MCM Devon Way - Oct 2010

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  • 1
  • Each trainer is to complete this section for the specific training activity
  • These are the subjects we will be covering today
  • These are the subjects we will be covering today
  • These are the subjects we will be covering today
  • These are the subjects we will be covering today
  • These are the subjects we will be covering today
  • These are the subjects we will be covering today
  • Capture Data on Flip chart from the homework question: What issues/questions do you have on Access Control Shared Surfaces Crossings
  • Capture Data on Flip chart from the homework question:
  • The Devon Way is a core path which follows the former railway line between Alloa and Dollar. It is 10k long and passes through the communities of Alloa, Sauchie, Fishcross, Marchglen, Devonside, Tillicoultry and Dollar. It's southern end links with the newly opened Alloa Railway Station and with the National Cycle Route, which also forms a part of the Round the Forth route. It also provides access to the newly opened Clackmannan Community Health Centre and to shops and other facilities in Alloa town centre and passes close to a number of primary schools and horse livery yards. Because of these links, the Devon Way has great potential for use in active travel, for use by tourists visiting the area and for recreation.
  • Take a step back and ask why complete a demonstration project?
  • The main driver for the development of a site was the production of CAPS and the introduction of a facility to share good practice in one venue due to the varying projects throughout Scotland. Cycling Scotland was also used to queries in various areas including shared use paths, junctions, access control and contra flow lanes. A number of years prior to CAPS we had looked at developing demo sites to promote good practice and the foundations were laid. What was the next step?
  • WHY?? Cycle action plan for Scotland Professionals agreed if we have money the following should gain the most investment – On Road – Off Road Add to that the questionnaires filled in stated segregation from traffic Later we will look at what that actually means as people can not see reducing cars may help them
  • Inception Report developed prior to final version of CAPS and therefore slightly different from the ones listed above. Do not wish to go over this in great detail but I have a copy of the inception report here if you wish to look through.
  • Expanding on Action 2, cycling scotland has set in motion the ability to offer mcm at various locations: Specific to councils in their area Universities Demo Projects Could not do it ourselves
  • Meeting was held between paths for all and Cycling Scotland to discuss future development and at this time it was agreed the Devon Way and Clacks could be a partner. Sustrans have provided numerous projects and are funders.
  • Where are we now: Well we have progressed the above in the following ways: Inception – complete Report Produced Public Questionnaire – Requires to be completed Design Report – will be a live document Design – Ongoing Construction – Programmed for Dec/Jan Maintenance – Training – well here we are for the first of a series of courses over the next three years
  • What should a demo site criteria be? Accessible - Train Station – Off Road Typical Situation – Old Railway Line and Crossings and Access control issues It should reflect the vastly different environments encountered across Scotland so that access practitioners and managers Live – The path is in use today Demonstrate various good practice examples Commitment from CS, Sus, PfA and CC
  • There has been a continuous development of the path network from Alloa over the last few years. Requires to be upgraded Equestrian Use Current good practice Ownership of Council
  • The above is still being explored as the project design takes shape and ideas are discussed. So as mentioned the report was finalised during 2010 and will be made available as part of the website production in relation to the project.
  • Provide more information
  • Not going to go into this too much but signing is the main area being taken forward by Sustrans and Clacks One area of future work is www.cyclestreets.org Commuting into Alloa – Led Rides
  • We will go in more detail the list above during the morning.
  • Provide more information
  • We will go in more detail the list above during the morning.
  • Each trainer is to complete this section for the specific training activity
  • Peter to Read out Groups Split into your groups a joint exercise first – Just shout out design manuals you know of and use at present. Summarise the flip chart by grouping the manuals Then split into your groups I would ask within your field how would you use the manuals?
  • Each trainer is to complete this section for the specific training activity
  • List of the manuals above So how do I use them? Again an information sheet is available and will be sent out and is available on our web
  • Over the years Sustrans has developed guidelines for the design and construction of off road cycle ways. These tend to be philosophical as well as specifications. The greenway guide was developed primarily to be used by partners on the connect 2 projects although it is fully relevant to any other greenway project. The guide covers technical aspects such as designing of gradients etc and also talks about wider aspects such as monitoring and land arrangements. The NCN guidelines in muchly superseded by the likes of cycling by design it was written to provide a standard for the development of the NCN and still has uses in the standards to be used for NCN routes. Making ways for the bicycle is the early Sustrans design and construction guidance and has useful information on path construction techniques.
