Introduction to<br />for publishers<br />Patricia Feeney<br />Product Support Manager<br />
Agenda<br /><ul><li>CrossRef overview
Creating and working with CrossRef DOIs
Maintaining your DOIs and metadata
CrossRef services
Resources</li></li></ul><li>mission statement:<br />CrossRef's goal is to be a trusted collaborative organization with bro...
?<br />Why do publishers join?<br /><ul><li> To get persistent identifiers for their content
 To drive more traffic to their content
 To turn references into hyperlinks
 To pull in cited-by links (who cites this?)
 Participate in other collaborative services (CrossCheck, CrossMark)</li></li></ul><li>DOI = Digital Object Identifier<br />
Broken links are a problem<br />
A DOI uniquely identifies a piece of electronic content<br />
http://dx.doi.org/ + DOI = persistent URL<br />http://dx.doi.org/10.1577/H02-043<br />http://dx.doi.org//10.1577/H02-043<b...
International DOI Foundation (IDF): oversees the central DOI system, promote DOI as a standard, and provides an organizati...
DOI Registration agencies<br />European Union Office of Publications<br />TIB (TechnischeInformationsbibliotek)<br />R.R. ...
10.1016/j.lwt.2008.02.010 10.3113/FAI.2008.0185 10.1037/07357028.38.4.338.supp 10.1016/j.diabet.2007.11.004 10.1139/Z07-11...
Content beyond journals…<br />Books<br />Standards<br />Proceedings<br />Images<br />Figures<br />Datasets<br />Working pa...
Linking 5 centuries of content <br />1665<br />
Member obligations:<br /> outbound reference linking<br /> deposit all current journal articles<br /> resolve any DOI conf...
Step-by-step<br />
Suffix:<br /><ul><li> Unique within a prefix – a DOI can only be assigned to one item
 Consistent
 Logical
 Easily documented
 Readily implemented</li></ul>Prefix:<br /> Assigned to members <br /> Format is 10.XXXX<br /> Identifies who intially cre...
Creating a DOI Suffix<br />Keep it simple:<br />10.5664/sleep.1000<br />10.3183/NPPRJ-1986-01-03-p004-013<br />10.3103/S00...
Publish DOI response page<br />Response page must include:<br /> bibliographic information about the item<br /> means to a...
DOIs are required on the response page, recommended on other pages:<br /><ul><li>Tables of contents
 Abstracts
 Full text HTML and PDF articles and other scholarly documents
 Citation downloads to reference management systems
 Metadata feeds to third parties
 “How to Cite This” instructions on content pages
 Social networking links
Anywhere users are directed to a permanent, stable, or persistent link to the content</li></li></ul><li>
DOIs for books<br />
Deposit Process<br />Handle<br />Thanks!<br /><journal><br /><journal_metadata><br />  <full_title>Test Publication</full_...
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?><br /> …<br /><timestamp>200706181120</timestamp><br /> …<br /><journal><br /><journ...
Submission log:<br /><?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?><br /><doi_batch_diagnostic status="completed" sp="cr6.crossref...
Machine interfaces<br />The vast majority of transactions are made via a machine interface<br />
Public interface<br />Web deposit formhttp://www.crossref.org/webDeposit/<br />Enter data into form<br />Form generates XM...
Web Deposit Form<br />at: http://www.crossref.org/webDeposit/<br />Accepts deposits for:<br /><ul><li> journals and articles
 books and book chapters
 conference proceedings and conference papers
 reports.</li></li></ul><li>CrossRef system public interface:<br />http://doi.crossref.org<br />
Querying for outbound links<br />Public interfaces:<br />SimpleText Query<br />Guest Query<br />http://doi.crossref.org<br...
SimpleText Query form<br />http://www.crossref.org/SimpleTextQuery<br />
Guest Query form<br />http://www.crossref.org/guestquery<br /> Bibliographic metadata search<br /> Author / title search<b...
Machine interface: HTTP POST or GET<br />Get<br />http://doi.crossref.org/servlet/query?usr=<USR>&pwd=<PWD>&qdata= |%20Nat...
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Introduction to CrossRef for Publishers

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This a non-technical introduction to CrossRef and includes a brief outline of how CrossRef works.

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  • What is it? Digital Object Identifier, alphanumeric string that uniquely identifies an item and where it lives online DOIs can be used to identify things online, basically anything that you can link to (html pages, images, audio, raw data, programs, etc.) Once a DOI has been assigned to an item, the DOI URL (if properly maintained) can remain a consistent locator for the item.
  • Why are DOIs important? They solve the problem of ‘link rot’ i.e. broken links. (image) Broken links are a big problem with online content – titles move from publisher to publisher, publishers upgrade their sites regularly, which usually involves changing URLs.
  • A CrossRef DOI reliably identifies content. If you follow a DOI to an article, for example, you’re assure that the page you view is the publisher maintained version of an article. This is very important, because research articles are corrected, retracted, enhanced regularly.
  • 1. A DOI link consists of two parts: the DOI resolver URL, and the DOI itself.  2. When combined, the DOI is ‘made actionable’, that is, made into a link. 3. When you click on the link, you’re taken to the current URL of the item.The URL for the DOI in this example has been updated 5 times since it was initially deposited in June 2004.  4. We updated our DOI display guidelines in early August – we now ask that DOIs be represented as a link with the http://dx.doi.orgprefix
  • There are a number of DOI RAs, all overseen by the International DOI Foundation. CrossRef is the largest RA – we registered over 90% of the DOIs – at last count the percentage was 96%. We register DOIs for scholarly and professional materials, other RAs assign DOIs to different materials, or use the DOI differently.
  • As of April 2011 there were over 51 million DOIs registered. CrossRef registers a lot of DOIs, now (as of last week) nearing 49 million
  • The majority of CrossRef content is journals but as we grow we’re seeing increases in deposits of other content types, particularly books. The main content types we accept are journals, books, conference proceedings, reports, standards, dissertations, and supplementary materials, but we do have some flexibility so if you want to assign DOIs to a content type not listed here, please ask.
