TO7_Elephants_0645589

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My presentation is about elephants, their lifestyle and their contributions to the international underground economy. Captive and wild elephants alike are threatened by endangerment, and this presentation will serve to raise awareness of this problem.

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TO7_Elephants_0645589

  1. 1. The wild, the captive, and the unfortunate tricks of the trade.
  2. 2. <ul><li>Elephants are the largest land animals on Earth </li></ul><ul><li>They have the largest brains amongst the animal kingdom </li></ul><ul><li>Elephants once populated the WHOLE of Africa </li></ul><ul><li>Can live up to 70 years of age </li></ul><ul><li>Spend most of their day eating; their daily intake is about 4-7% of their bodyweight </li></ul>
  3. 4. <ul><li>The African Elephant ( Loxodonta africana ) </li></ul><ul><li>4000-7000 kg </li></ul><ul><li>More wrinkled </li></ul><ul><li>Bigger ears </li></ul><ul><li>Both males and females have tusks </li></ul><ul><li>Eat mainly leaves </li></ul><ul><li>The Indian/Asian Elephant ( Elephas Maximus ) </li></ul><ul><li>3000-6000 kg </li></ul><ul><li>Smoother </li></ul><ul><li>Smaller ears </li></ul><ul><li>Only males have tusks, females usually don’t </li></ul><ul><li>Eat mainly grass </li></ul>
  4. 5. <ul><li>Most wild life experts consider that elephants are an endangered species. They are protected by the African Elephant Conservation Act and the Endangered Species Act. The ivory trade and diminishing habitats are the greatest threats to Elephants. Like many endangered species around the world, the biggest threat to elephants is man, including poachers. Throughout the 1980s, ivory was trading for over $100 per pound, making it an attractive commodity to subsistence farmers, cash-strapped governments, and revolutionaries trying to finance troops. As a result, African elephant populations—estimated at 3 million to 5 million in the early 1900s — plummeted at the hands of poachers. </li></ul>
  5. 8. There are an approximate 600, 000 African Elephants compared to only about 60, 000 Asian Elephants, in today’s world.
  6. 9. Both African and Asian elephants are under threat from poachers who kill them for their ivory tusks. Fortunately today's world is more aware of the impact of ivory poaching and smuggling. An international five-year moratorium on ivory trading was agreed in 1989. More recent methods to track elephants and fight poaching involve 'fingerprinting' their footprints and ear patterns.
  7. 10. <ul><li>1. http://www.eleaid.com/index.php?page=elephantfacts </li></ul><ul><li>(slide 2) </li></ul><ul><li>2. http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/a </li></ul><ul><li>frican-elephant.html (slide 4) </li></ul><ul><li>3. http://www.riverdeep.net (slide 8) </li></ul><ul><li>4. http://www.ivorytrade.com/jsy/ (slide 9) </li></ul><ul><li>5. www.nationalwildlife.org (pictures on slides 1, 4, and 9 top) </li></ul><ul><li>6. S. Kassam, 2008, Arusha. (pictures on slides 2, 3 bottom, and 7) </li></ul><ul><li>7. www.news.bbc.co.uk (picture on slide 9 bottom – tusks) </li></ul><ul><li>8. www.outtoafrica.nl/animals/engelephant.htm (slide 6) </li></ul><ul><li>9. nationalzoo.si.edu/Animals/AsianElephants/elephantfacts.cfm (slide 5) </li></ul>

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