  • List of the manuals above So how do I use them? Again an information sheet is available and will be sent out and is available on our web
  • List of the manuals above So how do I use them? Again an information sheet is available and will be sent out and is available on our web
  • Sustrans produces a range a TINs designed for internal use – however many of these are available for partners from Sustrans staff. The information sheets are availible on the Sustrans website under resources but many of these are out dated and superseded by other guidance. TINs cover a range of subjects: Speed humps for motorcycles Alternatives to statutory guidance Signing – which has lots of examples and standards Aggregates for paths Path surfaces – discussing the merits and problems of different types of materials Access controls and barriers Trees Side road crossings Zebra Crossing Toucan Crossings
  • List of the manuals above So how do I use them? Again an information sheet is available and will be sent out and is available on our web
  • Note: Local transport Notes (LTN) are not policy within Scotland but nevertheless provide a good source of guidance reflecting the best practice to be adopted when providing for cyclists. See also Cycling to the Future and Cycling by Design for additional policy and guidance. What are their characteristics? – shout them out It is important to understand that cyclists are not an homogenous group and their needs will differ accordingly: Confident in most on-road situations May seek some segregation at difficult junctions and on link with high speed traffic May be willing to sacrifice directness to avoid difficult traffic conditions by using lighter trafficked routes and may well travel more slowly than regular cyclists. May require segregated direct of-road routes between residential areas and schools where suitable on-road solutions are not available This category includes disabled people using hand cranked machines and others using tricycles, child buggies tandems etc. It is important to recognise that all of the above categories may be found on the same route at the same time, for example on a housing estate road at the beginning of their journey or where a number of routes pass through a complex junction. Equally, more vulnerable users, such as elderly cyclists whose ability to compete with other traffic is declining but whose mobility depends on their use of a bike, may welcome the opportunity to stay off busy roads in much the same way as inexperienced cyclists. It should not, therefore, be assumed that cyclists are always a homogeneous group or that a route has a single journey purpose. Similarly, it can not be assumed that traffic safety and personal security are always the most important design requirements when dealing with journeys that have a time-critical purpose such as catching a train or bus.
  • Flip Chart – Name types of users we design for.
  • User Groups Dog Walker Family Wheelchair Cyclist Walker Equestrian
  • Note: Local transport Notes (LTN) are not policy within Scotland but nevertheless provide a good source of guidance reflecting the best practice to be adopted when providing for cyclists. See also Cycling to the Future and Cycling by Design for additional policy and guidance. What are their characteristics? – shout them out It is important to understand that cyclists are not an homogenous group and their needs will differ accordingly: Confident in most on-road situations May seek some segregation at difficult junctions and on link with high speed traffic May be willing to sacrifice directness to avoid difficult traffic conditions by using lighter trafficked routes and may well travel more slowly than regular cyclists. May require segregated direct of-road routes between residential areas and schools where suitable on-road solutions are not available This category includes disabled people using hand cranked machines and others using tricycles, child buggies tandems etc. It is important to recognise that all of the above categories may be found on the same route at the same time, for example on a housing estate road at the beginning of their journey or where a number of routes pass through a complex junction. Equally, more vulnerable users, such as elderly cyclists whose ability to compete with other traffic is declining but whose mobility depends on their use of a bike, may welcome the opportunity to stay off busy roads in much the same way as inexperienced cyclists. It should not, therefore, be assumed that cyclists are always a homogeneous group or that a route has a single journey purpose. Similarly, it can not be assumed that traffic safety and personal security are always the most important design requirements when dealing with journeys that have a time-critical purpose such as catching a train or bus.
  • Each trainer is to complete this section for the specific training activity
  • The five core principles are set out here and explored in more detail in the following slides. They may be found in Local transport Note 02/08 DfT 2008 Note: this is almost identical to guidance contained within Cycling by Design. The order and wording is slightly different but the principles remain the same. Exercise – What do they mean?
  • The five core principles are set out here and explored in more detail in the following slides. They may be found in Local transport Note 02/08 DfT 2008 Note: this is almost identical to guidance contained within Cycling by Design. The order and wording is slightly different but the principles remain the same. Exercise – What do they mean?