  • Our range is broad chronologically as well – we of course have a significant amount of current content but deposits range back as far as 1665.
  • Publisher members: What does it mean to be a ‘CrossRef Member’ – member obligations outbound reference linking :  Members are required to create outbound DOI links within their references, meaning members must add DOI links (when available) to the reference list for journal articles deposited with CrossRef .deposit all current journal articles: no other content types are required, back files aren’t required, but we encourage themresolve any DOI conflicts: a ‘conflict’ happens when two DOIs share the same metadata, meaning more than one DOI has been assigned to a single item. This can happen for a number of reasons - we provide tools to identify and resolve conflicts.update metadata and URLs: a DOI is only as good as its most recent URL. If your URL changes, the DOI must be updated.Do not publicize CrossRef DOIs until links are liveMake plans for long term archiving: this is new, you need to decide what you’re going to do if you go out of business – there are a number of archiving organizations that are very willing to host journals that have ceased publications (Portico, CLOCKSS, KLB) 
  • In this next section I’m going to go over the different stages of registering and managing CrossRef DOIs. These are presented step-by-step, but this isn’t necessarily the order you need to do things in and don’t view it as a recommended workflow.
  • When you first join CrossRef as a member, you are given a DOI prefix - the DOI consists of two parts: a prefix and a suffix.
  • When creating a suffix, keep it simple. Here are some example suffixes – the DOI is an opaque string intended to remain unique and persistent throughout changes in ownership and location of the content, so you do not need to include any specific or descriptive information in the DOI. Descriptive information is included in the DOI’s metadata. If you choose to include such bibliographic information in a DOI string, it will have no meaning within the CrossRef or DOI system or to end users. To the end user, a DOI is a DOI – the prefix/suffix combination have no meaning, it’s a string of letters and numbers.Existing identifiers can also be used for the DOI suffix, such as an ISBN, or existing internal numbering scheme. We have an allowed character set – any DOIs outside of this character set will not be created.
  • Your journal article, book, report, etc. will need what we call a ‘DOI response page’ which is the page the DOI resolves to. Usually this is the same as the article landing page.A DOI ‘response page’ must include the DOI, bibliographic information about the item, and a means to access full text.In a perfect world, DOIs would be published and deposited with CrossRef spontaneously, but realistically we ask you to keep the gap between publication and deposit within 24 hours.
  • DOIs are required on the DOI response page but we also recommend you include them whenever a persistent link is needed – in your tables of contents, abstracts, citation downloads, metadata feeds, etc. etc. – they’re not just for reference linking.
  • So, here are some examples of DOIs in the wild. Here’s one from PNAS, included with other bibliographic metadata
  • this example is following the new guidelines already, which is excellent
  • And a third example of a title-level book DOI. DOIs can be assigned to both chapters and books.
  • The next steps are the most complex and involve sending and receiving data from CrossRef. You deposit your DOIs and metadata with us, which enables inbound linking, meaning you (and others) are able to use DOIs to link to your content. You also look up DOIs for other publishers and include them in your references as outbound links. I’m going to cover depositing first but Querying and outbound linking can happen at whatever point in your workflow makes sense to you. Depositing:Publishers send in metadata for every DOI they register. We call this process ‘depositing’. We sometimes use the terms ‘deposit’ and ‘register’ interchangeably but they’re slightly different - when a publisher ‘deposits’ a DOI, the metadata is added to the CrossRef database, making the DOI retrievable. The DOI is also registered with the Handle resolver, meaning the DOI and URL only – no citation metadata is recorded by the Handle resolver.  Regarding the deposit process: You send the XML to the CrossRef system, where it is placed in our system’s submission queue. When the submission is processed, CrossRef registers the DOI and URL with the Handle resolver.Immediately after the submission is processed, the system sends you a submission log. This is very important - data is often messy, and we try to keep the messy stuff out of our database, so there are many reasons your submission might fail. Once the DOI has been registered, it is resolvable and queryable, meaning it can be used for linking and can be retrieved from our system by end users.
  • XML must comply with the CrossRef deposit schema – quickly, here’s a sample of an XML deposit – it includes basic journal metadata like title, ISSN, volume issue publication date. Article metadata includes title, authors (all, preferably), page number, and of course the DOI and URL.
  • Submission methods vary from very robust complicated systems to one guy cutting and pasting stuff from Word into our web deposit form (which converts the data to XML). Most deposits are made via machine interfaces. Data is sent to us via HTTP POST – we do have a simple java-based tool that can be used for uploads, it’s available in our help documentation. Many publishers prefer to create their own tools. We do not currently accept FTP deposits.
  • We have one main Public interface for depositing, the web deposit form: enter your metadata field by field into the form. XML will be generated for you and sent to the system
  • This is only suitable for low volume deposits for obvious reasons – someone needs to enter all of the metadata into the form. It’s a good option if you publish infrequently or only publish a small number of articles at a time. It’s also handy if you need to update a single DOI and don’t want to redo an entire deposit. The web deposit form accepts deposits for journals and articles, books and book chapters, conference proceedings and conference papers, and reports.1.Enteryourmetadata field by field into the form, and XML will be generated for you and sent to the system. You first enter basic title-level metadata – for journals, that’s title, ISSN, volume, issue, date – and any title or issue-level DOIs you want to create. Title level DOIs are not required for journals but we recommend them.2. Next, enter item-level metadata, so for example, for a journal you’d enter article title, authors, and page numbers and publication date. It’s in everyone’s best interest if all available metadata is entered, including all authors – it’s easy to just enter one, but entering all increases the chance that members, users, and subscribers will be able to find your DOIs.3. Last step: submit! There’s a tick box for ‘send XML’ which is selected by default – we recommend that you leave this selected.After you hit the ‘submit’ button, an XML file is sent to the system for deposit. Submitting the form doesn’t mean your DOIs have been deposited, it just means they’ve been submitted. When the deposit has been processed, you’ll get an emailed submission log. We also send you a second email containing the XML from your deposit – it can come in handy if you discover errors in your deposit and need to update your metadata –you can edit the XML instead of re-entering everything into the form.Note; You can also upload single NLM files to this interface
  • We do have a public interface to our system which can be used to upload deposit and query files. This is where you’d go if you needed to resubmit an XML file generated by the web deposit form.
