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Ashwin 8 3 french revolution keynote

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A pdf of my french revolution keynote.

A pdf of my french revolution keynote.

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  • 1. THE FRENCH REVOLUTION____________LA REVOLUTION FRANÇAISEBy :Ashwin Srikanth1
  • 2. INTRODUCTIONTOTHEFRENCH REVOLUTION  The  French  Revolution  is  arguably  among  the  worlds’  most  monumental  revolutions.  Those  who  witnessed  it  were  scarred  for  life.  Not  many  of  these  people  even  survived  this  violent  time  period.  This  time  period  was  a  pivotal  moment  on  which  the  very  hinges  of  the  world  turned.     The  French  Revolution  was  started  when  prices  skyrocketed,  and  dissent  for  the  French  Government  was  to  be  found  everywhere.  It  is  disputed  as  to  the  exact  starting  point  of  the  French  Revolution;  however,  it  can  be  agreed  that  one  of  the  key  events  that  affected  the  direction  of  France  is  The  Tennis  Court  Oath.  The  Tennis  Court  Oath  was  sworn  to  uphold  the  idea  of  a  constitution  within  the  third  estate.  It  was  sworn  in  a  tennis  court  because  when  the  members  of  the  3rd  estate  arrived,  they  found  the  meeting  hall  locked,  as  all  of  the  estates  were  to  meet.    They  quickly  convened  in  a  tennis  court  and  576  of  577  people  signed  this  historic  document.     The  idea  of  a  constitution  spread  like  wildJire.  There  were  of  course,  people  who  supported  it  and  people  who  disliked  the  very  notion.  Many  of  the  supporters  of  the  idea  were  from  the  3rd  estate  and  the  peasants;  however,  there  were  some  clergy  who  supported  the  idea  of  a  constitution.  At  this  point,  France  was  hanging  by  a  few  loose  threads.  Treachery  ruled  on  the  streets  and  prices  were  so  high  that  people  could  not  afford  to  live.     The  character  that  I  wrote  as  is  a  man  from  the  clergy  of  France.  His  name  is  Antoine  Francois  Champollion  Frederick  Archibeque.  As  a  noble  he  has  many  privileges  that  others  do  not  have.  He  is  also  a  seasoned  politician  who  is  also  exposed  to  great  events  such  as  the  Tennis  Court  Oath  and  the  Declaration  of  Rights  of  Man  and  Citizen.  He  is  also  a  staunch  supported  of  the  peasants  but  is  afraid  to  support  them  publicly  for  fear  of  being  cut  off  from  the  rest  of  the  nobles.  I  have  chose  Jive    of  the  most  pivotal  moments  in  the  French  revolution,  and  I  have  written  Jive  diary  entries  of  Antoine  to  show  what  it  was  like  to  live  in  that  time  period.     The  French  Revolution  was  a  time  period  of  confusion,  hatred,  and  above  all  terror.  As  the  story  of  the  French  Revolution  is  entwined  with  Antoine’s,  many  difJiculties  and  complications  arise  both  for  Antoine  but  also  for  the  progression  of  the  French  Revolution.  2
  • 3. ANTOINE’S JOURNAL______HOPE’S RISE• Antoine François Champollion Fredrick Archibeque June 20, 1798Mon histoire de la revolution Française, partie 1:Ensuite!  Today,  as  the  three  estates  met  I  was  astounded  that  many  ofthe  members  of  the  3rd  estate  had  not  attended  this  meeting.  My  name  is  Antoine  Francois  Champollion  Fredrick  Archibeque,  and  I  am  one  of  the  higher  clergy  of  France.  I  live  by  myself,  so  I  had  no  trouble  answering  the  summons  to  the  meeting.  