  • The five core principles are set out here and explored in more detail in the following slides. They may be found in Local transport Note 02/08 DfT 2008 Note: this is almost identical to guidance contained within Cycling by Design. The order and wording is slightly different but the principles remain the same. Exercise – What do they mean?
  • The five core principles are set out here and explored in more detail in the following slides. They may be found in Local transport Note 02/08 DfT 2008 Note: this is almost identical to guidance contained within Cycling by Design. The order and wording is slightly different but the principles remain the same. Exercise – What do they mean?
  • The five core principles are set out here and explored in more detail in the following slides. They may be found in Local transport Note 02/08 DfT 2008 Note: this is almost identical to guidance contained within Cycling by Design. The order and wording is slightly different but the principles remain the same. Exercise – What do they mean?
  • The five core principles are set out here and explored in more detail in the following slides. They may be found in Local transport Note 02/08 DfT 2008 Note: this is almost identical to guidance contained within Cycling by Design. The order and wording is slightly different but the principles remain the same. Exercise – What do they mean?
  • Each trainer is to complete this section for the specific training activity
  • What is the objective of access control? What access do we want to control and Why? What different requirements do the different users have? 5 min group discussion and feedback
  • Like Pedestrians, cyclists should be able to virtually get to the front door of their destination. In addition the network itself should be accessible to all motorised users with out the barriers created by other highway management activities. It might not be possible to achieve direct access to all users on the most desirable line but this should be the objective. However the needs of the majority should be considered as well as the needs of minority. E.g. steps on the direct desire line could provide a direct line for walkers and a less direct route including a ramp for wheeled users could be provided on a less direct route. Routes should be continuous and as direct as possible in terms of both journey time and distance. Access controls or accessibility measures / infrastructure should not compromise this. Opportunities that give cyclists advantage in terms of journey time, distance and permeability should be exploited through the use of routes through shopping areas, parks and housing estates not available to motor vehicles. The listed options all have various roles to play depending up the types of paths and the specific location, hazards and usage. Attitudes have changed in many areas once keeping motor bikes out and cars was the main challenge but actually this restricts far to many legitimate users from accessing and using the path as we would wish so alternative methods of control need to be adopted.
  • Routes should be safe in terms of both integration with other traffic and in terms of personable Infrastructure must not only be safe but also perceived to be safe. Whilst this scheme may give cyclists permeability and advantage, their very presence may deter those with impaired mobility, especially of they are blind or partially sighted. Equally there will be times of day when cyclists feel at risk from those hidden from view during the hours of darkness, even despite the presence of lighting. This where maintenance of trees and shrubs along this route will play a major role in encourage use. Signage – information on consideration and the purpose of the route – all non mortised users. The objectives of the access controls and accessibility measure should reflect the objectives relating to a specific situation. One size doesn't fit all – it should also fir in with local policies and practices to be consistent. Sustrans has developed access controls and gateways on there estate in Renfrewshire and during this process 6 usual situations where access control is required have been considered and appropriate layouts for these developed to control unwanted but not restrict undesirably the access to the network. Access controls have also been used as gateways to advertise and highlight the network.
  • What is the objective of access control? What access do we want to control and Why? What different requirements do the different users have? 5 min group discussion and feedback
  • Designing for a range of users presents challenges and guidelines are available from a number of perspectives. The Transport Scotland document designed at enabling the trunk road network (including shared use footways) to be accessible to all and comply with the disability discrimination act. This includes requirements for disabled users in terms of surfaces, highlighting obstacles, widths and clearances. The Fieldfare trust guidance provides lots of information an making routes accessible to all – with clear dimension requirements and diagrams of infrastructure. The gradients of ramps and use of resting platforms. After construction of a ramp in Renfrewshire Sustrans consulted with the local Disability Access Forum who usually provided feedback on the construction we’d done. Access controls are covered by a TIN and sustrans information sheet although this is somewhat out dated – many of the designs would not allow for those with wheel chairs or impared mobility. Following on from the work on our gateways in Renfrewshire Sustrans shall be producing a guidance document for access controls and gateways. At this stage I’m not able to say when this will be or in what format.