  • Query CrossRef to retrieve DOI matches for outbound linking: meaning you need to search our database for DOI matches for your journal articles. Outbound linking is required for recent journal articles but we encourage publishers to link references for back issues and other content types as well, since it strengthens the linking network for everyone.Public interface: STQ – again, suitable only for low volume querying. The STQ form basically breaks your citatons into XML , then submits the XML to our system as a query.XML / bulk querying: if you are able to separate your citations to fit our schema, XML querying is the way to go – we have a number of methods you can use for querying. You can upload bulk XML queries, poll the system using XML queries, or do OpenURL queries.
  • To use, cut-and-paste a list of citations into the form and…
  • Your list will be returned to you with any DOI matches.
  •  We also have a ‘guest query’ form which provides a number of single-DOI searches. It’s not a tool you’d want to use for bulk querying, but it’s an excellent resource for testing out queries. It’s a good practice to query for your own DOIs, just to make sure they are discoverable. The GQ has a ‘bibliographic metadata search’, which allows you to enter fielded metadata into the form  There’s also an author/title search, which can be useful if you don’t have full article metadata Next, there’s a formatted reference parser, you can enter a single reference here – for multiple references you’ll need to use the STQ There is a DOI-to-metadata query, you enter a DOI and get back the metadata  You’re also able to submit an XML query – this is quite handy for troubleshooting and testing, we’ve got several options for controlling query execution so it’s pretty easy to just cut and paste a query into the box and edit it on the fly.
  • Here is another example of outbound linking - this publisher is including the full DOI url in their references, making it very easy to cut and paste etc. This is recommended in our new DOI guidelines…
  • The complete guidelines are on our website, there’s a link, I’ve included the different reference linking options here. 1. uses the complete DOI link in the referenceGhosh, M.K., M.L. Harter. 2003. A viral mechanism for remodeling chromatin structure in G0 cells. Mol. Cell. 12:255–260, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1097-2765(03)00225-9  2.—Use a ShortDOI as the permanent link - a ShortDOI is a shortcut DOI name - if you find yourself in possession of a long DOI that adds extra lines to your references or is otherwise difficult to represent, you can create a shortcut using the shortDOI service at http://shortdoi.org/ ExampleGhosh, M.K., M.L. Harter. 2003. A viral mechanism for remodeling chromatin structure in G0 cells. Mol. Cell. 12:255–260, http://doi.org/bm6 3—Displays the CrossRef linking graphic next to the permanent DOI link.Linking graphics can be found on the member logo page. ExampleGhosh, M.K., M.L. Harter. 2003. A viral mechanism for remodeling chromatin structure in G0 cells. Mol. Cell. 12:255–260 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1097-2765(03)00225-9 4—Display the CrossRef linking graphic with the permanent URL behind it, so if you click on the graphic you resolve the DOILinking graphics can be found on the member logo page. ExampleGhosh, M.K., M.L. Harter. 2003. A viral mechanism for remodeling chromatin structure in G0 cells. Mol. Cell. 12:255–260  5—Display the text “CrossRef” with a permanent DOI link behind the text  ExampleGhosh, M.K., M.L. Harter. 2003. A viral mechanism for remodeling chromatin structure in G0 cells. Mol. Cell. 12:255–260, CrossRef. 6—Display the words “Full Text” or “Article” or something similar with the permanent DOI link behind the text. ExampleGhosh, M.K., M.L. Harter. 2003. A viral mechanism for remodeling chromatin structure in G0 cells. Mol. Cell. 12:255–260, Article.  So, once your DOIs have been included in your references, you’re done! Until the next issue. Or unless there are problems..
  • Making changes: for the most part, if the metadata you send us is thorough and accurate, DOIs don’t need to be touched. There are some circumstances that require attention - Common changes are:Updating URLs: this is the most frequent change, for obvious reasons. If you make changes to your site or acquire DOIs from another publisher, DOIs can be updated easily by either:Redepositing your metadata with the new URLs – the metadata in our system will be overwrittenSending support@crossref.org a tab separated list of DOIs and their new URLs. These updates can usually be processed within 24 hours (excluding weekends). If you have a large number of DOIs to update (say over 100,000) contact us in advance and we can give you an estimate of the time involved.Changing metadata: if you’ve discovered errors in your metadata or otherwise need to make an update, redeposit your metadata with the changes – any deposits already in the system will be overwritten, so make sure the redeposit is complete. For example, if you deposit your DOIs with an online publication date before the item has been published in print, you can update the metadata once the print info is available. There is no charge for updating your DOIs – we encourage you to update them as often as you like.
  • If you have titles that have gone through name changes, you’ll need to pay attention to our title management policies.Titles in the CrossRef system are created from publisher metadata with the first deposit of a journal. Title and ISSN combinations are not verified with an external agency. A check digit validation is performed on every ISSN submitted in a deposit. Once a title or ISSN is introduced into the CrossRef system, a new publication with the same title or ISSN cannot be created without CrossRef intervention. The publisher determines the exact title and ISSN included in the deposit. At least one ISSN is required for each journal deposited with CrossRef, but publishers are encouraged to deposit all ISSN available for a title. If you are depositing a series that predates ISSNs, they can be assigned retroactively – there’s no charge for assigning ISSNs.The title / ISSN combination in your deposit must match the title / ISSN combination in our system. We do allow for minor variances, like Journal of… vs. The Journal of… or mixing and and &amp;Publishers requesting significant changes to a title are instructed to request a new ISSN from the appropriate agency. This isn’t a CrossRef policy, it’s an ISSN Centre policy and is actively supported by the Library of Congress (for those of you in the US)5. Journals should be deposited with the correct title – sometimes journals appear online under the most current title. We really need to make sure that the title in our database is the original title, since that title will be used in citations, which turn into CrossRef queries. We can add multiple versions of a title to a title record to help with querying, but it’s important that DOIs be attached to the correct title.