But  I  was  truly  astonished  that  the  3rd  estate  had  not  deigned  to  show  up.  How  could  they  ignore  the  summons  of  our  monarch?  Do  they  have  no  honor,  no  dignity?  As  the  mighty  doors  closed  around  us,  we  felt  that  our  hopes  for  a  new  constitution  had  been  locked  out  as  well.     As  the  negotiations  commenced,  we  all  felt  as  if  we  were  caught  in  an  endless  loop.  Many  of  the  well-­‐versed  politicians  like  myself  were  the  only  people  holding  back  the  outbursts  of  arguments.  After  hours  of  negotiations  we  heard  a  great  wall  of  sound  reverberate  through  the  hall.  Every  one  of  us  stood  and  as  I  looked  around,  everyone’s  faces  reJlected  the  confusion  that  I  felt.  Questions  whirled  through  my  head  as  the  rest  of  the  Clergy  tried  to  retain  the  fragile  peace  that  had  been  violently  shaken.   Curiosity  overwhelmed  us  as  we  rushed  outside  to  investigate  the  origin  of  the  shouting.  As  we  blindly  rushed  towards  the  source  of  the  sound,  my  ornate  jewelry  fell  off  and  the  dirt  and  grime  on  the  streets  soiled  my  culottes.  Suddenly,  our  rag-­‐tag  host  screeched  to  a  halt.  A  tennis  court  stood  before  us.  What?  The  sound  is  coming  from  a  TENNIS  COURT?  I  volunteered  to  go  inside  and  check.  Inside,  a  bafJling  spectacle  met  my  eyes.  The 577 Members of the 3rd estate in the tennis Court3
  • 4.                            I  stood  perplexed  as  576  politicians  from  the  3rd  estate  stood  up  chanting  words  that  had  never  before  been  uttered  in  France.  Nous  avons  besoin  dune  constitution!  We  need  a  constitution!  As  I  walked  around,  I  asked  many  of  the  people  what  they  were  doing  here  instead  of  being  in  the  hall.  The  answer  that  I  received  shamed  me  to  no  end.  When  they  arrived,  it  appears  that  they  found  the  doors  locked  and  so  convened  in  this  tennis  court.  But,  I  also  learnt  that  there  were  originally  577  people  in  the  tennis  court.  Unfortunately  a  man,  Joseph  Martin  Dauche,  did  not  sign  this  because  he  could  not  agree  with  anything  that  the  king  did  not  approve  of.  How  could  this  man  be  so  naïve!  Can  he  not  see  that  the  king  and  his  rule  is  falling  apart?   In  hindsight,  I  do  believe  that  France  is  in  need  of  a  constitution  because  of  the  grievous  mistakes  made  by  Louis  XVI.  France’s  backbone  has  been  broken  and  its  will  to  live  has  been  shattered.  I  realized  that  with  this  constitution  we  are  given  the  chance  to  rebuild  our  France  into  the  country  that  it  was  meant  to  be.     As  they  continued  with  their  chant  I  joined  them  to  let  them  know,  no,  to  let  France  know,  that  I  supported  them  and  will  continue  to  do  so  until  France  is  a  changed  country.  Whatever  comes  next,  I  know  that  it  will  be  the  best  for  France.  At  this  time  it  is  uncertain,  as  it  is  uncertain  with  all  great  events.  We  cannot  predict  what  is  going  to  happen  next  as  the  future  is  clouded  and  uncertain,  but  what  I  do  know  is  that  I  will  carry  on  supporting  the  people.  Antoine François Champollion Fredrick ArchibequeANTOINE’S JOURNAL______HOPE’S RISE(CONTINUATION)The estates meet without the 3rd estate4
