Beyond Communications

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My blogevento (#ebe10) presentation, delivered in Seville, Spain, 20 November 2010.

Discusses how the Communications industry is moving beyond it's traditional stomping grounds, into business transformation.

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  • I’m the newly appointed Director of Digital at Edelman in London. We’re the World’s largest independent public relations firm.\n
  • So anyway, the blurb about this talk sounded pretty academic and theoretical and I don’t want to risk disappointing anyone who came for that, so let’s get going...\n\nOver the last century, most products and services have been devised based not on genuine human need, but on the basis of cost of production and revenue potential.\n
  • At the BBC, I looked after all sorts of social media projects. This one, BBC News Online’s Have Your Say, was one that I helped through a technical and editorial transition. They ask fairly open ended questions, and get this sort of response.... (next)\n
  • So one key take away from this is that you need to think about how you will encourage participants in any social media proposition you put together to participate in a way that is beneficial both to them and to you or your aims. Open ended questions just don’t cut it most of the time, and you may find yourself flooded with stuff like this...(next)\n
  • BBC News has a ticker tape that runs along the bottom of the screen, inviting audiences to submit images of - well, whatever - to “yourpics@bbc.co.uk”. What sort of response do they get? Well, on a good day, you’ll get a few fluffy kittens playing with balls of yarn.\n
  • So anyway, the blurb about this talk sounded pretty academic and theoretical and I don’t want to risk disappointing anyone who came for that, so let’s get going...\n\nOver the last century, most products and services have been devised based not on genuine human need, but on the basis of cost of production and revenue potential.\n
  • This means we needed mass communication to help generate desire within target markets. That’s not to say there aren’t some benefits to mass communication, or that all mass produced products or services don’t meet the needs of the audiences and consumers they are targeted at - that would be too sweeping a generalisation, but it’s true in many instances.\n
  • So anyway, the blurb about this talk sounded pretty academic and theoretical and I don’t want to risk disappointing anyone who came for that, so let’s get going...\n\nOver the last century, most products and services have been devised based not on genuine human need, but on the basis of cost of production and revenue potential.\n
  • So anyway, the blurb about this talk sounded pretty academic and theoretical and I don’t want to risk disappointing anyone who came for that, so let’s get going...\n\nOver the last century, most products and services have been devised based not on genuine human need, but on the basis of cost of production and revenue potential.\n
  • So anyway, the blurb about this talk sounded pretty academic and theoretical and I don’t want to risk disappointing anyone who came for that, so let’s get going...\n\nOver the last century, most products and services have been devised based not on genuine human need, but on the basis of cost of production and revenue potential.\n
  • So anyway, the blurb about this talk sounded pretty academic and theoretical and I don’t want to risk disappointing anyone who came for that, so let’s get going...\n\nOver the last century, most products and services have been devised based not on genuine human need, but on the basis of cost of production and revenue potential.\n
  • So anyway, the blurb about this talk sounded pretty academic and theoretical and I don’t want to risk disappointing anyone who came for that, so let’s get going...\n\nOver the last century, most products and services have been devised based not on genuine human need, but on the basis of cost of production and revenue potential.\n
  • So anyway, the blurb about this talk sounded pretty academic and theoretical and I don’t want to risk disappointing anyone who came for that, so let’s get going...\n\nOver the last century, most products and services have been devised based not on genuine human need, but on the basis of cost of production and revenue potential.\n
  • So anyway, the blurb about this talk sounded pretty academic and theoretical and I don’t want to risk disappointing anyone who came for that, so let’s get going...\n\nOver the last century, most products and services have been devised based not on genuine human need, but on the basis of cost of production and revenue potential.\n
  • So anyway, the blurb about this talk sounded pretty academic and theoretical and I don’t want to risk disappointing anyone who came for that, so let’s get going...\n\nOver the last century, most products and services have been devised based not on genuine human need, but on the basis of cost of production and revenue potential.\n
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  • So anyway, the blurb about this talk sounded pretty academic and theoretical and I don’t want to risk disappointing anyone who came for that, so let’s get going...\n\nOver the last century, most products and services have been devised based not on genuine human need, but on the basis of cost of production and revenue potential.\n
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