  • The Resolution Report is emailed monthly to the business contact we have on file. This report is comprised of statistics we extract from DOI resolution logs and contains data about how many times your DOIs have been clicked and your overall resolution failure rate (successes vs. failures)More info: http://www.crossref.org/help/CrossRef_Help_CSH.htm#03_The%20CrossRef%20user%20interfaces/07_Reports/Resolution_Report.htm
  • Depositor reports are generated for journals, books and conference proceedings – the report lists all titles and DOIs for each publisher. The report is linked from the members page (http://www.crossref.org/06members/index.html) under Technical Info
  • The status page is in the members area as well and lists statistics about CrossRef DOIs as a whole including the total number of DOIs deposited overall and for each content type, and statistics about deposits and query success rates.
  • This is another members area report – it lists prefix data for all members.
  • Conflict report: this report is linked through the members area. Alerts are also sent out monthly to technical contacts when you have conflicts to resolve. If you don’t have any conflicts, you won’t get this report. Again, conflicts are what happens when two DOIs are created with the same metadata.  More info on conflicts: http://www.crossref.org/help/CrossRef_Help_CSH.htm#06_Maintaining%20DOIs/Resolving_conflicts/Resolving_conflicts.htm
  • This report is emailed as needed to the technical contact. These alerts are compiled from complaints about unresolving DOIs submitted to us by end users. If an end user tries to resolve a DOI that has not been registered, they are delivered to a form that they can submit to us with comments and their email address. When the DOI has been registered, we send them an alert. Any comments are passed on to publishers.
  • We also have something called the Schematron report –Schematronis a validation language. These reports are used to identify messy metadata We need to be flexible and accommodate variances in data, so our deposit schema can’t keep all of the questionable data out without blocking good data as well, so we do a post-deposit review of metadata and pick out items that we think might be incorrect. These reports are emailed out weekly on Saturday, and we send out an average of 45 reports a week.
  • Here’s an idea of what we consider ‘messy data’ – the schematron report identified that the #1 most common problem was including ‘JR’ in the surname field. This is a big deal, since author surnames are weighted heavily in querying – we do some fuzzy matching, but it’s very probably that a surname like ‘Smith JR’ wont’ be matched. As you can see, we also get a lot of deposits with garbage in the surname, like footnote remnants – it really can make the difference between someone finding your DOI and not finding it.
  • Here’s an example of what the actual schematron report looks like
  • Cited-by linking: http://www.crossref.org/citedby/index.html CMS: http://www.crossref.org/metadata_services.htmlCrossCheck: http://www.crossref.org/crosscheck/index.html CrossMark: http://www.crossref.org/crossmark/index.html
  • We also have a separate ‘labs’ website for more experimental efforts – these aren’t considered in production so while they are generally reliable I need to tell you to use them at your own risk. The labs offers browser plugins that make it easy to cite using DOIs, tools for adding linked images or CrossRef metadata to PDFs, and an experimental CrossRef metadata search interface.
  •  
  • Introduction to CrossRef for Publishers

    1. 1. Introduction to<br />for publishers<br />Patricia Feeney<br />Product Support Manager<br />
    2. 2. Agenda<br /><ul><li>CrossRef overview
    3. 3. Creating and working with CrossRef DOIs
    4. 4. Maintaining your DOIs and metadata
    5. 5. CrossRef services
    6. 6. Resources</li></li></ul><li>mission statement:<br />CrossRef's goal is to be a trusted collaborative organization with broad community connections; authoritative and innovative in support of a persistent, sustainable infrastructure for scholarly communication.<br />
    7. 7. ?<br />Why do publishers join?<br /><ul><li> To get persistent identifiers for their content
    8. 8. To drive more traffic to their content
    9. 9. To turn references into hyperlinks
    10. 10. To pull in cited-by links (who cites this?)
    11. 11. Participate in other collaborative services (CrossCheck, CrossMark)</li></li></ul><li>DOI = Digital Object Identifier<br />
    12. 12. Broken links are a problem<br />
    13. 13. A DOI uniquely identifies a piece of electronic content<br />
    14. 14. http://dx.doi.org/ + DOI = persistent URL<br />http://dx.doi.org/10.1577/H02-043<br />http://dx.doi.org//10.1577/H02-043<br />
    15. 15. International DOI Foundation (IDF): oversees the central DOI system, promote DOI as a standard, and provides an organizational infrastructure that ensures persistence and interoperability.<br />Corporation for National Research Initiatives (CNRI):they (among other things) are responsible for the Handle system, which is the technology that causes DOIs to resolve.<br />Registration Agencies (RAs): Register DOIs on behalf of other organizations. CrossRef is a RA.<br />