  • 5. Antoine François Champollion Fredrick Archibeque July 14th 1978Mon histoire de le revolution Française, partie 2:In  the  blackness  of  the  deep  cell,  I  was  isolated  and  my  senses  had  withdrawn;  but  I  was  still  able  to  hear  the  mufJled  boom  of  cannons  Jiring  and  guns  being  shot.  The  Bastille  shook  and  I  was  thrown  from  side  to  side.  It  seems  only  yesterday  that  I  was  there  at  the  tennis  court  chanting  with  the  3rd  estate.    The  king  also  imprisoned  many  of  the  original  signers  of  the  Tennis  Court  Oath.  After  swearing  the  Tennis  Court  Oath,  it  seemed  as  though  the  peasants  regarded  us  with  a  new  honor.  Some  were  in  such  a  hurry  to  help  us  that  they  would  tell  us  what  they  thought  we  wanted  to  hear,  not  the  truth.  I  felt  as  if  the  king’s  oppression  would  never  stop  as  he  continues  to  terrorize  France.  I  was  imprisoned  after  Louis  XVI  heard  that  we  wanted  a  constitution.  His  deluded  mind  interpreted  our  feelings  in  the  way  that  he  thought  that  we  wanted  to  overthrow  him.  It  seemed  like  an  eternity  in  the  cold  darkness  of  the  cell.  My  sight  was  leveled  down  to  zero  and  the  chill  I  felt  went  bone  deep.  It  was  by  far,  the  worst  experience  of  my  life.  What  only  prolonged  my  suffering  was  the  fact  that  the  king  came  down  to  childishly  torment  us  with  his  jeers  and  scalding  comments  about  our  honor.  It  seemed  a  blessing  when  I  learnt  that  the  fortress  was  under  attack.  My  spirits  plunged  however,  when  I  heard  that  undisciplined  peasants  were  the  ones  leading  the  charge.  How  could  mere  peasants  stand  up  to  the  discipline  and  strength  of  trained  soldiers?  It  seemed  impossible.  I  was  sure  that  I  would  rot  there,  willing  the  world  to  change.  ANTOINE’S JOURNAL______FLYING BULLETS AND SPLATTERING BLOODThe Bastille is Attacked5
  • 6. It  seemed  like  a  miracle  when  some  bloody,  beaten  peasants  limped  in  through  the  door.  They  surveyed  the  room  and  at  Jirst  they  looked  at  me  in  disgust.  My  last  ope  hated  me!  But  just  then  they  decided  to  take  me  with  them  and  dragged  me  into  the  light.  The  blinding  rays  of  the  afternoon  seared  into  my  eyes  even  as  I  screwed  them  shut.  I  tried  to  turn  my  head  away  but  it  seemed  as  if  the  whole  world  was  an  explosion  of  light.  All  of  my  senses  were  overwhelmed.  I  sat  there  in  a  daze  for  a  fewminutes  until  I  began  to  recover.     Over  the  short  period  of  an  hour,  I  learnt  that  the  peasants  had  stormed  the  Bastille  with  weapons  that  had  been  procured  from  local  armorers.  Amidst  all  of  this  chaos,  the  Assembly  remained  IGNORANT  of  the  monumental  events  taking  place  around  Paris.  How  could  our  governors  not  be  involved  with  the  affairs  of  the  people?  Has  France  sunk  so  low?  And,  considering  the  fact  that  the  country  is  in  a  huge  Jinancial  crisis,  the  government  must  pay  even  more  attention  to  the  people.  It  seems  to  me  that  France  is  only  digging  itself  deeper  and  deeper  into  the  hole  of  depression,  isolation,  and  destruction.  I  have  fallen  into  the  world  of  searing  violence  and  death.  I  wait  the  day  that  the  king  accepts  a  pact  that  enacts  the  rights  of  all  citizens  as  well  as  providing  all  needed  to  help  France  out  of  this  slump.  Antoine François Champollion Fredrick ArchibequeANTOINE’S JOURNAL______FLYING BULLETS AND SPLATTERING BLOOD(CONTINUATION)Peasants destroy the Bastille6
