Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
CREATIVE METROPOLES Public Strategies – help or hindrance? Birmingham from heavy metal to creative hub Jill Robinson MA (O...
From heavy metal to creative hub <ul><li>This presentation will: </li></ul><ul><li>Set Birmingham’s approach to the creati...
Heavy metal city <ul><li>19 th  C Birmingham   </li></ul><ul><li>At the heart of the industrial revolution </li></ul><ul><...
Recession city <ul><li>Birmingham   in 1980’s </li></ul><ul><li>Collapse of heavy industries </li></ul><ul><li>Collapse of...
Recovering city <ul><li>Birmingham approach </li></ul><ul><li>Overarching strategic vision (Highbury 1987/8) </li></ul><ul...
Recovering city <ul><li>Strategy for restructuring of economy in late 1980s and 1990s </li></ul><ul><li>Highbury Initiativ...
Recovering city <ul><li>Quarters Plan </li></ul>
Renaissance city <ul><li>Priorities for local policies in 1990’s </li></ul><ul><li>Enhancing the attractiveness of the urb...
Renaissance city <ul><li>Focus of local policies in 2000’s </li></ul><ul><li>Regeneration of Eastside/Digbeth Quarter </li...
Renaissance City
Renaissance city <ul><li>National and regional context in 2000s </li></ul><ul><li>National focus on Creative industries  <...
Renaissance City  <ul><li>Examples of local strategies relevant to the Creative industries agenda </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ar...
Creative City Strategy - 2002 <ul><li>1. Consolidating Birmingham’s international  and UK role in creative industries </li...
Creative City Strategy - 2002 <ul><li>Three international and national prestige cultural quarters </li></ul><ul><li>Suppor...
Creative City Strategy - 2002 <ul><li>Focused development of product innovation and technical skills </li></ul><ul><li>Bir...
AWM Cluster Opportunity Groups Media/Music High value added AWM Zone Funding Pillar 1 Bus.Link eg business relocation Pill...
MARKETING STRATEGY DEVELOPMENT £1,874,197 FEASIBILITY £301,002 INCUBATION £995,000 BUSINESS SUPPORT FOR CREATIVE INDUSTRIE...
ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT £1m OVERHEADS INCLUDING  MARKETING £1.3 M BUSINESS SUPPORT FOR THE CREATIVE INDUSTRIES 2006-2008  B...
Creative City  <ul><li>Barriers to delivery of the overarching strategy </li></ul><ul><li>Competing or parallel initiative...
Creative Hub? <ul><li>Birmingham at the crossroads – which way forward?  </li></ul><ul><li>Learning City? </li></ul><ul><l...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Public Strategies – help or hindrance?

1,146

Published on

Presentation by Dr. Jill Robinson from Creative Metropoles on Public Strategies (help or hindrance?) given at the Experience exchange event in Warsaw, October 2009

Published in: Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,146
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
11
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "Public Strategies – help or hindrance?"

