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Presentation by Ray Gallon    MEDIA BEHAVIOUR: TOWARDS THE    TRANSFORMATION SOCIETYFriday, 16 December 2011
11 MARCH 2004      In the morning, multiple explosions resound in       commuter trains in Madrid’s Atocha station. The m...
11 MARCH 2004               All morning, Political spokespersons attribute the attack to ETA.      8:00am               Be...
12 MARS 2004      The Spanish government insists on ETA responsibility      The editor-in-chief of El Pais admits, later...
12 MARS 2004      Viral Communal cellular messaging       spontaneously starts organizing demonstrations       throughout...
13 MARS 2004    During the day, it becomes increasingly     obvious that the attack came from Al     Qaida or a similar o...
14 MARS 2004   The Aznar government, slated by all the    polls to win with an absolute (albeit reduced)    majority, los...
PEOPLE, HARDWARE, DATA &   METADATA INTERACTING...                              8Friday, 16 December 2011
...IN A LIVING, BEHAVING NETWORK                                      9Friday, 16 December 2011
THE LARGEST LIVING ORGANISM IN THE WORLD   IS A NETWORK - WITH 36000 SEXES!                                              1...
NETWORKED DIVERSITY IS THE KEY TO SURVIVAL    Biodiversity is evolution’s safety net    In the case of humans, we have  ...
The Information Society – a Collector Mentality              ds! accumulation of information       Based on          rien ...
The Information Society – a Collector Mentality    This mirrors older collector models, for     example, collectors of « ...
What is music?                           15Friday, 16 December 2011
Music can only exist in real time    Performed by live musicians    Decoded from a recording medium    Replayed in our ...
Music in the digital age      The advent of digital recording has simply changed       the way we encode and store music ...
Music in the digital age    When digital clones of music files go out     onto a network, they can take on lives of     th...
Peer to peer      The collector model of a network involves a       client-server structure: central repository       acc...
The « music industry » vs music    The music industry, largely based on the     collector model of buying and selling    ...
The « music industry » vs music      In truth, music was always resistant to this model                              d   ...
The « music industry » vs music      Instead of adopting a new business       model that would enable it to survive, the ...
The « music industry » vs music      Music wants to be heard.      People, sharing     a powerful, behavioural system t...
Individualism vs Community      “We shape our tools, and thereafter our tools       shape us”                   -Marshall...
FRIENDS AS COLLECTABLES                           What would you do for a free                           WHOPPER®? Would y...
Facebook and Burger King      When Burger King advertised that it would       give a free hamburger to anyone who       «...
Individualism vs Community      Networks foster exchange. However, exchange can be one-       way (broadcasting), two-way...
Web 2.0 does not exist      There is no such thing, in technological terms, as       web 2.0 – it is a marketing term.   ...
Web 3.0 does represent a paradigm   shift    Web 3.0, as it is being developed by the     W3C consortium, represents the ...
The Transformation Society      The Transformation Society proposes a       model built on the transformation of       in...
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Media behavior: Towards the Transformation Society

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Presented at the "Consciousness Reframed" conference, Munich, November 2009.

The Information Society is a model based on industrial thinking and collector's mentality. The nature of new media, however, and the fact that media systems have their own behavior, means that we must evolve from the Information Society to a Transformation Society.

Transformation includes community actions across networked media systems, working to transform information into knowledge, and knowledge into understanding. Transformation means individual self actualization combined with community solidarity.

It is built on a "technoethical" model for society.

Published in: Education, Travel, Technology
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Transcript of "Media behavior: Towards the Transformation Society"