  • 7. ANTOINE’S JOURNAL___________BONDS REFORGED AND HOPES REKINDLEDAntoine François Champollion Fredrick Archibeque August 27th 1789Mon histoire de le revolution Française, partie 3:   Liberty  and  equality,  they  are  what  we  all  crave  for.  Our  want  for  it  has  formed  in  us,  a  gaping  cavern  of  want  and  despair  into  which  we  all  fall.  It  is  not  a  good  time  for  France.  Destruction  runs  rampant  through  the  abandoned  streets  and  fear  permeates  the  very  air  that  we  breathe.  I  sit  here  in  the  greatest  fear  that  the  king’s  soldiers  will  Jind  me.     I  removed  myself  from  society  as  fear  overwhelmed  me.  It  seeped  into  my  very  being  like  no  frigid  wind  ever  has.  After  the  Bastille  episode,  I  feel  as  if  a  piece  of  me  was  broken  off.  Rumor  has  it,  that  the  Nobles  of  France  can  no  longer  be  trusted.  Apparently  they  band  together  to  eliminate  any  peasants  who  even  remotely  seem  to  be  conspiring  against  their  dastardly  masters.  It  only  reafJirms  my  fears  that  they  will  come  after  me  next.  The  entirety  of  the  malcontent  shown  these  days  is  focused  on  the  peasants  who  rise  up  against  the  tyranny  of  the  higher  class.  It  feels  as  though  I  am  caught  in  the  middle  of  two  groups  of  people  who  need  me.  My  heart  wants  to  go  with  the  peasants  of  indomitable  spirit  and  Jight  for  our  freedom.  In  pain,  sickness,  and  through  all  occurrences  I  WILL  support  them  in  their  Jight  for  truth.     I  was  forced  to  attend  a  meeting.  Expecting  to  be  briefed  on  our  “unwavering”  loyalty  to  the  king  I  made  my  way  into  the  hall  with  my  head  down.  I  did  not  want  to  be  singled  out  by  anyone.  I  was  surprised  to  see  that  the  king  had  not  attended.  If  he  was  not  there,  then  that  means  that  we  were  discussing  a  topic  that  he  did  not  like.  That  was  either  great  news  or  news  that  could  destroy  me  once  and  for  all.  Then  Olympe  de  Gouches,  a  playwright  stepped  up  and  took  the  stage.  She  opened  her  speech  with  everything  that  I  had  been  feeling  the  past  few  months.  I  could  feel  the  pain  in  her  voice  as  she  described  how  France  was  bleeding  from  its  deep  wounds.  She  then  presented  a  document.  It  seemed  important  as  it  had  a  golden  seal  on  the  top.  As  she  unrolled  the  paper  she  read  in  a  powerful  voice  that  Jilled  the  room.  Many  of  the  things  she  stated  threw  me  off  guard.  How  could  she  state  the  terms  of  equality  to  these  slave  owners!  I  could  not  bring  myself  to  agree  with  her  in  public  but  in  my  heart  of  hearts  I  was  cheering  for  her.    Declaration of Rights of Man and of Citizen7
  • 8. ANTOINE’S JOURNAL___________BONDS REFORGED AND HOPES REKINDLED(CONTINUATION)   We  were  herded  outside  to  see  the  public’s  reaction  to  the  Declaration  of  Rights  of  Man  and  Citizen.  As  we  stepped  outside,  I  was  bafJled  to  see  the  size  of  the  crowd  that  was  present.  As  Olympe  presented  the  declaration  to  the  crowd,  A  roar  went  up  hat  was  so  loud,  it  nearly  blasted  my  eardrums  to  shreds.  It  felt  as  if  though  the  whole  of  France  was  cheering.  The  sound  wave  washed  over  us  paralyzing  us  and  eliminating  any  chance  for  us  to  speak.  It  was  the  most  unbelievable  spectacle  I  have  ever  witnessed.  ‘   Now  as  I  sit  here  writing  this,  I  feel  a  sense  of  foreboding.  Already  Robespierre  has  seized  a  lot  of  power,  and  thousands  have  lost  their  heads  to  the  blade  of  the  guillotine.  It  is  not  for  me  to  predict  the  future  of  France  and  her  people.  What  I  do  know  is  that  the  guillotine  has  not  seen  its  last  men.  Antoine François Champollion Fredrick Archibeque Olympe de Gauches before the meeting8