    16. 16. DOI Registration agencies<br />European Union Office of Publications<br />TIB (TechnischeInformationsbibliotek)<br />R.R. Bowker<br />Nielsen Bookdata<br />Copyright Agency Limited (CAL)<br />mEDRA<br />Wanfang Data<br />DataCite<br />CrossRef<br />
    17. 17. 10.1016/j.lwt.2008.02.010 10.3113/FAI.2008.0185 10.1037/07357028.38.4.338.supp 10.1016/j.diabet.2007.11.004 10.1139/Z07-115 10.1016/j.foreco.2008.01.033 10.1016/j.coph.2008.01.007 10.1109/ISBI.2007.357057 10.1016/j.jcis.2008.01.049 10.1016/j.aorn.2007.12.029 10.1097/HJR.0b013e3282f29aa6 10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2007.12.144 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2008.02.009 10.1016/j.jfs.2007.12.003 10.1177/0278364907085562 10.1016/j.jip.2008.02.011 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2007.10.008 10.1016/j.talanta.2008.02.043 10.1080/1055678031000152079 10.1111/j.1538-7836.2008.02908.x 10.1016/j.cep.2008.01.011 10.1016/j.physletb.2008.03.004 10.1016/j.cytogfr.2008.01.004 10.1006/S0003-2670(03)00575-0 10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9445(1993)119:12(3537) 10.1016/j.orggeochem.2008.03.001 10.1016/j.jce.2008.03.001 10.1097/YIC.0b013e3282f2d42c 10.1016/j.jmmm.2008.02.146 10.2223/JPED.1758 10.1016/j.jns.2008.01.016 10.1109/ISBI.2007.356995 10.1007/3-540-48311-X 10.1016/S0168-583X(97)00553-3 10.1029/2007GL090712 10.1016/j.biombioe.2008.02.002 10.1038/sj.ijo.0801704 10.1111/j.1600-0714.2007.00624.x 10.1016/j.jchemneu.2008.02.007 10.1016/S0021-8502(97)00109-2 10.1016/j.tet.2008.02.077 10.1016/j.yhbeh.2008.02.020 10.1029/2007SW000355 10.1016/j.forsciint.2008.01.009 10.1111/j.1365-2044.2007.05319. 10.1016/j.csr.2008.02.009 10.1016/j.physleta.2008.02.040 10.1016/j.poly.2007.12.031 10.1016/j.biocon.2007.12.030 10.1016/j.eurpsy.2007.11.005 10.3390/molecules130100 10.1016/j.cam.2008.02.015 10.1016/j.nuclphysbps.2007.11.105 10.1007/s12282-008-0037-0 10.1016/j.colsurfa.2008.02.018 10.1016/j.colsurfa.2008.02.018 10.1111/j.1399-6576.2007.01461.x 10.1021/la7032753 10.1111/j.1432-0436.2007.00257.x 10.1109/QSIC.2007.4385520 10.1016/j.nimb.2008.03.025 10.1016/j.nimb.2008.03.028 10.1016/j.nimb.2008.03.036 10.1017/SO266467405003056 10.1016/j.agrformet.2008.01.004 10.1016/j.agee.2008.01.003 10.1016/j.cortex.2008.03.001 10.1016/j.jtbi.2008.02.023 10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2008.03.003 10.1016/j.actamat.2007.12.057 10.1016/j.paed.2007.12.008 10.1016/j.canlet.2008.01.034 10.1016/j.molcata.2008.03.002 10.1016/j.apenergy.2008.01.002 10.1111/j.1365-2044.2007.05262.x 10.1016/j.seares.2008.02.004 10.1016/j.expneurol.2008.02.013 10.1016/j.ica.2008.02.064 10.1080/10242420701379866 10.1016/j.trstmh.2008.01.002 10.1043/0012-9658(1975)056[0511:TMGS]2.0.CO;2 10.1016/j.biortech.2008.01.006 10.1016/j.pedex.2008.01.005 10.1016/j.jsv.2007.07.090 10.1016/j.jomh.2007.11.003 10.1016/j.brainresrev.2008.02.004 10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2008.01.007 10.1111/j.1365-2621.2006.01425.x 10.1080/87565640701376151 10.1016/j.jcpa.2007.11.004 10.1016/j.jala.2007.12.008 10.1016/j.smallrumres.2007.12.023 10.1016/j.eja.2008.01.006 10.1002/(SICI)1096-8644(199708)103:4<507::AID-AJPA8>3.0.CO 10.1007/s12033-008-9055-6 10.1016/j.ijoa.2008.01.005 10.1016/j.rmed.2008.01.004 10.1016/j.compenvurbsys.2007.11.003 10.1016/j.atmosenv.2008.02.031 10.1021/b608262a 10.1016/j.jss.2007.04.049 10.1016/j.rbmret.2007.10.001 10.1097/01.CCM.0000298158.12101.41 10.1016/j.foodchem.2008.01.051 10.1016/j.irfa.2008.02.004 10.1016/j.csr.2008.02.013 10.1016/j.foodchem.2008.01.014 10.1007/978-3-8350-9310- 10.1016/j.nuclphysbps.2007.11.109 10.1146/annurev.celibio.22.011105.102609 10.1016/j.radphyschem.2008.02.010 10.1016/j.chemgeo.2007.12.007 10.1016/j.smallrumres.2007.12.025 10.1016/j.mpdhp.2007.12.003 10.1038 10.1016/j.tiv.2008.01.013 10.1186/1471-2105-9-141 10.1097/WNR.0b013e3282f3476f 10.1016/j.destud.2007.12.006 10.1013/j.bjps/2007.11.011 10.1016/j.fbp.2008.01.001 10.1016/j.jomh.2007.12.004 10.1016/j.actamat.2007.12.036 10.1109/SECON.2007.342869 10.1016/j.ejmech.2008.02.027 10.1016/j.still.2008.01.009 10.1890/060162 10.1016/j.epsr.2007.11.002 10.2514/1.27866 10.1155/2008/483857 10.1016/j.measurement.2008.02.009 10.2466/PRO.101.3.970-978 10.1016/j.ab.2008.03.006 10.1213/01.ane.0000295230.55439.f4 10.1017/S095410200600037X 10.1146/annurev.genom.7.0805.115737 10.1016/j.anl.2007.12.006 10.1016/j.aorl.2007.10.004 10.1016/j.cca.2008.02.021 10.1016/j.cplett.2008.03.001 10.1016/j.na.2008.02.061 10.1111/j.1365-2524.2007.00722.x 10.1016/j.molcata.2008.03.002 10.1016/j.cag.2005.05.010. 