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Creating change   social media 11 9
 

Creating change social media 11 9

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Social Media 201 Presentation to Nonprofits - 11/9/11

Social Media 201 Presentation to Nonprofits - 11/9/11

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  • Surveyed more than 11,000 nonprofit organizationsSix out of 10 nonprofits have a presence on Twitter.The Facebook average member community size is up 161% in 2011 to 6,376 members per page.Fewer than 3 percent raised more than $10,000 through FacebookOf those that raised over $100,000, 30 percent have revenues between $1 and 5 million>> this suggests that a nonprofit does not have to be mega-sized to reap such benefits. >> There is, however, not surprisingly, a correlation between resources devoted to this activity and results. Environmental/AnimalWelfare groups recorded the highestaverage community size on Facebook with 8,490 members compared to theoverall industry average of 6,376 members. International Serviceorganizations reported the highest use of Facebook with 97% of these groupsreporting a presence here, Public and Societal Benefit charities report the highest average LinkedInbase with 5,544 members, more than three times greater than the nearestpeer sector – Higher Education with 1,591 LinkedIn members.
  • *Surveyed more than 11,000 nonprofit organizationsFewer than 3 percent raised more than $10,000 through FacebookOf those that raised over $100,000, 30 percent have revenues between $1 and 5 million>> this suggests that a nonprofit does not have to be mega-sized to reap such benefits. >> There is, however, not surprisingly, a correlation between resources devoted to this activity and results. International Serviceorganizations reported the highest use of Facebook with 97% of these groupsreporting a presence here, Public and Societal Benefit charities report the highest average LinkedInbase with 5,544 members, more than three times greater than the nearestpeer sector – Higher Education with 1,591 LinkedIn members.
  • Tumblr has been around for the past 4 years, they boast 12,286,822,053 total posts and 33,376,348 total blogs.The average Tumblr user creates 14 original posts each month, and reblogs 3. Half of those posts are photos. The rest are split between text, links, quotes, music, and video.The same way YouTube embeds make it easy for a video to become a viral hit, the "reblog" button on all Tumblr posts allows a meme to spread rapidly across thousands of blogs with just a click.
  • This example is from the Punish Geoff Fundraiser: Geoff Livingston in a DC blogger whose snarky attitude and posts gain him fans and critics alike. He used his personality and Razoo, an online fundraising tool, to help a friend earn a $10,000 matching grant from the Pierce Foundation to help fight homelessness through the InvisiblePeople.tv organization. He allowed his followers to donate money for different punishments. Once each goal was reached, Geoff had to perform the punishments and post them on YouTube.Geoff set out to raise $3,200 through the fundraiser and ended up raising $3,311.
  • Understand that anyone’s posts can be reported on by media or bloggersIdentify your spokespeople (traditional and social media) Set a social media policy (independent or as part of a communications policy) for all other employees and volunteers.Empower employees and volunteers to be ambassadors by encouraging them to follow you on social media and share posts that resonate with them.Identify “super ambassadors” who can contribute content and/or help manage your social media profile.Encourage your employees and volunteers to tag you or use designated hashtags when attending events for your nonprofit.

Creating change   social media 11 9 Creating change social media 11 9 Presentation Transcript