  • 9. ANTOINE’S JOURNAL_______TERROR IS JUSTTHE BEGINNINGAntoine François Champollion Fredrick Archibeque July 27 1794Mon histoire de le revolution Française, partie 4:Terror  is  the  founding  father  of  all  that  is  sinful.  Those  that  are  consumed  by  it  can  never  return  to  their  previous  lives,  and  they  become  slaves  to  it.  Terror  is  a  hole  into  which  people  pour  their  belongings,  their  family,  and  their  very  soul.  It  starts  as  a  small  Jlicker  at  the  back  of  your  mind  and  then  grows  into  an  inferno  of  blazing  heat  that  Jlashes  through  your  mind,  searing  your  thoughts  and  shattering  your  being.  It  stays  with  you  until  your  death.  This  terror  will  always  remain  with  me.  It  is  the  Reign  of  Terror.     France  is  on  the  brink  of  destruction.  Never  in  my  wildest  dreams  did  I  think  that  it  would  come  to  this.  Robespierre  is  plowing  through  all  those  who  attempt  to  stop  him  with  a  vengeance  that  I  have  never  seen  in  a  politician.  His  killing  spree  has  not  abated  over  the  years.  More  and  more  men  have  lost  their  lives  to  theguillotine.  The  Jacobin  has  brought  nothing  but  terror  since  1791.  Robespierre  has  executed  already  40,000  people.  Whenever  someone  was  executed,  we  were  forced  to  stand  outside  and  watch  as  his  head  was  unceremoniously  chopped  off.  There  seemed  to  be  an  endless  line  of  executionees.  There  is  no  limit  to  the  people  that  he  is  willing  to  execute.  He  even  killed  one  of  the  clergy  a  dear  friend  of  mine.  Anyone  could  be  his  next  target;  it  doesn’t  matter  if  he  is  clergy,  or  a  peasant.  After  my  friend’s  execution  I  had  to  keep  on  my  feet.  I  can’t  afford  to  settle  in  one  spot  for  fear  that  I  might  be  the  next  one.    A portrait of Robespierre Guillotining someone9
  • 10. ANTOINE’S JOURNAL_______TERROR IS JUSTTHE BEGINNING(CONTINUATION)Dissent  for  the  Jacobin  grew  among  the  three  classes  and  reached  such  a  level  that  the  very  mention  of  their  name  enticed  a  Jlurry  of  spitting  and  cursing.  Les  Conards!  (The  Idiots)  is  what  they  were  referred  to  these  days.  It  was  then  that  we  learnt  that  Robespierre  was  to  be  executed.  Ha!  Finally,  a  punishment  that  is  actually  deserved.  The  entire  city  of  Paris  gathered  to  watch  this  historic  moment.  The  fanfare  of  trumpets  echoed  against  the  stone  of  the  houses  lining  the  square.  As  Robespierre  started  his  solemn  march  to  the  guillotine,  he  received  a  lifetime  of  jeers  and  insults.  I  almost  felt  sorry  for  him.  Then  I  remembered  the  pain  and  suffering  that  he  had  caused  the  people  of  Paris.  He  deserved  it.  As  his  head  rolled  off  into  the  woven  basket,  cheers  went  up  from  the  crowd.  Now  they  wouldn’t  be  punished  needlessly!!In  that  moment,  the  world  seemed  right  again.  But  then,  we  were  dragged  back  into  reality  when  we  realized  that  the  Jacobin  were  still  in  power.  Later  even  as  we  thought  this,  we  heard  that  the  Jacobin  had  fallen.  Happiness  overrode  our  grief  and  sorrow  like  a  healing  wave.     Now  France  has  hope.  Hope  for  the  future  to  be  a  bright  one.  We  have  seen  the  ending  of  a  life  that  was  orchestrated  by  the  gods  themselves.  Antoine François Champollion Fredrick Archibeque  A Portrait of Robespierre10