  • Routes should be safe in terms of both integration with other traffic and in terms of personable Infrastructure must not only be safe but also perceived to be safe. Whilst this scheme may give cyclists permeability and advantage, their very presence may deter those with impaired mobility, especially of they are blind or partially sighted. Equally there will be times of day when cyclists feel at risk from those hidden from view during the hours of darkness, even despite the presence of lighting. This where maintenance of trees and shrubs along this route will play a major role in encourage use. Signage – information on consideration and the purpose of the route – all non mortised users.
  • Routes should be safe in terms of both integration with other traffic and in terms of personable Infrastructure must not only be safe but also perceived to be safe. Whilst this scheme may give cyclists permeability and advantage, their very presence may deter those with impaired mobility, especially of they are blind or partially sighted. Equally there will be times of day when cyclists feel at risk from those hidden from view during the hours of darkness, even despite the presence of lighting. This where maintenance of trees and shrubs along this route will play a major role in encourage use. Signage – information on consideration and the purpose of the route – all non mortised users.
  • Designing for a range of users presents challenges and guidelines are available from a number of perspectives. The
  • Designing for a range of users presents challenges and guidelines are available from a number of perspectives.
  • Pass onto Alan
  • Thanks to Alan – So taking what the council have in place can we discuss the use of Zebra Crossings
  • Thanks to Alan – So taking what the council have in place can we discuss the use of Zebra Crossings
  • Thanks to Alan – So taking what the council have in place can we discuss the use of Zebra Crossings
  • Thanks to Alan – So taking what the council have in place can we discuss the use of Zebra Crossings
  • Thanks to Alan – So taking what the council have in place can we discuss the use of Zebra Crossings
  • Thanks to Alan – So taking what the council have in place can we discuss the use of Zebra Crossings
  • Summary of this morning – improvising based on the above.
  • Summary of this morning – improvising based on the above.
  • Fort he site visit this afternoon you shall work in 3 groups. Each group will have a primary area of the route design to consider: Path surface, accessibility and controls, road crossing. However each group should look at general issues
  • Fort he site visit this afternoon you shall work in 3 groups. Each group will have a primary area of the route design to consider: Path surface, accessibility and controls, road crossing. However each group should look at general issues
  • Fort he site visit this afternoon you shall work in 3 groups. Each group will have a primary area of the route design to consider: Path surface, accessibility and controls, road crossing. However each group should look at general issues
  • Fort he site visit this afternoon you shall work in 3 groups. Each group will have a primary area of the route design to consider: Path surface, accessibility and controls, road crossing. However each group should look at general issues
  • Fort he site visit this afternoon you shall work in 3 groups. Each group will have a primary area of the route design to consider: Path surface, accessibility and controls, road crossing. However each group should look at general issues
  • To be completed by individual trainers.
  • MCM Devon Way - Oct 2010

    1. 1. Shared use Path Demonstration Project TRAINING DAY Providing training to deliver solutions
    2. 2. Demonstration Project – Shared Use Path – Devon Way <ul><li>6/7 th October 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>Alloa </li></ul><ul><li>Peter Leslie and Clary Elliott </li></ul><ul><li>Clackmannanshire Council - Thanks </li></ul>Providing training to deliver solutions
    3. 3. LEARNING OUTCOMES <ul><li>Be aware of and be able to: </li></ul><ul><li>Introduce the Demonstration Project </li></ul>
    4. 4. LEARNING OUTCOMES <ul><li>Be aware of and be able to: </li></ul><ul><li>Introduce the Demonstration Project </li></ul><ul><li>Summarise Design Manuals available for use by Practitioners </li></ul>
    5. 5. LEARNING OUTCOMES <ul><li>Be aware of and be able to: </li></ul><ul><li>Introduce the Demonstration Project </li></ul><ul><li>Summarise Design Manuals available for use by Practitioners </li></ul><ul><li>Summarise surfaces available and users characteristics </li></ul>
    6. 6. LEARNING OUTCOMES <ul><li>Be aware of and be able to: </li></ul><ul><li>Introduce the Demonstration Project </li></ul><ul><li>Summarise Design Manuals available for use by Practitioners </li></ul><ul><li>Summarise surfaces available and users characteristics </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss Access Control and Disabled Users Requirements </li></ul>
    7. 7. LEARNING OUTCOMES <ul><li>Be aware of and be able to: </li></ul><ul><li>Introduce the Demonstration Project </li></ul><ul><li>Summarise Design Manuals available for use by Practitioners </li></ul><ul><li>Summarise surfaces available and users characteristics </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss Access Control and Disabled Users Requirements </li></ul><ul><li>Detail crossing requirements and options </li></ul>
    8. 8. LEARNING OUTCOMES <ul><li>Turn all of the learning outcomes into designs </li></ul>
    9. 9. Demonstration Project – Shared Use Path – Devon Way Before we get started Name Council Describe your journey here Homework
    10. 10. Demonstration Project – Shared Use Path – Devon Way Introduction
    11. 11. Devon Way - Information Core Path Linking Alloa and Dollar 10km long linking 7 settlements Alloa Railway Station, Community Health Centre, Liveries and Primary Schools and other amenities.