  1. 1. CREATIVE METROPOLES Public Strategies – help or hindrance? Birmingham from heavy metal to creative hub Jill Robinson MA (Oxon) FRSA
  2. 2. From heavy metal to creative hub <ul><li>This presentation will: </li></ul><ul><li>Set Birmingham’s approach to the creative industries in context of the changing economy of the city in the last decades of the 20 th C. </li></ul><ul><li>Highlight key strategic developments in the 1990s and 2000s in the city. </li></ul><ul><li>Consider some of the issues relating to the development of the Creative Industries in Birmingham. </li></ul><ul><li>Offer some thoughts on where we are and what the future might hold </li></ul>
  3. 3. Heavy metal city <ul><li>19 th C Birmingham </li></ul><ul><li>At the heart of the industrial revolution </li></ul><ul><li>Renowned for its engineering & metal working skills </li></ul><ul><li>20 th C Birmingham </li></ul><ul><li>Manufacturing centre of UK </li></ul><ul><li>Motor city </li></ul>
  4. 4. Recession city <ul><li>Birmingham in 1980’s </li></ul><ul><li>Collapse of heavy industries </li></ul><ul><li>Collapse of automotive sector </li></ul><ul><li>Major job losses </li></ul><ul><li>Little or no alternative employment opportunities </li></ul><ul><li>-particularly for low skilled, blue collar workers </li></ul>
  5. 5. Recovering city <ul><li>Birmingham approach </li></ul><ul><li>Overarching strategic vision (Highbury 1987/8) </li></ul><ul><li>Specific initiatives </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Geographical areas – Quarters Plan </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Economic sectors including cultural and creative industries </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Vision remained essentially unchanged until modified in 2007 </li></ul><ul><li>The Big City Plan </li></ul>
  6. 6. Recovering city <ul><li>Strategy for restructuring of economy in late 1980s and 1990s </li></ul><ul><li>Highbury Initiative </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(Complete rethink of city centre & surrounding quarters) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(New possibilities for wealth creation & employment) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Quarters Plan </li></ul><ul><li>& </li></ul><ul><li>Investment in physical infrastructure </li></ul>
  7. 7. Recovering city <ul><li>Quarters Plan </li></ul>
  8. 8. Renaissance city <ul><li>Priorities for local policies in 1990’s </li></ul><ul><li>Enhancing the attractiveness of the urban environment </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Hard infrastructure: public spaces e.g. city centre squares, public buildings e.g. ICC including Symphony Hall, controlled development of key quarters e.g. Jewellery Quarter; </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Soft infrastructure: support for high quality cultural activity in city centre e.g. CBSO, BRB + niche companies, development of events to animate the spaces e.g. ArtsFest </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Contributing to economic growth & wealth creation </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Using cultural and creative sector to help change external perceptions of the city & so encourage inward investment & visitors </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Public & private initiatives for low cost space for creatives, business start ups e.g. The Custard Factory, The Jewellery Business Centre </li></ul></ul></ul>
  9. 9. Renaissance city <ul><li>Focus of local policies in 2000’s </li></ul><ul><li>Regeneration of Eastside/Digbeth Quarter </li></ul><ul><ul><li>First proposed in 1996, this has become one of the biggest regeneration projects ever undertaken in the UK </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The area has been home to creative practitioners since early 1990’s, notably at and around The Custard Factory </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Has been promoted as a Learning and Cultural Quarter, Digital District, a Creative Hub </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Focused support for Creative Industries </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Creative Cities Strategy 2002 & Action Plans to 2008 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Moving to narrower focus on subsectors e.g. digital </li></ul>
  10. 10. Renaissance City
  11. 11. Renaissance city <ul><li>National and regional context in 2000s </li></ul><ul><li>National focus on Creative industries </li></ul><ul><ul><li>DCMS Creative Britain Report </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Arts Council of England grant schemes for artists & craft practitioners </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Design Council </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>NESTA </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Regional interest – Regional Development Agency (AWM) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Agenda for Action 2001 ‘Building a new and creative culture’ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cluster Plans included creative industries but under Tourism and Leisure or High Value consumer products </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3 year Cluster Action Plans becoming more subsector specific & now focus is exclusively digital & screen media </li></ul></ul>
  12. 12. Renaissance City <ul><li>Examples of local strategies relevant to the Creative industries agenda </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Arts Strategy first developed in early 1990s & modified in late 90s </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Conservation Strategy 1999 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Creative City Strategy 2002 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cultural Strategy 2006 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Heritage Strategy 2006 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Economic Strategy 2005 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The Big City Plan 2007 </li></ul></ul>
  13. 13. Creative City Strategy - 2002 <ul><li>1. Consolidating Birmingham’s international and UK role in creative industries </li></ul><ul><li>2. Taking new directions in business capability </li></ul><ul><li>3. Building talent and expertise by becoming a learning city </li></ul>
  14. 14. Creative City Strategy - 2002 <ul><li>Three international and national prestige cultural quarters </li></ul><ul><li>Supporting four leading edge clusters:- </li></ul><ul><ul><li>software/ visual arts & design/ publishing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>screen based media/ music </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>tourism & heritage/ leisure/ performing arts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>higher value added consumer production (crafts) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Creating a world-class physical environment and showcasing the city </li></ul>
  15. 15. Creative City Strategy - 2002 <ul><li>Focused development of product innovation and technical skills </li></ul><ul><li>Birmingham as a learning city with an intensive stream of learning directed into creative industries, particularly in ICT and business skills </li></ul><ul><li>Bridging - engagement with communities who are disadvantaged </li></ul><ul><li>Creation of five City Wide Task Groups </li></ul>
  16. 16. AWM Cluster Opportunity Groups Media/Music High value added AWM Zone Funding Pillar 1 Bus.Link eg business relocation Pillar 2 LSC, etc eg learning centres LSC COFINANCING - Partnerships Workforce development BUSINESS LINK CITY COUNCIL AND PARTNERS Creative City Initiative Projects- Business Support National EQUAL Creative Knowledge Creative Companies Knowledge Support for Business Regeneration Areas SRB6 Aston Pride THE PARTNERSHIP MAP Regional Venture Capital Funds Arts Council Investment - Artists/Organizations Development - Eastside Team JQ Partnership City Council Leisure and Culture - Infrastructure Events
  17. 17. MARKETING STRATEGY DEVELOPMENT £1,874,197 FEASIBILITY £301,002 INCUBATION £995,000 BUSINESS SUPPORT FOR CREATIVE INDUSTRIES £4,942,294 including overheads of £526,000 BUSINESS SUPPORT FOR THE CREATIVE INDUSTRIES 2001-2005 PROGRAMMES £1,246,095 (ERDF and MAIN BCC PROGRAMME) PROJECT PART FINANCED BY THE EUROPEAN UNION
  18. 18. ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT £1m OVERHEADS INCLUDING MARKETING £1.3 M BUSINESS SUPPORT FOR THE CREATIVE INDUSTRIES 2006-2008 BUSINESS PROGRAMMES £1.7m CREATIVE SPACE £1m BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT £2m MARKET DEVELOPMENT £500k BUSINESS SUPPORT FOR THE CREATIVE INDUSTRIES £10m FEASIBILITY £500K PRE-START UP CREATIVE LOAN £2m
  19. 19. Creative City <ul><li>Barriers to delivery of the overarching strategy </li></ul><ul><li>Competing or parallel initiatives and policies of Birmingham and the regional agencies </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of joined up thinking between the many different agencies and Birmingham’s own depts. </li></ul><ul><li>Mismatch between public sector criteria and the needs of clients </li></ul><ul><li>Complexity of support structures (red tape!!) </li></ul><ul><li>Shifting priorities of stakeholders for their funds </li></ul><ul><li>Failure/inability to commit financial support beyond the short term (largely because of funding mechanisms & their time frames) </li></ul>
  20. 20. Creative Hub? <ul><li>Birmingham at the crossroads – which way forward? </li></ul><ul><li>Learning City? </li></ul><ul><li>Digital City? Creative Hub? </li></ul><ul><li>Science City? </li></ul>
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×