  • 11. ANTOINE’S JOURNAL_______THE END OFTHE REVOLUTION ANDTHE BEGINNING OF A NEW CHAPTERAntoine François Champollion Fredrick Archibeque November 9th 1799Mon histoire de le revolution Française, partie 5:  Power  is  ever  corrupting.  It  worms  its  way  into  peoples’  minds  and  hearts,  ensnaring  them  in  its  grasp.  There  is  only  power  and  those  who  are  too  weak  to  seek  it.  Strength  comes  from  within,  it  is  not  given  nor  can  it  be  bought.  But  there  are  people  who  are  born  with  both  a  physical  and  mental  strength,  and  those  are  the  people  eligible  to  lead  France  back  to  greatness.   After  Robespierre’s  death  France  seems  like  a  better  place.  Price  controls  were  lifted,  prices  dropped  to  much  more  acceptable  rates,  and  a  constitution  was  set  up  by  Jive  men  called  the  directory.  Life  Jinally  started  to  get  back  on  track.  Also,  the  new  government  reforms  have  also  had  a  positive  impact  on  the  people.  I  took  a  walk  through  the  streets  today,  and  I  can  already  tell  the  difference.  The  streets  no  longer  reek  of  rotting  Jlesh,  sewage,  and  other  unsavory  things.  Also,  when  I  pass  others  they  stop  and  smile,  some  even  strike  up  conversation.  Even  with  these  new  changes  to  society,  the  biggest  question  on  everybody’s  mind  is  WHO  WILL  BECOME  THE  NEXT  LEADER  OF  OUR  COUNTRY?     The  entire  government  is  buzzing  with  the  prospect  of  having  a  new  leader.  I  applied  for  the  prestigious  post  myself,  but  I  didn’t  think  that  I  would  get  it.  My  competition  was  very  tough.  My  biggest  worry  was  Napoleon  Bonaparte.  He  is  a  military  leader  and  politics  to  him  just  means  beat  adversaries  with  military  force.  I  thought  to  retract  my  application  for  the  best,  and  in  the  end,  the  pressure  cracked  me  and  I  withdrew  my  application.  I  began  to  quake  in  my  boots  as  Napoleon’s  diminutive  Jigure  got  up  and  walked  to  the  podium.  He  wasted  no  time  in  launching  into  a  passionate  speech  about  the  fragile  state  of  France  and  how  it  must  be  “built  up  to  its  previous  strength.”    He  was  truly  a  man  whose  mettle  clearly  extended  beyond  the  limits  of  his  miniature  body.  I  will  never  forget  what  happened  next.  He  clapped  his  hands  as  well  and  over  one  hundred  soldiers  burst  into  the  room  carrying  riJles  that  gleamed  in  the  torchlight.  I  was  frozen  on  the  spot.  They  all  rushed  to  positions  as  if  this  event  had  been  orchestrated.  Then  the  fog  was  cleared  from  my  mind  when  I  saw  all  of                                                                                                                                                      the  soldiers’  head  towards  the  place  where  the  directory  was  seated.  This  must  have  been  an  elaborate  scheme  to  kill  them!  Napoleon’s  hate  for  the  directory  was  well  known.  Then  fear  descended  upon  us  as  we  realized  that  they  were  going  to  kill  them.  The  stories  circulating  about  Napoleon’s  antics  were  truly  horriJic.  I  covered  my  eyes  as  they  lowered  their  weapons.  The  boom  echoed  around  the  hall  but  what  was  even  more  frightening  was  the  wet  splash  of  blood  hitting  the  walls  and  Jloor.  It  was  almost  Jive  minutes  before  I  deigned  to  open  my  eyes  again.  This  must  be  what  they  call  a  coupe  d’état  an  attack  on  a  government  party  using  military  force.  It  cannot  be  disputed  anymore;  anyone  who  even  thinks  of  defying  Napoleon  will  be  shot.  It  was  evident  then  that  Napoleon  was  our  new  consul,  and  nothing  that  we  could  do  can  change  that.  Napoleon on his Egypt CampaignThe Directory11