    12. 12. Demonstration Project – Shared Use Path – Devon Way Why Complete a Demonstration Project?
    13. 13. Cycling Scotland Policy Drivers <ul><li>National Outcomes </li></ul><ul><li>National Indicators and Targets </li></ul><ul><li>Cycle Action Plan for Scotland </li></ul><ul><li>“ By 2020, 10% of all journeys taken in Scotland will be by bike” </li></ul><ul><li>Questions and Queries </li></ul><ul><li>Scottish Outdoor Access Code </li></ul>
    14. 14. Cycle Action Plan for Scotland Professionals – Perth October 2008
    15. 15. Cycle Action Plan for Scotland <ul><li>Action 2: To work with key stakeholders and the tertiary education sector to offer accredited modules on integrating cycling best practice within their professional spheres. </li></ul><ul><li>Action 7: To complete the missing links in the National Cycle Network in Scotland. </li></ul><ul><li>Action 8: To promote the use of planning policy, access legislation and design guidance to a wide range of professionals; and to promote the outcomes of access legislation in the form of leisure activities. </li></ul>
    16. 16. Cycle Action Plan for Scotland <ul><li>Action 2: Making Cycling Mainstream </li></ul><ul><li>Up skill the workforce delivering cycle facilities in Scotland </li></ul><ul><li>Local Authority </li></ul><ul><li>University </li></ul><ul><li>Demonstration Project </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Visual approach </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Continuous Development </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Various Locations </li></ul></ul>
    17. 17. Partners – National Agencies <ul><li>Paths for All </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Current demonstration projects and experience of delivering demonstration projects </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Sustrans </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Extensive knowledge of shared use routes and path projects </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Where Next? </li></ul>
    18. 18. Partners – Local Authority Delivery <ul><li>Clackmannanshire Council </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Meeting held between the parties and over the course of 6 months the project was developed and the following stages agreed: </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Inception </li></ul><ul><li>Public Questionnaire </li></ul><ul><li>Design Report </li></ul><ul><li>Design </li></ul><ul><li>Construction </li></ul><ul><li>Maintenance </li></ul><ul><li>Training </li></ul>
    19. 19. Devon Way – Demonstration Project <ul><li>Accessible </li></ul><ul><li>Typical situations </li></ul><ul><li>Live </li></ul><ul><li>Varying provisions </li></ul><ul><li>Can see relevance to their own sites </li></ul><ul><li>Financial and human resources available </li></ul>
    20. 20. Why the Devon Way? Existing capital investment The route is live Requires Development Clackmannanshire Council have provided excellent infrastructure to date along the Devon Way The site is in full ownership of the Council
    21. 21. Inception Report – Funding <ul><li>Scottish Rural Development Programme – Access </li></ul><ul><li>Forth Valley and Lomond Leader </li></ul><ul><li>Sustrans </li></ul><ul><li>Central Scotland Green Network </li></ul><ul><li>Click to locate funding sources </li></ul>
    22. 22. Inception Report – Objectives of the Demonstration Project <ul><li>Objective 1 – Encourage active travel (walking, cycling and equestrian) along the strategic Devon Way path. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The local community and users are an important part of the project as they have to be attracted to using the path. Therefore the demonstration site will look at how they can attract users and the local community. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Objective 2 – Demonstrate and promote good practice for shared use paths and active travel infrastructure using real life examples. </li></ul><ul><li>Objective 3 – Delivery of a training venue which will assist practitioners in the judgement/assessment of installing shared use and active travel infrastructure. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The second and third objective identifies how the demonstration site will aid path practitioners and professionals working within the field of active travel </li></ul></ul>