10.1109/ICNSC.2007.372901 10.1111/j.1525-142X.2007.00195.x 10.1007/BF02845227 10.1016/j.landusepol.2008.01.001 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2008.02.057 10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2007.12.013 10.1007/s11450-008-2014-7 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19990515)85:10<2114::AID-CNCR3>3.0.CO;2-U 10.1016/j.archger.2008.01.009 10.1111/j.1552-6569.2007.00179.x 10.1016/j.postharvbio.2007.12.005 10.1016/j.clim.2007.12.010 10.1016/j.jhin.2007.12.012 10.1038/417304a 10.1016/j.jfluidstructs.2007.10.004 10.1016/j.apal.2008.01.001 10.1080/00497870701870285 10.1109/TMI.2007.906091 10.1042/BST0360114 10.1016/j.enggeo.2007.11.005 10.1016/j.tig.2008.01.005 10.1111/j.1750-3639.2007.00121.x 10.1016/j.cbi.2008.02.012 10.1016/j.mpdhp.2007.12.001 10.1016/j.tra.2007.12.002 10.1029/JD007393 10.1016/j.cpc.2008.02.013 10.1111/j.0022-202X.2005.23909.x 10.1016/j.aorn.2007.12.001 10.1111/j.1399-6576.2007.01521.x 10.1016/j.biocon.2008.01.011 10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2008.01.031 10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2008.03.001 10.1016/j.indmarman.2008.01.001 10.1007/s12230-008-9004-8 10.1016/j.automatica.2007.12.010 10.1016/j.aorl.2007.11.003 10.1002/anie.200705516 10.1111/j.1745-7262.2008.00333.x 10.1016/j.nima.2008.02.065 10.1021/brn700468f 10.1002/esq.1066 10.1016/j.ntt.2008.02.003 10.1016/j.jviromet.2008.01.025 10.1111/j.1708-8305.2007.00164.x 10.1016/j.tcs.2008.03.006 10.1016/j.jspi.2008.02.007 10.1016/j.jspi.2008.02.007 10.1016/j.biocel.2008.02.021 10.1016/j.chemphyslip.2008.02.011 10.1016/j.biocel.2008.02.026 10.1016/j.critrevonc.2008.01.002 10.1016/j.biocel.2008.02.026 10.1163/156854088X00212 10.1043/E-21 10.1016/j.epsl.2008.02.035 10.1016/j.fluid.2008.01.021 10.1016/j.compag.2008.01.009 10.1128/JCM.43.5.2274–2276.2005 10.1016/j.jeurceramsoc.2007.11.003 10.1016/j.enggeo.2008.02.005 10.1016/j.ode.2006.11.002 10.1002/(SICI)1098-1063(1998)8:3<198::AID-HIPO2>3.0.CO;2-G 10.1109/QELS.1996.865586 10.1016/j.forsciint.2007.11.010 10.3390/molecules13010003 10.1111/j.1552-6569.2007.00175.x 10.1016/j.jallcom.2008.01.045 10.1016/j.jsg.2008.02.017 10.1016/j.nimb.2008.03.037 QELS.1996.865586 10.1016/j.forsciint.2007.11.010 10.3390/molecules13010003 10.1111/j.1552-6569.2007.00175.x 10.1016/j.jallcom.2008.01.045 10.1016/j.jsg.2008.02.017 10.1016/j.nimb.2008.03.037 QELS.1996.865586 10.1016/j.forsciint.2007.11.010 10.3390/molecules13010003 10.1111/j.1552-6569.2007.00175.x 10.1016/j.jallcom.2008.01.045 10.1016/j.jsg.2008.02.017 10.1016/j.nimb.2008.03.037QELS.1996.865586 10.1016/j.forsciint.2007.11.010 10.3390/molecules13010003 10.1111/j.1552-6569.2007.00175.x 10.1016/j.jallcom.2008.01.045 10.1016/j.jsg.2008.02.017 10.1016/j.nimb.2008.03.037QELS.1996.865586 10.1016/j.forsciint.2007.11.010 10.3390/molecules13010003 10.1111/j.1552-6569.2007.00175.x 10.1016/j.jallcom.2008.01.045 10.1016/j.jsg.2008.02.017 10.1016/j.nimb.2008.03.037QELS.1996.865586 10.1016/j.forsciint.2007.11.010 10.3390/molecules13010003 10.1111/j.1552-6569.2007.00175.x 10.1016/j.jallcom.2008.01.045 10.1016/j.jsg.2008.02.017 10.1016/j.nimb.2008.03.037QELS.1996.865586 10.1016/j.forsciint.2007.11.010 10.3390/molecules13010003 10.1111/j.1552-6569.2007.00175.x 10.1016/j.jallcom.2008.01.045 10.1016/j.jsg.2008.02.017 10.1016/j.nimb.2008.03.037QELS.1996.865586 10.1016/j.forsciint.2007.11.010 10.3390/molecules13010003 10.1111/j.1552-6569.2007.00175.x 10.1016/j.jallcom.2008.01.045 10.1016/j.jsg.2008.02.017 10.1016/j.nimb.2008.03.037<br />=<br />
    18. 18. Content beyond journals…<br />Books<br />Standards<br />Proceedings<br />Images<br />Figures<br />Datasets<br />Working papers<br />Dissertations<br />
    19. 19. Linking 5 centuries of content <br />1665<br />
    20. 20. Member obligations:<br /> outbound reference linking<br /> deposit all current journal articles<br /> resolve any DOI conflicts<br /> update metadata and URLs<br /> do not publicize CrossRef DOIs until links are live<br /> make plans for long term archiving<br />
    21. 21. Step-by-step<br />
    22. 22. Suffix:<br /><ul><li> Unique within a prefix – a DOI can only be assigned to one item
    23. 23. Consistent
    24. 24. Logical
    25. 25. Easily documented
    26. 26. Readily implemented</li></ul>Prefix:<br /> Assigned to members <br /> Format is 10.XXXX<br /> Identifies who intially created the DOI<br /> Prefix does not identify the current owner of the DOI<br />
    27. 27. Creating a DOI Suffix<br />Keep it simple:<br />10.5664/sleep.1000<br />10.3183/NPPRJ-1986-01-03-p004-013<br />10.3103/S0005105507050032<br />10.4260/BJFT20094508 <br />10.1632/074069503X85526<br />Allowed characters:<br />"a-z", "A-Z", "0-9" and "-._;()/”<br />Establishing a suffix pattern: <br />http://www.crossref.org/help/CrossRef_Help_CSH.htm#02_Getting_started/Establishing_a_DOI_suffix_pattern.htm<br />
    28. 28. Publish DOI response page<br />Response page must include:<br /> bibliographic information about the item<br /> means to access full text<br /> the DOI<br />New DOI Display guidelines!<br />http://www.crossref.org/02publishers/doi_display_guidelines.html<br />CrossRef DOIs should always be displayed as permanent URLs in the online environment.<br />YES: http://dx.doi.org/10.5555/imadoi<br />NO: doi: 10.5555/imadoi<br />
    29. 29. DOIs are required on the response page, recommended on other pages:<br /><ul><li>Tables of contents
    30. 30. Abstracts
    31. 31. Full text HTML and PDF articles and other scholarly documents
    32. 32. Citation downloads to reference management systems
    33. 33. Metadata feeds to third parties
    34. 34. “How to Cite This” instructions on content pages
    35. 35. Social networking links
    36. 36. Anywhere users are directed to a permanent, stable, or persistent link to the content</li></li></ul><li>
    37. 37.