  • 12. CONCLUSIONNow  at  the  ending  of  a  powerful  time  period,  we  can  see  the  entire  complexity  that  the  French  Revolution  was  orchestrated  with.  Those  that  stood  against  the  chief  political  parties  were  viciously  torn  down.  At  the  end  of  this  terrible  revolution,  we  can  realize  the  intensity  of  the  violence  and  horror  present  during  the  French  Revolution.  We  can  feel  the  pain  that  the  families  of  the  deceased  must  have  felt  when  their  wives,  husbands  or  even  children,  were  unceremoniously  executed  by  the  savage  strength  of  the  Guillotine.  It  is  hard  to  imagine  living  in  that  time  period  of  terror  and  pain.     The  French  Revolution  effected  many  people  in  many  different  ways.  There  were  short-­‐term  affects  and  long-­‐term  effects  of  this  monumental  revolution.  Some  of  the  short-­‐term  effects  were  that  France  was  made  into  a  republic,  and  that  the  population  of  France  was  practically  reduced  by  half.  Another  short-­‐term  effect  of  the  French  Revolution  was  that  it  opened  the  path  for  other  political  leaders  to  take  charge  of  France  seeing  that  it  needed  to  have  a  strong  leader.  Well,  France  de)initely  had  a  strong  leader  after  the  French  Revolution.  Napoleon  Bonaparte.  Along  with  the  many  short-­‐term  causes  their  came  many  long-­‐term  ones  as  well.  We  already  know  that  the  French  Revolution  continues  to  inspire  and  frighten  many  people  now  as  we  read  and  research  about  this  time  period.  Another  reason  why  we  can  signal  out  this  revolution  out  of  the  multitudes  of  others  is  because  of  its  gruesome  occurrences  during  the  revolution  as  well  as  the  circumstances  under  which  this  revolution  occurred.  We  now  know  that  the  French  Revolution  was  one  of  the  most  gruesome  and  bloody  in  history.  This  is  one  of  the  reasons  that  we  take  notice  of  it.       Nothing  is  permanent  except  for  change.  Change  brings  new  opportunities,  but  it  can  also  bring  new  dilemmas.  Change  in  an  environment  has  the  power  to  drastically  alter  a  person’s  life.  Many  things  changed  during  the  French  Revolution,  but  some  things  also  stayed  the  same.  Many  of  these  are  obvious  but  many  more  are  deeper  and  lie  under  the  words  like  a  Jine  layer  of  dust  under  a  carpet.  When  the  government  changed,  so  did  the  peoples’  mindset  and  their  feelings.  This  ushered  in  a  new  era  of  peace.  There  were  only  a  few  things  that  stayed  the  same  during  this  conJlict.  This  was  because  of  the  titanic  scale  of  the  revolution.  One  such  thing  that  did  not  change  would  be  the  border  of  France.  In  other  words,  France’s  territory  remained  the  same.  Of  course  people  could  say  that  no  one  ever  actually  wanted  for  liberty,  in  truth  we  all  want  more  freedom  to  do  what  our  hearts  please.  To  truly  understand  the  signiJicance  of  the  French  Revolution  we  can  compare  it  to  our  world  today.  