with planning before or during a journey. May encourage people to make journeys. 22
    • 23. Poor signage leaves route users…Frustrated and angry No one likes to be lost. Users have appointments, transport connections and hotel bookingsFacing greater risk Users may end up on busy roads due to getting lost Busy roads used in an attempt to make up lost time Signs are seen at the last minute – and users may be tempted to take risks to conduct a manoeuvreWary of using cycle routes A poor experience on one route may put a user off foreverDissatisfied with your If the route on the ground doesn’t tally with your maps, websites and press releases, thenorganisation users will be unhappy 23
    • 24. Building Blocks of Signage 24
    • 25. Legislation – The TSRGD Peter Leslie – Cycling Scotland 25
    • 26. DirectionDestinationsDistancesSymbols 26
    • 27. Basic are two sign shapesThere Sign Anatomy chevron rectangularThere are three basic sign types Junction Junction ahead Confirmation (repeater) 27
    • 28. Signs used at junctionsThese sign types requireimmediate action 28
    • 29. Signs indicatingjunction ahead.These sign prompt greaterawareness and adoption ofdifferent road space. 29
    • 30. Signs confirming theroute.Used after junctions to confirmthe correct route was chosenUsed at intervals betweenjunctions where route stays onthe same road. 30
    • 31. 31
    • 32. 32
    • 33. 33
    • 34. DirectionDestinationsDistancesSymbols 34
    • 35.  Selecting appropriate destinations requires an understanding of route and the route user Four destinations per sign maximum Nearest destination first Hierarchy of destinations Confirm direction with ‘North’ / ‘South’ 35
    • 36. 36
    • 37. Destination HierarchyPrimary Tertiary Glasgow City Centre  SECC Loch Lomond  Partick  ScotstounSecondary  Renfrew Ferry Clydebank  Bowling Dumbarton  Alexandria 37
    • 38. 38
    • 39. DirectionDestinationsDistancesSymbols 39
    • 40.  Very close destinations don’t need distances Units are Yards and Miles Fractions up to 3 miles Measure to a centre OR to a buffer around an area Measuring distances can be time consuming – GIS can help Time (Mins and Hours) can be used on signs but the extra details can compromise sign design. 40
    • 41. GIS can be used to determine distance frompoint to point OR between sign locations anddestinations. SITE 1 SITE 2 SITE 3 SCOTSTOUN 2 1 0 CLYDEBANK 6 5 4 BOWLING 9 8 7 DUMBARTON 13 12 11 ALEXANDRIA 16 15 14 BALLOCH 19 18 17 41
    • 42. DirectionDestinationsDistancesSymbols 42
    • 43.  NCN routes use cycle and route number patch Links to the NCN use route number patch in brackets Various symbols are available in TSRGD to convey messages to assist route users Patches can be used to help merge signs and reduce clutter Route names can be added 43
    • 44.  The cycle tows the route number Pedestrian follows the route number on traffic- free routes Symbols have left – right orientations 44
    • 45. 45
    • 46. 46
    • 47. 47
    • 48. Sign face design is based on ‘x height’ Layout of text and symbols Use of multiple panels for separate destinationsSign Face Design directly affects Legibility Aesthetics Cost (surface area and post requirement) Durability 48
    • 49. Sign Design Software  Traffic-type signs are often designed using programs such as SignPlot or Key Signs  TSRGD rules are in-built  These compile a list of signs for manufacture. (schedule)  Calculate requirements for posts and foundations based on wind-loading 49
    • 50.  Major factor governing overall size of sign. Minimum x height of 30 on road or adjacent to road Off road there is no legal requirement x height should vary as the route varies. A single x- height for all signs on a route may not be appropriate Always check overall height and width of signs before manufacture 50
    • 51.  Avoid long thin signs that require more than one post Spread text across more than one line Arrange symbols under text 51
    • 52.  Create a single sign instead of two separate signs Cheaper Less clutter 52
    • 53. 53
    • 54. 54
    • 55. Fixings are used to control Sign visibility Protrusion of sign into road space Turning due to wind Aesthetics Costs 55
    • 56. 56