    38. 38. DOIs for books<br />
    39. 39. Deposit Process<br />Handle<br />Thanks!<br /><journal><br /><journal_metadata><br /> <full_title>Test Publication</full_title><br /> <abbrev_title>T27P</abbrev_title><br /> <issnmedia_type='print'>99999999</issn><br /></journal_metadata><br /><journal_issue><br /> <publication_datemedia_type='print'><br /> <month>5</month><br /> <day>5</day><br /> <year>2001</year><br /> </publication_date><br /> <journal_volume><br />Researcher <br />Where is my DOI?<br />submission<br />Publisher who did not review <br />their submission log<br />CMS subscriber<br />Member querying for <br />outbound links<br />
    40. 40. <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?><br /> …<br /><timestamp>200706181120</timestamp><br /> …<br /><journal><br /><journal_metadata><br /> <full_title>American Journal of Meetings<br /></full_title><br /> <abbrev_title>Am J Meet</abbrev_title><br /> <issnmedia_type='print'>4445-6767</issn><br /></journal_metadata><br /><journal_issue><br /> <publication_datemedia_type='print'><br /> <month>5</month><br /> <day>5</day><br /> <year>2001</year><br /> </publication_date><br /> <journal_volume><br /> <volume>33</volume><br /> </journal_volume><br /> <issue>1</issue><br /></journal_issue><br /> <journal_articlepublication_type='full_text'><br /> <titles> <title>Lets have a meeting</title></titles><br /> <contributors><br /> <person_name sequence='first' contributor_role='author'><br /> <given_name>Bob</given_name> <br /> <surname>Surname</surname><br /> </person_name><br /> <publication_datemedia_type='print'><br /> <month>5</month> <day>9</day> <year>2001</year><br /> </publication_date><br /> <pages><br /> <first_page>100</first_page><last_page>200</last_page><br /> </pages><br /> <doi_data><br /> <doi>10.50505/test_200704082300</doi><br /> <resource>http://www.crossref.org/</resource><br /> </doi_data><br /> … <br />
    41. 41. Submission log:<br /><?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?><br /><doi_batch_diagnostic status="completed" sp="cr6.crossref.org"><br /> <submission_id>426240380</submission_id><br /> <batch_id>12009_DOIs_unreg_2007-09-21</batch_id> <record_diagnostic status="Success"><br /> <doi>10.1385/AO:38:1:8</doi><br /> <msg>Success</msg><br /> </record_diagnostic><br /> <record_diagnostic status="Failure" msg_id="22"><br /> <doi>all doi's of the current journal element</doi><br /> <msg>ISSN "15304086" has already been assigned to a different title/publisher/genre</msg><br /> </record_diagnostic><br /> <record_diagnostic status="Warning"><br /> <doi>10.3386/w11255</doi><br /> <msg>Addedwith conflict</msg><br /> <conflict_id>354709</conflict_id><br /> <dois_in_conflict><br /> <doi>10.1596/1813-9450-3622</doi><br /> </dois_in_conflict><br /> </record_diagnostic><br /><batch_data><br /> <record_count>3</record_count><br /> <success_count>1</success_count><br /> <warning_count>1</warning_count><br /> <failure_count>1</failure_count><br /></batch_data><br /></doi_batch_diagnostic><br /><batch_data><br /> <record_count>3</record_count><br /> <success_count>1</success_count><br /> <warning_count>1</warning_count><br /> <failure_count>1</failure_count><br /></batch_data><br />More info:<br />http://www.crossref.org/help/CrossRef_Help_CSH.htm#03_The%20CrossRef%20user%20interfaces/07_Reports/System/Interpreting_reports.htm<br />
    42. 42. Machine interfaces<br />The vast majority of transactions are made via a machine interface<br />
    43. 43. Public interface<br />Web deposit formhttp://www.crossref.org/webDeposit/<br />Enter data into form<br />Form generates XML and sends it to the system<br />DOI is deposited (or not, be sure to check your submission log)<br />
    44. 44. Web Deposit Form<br />at: http://www.crossref.org/webDeposit/<br />Accepts deposits for:<br /><ul><li> journals and articles
    45. 45. books and book chapters
    46. 46. conference proceedings and conference papers
    47. 47. reports.</li></li></ul><li>CrossRef system public interface:<br />http://doi.crossref.org<br />
    48. 48. Querying for outbound links<br />Public interfaces:<br />SimpleText Query<br />Guest Query<br />http://doi.crossref.org<br />Machine interfaces:<br />HTTP POST or GET<br />OpenURL<br />OAI-PMH (for CMS subscribers)<br />
    49. 49. SimpleText Query form<br />http://www.crossref.org/SimpleTextQuery<br />
    50. 50.
    51. 51.