    23. 23. Delivery of Objectives <ul><li>Objective 1 – Encourage active travel (walking, cycling and equestrian) along the strategic Devon Way path. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Signing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tourism Route – Leaflets </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Active Travel Promotion – Commuting - Led rides </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Council Promotion of Route </li></ul></ul>
    24. 24. Delivery of Objectives <ul><li>Objective 2 – Demonstrate and promote good practice for shared use paths and active travel infrastructure using real life examples. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Shared Use Surfaces </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Crossings </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Conflict Reduction (Width/Surface) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Access Control </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cycle Parking </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Monitoring </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Interpretation of Path Network </li></ul></ul>
    25. 25. Inception Report – Objectives of the Demonstration Project <ul><li>Objective 3 – Delivery of a training venue which will assist practitioners in the judgement/assessment of installing shared use and active travel infrastructure. </li></ul><ul><li>We are here today and the ongoing training delivery will be as follows: </li></ul><ul><li>Action Plan </li></ul><ul><li>Email updates </li></ul><ul><li>Site Visit </li></ul><ul><li>Course Delivery after Construction </li></ul>
    26. 26. Objective 2 <ul><ul><li>We are to cover the following areas today and information sheets will be provided on all areas in due course </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Design Manuals </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Shared Use Surfaces </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Crossings </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Access Control </li></ul></ul>
    27. 27. Objective 2 <ul><ul><li>How are we covering objective 2 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Produce and distribute a design report (literature review) to relevant practitioners. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The design report will be distributed to local authorities and other relevant practitioners through the use of Paths for All and Cycling Scotland website. This will be achieved through information sheets rather than publication of a full report. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Complete the construction of the project. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The design report will be updated to include construction issues/findings and be distributed to local authorities and relevant practitioners through the use of Paths for All and Cycling Scotland website. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This Leads us onto our first topic today – </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Design Manuals </li></ul></ul>
    28. 29. Design Manuals <ul><li>Group Exercises </li></ul><ul><ul><li>List the design manuals you currently use </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What information would you look for within the manual and how would you use the manuals? </li></ul></ul>
    29. 31. Active Travel Design Manuals <ul><li>Netherlands - Crow – Design manual for bicycle traffic </li></ul><ul><li>UK – DFT – Cycle Infrastructure Design </li></ul><ul><li>Scotland – TS - Cycling By Design 2010 </li></ul>
    30. 32. Sustrans Publications - Guidelines <ul><li>Connect 2 and Greenway Design Guide – 2007 </li></ul><ul><li>The NCN – Guidelines and Practical Details -1997 </li></ul><ul><li>Making Ways for the Bicycle – 1994 </li></ul><ul><li>www.sustrans.org.uk/resources </li></ul>
    31. 33. Active Travel Design Manuals <ul><li>UK – TFL – London Design Standards </li></ul><ul><li>Scotland – SE – Design for Streets </li></ul>
    32. 34. Active Travel Design Internet <ul><li>www.cyclingengland.co.uk </li></ul><ul><li>www.ctc.org.uk/Benchmarking </li></ul><ul><li>www.cyclingresourcecentre.org.au/ </li></ul><ul><li>www.fietsberaad.nl/ </li></ul>
    33. 35. Sustrans Publications – Notes <ul><li>Technical Information Notes – Current - Available from Sustrans </li></ul><ul><li>Information Sheets – Some are Dated - Available from Website </li></ul>
    34. 36. Path Construction <ul><li>Countryside Access Design Guide </li></ul><ul><li>Lowland Path Construction </li></ul><ul><li>Upland Path Management </li></ul><ul><li>Scottish Access Technical Information Network (SATIN) </li></ul>
