~*~ Technology as a Basic Need Yet Always Obsolete ~*~  *~*  A Manipulative Deception *~*   Blurb:  Technological advances...
 
Re-Defining Basic Needs <ul><li>Through the use of the media and advertisements technology companies are able to possess, ...
Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs
Say What ???  <ul><li>These companies and advertising firms do this by making technology obsolete on purpose, it gives mot...
Change in Technology Ownership from 2005-2007
Desensitizing Society  <ul><li>Do people really need a top of the line accessory or is a basic one sufficient? We have bee...
Distribution Among First Years
 
Works Cited <ul><li>Evolution of Technology  . 2006. Cognent Inc.. 6 Oct 2008 <http://images.google.ca/imgres?imgurl=http:...
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T10 ~ 0763901 ~ Technology as a Basic Need Yet Always Obsolete - A Manipulative Deception

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T10 ~ 0763901 ~ Technology as a Basic Need Yet Always Obsolete - A Manipulative Deception

  1. 1. ~*~ Technology as a Basic Need Yet Always Obsolete ~*~ *~* A Manipulative Deception *~* Blurb: Technological advances are manufactured secretly to dominate our society. By manufacturing technology to become rapidly obsolete, it is forcing technology into becoming a seeming basic need for university students. This presentation examines how a student’s educational accomplishments, a culture’s consumption habits, and the societal pressures of consumerism are compromised due to the evolution of technology .
  2. 3. Re-Defining Basic Needs <ul><li>Through the use of the media and advertisements technology companies are able to possess, maintain, and use their control over members of society. </li></ul><ul><li>This not only allows these companies to become profitable, but it permits individuals in humanity to subconsciously release control over their individual views, identities, values, and their involvement in deciding their overall role as a consumer. </li></ul><ul><li>Abraham Maslow </li></ul><ul><li>They trick students into feeling they need the latest and newest technology to stay on top of their work and be successful. </li></ul><ul><li>Take for example the laptop; students used to know short hand and use pen and paper and it worked just fine, but then the laptop became popular and more and more students started to consider it a basic need. </li></ul>
  3. 4. Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs
  4. 5. Say What ??? <ul><li>These companies and advertising firms do this by making technology obsolete on purpose, it gives motive for them to keep updating and creating new device for students to buy. </li></ul><ul><li>Take the example of educational success. University students are at a point in their life where fitting in, and doing well while learning new things is an important part of their lives. </li></ul><ul><li>Technological advances make it almost impossible for students currently enrolled in university to do so without technology to aid them. </li></ul><ul><li>There are courses where you need itunes to prepare for lectures and tests, or laptops to write assignments and do research or the internet to participate in classes. </li></ul>
  5. 6. Change in Technology Ownership from 2005-2007
  6. 7. Desensitizing Society <ul><li>Do people really need a top of the line accessory or is a basic one sufficient? We have been deceived into believing that basic is never acceptable, and even if you get basic it is obsolete. Old just no longer suffices, and thus society falls into the trap of technology. By allowing their awareness to be overpowered by technology companies students are allowing themselves to be exploited, thus becoming objects of consumerism and having a lesser value in society. </li></ul><ul><li>Technological advances are desensitizing society’s choice of personal identity through the use of companies such as Apple, Dell, etc. Collectively, this is reducing individual though by jointly domineering the messages taught to society. This can be demonstrated through the consumer consumption habits. We don’t need to buy things like ipods and televisions for our rooms, but we feel we need to. Societal pressures of consumerism created by continuously obsolete technologies increase a persons feeling of insignificants if they don’t buy the top of the line or newest products. How can you tell people to be true to who they are when technological companies are constantly telling people they won’t get anywhere in life if they don’t have the newest gadgets. Just because a product seems genuine, does that mean you should buy your identity, just to fit in? Shouldn’t you be happy with what you have without being told; or is it too late? Has technology corrupted our minds so much that people can no longer think for themselves? </li></ul>
  7. 8. Distribution Among First Years
  8. 10. Works Cited <ul><li>Evolution of Technology . 2006. Cognent Inc.. 6 Oct 2008 <http://images.google.ca/imgres?imgurl=http://www.evolutionoftechnology.com/images/evolutiontech.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.evolutionoftechnology.com/&h=300&w=528&sz=96&hl=en&start=1&um=1&usg=__yTgTPSdBU1Q5qTUp2nKpOELK-yY=&tbnid=LWKwkxl1VzjSvM:&tbnh=75&tbnw=132&prev=/images%3Fq%3Devolution%2Bof%2Btechnology%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26client%3Dfirefox-a%26channel%3Ds%26rls%3Dorg.mozilla:en-US:official%26sa%3DX>. </li></ul><ul><li>Team, k2. &quot;Law of Attraction.&quot; Human Revolution . 29 Sept 2007. World Press. 6 Oct 2008 <http://humanrevolution.wordpress.com/2007/09/>. </li></ul><ul><li>Educause, &quot;Change in Technology Ownership from 2005 to 2007.&quot; Report on Undergraduate Studnets and Technology . 2007. Educause. 6 Oct 2008 <http://dltj.org/wp-content/uploads/2007/09/EDUCAUSE-results.png>. </li></ul>

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