    • 57. 57
    • 58. 58
    • 59. 59
    • 60. 60
    • 61. 61
    • 62. 62
    • 63. 63
    • 64. 64
    • 65. 65
    • 66. 66
    • 67. Choice and Frequency of Signs. Busy urban areas. Advanced, Junction and confirmation signs should be used. Quieter urban areas. Junction and confirmation signs. Rural areas. Junction signs alone may be sufficient. Confirmation signs used at intervals. 67
    • 68. 68
    • 69. 69
    • 70. 70
    • 71. Sign Structures. Signs should be erected so they are clearly visible at all times. A sign mounted at right angles to the route user is most visible. In slow-moving environments, such as a 3-way junction on a traffic-free path, this is not essential. Sign structures are liable to damage and to being obscured by foliage. 71
    • 72. 72
    • 73. 73
    • 74. 74
    • 75. 75
    • 76. 76
    • 77. 77
    • 78. 78
    • 79. 79
    • 80. 80
    • 81. 81
    • 82. Sign Audits  Signage is not a desktop exercise – cycle the route  GOOD Photos for you and for installer  Better to visit site twice during the design stage, than have to reinstall signs 82
    • 83. C olours: white on blue white on red S cale 1:30 white on brown Sign Scheduling Dimensions (mm): Width: 781, Height: 416 Width: 781, Height: 416 Date printed: 05-09-12 x-Heights: 30, 24 Drawn By: simon.phillips Area: 0.65 sq m C antilever Double S ided Material: RA1 to BS E N 12899-1:2007 ALL S IG NS TO BE MADE W ITHS ign R eference:R E F_040D PR OTE C TIVE OVE RLAY FILM QUE R IE S TO S IMON PHILLIPS Purposes 07824863028 0131 539 8122 s imon.phillips@ sustrans.org.uk S cale 1:30 Dimensions (mm): Width: 742, Height: 349 Width: 742, Height: 349 x-Heights: 30, 24 S ustrans S cotland  Sign manufacture Area: 0.52 sq m G lenorchy House  Sign installation C antilever Double S ided 20 Union S t. E dinburgh E H1 3LR 0131 539 8122S ign R eference:R E F_041D S cale 1:30 Dimensions (mm): Width: 883, Height: 444 Width: 883, Height: 444 x-Heights: 30, 20, 24 Area: 0.78 sq m C antilever Double S idedS ign R eference:R E F_042D S ignPlot v2.81 Drg. no. 83
    • 84. Manufacturing schedulesSpreadsheets  No expensive software required BUT  Room for error in design and manufacture  More time consuming 84
    • 85. Manufacturing schedulesSign software files and print outs  More clarity for manufacturer  Built in TSRGD rules  Quicker to design  No proofing of designs required 85
    • 86.  What sign goes whereSign Installation Schedule 86
    • 87. Sign Installation Schedule 87
    • 88. Post installation specification 88
    • 89. x height 25 x height 3076mm post 89mm post 89
    • 90. Working with contractors Visit signage sites with contractor before installation Use temporary paint or crayon to confirm sites Visit site after installation. Snagging should be done as soon as possible If your instructions can be misinterpreted – they probably will be!! 90
    • 91. 91
    • 92. Sign Management Many signage problems could have been avoided at the design stage…. So good design and placement is key to long sign life Checking (volunteers) Asset Register Stock of generic replacements Replacement budget. (10% per year) 92
    • 93. Physical factors affecting signs following installationLoss Obscure DamageTheft for scrap Foliage UV bleaching / ageingReplacement of lighting Other signs and street Traffic accidentscolumns furniture VandalismConstruction projects Vehicles Hedge cuttersTraffic accidents Wind turning Malicious turning Fading Lichen / Slime Grafffiti Change of road layout 93
    • 94. LEARNING OUTCOMESBe aware of and be able to: Learn to understand the role of directional signs – not just as basic way finding tools for existing route users, but to advertise the presence of a route to new users and to enhance the experience and utility of routes.  Understand appropriate sign types for a variety of scenarios. By considering the needs of route users you will ensure that the correct signs are used. Learn aspects of best practice – and how to avoid common mistakes.  Learn different methods for scheduling signs for correct manufacture and installation. 94
    • 95. QUESTIONS? Providing training to deliver solutions
    • 96. THANK YOU

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