  1. 1. Presentation by Ray Gallon MEDIA BEHAVIOUR: TOWARDS THE TRANSFORMATION SOCIETYFriday, 16 December 2011
  2. 2. 11 MARCH 2004  In the morning, multiple explosions resound in commuter trains in Madrid’s Atocha station. The media are unclear as to how many explosions, or the number of casualties. 2Friday, 16 December 2011
  3. 3. 11 MARCH 2004 All morning, Political spokespersons attribute the attack to ETA. 8:00am Between 8:00am and 3:00pm, the number of people connecting to an online news source is multiplied by 5 compared to a normal day. 9:00am the number of telephone calls from landlines to mobiles increased by 725%. The telephone network is in a state of collapse. Internet becomes “unstable” and many sites become totally saturated. 1:30pm  Headlines at Spanish elmundo.es: “Massacre in Madrid newspaper websites 2:00pm garra.es – official site of a daily connected to Batasuna, the political wing of the Basque terrorist organisation – announces that a communiqué from Batasuna rejected responsibility for the attack, and therefore, implicitly, responsibility of ETA. elmundo.es: “ETA Massacre in Madrid 4:30pm elpais.es: “ETA Slaughter in Madrid.” LOS CIBERMEDIOS ANTE LAS CATÁSTROFES: DEL 11S AL 11M Sources: -Dr. Ramón Salaverría, Universidad de Navarra LA ASSOCACIÓN PARA EL PROGRESSO DE LAS COMMUNICACIONES (Spain): www.apc.orgFriday, 16 December 2011
  4. 4. 12 MARS 2004  The Spanish government insists on ETA responsibility  The editor-in-chief of El Pais admits, later, that President Aznar called the media, pressured them to maintain this story.  Media outside of Spain begin to note that the attack methodology does not correspond to ETA’s usual practices.  Spanish internauts start to read the truth on foreign media sites.  Spanish internet community reacts with:  Postings in forums  Blog posts  SMS (text) messages: Tomás Delclós, journalist for El Pais, cites an increase of 40% in the number of SMS messages in Spain between March 11 and the national elections on March 14.Friday, 16 December 2011
  5. 5. 12 MARS 2004  Viral Communal cellular messaging spontaneously starts organizing demonstrations throughout Spain for the night of March 12.  The government, once it gets wind of this, attempts to co-opt the event by calling for a “silent demonstration against terrorism.”  That night, there are demonstrations throughout Spain, but not at all silent!  Barcelona is host to the largest demonstration in its entire history.  Government politicians are publicly condemned for lying and are heckled when they try to make an appearance.Friday, 16 December 2011
  6. 6. 13 MARS 2004  During the day, it becomes increasingly obvious that the attack came from Al Qaida or a similar organisation, not ETA  The government continues to insist on ETA responsibility, with the subtlety that they admit there “might” be other possibilities.  That night, there are more communally organised anti-government demonstrations.Friday, 16 December 2011
  7. 7. 14 MARS 2004  The Aznar government, slated by all the polls to win with an absolute (albeit reduced) majority, loses national elections to the socialist party of Spain.  A communal media system of people, internet and cell phones effectively brought down a government.  CLEARLY, IT IS NO LONGER POSSIBLE TO SPEAK OF INTERACTIVE MEDIA AS MERELY TOOLS.Friday, 16 December 2011
  8. 8. PEOPLE, HARDWARE, DATA & METADATA INTERACTING... 8Friday, 16 December 2011
  9. 9. ...IN A LIVING, BEHAVING NETWORK 9Friday, 16 December 2011
  10. 10. THE LARGEST LIVING ORGANISM IN THE WORLD IS A NETWORK - WITH 36000 SEXES! 10Friday, 16 December 2011
  11. 11. NETWORKED DIVERSITY IS THE KEY TO SURVIVAL  Biodiversity is evolution’s safety net  In the case of humans, we have eliminated diversity from our evolutionary line - there is only homo sapiens sapiens, a monoculture.  In human society, cultural diversity takes the place of biodiversity.  The variety of human cultures, networked together, is our safety net. 11Friday, 16 December 2011
  12. 12. The Information Society – a Collector Mentality ds! accumulation of information Based on rien  35M2X + F - 37 R∜ (Y-7) 6Y/ 2 = *G3 ???? + I the think ref o am re I N D am  Search engines focus on ability to find Na ate o e: Sex tiona f Birt Pol ual P lity: h: i r An tical p efere unimaginable quantities of hierarchically nua ar nc We l inc ty e: akn om ess e: es: ordered information  You can even accumulate « friends ». This can become a competition. 12Friday, 16 December 2011 1
  13. 13. The Information Society – a Collector Mentality  This mirrors older collector models, for example, collectors of « music ».  As noted by Evan Eisenberg, in his book, « The Recording Angel, » these collectors confuse the physical object (a disk) with « music » 14Friday, 16 December 2011
  14. 14. What is music? 15Friday, 16 December 2011
  15. 15. Music can only exist in real time  Performed by live musicians  Decoded from a recording medium  Replayed in our memories.  It is impossible to hold music in our hands or manipulate it in tangible fashion.  It is, perhaps, the first virtual art form. 16Friday, 16 December 2011
  16. 16. Music in the digital age  The advent of digital recording has simply changed the way we encode and store music performances:  Digital recordings of real-time performances  Creation of original digital codes and algorithms that, when decrypted, produce music in real time  Digital production of traditional and non-traditional graphic notations for music, before or after the fact of « composition ».  Mixtures of the above  Digital recording also allows direct editing and modification of the encoded digital file, without loss of quality.  The same applies to copies. Every copy is a clone, and every clone can be modified in the same way as the original. 17Friday, 16 December 2011