    35. 37. Other Design Manuals <ul><li>Equestrian – </li></ul><ul><ul><li>British Horse Society </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>www.iprow.co.uk </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Disabled Users </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Fieldfare Trust </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://91.135.228.71/$sitepreview/phototrails-dev.org/default.cfm?walk=Devon-Way---Fishcross-to- Devonside&page = trail&walk_id =70 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Walker </li></ul><ul><ul><li>www.livingstreets.org.uk/scotland </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Cyclist </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Natural Surface Trails by Design </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Trail Solutions - IMBA </li></ul></ul>
    36. 38. Shared use Paths <ul><li>Who are the users? </li></ul>
    37. 40. Group Exercise? <ul><li>First of all get to know playmobil as they are going to be with you all day. </li></ul><ul><li>Dog Walker </li></ul><ul><li>Family (Sorry) </li></ul><ul><li>Wheelchair </li></ul><ul><li>Cyclist </li></ul><ul><li>Rambler </li></ul><ul><li>Equestrian </li></ul>
    38. 41. How do we cater for all? <ul><li>Space Requirements? </li></ul><ul><li>Reasons for use of Path? </li></ul><ul><li>Origin and Destinations? </li></ul><ul><li>Path Conditions? </li></ul><ul><li>Safety? </li></ul><ul><li>Enjoyment / Aesthetics? </li></ul>
    39. 42. Gathered the characteristics of each user group <ul><li>How do we design a surface for each user? </li></ul>
    40. 43. Different Users <ul><li>Can we come up with an agreed surface? </li></ul><ul><li>In your groups please list three points you feel are key for your user group in a surface </li></ul>
    41. 44. Other Interested Parties <ul><li>Funding </li></ul><ul><li>Local Authority Maintenance </li></ul><ul><li>Landowners (Neighbour) </li></ul><ul><li>Statutory Bodies </li></ul>
    42. 45. Ideal Surface to suit a shared use path <ul><li>Thoughts? </li></ul><ul><li>Think outside the box </li></ul>
    43. 47. Devon Way – Shared Use Path – Trial Surfaces <ul><li>Existing 2.5m wide bound surface </li></ul><ul><li>2.5m wide tar spray and chip with Recycled Tyre Chips </li></ul><ul><li>Toptrec – Machine Laid </li></ul><ul><li>2.5m wide 150mm Subbase and Whin </li></ul><ul><li>2.5m wide bound surface and 2.5m sub-base/whin equestrian path </li></ul>
    44. 48. Devon Way – Shared Use Path – Trial Surfaces <ul><li>Existing 2.5m wide bound surface </li></ul>
    45. 49. Devon Way – Shared Use Path – Trial Surfaces <ul><li>Tar spray and chip with Recycled Tyre Chips </li></ul>
    46. 50. Devon Way – Shared Use Path – Trial Surfaces
    47. 51. Devon Way – Shared Use Path – Trial Surfaces <ul><li>WRAP – Executive Summary </li></ul><ul><li>Discussion with Suppliers – Will pay for you to use them. </li></ul>
    48. 52. Devon Way – Shared Use Path – Trial Surfaces <ul><li>Toptrec – Machine Laid </li></ul>
    49. 53. Devon Way – Shared Use Path – Trial Surfaces <ul><li>150mm Subbase and Whin </li></ul>
    50. 54. Devon Way – Shared Use Path – Trial Surfaces <ul><li>2.5m wide bound surface and 2.5m sub-base/whin equestrian path </li></ul>
    51. 55. Devon Way – Shared Use Path – Trial Surfaces Any Questions As mentioned the design report will contain the information and be circulated on completion
    52. 56. Coffee/Tea and Biscuits
    53. 57. Accessibility and Access Controls <ul><li>What is the objective? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the requirements of different user groups? </li></ul>
    54. 58. Access Controls - Options <ul><li>Bollards </li></ul><ul><li>Chicanes </li></ul><ul><li>Planting </li></ul><ul><li>Path alignment – horizontal and vertical </li></ul><ul><li>Community ‘policing’ </li></ul><ul><li>Nothing </li></ul>
    55. 59. Accessibility Objectives <ul><li>Prevent motorised users </li></ul><ul><li>Allow free flow of users </li></ul><ul><li>Alert users to hazards / potential conflicts </li></ul><ul><li>Slow users’ speed </li></ul>
    56. 60. Access Controls - Examples Providing training to deliver solutions
    57. 61. Accessibility - Documents <ul><li>Transport Scotland Disability Discrimination Act: Good Practice Guide for Roads </li></ul><ul><li>BT / Fieldfare Trust Country Side for All </li></ul><ul><li>Design guides referenced earlier </li></ul><ul><li>Sustrans TIN and Information Sheet </li></ul><ul><li>Proposed Sustrans Arts and Gateways guide </li></ul>
    58. 62. Do access controls work?