  • Social Media 201Implementation, Strategy, Tips & Techniques Discovery Impact: Creating Change November 9, 2011
  • Introductions Gayle Weiswasser Vice President, Social Media Communications @gweiswasser Kristen Variola Social Media Specialist @kvariola David Tra Social Media Specialist @dtra Corporate: @DiscoveryComm and #ourimpact
  • Today’s Agenda  Nonprofits Online  How Nonprofits Are Using Social Media  How to Create a Social Media Plan  Social Media Tools  Social Media Tactics • Engagement on Facebook • Engagement on Twitter • Engagement on Tumblr • Relevant Blog Content • Involving Leadership • Involving Employees • Use of Social Media Tools  Evaluating Impact  Q&A
  • How Nonprofits Are Using Social Media  Nine out of 10 nonprofits report having a presence on Facebook in 2011. Twitter has the second highest adoption rate at 57%.  Average nonprofit Facebook community size is up 161% in 2011 to 6,376 members per page.  Online giving is growing: $808 million online in 2010 up from $523.1 million in 2009 Source: 2011 Nonprofit Social Network Survey and Chronicle of Philanthropy
  • How Nonprofits Are Using Social Media Environmental/animal welfare groups recorded the highest average community size on Facebook. Small nonprofits ($1 to $5MM annual budget) make up 30% of the organizations who raised $100,000 or more on Facebook over the last 12 months
  • How Nonprofits Are Using Social Media Source: craigconnects
  • How to Create a Social Media Plan  Goals • What do you want to accomplish?  Audience(s) • One or many? • Open or closed?  Content • What information are people looking for? • What can you share?  Voice • Does your organization have a voice? • Who can translate that voice to social media?  Integration • What need does social media satisfy? • What existing communications can your social profiles supplement?  Resources • Do you have a dedicated person or persons to manage your social media presence? • Can you invest in social media tools or applications?
  • How to Create a Social Media Plan  Define target audience(s).  Define goals and objectives.  Monitor conversation and topics of interest to look for entry points into discussions. • Set up Google alerts.  Assign and create content. • Consider creating an editorial calendar. • Consider introducing weekly traditions/post schedules. • Schedule content.  Engage!
  • Social Media Tools Engagement & Monitoring Influencers & Trends  HootSuite, TweetDeck  Topsy  TwitPic, TwitVid, etc.  Google Realtime  Bit.ly  Klout  Vitrue, BuddyMedia, Involver  Tumblr  Google Alerts  Kred Metrics & Analysis Assemble & Mobilize  Facebook Insights  Twitvite  TwitterCounter  Eventbrite  Radian6  Meetup
  • Social Media Tactics: FacebookFacebook can help you: Share relevant content. Share testimonials. Recruit volunteers/energize advocates. Broadcast milestones. Demonstrate your expertise. Gather feedback. “Everyone at the Do Something office is dressed up for Halloween! Do you recognize any of these costumes?” http://ow.ly/7lAFZ
  • Social Media Tactics: Twitter  Twitter can act as a newsfeed.  Allows you to jump on the bandwagon with trends in your industry.  Connect with like-minded organizations through hashtags and tagging.  Great for crisis management and communication.
  • Engagement on Twitter UNICEF (@UNICEF) • UNICEF shares the latest news – from every medium. • @UNICEF retweets followers who mention them. • Hashtags optimize the impact of Tweets and organize conversations – ex. #eastafricacrisis
  • Social Media Tactics: Tumblr Tumblr is a great place to share photos and short success stories of your work. Images, like this one posted by Good Neighbors USA, give donors and members an inside look at where their money is going. Also a great platform for information to go viral. Encourage your audience to share your success with their networks.
  • Social Media Tactics: Blog Content Blogs:  Position your organization as an expert in the field.  Share news and opinion.  Link to content throughout your site.  Highlight others’ successes (as well as your own).  The Humane Society hosts a blog from President & CEO Wayne Pacelle.  Content is updated regularly and includes actionable items.  Blogroll and social media integration on the site and within posts makes content “spreadable.”
  • Social Media Tactics: Involving Leadership Involving leaders can help:  Strengthen your message through personality.  Provide a more genuine connection between your target audience(s) and your organization.  Get leadership involved and excited about social media activities.
  • Involving Employees in Strategy Involving employees can help you:  Empower employees and volunteers to be ambassadors of your organization.  Highlight multiple perspectives .  Increase your reach. Our social media team actively represents our company by:  Identifying ourselves on our social profiles as company employees.  Blogging on our corporate blog.  Attending/speaking at events and providing real-time A team member provides social media counsel during updates. Discovery Communications’ trip to rebuild tornado ravaged homes in Alabama
  • Involving Employees in Strategy  Identify spokespeople (traditional and social media) .  Set a social media policy (independent or as part of a communications policy) for all other employees and volunteers. Remember that anyone’s posts can be reported on by media or bloggers.  Empower employees and volunteers to be ambassadors by encouraging them to follow you on social media and share posts that resonate with them, as well as their own posts.  Identify “super ambassadors” who can contribute content and/or help manage your social media profile.  Encourage your employees and volunteers to tag you or use designated hashtags when attending events for your nonprofit.
  • Use of Social Media Tools  The National Breast Cancer Foundation used Twibbon to allow supporters to decorate their Twitter avatars with pink Twibbons to illustrate their support of the nonprofit.  It’s free to set up a Twibbon. When a supporter uses one, it sends a Tweet out to all of his/her followers, to alert them of the affiliation.  Oceana encourages action and richer experiences through a variety of Facebook tabs – from holiday cards to adopting animals and signing petitions.  Philanthroper is a daily deals site for social good.  It started as a site where users gave $1/day to a certain cause.  Due to overwhelming demand, they can now give up to $10 a day.
  • Evaluating Impact Set realistic goals that drive your organization’s mission – target donations, volunteers, signatures, members, clicks, photos, etc. Look to peers for inspiration, but not necessarily for benchmarking. Keep track of qualitative examples that demonstrate impact of social media, and trumpet them. Ask followers for feedback; seek ideas from the target audience. Find learnings in successes and failures.
  • Questions?
  • blog.discoverycommunications.com | @DiscoveryComm