  17. 17. Music in the digital age  When digital clones of music files go out onto a network, they can take on lives of their own, be modified, in turn cloned, remodified, recloned, and so on, in a dizzying parody of the old exquisite corpse game.  « E unum, pluribus »  Or, another viral model. 18Friday, 16 December 2011
  18. 18. Peer to peer  The collector model of a network involves a client-server structure: central repository accumulates information, amasses it from distant clients, and « serves » it up on demand to them. Who controls the server, controls the information.  The peer to peer model, developed originally via Napster, allows users to share information without any central server or control. Each user on the network decides what s/he wants to share with others, and what to take from the shared pool.  Individual choices = pooled community resource 19Friday, 16 December 2011
  19. 19. The « music industry » vs music  The music industry, largely based on the collector model of buying and selling physial objects that encode music, was rightfully terrified by the advent of peer- to-peer.  Many years later, even after having destroyed Napster, they have been unable to stop peer to peer sharing and continue their hold on the distribution of music as physical objects. 20Friday, 16 December 2011
  20. 20. The « music industry » vs music  In truth, music was always resistant to this model d Gara ge Ban 21Friday, 16 December 2011
  21. 21. The « music industry » vs music  Instead of adopting a new business model that would enable it to survive, the music industry has tried to wall itself inside a fortress of enforcement of copy- right when copy-making has gotten totally out of their control. 21Friday, 16 December 2011
  22. 22. The « music industry » vs music  Music wants to be heard.  People, sharing  a powerful, behavioural system that confounds the power, money, and political clout of huge companies such as Time- Warner, Universial, BMG, etc.  In such a system, what is the part of the infrastructure? The technology? The people? 22Friday, 16 December 2011
  23. 23. Individualism vs Community  “We shape our tools, and thereafter our tools shape us” -Marshall McLuhan, 1960s  Individualism trumps the community at every pass (at least in the USA) -Jessica Tuchman Matthews, 1980s  “Friendship is strong, but the Whopper is stronger” -Burger King, 2009 24Friday, 16 December 2011
  24. 24. FRIENDS AS COLLECTABLES What would you do for a free WHOPPER®? Would you insult an elected official? Would you do a naked handstand? Would you go so far as to turn your back on friendship? Install WHOPPER® Sacrifice on your Facebook profile and well reward you with a free flame-broiled WHOPPER® Sandwich when you sacrifice 10 of your friends*. 24Friday, 16 December 2011
  25. 25. Facebook and Burger King  When Burger King advertised that it would give a free hamburger to anyone who « unfriended » 10 people on Facebook, two things happened simultaneously:  Thousands of people responded (many re- friending the same people the next day) to benefit from the individual gain proposed.  Thousands of people protested, forcing to Facebook to negotiate the withdrawl of the ad from Facebook. 23Friday, 16 December 2011
  26. 26. Individualism vs Community  Networks foster exchange. However, exchange can be one- way (broadcasting), two-way (transactional) or multi-way (viral and communal).  The only way to ensure that the dream of greater community, openness, « glocalisation », can take place is to ensure that there is space, in an internet that is more and more dominated by a transactional, individualist collector model, held safe for multi-way communities to develop and prosper.  These are behavioural models, and we cannot expect that such behaviour will spontaneously appear simply because we have a technological infrastructure to support it. The recent history of web 2.0 proves this. 25Friday, 16 December 2011
  27. 27. Web 2.0 does not exist  There is no such thing, in technological terms, as web 2.0 – it is a marketing term.  As a marketing term, it represents the application of certain interactive technologies which are not new, to transactional relationships, often relationships that raise questions of Big Brother (keystroke logging, localisation, use of cookies to develop profiles for « push » technologies, etc.)  The principle benefactors of these technologies have been large economic interests, most notably Google and Amazon. 26Friday, 16 December 2011
  28. 28. Web 3.0 does represent a paradigm shift  Web 3.0, as it is being developed by the W3C consortium, represents the semantic web, which promises that documents will be machine readable and parseable.  It also uses ontologies for searches, which are more interesting than hierarchical searches as they often produce surprising results or lead the user down new paths. 27Friday, 16 December 2011
  29. 29. The Transformation Society  The Transformation Society proposes a model built on the transformation of information into knowledge, and a behavioural model that can be described as « technoethical. » 28Friday, 16 December 2011
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