One  similarity  that  is  obvious  is  the  fact  that  revolutions  still  occur  today  albeit  using  many  different  forms  of  warfare  and  technology.  Another  similarity  would  be  that  people  still  crave  for  freedom  as  multitudes  are  still  enslaved  by  either  mind  or  body.  A  difference  between  the  world  of  the  French  Revolution  and  the  world  today  is  that  in  our  world,  we  have  more  materialistic  views  instead  of  viewing  to  give  more  to  others.  Another  difference  is  that  corruption  is  not  a  wild  and  uncontrollable  as  it  was  then.This  revolution  started  as  nothing  but  a  few  paltry  riots  but  grew  into  a  full-­‐scale  revolution  that  changed  the  fate  of  the  world.  It  cannot  be  argued  that  the  French  Revolution  was  like  a  wave  of  realization  crashing  through  the  minds  of  the  leaders  of  the  world.  12
  • 13. INFORMATION CITATIONS"Active Citizen/Passive Citizen, Liberty, Equality, Fraternity: Exploring the French Revolution, http://chnm.gmu.edu/revolution/d/75/ (accessedOctober 30, 2011).• Jacques–Guillaume Thouret, Report on the Basis of Political Eligibility" (29 September 1789), Liberty, Equality, Fraternity: Exploring the FrenchRevolution, accessed October 26, 2011 http://chnm.gmu.edu/revolution/d/282/.• Olympe de Gouges, Declaration of the Rights of Woman, 1791, College of Staten Island Library. http://www.library.csi.cuny.edu/dept/americanstudies/lavender/decwom2.html(accessed October 30, 2011).•. ^ a b Doyle, William (1990). The Oxford History of the French Revolution. Oxford University Press. p. 105. ISBN 978-0192852212.•. ^ Thompson, Marshall Putnam (1914). "The Fifth Musketeer: The Marquis de la Fayette". Proceedings of the Bunker Hill Monument Association atthe annual meeting. p. 50. Retrieved 10 February 2011.• Alder, Ken (2002). The Measure of All Things—The Seven-Year Odyssey and Hidden Error That Transformed the World. Free Press.ISBN 0-7432-1675-X.• Alter, Peter (2006). In T. C. W. Blanning and Hagen Schulze. Unity and Diversity in European Culture c. 1800. Oxford University Press.ISBN 0-19-726382-8.• Walker, Leslie H. "Sweet and Consoling Virtue: The Memoirs of Madame Roland" Eighteenth-Century Studies, French Revolutionary Culture (2001):403–419.• "Women." The Encyclopedia of Diderot and d’Alembert. University of Michigan Library, n.d. Web. 29 October 2009. < http://quod.lib.umich.edu/d/did/>.13
  • 14. IMAGE CITATIONS• David, Jaques Louis. The Tennis Court Oath. Digital image. Tennis Court Oath. Wikipedia, n.d. Web. 9 May 2013.• Cholat, Claude. Siege of the Bastille. Digital image. Storming of the Bastille. Wikipedia, 6 Aug. 2011. Web. 10 May 2013. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Siege_of_the_Bastille_(Claude_Cholat).jpg>.• "Bastille in Demolition." Bastille. Wikipedia, 6 Aug. 2011. Web. 10 May 2013. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Bastille_in_demolition_July_1789.jpg>.• Kucharsky, Alexander. Olympe Gauche. Digital image. Declaration of Rights of Man and of Citizen. Wikipedia, 13 Sept. 2008. Web. 10 May2013. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Marie-Olympe-de-Gouges.jpg>.• Le Barbier, Jean- Jacques-François. Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen. Paris: WIKIPEDIA, 29 Mar. 2012. JPG.• NA, NA NA. Robespierre Exécutant Le Bourreau. Unspecified: WIKIPEDIA, 5 May 2011. JPG.• School, French. Robespierre. N.p.: Wikipedia, 23 Sept. 2011. JPG.• "Napoleon: Revolution to Empire." Napoleon The Rise of Napoleon. Melbourne Winter Master Pieces, 2012. Web. 14 May 2013. <http://www.ngv.vic.gov.au/napoleon/revolution-to-empire/the-rise-of-napoleon>.14