    59. 63. Good Practice
    60. 64. Instead of us going on about the different users we would like to show you the following video. We think this shows the different users perspective and requirements. Remember by 2025, disabled people will have the same opportunities and choices as non-disabled people on travel choices Disable Discrimination Act Compliance
    61. 65. <ul><li>Video - </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.transportscotland.gov.uk/road/Roads-for-All-Conference-2010-video </li></ul>
    62. 66. Discuss Video Devon Way Audit - Promoting Countryside Access for Disabled People - Phototrails http://91.135.228.71/$sitepreview/phototrails- dev.org/default.cfm?walk =Devon-Way---Fishcross-to- Devonside&page = trail&walk_id =70
    63. 67. Thankfully I am now going to pass onto Alan Murray from Clackmannanshire Council to present crossings located in the council area
    64. 68. Pedestrian / Cycle Crossings <ul><li>Islands </li></ul><ul><li>Zebra </li></ul><ul><li>Puffin / Pelican </li></ul><ul><li>Toucan </li></ul><ul><li>Pegasus </li></ul>
    65. 72. Pedestrian / Cycle Crossings <ul><li>Islands </li></ul><ul><li>Zebra </li></ul><ul><li>Puffin / Pelican </li></ul><ul><li>Toucan </li></ul><ul><li>Pegasus </li></ul>
    66. 73. Other Options Cycling by Design Side Road Crossing – Bend Out There are other options but due to it being adjacent to a trunk road this was preferred
    67. 74. Other Options Side Road Crossing – Bend In Raise Table crossing with no give way markings
    68. 75. Other Options Side Road Crossing – Bend In Raise Table crossing both with give way markings
    69. 76. Other Options Side Road Crossing – Surfacing On Road Give Way Markings
    70. 77. Other Options Side Road Crossing – Bend out Raise Table crossing both with on road give way markings
    71. 78. Other Options Main Road Crossing – Traffic Island
    72. 79. Other Options Main Road Crossing – Rumble Strips and Coloured Surfacing Within Cycling by Design for use on the Trunk Road
    73. 80. Crossings Design Site Specific One size does not fit all Crossing Attributes Simple Field of Vision for All users Decision Making Cycling by Design Transport for London
    74. 81. Summary <ul><li>We’ve looked at: </li></ul><ul><li>Devon Way </li></ul><ul><li>Demonstration Project Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>Design Manuals </li></ul><ul><li>Shared Surfaces </li></ul><ul><li>Access Control </li></ul><ul><li>Crossings </li></ul>
    75. 82. <ul><li>Are there any questions from this mornings presentations? </li></ul>
    76. 83. Site Visit this Afternoon <ul><li>Project isn’t constructed but is designed </li></ul><ul><li>Group working to develop designs </li></ul><ul><li>Consider a specific aspect and general issues </li></ul><ul><li>Feedback and discussion on site </li></ul><ul><li>Proposals to take forward </li></ul><ul><li>Action Plan </li></ul>
    77. 84. Site Visit this Afternoon <ul><li>Scenario 1 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>B Road Crossing with Access Control </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Ramp </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Surfacing either side of the crossing </li></ul></ul></ul>
    78. 85. Site Visit this Afternoon <ul><li>Scenario 2 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Minor Road Crossing with Access Control </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Surfacing either side of crossing </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>DDA Compliance </li></ul></ul></ul>
    79. 86. Site Visit this Afternoon <ul><li>Scenario 3 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Pegasus Crossing (All Users) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Surfacing either side of crossing </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>DDA Compliance </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Access Control </li></ul></ul></ul>
    80. 87. Site Visit this Afternoon <ul><li>All </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Signing / Interpretation – Core Path Plan </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>DDA Compliance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What would like to see in a Demonstration Project </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Meet at Bridge on Plan after 1 hour </li></ul></ul>
    81. 88. THANK YOU Peter Leslie Clary Elliott Providing training to deliver solutions

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