Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
How do successful businesses innovate?
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

How do successful businesses innovate?

752
views

Published on

Published in: Business, Technology

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
752
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. 1. Business Model 5. Product Performance How the business makes Basic features, performance & functionality money 6. Product System 2. Networking Extended system that surrounds an offering Enterprise structure & value chain 7. Service How do you service your customers Finance Process Offering Delivery Business Enabling Core Product Product Customer Networking Performance Service Channel Brand Model Process Process Systems Experience 8. Channel How you connect the offering 3. Enabling Process to customers Assembled capabilities 9. Brand How you express the offering 4. Core Process benefit to customers Proprietary Process that add value 10. Customer Experience How you create overall experience for customers Credit – Peter Fisk, Genius Works
  • 2. Finance Process Offering DeliveryBusiness Enabling Core Product Product Customer Networking Performance Service Channel Brand Model Process Process Systems ExperienceVolume of InnovationEffortsLast 10 years Credit – Peter Fisk, Genius Works
  • 3. Finance Process Offering DeliveryBusiness Enabling Core Product Product Customer Networking Performance Service Channel Brand Model Process Process Systems ExperienceCumulative Value CreationLast 10 years Credit – Peter Fisk, Genius Works
  • 4. Finance Process Offering DeliveryBusiness Enabling Core Product Product Customer Networking Performance Service Channel Brand Model Process Process Systems Experience Credit – Peter Fisk, Genius Works
  • 5. Value Proposition Relationships Key Activities Channels Key Resources CustomerKey Partners Segments & Suppliers Cost Structure Revenue Streams
  • 6. Credit – Alex Osterwalder, Business Model Alchemist
  • 7. The time, effort, or budget a customer has to spendto switch from one product or service provider toanother is calledThe higher the switching costs, the likelier a customeris to to one provider rather than to leave forthe products or services of a competitor. Credit – Alex Osterwalder, Business Model Alchemist
  • 8. Customers copy all their music into which wouldmake it more for them to competingdigital music players.In a time when little more than brand preferenceswere preventing people from switching from one playerto another & laid the foundation for Apple’s on music and later innovations. Credit – Alex Osterwalder, Business Model Alchemist
  • 9. Scalability describes how easy it is to abusiness model without equally increasing its costbase.Of course software and Web-based business modelsare naturally more scalable than those based onbricks and mortar, but even among digital businessmodels there are . Credit – Alex Osterwalder, Business Model Alchemist
  • 10. With only a couple of thousand of engineerscreate value for hundreds of millions of users. Onlyfew other companies in the world have such a ratioof users per employee.By building games like or on theback Facebook, benefit from Facebook’s(and ) without having to build it themselves. Credit – Alex Osterwalder, Business Model Alchemist
  • 11. Recurring revenues have two major .Firstly, the costs of sales incur only for repetitiverevenues.Secondly, with recurring revenues you have a betteridea of how much you will in the . Credit – Alex Osterwalder, Business Model Alchemist
  • 12. When you buy a printer, you continue to spend oncartridges, or when you buy a game console, you’llcontinue to spend on games.While still earn most of their revenues fromhardware sales, the from contentand apps is 6% of revenues & steadily growing. Credit – Alex Osterwalder, Business Model Alchemist
  • 13. This one goes without saying. The you can earn spending, the better. Credit – Alex Osterwalder, Business Model Alchemist
  • 14. pioneered this model in the computer hardwaremanufacturing industry.By assembling after selling directly theymanaged to escape the terrible inventorydepreciation costs of the hardware industry. Resultsshowed how powerful it is to . Credit – Alex Osterwalder, Business Model Alchemist
  • 15. This is probably one of the least publicized weapons ofmass destruction in business model design. What couldbe more powerful than ? Credit – Alex Osterwalder, Business Model Alchemist
  • 16. gets to assemble the furniture you buy fromthem. You do the work - they save money. gets to post photos, create andparticipate in conversations, and “like” stuff.Facebook, provide the platform; You do the work -they earn the sky-high valuations of their shares. gets to recommend books which encourageother users to buy. Credit – Alex Osterwalder, Business Model Alchemist
  • 17. A great business model can provide you with a from competition than just agreat product. Credit – Alex Osterwalder, Business Model Alchemist
  • 18. main competitive advantage arises more fromits than purely from itsinnovative products.It’s easier for Samsung, for instance, to copy theiPhone than to build an ecosystem like Apple’s , which caters to developers and users alikeand hosts hundred thousands of applications. Credit – Alex Osterwalder, Business Model Alchemist
  • 19. Cutting costs is a long practiced sport in business. Somebusiness models, however, go beyond cost cutting by based on a coststructure.
  • 20. provides calls and communication almost like aconventional telecom company, but for free or for avery low cost.Skype’s model is based on the of a , while a telecom provider’s modelis based on the economics of a network company.The former’s costs are mainly people; while the latter’scost include huge capital expenditures ininfrastructure. Credit – Alex Osterwalder, Business Model Alchemist
  • 21. More profitper customer; out-investcompetitors to grow