    52. 52. Guest Query form<br />http://www.crossref.org/guestquery<br /> Bibliographic metadata search<br /> Author / title search<br /> Formatted reference parsing<br /> DOI-to-metadata Query <br /> Build an XML Query<br />
    53. 53. Machine interface: HTTP POST or GET<br />Get<br />http://doi.crossref.org/servlet/query?usr=<USR>&pwd=<PWD>&qdata= |%20Natl%20Acad.%20Sci.%20USA|Zhou|94|24|13215|1997|||<br />%0A|.%20Biol.|Hagerman|260|||1996|||<br />POST /servlet/query?usr=secret&pwd=passwerd&format=unixref HTTP/1.1<br />Host: doi.crossref.org<br />Connection: Keep-Alive, TE<br />TE: trailers, deflate, gzip, compress<br />User-Agent: RPT-HTTPClient/0.3-3<br />Accept-Encoding: deflate, gzip, x-gzip, compress, x-compress<br />Content-type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded<br />Content-length: 560<br />==== Body 560 bytes<br />Body => usr=<USR><br />Body => &pwd=<PWD><br />Body => &qdata=%3C%3Fxml+version+%3D+%221.0%22+encoding%3D%22UTF-8%22%3F%3E%3Cquery_batch+version%3D%222.0%22<br />ns+%3D+%22http%3A%2F%2Fwww.crossref.org%2Fqschema%2F2.0%22+xmlns%3Axsi%3D%22http%3A%2F%2Fwww.w3.org%2F2001%2FXMLSchema-instance%<br />E%3Chead%3E%3Cemail_address%3Eckoscher%40crossref.org%3C%2Femail_address%3E%3Cdoi_batch_id%3Ew001%3C%2Fdoi_batch_id%3E%3C%2Fhead<br />3Cbody%3E%3Cquery+key%3D%22555-555%22+expanded-results%3D%22true%22%3E%3Cdoi%3E10.1103%2FPhysRevD.7.2467%3C%2Fdoi%3E+%3C%2Fquery<br />3C%2Fbody%3E%3C%2Fquery_batch%3E%0A<br />==== <br />Post<br />XML<br />Query help:<br />http://www.crossref.org/help/CrossRef_Help_CSH.htm#04_Queries_and_retrieving/CrossRef%20Data%20Formats.htm<br />
    54. 54. Next – add outbound links to references<br />
    55. 55. Outbound linking with http://dx.doi.org/<br />
    56. 56. New guidelines<br />http://www.crossref.org/02publishers/doi_display_guidelines.html<br />Ghosh, M.K., M.L. Harter. 2003. A viral mechanism for remodeling chromatin structure in G0 cells. Mol. Cell. 12:255–260, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1097-2765(03)00225-9 <br />Ghosh, M.K., M.L. Harter. 2003. A viral mechanism for remodeling chromatin structure in G0 cells. Mol. Cell. 12:255–260, http://doi.org/bm6<br />Ghosh, M.K., M.L. Harter. 2003. A viral mechanism for remodeling chromatin structure in G0 cells. Mol. Cell. 12:255–260 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1097-2765(03)00225-9<br />Ghosh, M.K., M.L. Harter. 2003. A viral mechanism for remodeling chromatin structure in G0 cells. Mol. Cell. 12:255–260 <br />Ghosh, M.K., M.L. Harter. 2003. A viral mechanism for remodeling chromatin structure in G0 cells. Mol. Cell. 12:255–260, CrossRef.<br />Ghosh, M.K., M.L. Harter. 2003. A viral mechanism for remodeling chromatin structure in G0 cells. Mol. Cell. 12:255–260, Article.<br />
    57. 57. Maintaining DOIs and Metadata<br />URL updateH:email=pfeeney@crossref.org;fromPrefix=10.5555;toPrefix=10.555510.5555/doi1 http://www.yoururl.com/journal/art110.5555/doi2 http://www.yoururl.com/journal/art210.5555/doi2 http://www.yoururl.com/journal/art12<br />Updating metadata<br />To make changes to your metadata, resubmit your entire deposit<br />There is no charge for updating your DOIs – we <br />encourage you to update them as often as needed.<br />
    58. 58. Maintaining Journal Titles<br /> Title and ISSN combinations are determined by the publisher. <br /> A valid ISSN is required for all journal titles<br /> The title / ISSN combination in your deposit must match the title / ISSN combination in our system.<br /> If a title changes, a new ISSN is required<br /> Journals should be deposited under the original title<br />Title list: http://www.crossref.org/titleList/<br />
    59. 59. Reports<br />Recurring or static reports:<br /><ul><li>Resolution Report
    60. 60. Deposit Report
    61. 61. Missing Metadata Report
    62. 62. Status Report
    63. 63. Go-live report
    64. 64. Title list</li></ul>As-needed reports:<br /><ul><li>Conflict
    65. 65. DOI Error Report
    66. 66. Schematron Report</li></ul>Coming soon:<br />New system reports!<br />
    67. 67. Resolution Report<br />
    68. 68. Depositor Report<br />oror<br />
    69. 69. Deposit report detail<br />
    70. 70. Missing Metadata report<br />
    71. 71. Status Report<br />
    72. 72. Go-live report<br />
    73. 73. Conflict reports<br />
    74. 74. <ul><li> compiled from reports submitted by end users
    75. 75. emailed nightly to technical contact</li></ul>DOI Error report<br />Reasons for DOI Error:<br /><ul><li> a DOI was been published but not deposited
    76. 76. the published DOI does not match the deposited DOI
    77. 77. a DOI was deposited but does not resolve to the correct item
    78. 78. the end user misinterpreted or mistyped a DOI (i.e. confusing 1 for l or 0 for O) </li></li></ul><li>Schematron report<br />Schematron reports notify depositors of non-fatal deposit issues<br /><ul><li>35-40 emails sent out weekly
    79. 79. Alerts are generated for < 1% of deposits
    80. 80. Tend to identify ‘messy’ deposits
    81. 81. Rules updated periodically</li></li></ul><li>Schematron Warnings<br />Jr. in surname:<br />AraújoJr<br />Prata Jr.<br />Szezech Jr.<br />Punctuation in surname:<br />(Earven) Tribble<br />Frederick (Frikkie) J.<br />Arch Marin march@ub.edu<br />Plauchu********<br />Other rules:<br /><ul><li> ‘ed’ ‘iss’ ‘vol’ in edition, issue, volume elements
    82. 82. Publication year exceeds current year by >2
    83. 83. Surname / title all upper case</li></li></ul><li>
    84. 84. Powered by iThenticate<br />Services<br />Cited-by linking<br />Metadata feeds to third parties<br />Plagiarism screening<br />Version verification<br />
    85. 85. http://labs.crossref.org/<br /><ul><li>Plugins for Moveable Type and Wordpress
    86. 86. Experimental search interfaces
    87. 87. PDF tools
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