Cohhio fundraising kick it up a notch michelle cramer april 21, 2010

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Michelle Cramer's presentation at the 2010 COHHIO Annual Conference on Fundraising: Kick It Up A Notch

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  • We thought that we would start first with Introductions . . .
  • Here is the agenda for today, we will discuss what we are seeing as trends in philanthropy and how we got there. Then we will walk through strategies with donors, communication and messaging, how to utilize your Board and then we will have group discussions
  • Back at the beginning of the decade, things were simple, the donor gift table was a nice predictable pyramid of gifts. Then in 2008 things changed, people were no longer as concerned with the rainforest, football stadiums or opera programming – what little money that was given stayed very close to home – the good news for you is that basic human needs were suddenly in the forefront – food and shelter were priorities. Even for annual campaigns, only organizations that could make a very compelling case for support saw little or no dip in fundingNow in 2010 it’s a new day with different rules – creativity, sincerity, passion and hard work count for more than anything else – Wall Street has become stable and assets are back to pre-2008 levels, but Main Street is not as forthcoming. The businesses and families that provide the larger gifts in our communities are much more conservative and less trusting. They engage us differently, they want different results and their forms of giving are often now how we expect. Corporations are loaning executives to organizations, rather than give to our events, they will print our brochures for free. This makes us think smarter and ultimately will be healthier for us all in the long run.
  • “The average donor” no longer exists!We used to talk about the “Average Donor” – the ways in which donors find, give and participate with organizations has dramatically changed - this is why we talk about diversified strategiesSuccessful organizations are diversifying sources and amountsYou can’t afford to focus only on one sector – annual, events, major gift or even planned giving – you have to develop a healthy and diverse blendDonors want outcomes – prove that their gift will result in a measureable solutionDonor’s can’t afford to get it wrong – they want data to back up your case- prove to the best that you can why it is that your solution will workDonors want to see others at the table – lead donors no longer willing to be alone out front Traditional capital campaigns had that one donor who would make their big million dollar gift before anyone else – it just doesn’t happen that way anymore. They want to know that they are going to be joined by many other donors. This has led to many many campaigns today using that lead gift as a challenge gift – remember how the Kresge Foundation used this tactic at the end of a campaign – today, this is how many campaigns are kicked off- using one gift to stimulate others.
  • Organizations can not afford mistakes or mixed messages With competition much stronger, you can not afford to make any mistakes with your numbers, your programs or staff. It takes a long time and a lot of work to build up a strong brand and reputation. If a negative situation occurs, be as open and honest with you donors as possible. Duplication of services no longer tolerated – donors expect collaboration and partnerships This is an area that we in the non-profit sector lag behind from the for-profit sector. Donors are wanting to see greater cooperation and partnering in the non-profit sector. They are using their funding to push and often force groups to work closer together. Be proactive with your relationships and each other. Donors like to feel that their funds are going farther and doing more.Entrepreneurial strategies most successful – funding to help generate new revenue for the organization to become more self sustainingThis is a real hot button with many large donors. Recently we heard the Columbus Foundation praising a local furniture bank for presenting them with a funding opportunity that will ultimately bring the organization income. Jim Stein, . . .
  • Finding new donorsFinding new donors should be an ongoing process, it is the purpose of your annual campaign activities, but here are a few strategies to helpAppeal to many donors for a small amountStart small – at the beginning of last year how many of us thought that would be giving charitable dollars to Haiti? But it was made convenient and presented in a way that made us feel that even a dollar would help. You might have given through your church, by sending a text message or even on iTunes by buying a song. Through this, the Red Cross has many of our names (or our cell phone numbers) for when the next disaster strikes. Utilize your Board’s networkEach board member has their own network, build your trust with them to allow you to engage their peer group – we will talk more about them laterBe visible – participate in community activities, other groups events and take the time to promote your presence (work the room!)You know who I am talking about, every community has an Executive Director that is involved in everything – they are at every event, wedding, funeral, Bar Mitzvah, you name it and they are there wearing their organizations pin Be proactive – call on community leaders, businesses and foundations – ask for input, provide updates, learn about them – and afterwards, if appropriate, make a requestIf you really feel that your organization is worthy and that you are making a difference, then pick up the phone and make the first move. Its important to be prepared, organized and respectful of someone’s time, but if you do it right, they will want to hear what you have to say – and if you listen carefully – they will have a helpful message back to you as well
  • Retaining existing donorsAfter you have gotten these new donors – its easier to keep them if you do a few things rightReward and make them feel specialPhone call or a personal note to explain how they are impacting your organizationThink about it – if you got home after grocery shopping and the manager of the store called you personally and wanted to know about your experience with the store, how special would you feel? The personal touch goes a very very long way. Handwritten note versus an email. Tell them how much you appreciate their generosity. Communicate how their gift made a differenceWith your gift of $_____ we were able to do ______ We have a client in Marietta, Ohio that did this very well last year, their spring/summer annual campaign focused on providing laptops for college students. Then in September they sent a letter to everyone solicited reporting back to them about how many they purchased, how many students were effected and how it impacted their ability to learn. The letter did not contain an appeal – you have to communicate without making an ask- your donors are not ATM machines. Find ways to engage other than cash - expand their role beyond funding - events, communicator, volunteer, etc.Ask them to tell your story, write a letter to the editor, come for a tour, help with events, be a part of your team. They may not accept, but the important thing is to make them feel welcome.
  • Strategic PlanningEvery organization should have a strategic plan that addresses short-term needs and long-range goalsEvery one of you should have a working strategic plan – not a binder on the shelf that you take down every five years, but an engaged, working plan that is constantly evolving.Engage your donors (and potential donors) in this process so that they feel vested and have a sense of ownership to the visionFar too often we have a Director and a hand full of board members craft an organization’s vision and then try to sell it to the community.If you make donors, prospective donors, community leaders, volunteers, staff, collaborative partners, etc. a part of your plan, everyone is vested in the outcomes and have a greater willingness to help you succeed. Utilize the process to meet new leaders, reacquaint with old and bring new ideasThis is a perfect reason to bring people close to your organization. It is easier to ask for participation and it utilizes them in a non solicitation mannerAlso know that if you ask for their input, be prepared to listen – do not be defensive, thank them and present the strategic plan as the comprehensive plan of moving forward
  • Introduce Dawn here
  • DAWN - Talk about COSI recent Gala / Columbus State Taste for the Future twitter account
  • Twitter is a very powerful information sharing tool that is a great way to reach a large group of people. This person who has a wide variety of interests is based in the Vancouver area. She mentioned an article about the Vancouver homeless shelter. This person has about 5,000 people following her. So her little clip and link to a news story reached a huge number of people. You should also consider this just one part of your overall communications strategy. How many of you are on Twitter?How many of you plan on doing so?
  • Facebook is a powerful and very cost effective way to communicate and reach new people – however – it should only be one form of your entire communication plan – it shouldn’t replace your personal connections and it requires time and work to be successful. How many of you have a personalFacebook page?How many of your organizations have a Facebook page?This is Fredericton Homeless Shelter’s facebook page, it is in Canada just over the border from Maine. They have done a good job of providing relevant information, however it needs more human interest elements to keep people engaged – there are no photos, videos, or discussions. But it has 59 members who can be sent a direct, free communication.
  • Yet another way to effectively tell your story is through the creation of a video or presentation for YouTube. This video (on the left) is about homelessness in Youngstown and the video on the right is about a ”9, 10, and 11 year old investors/philanthropist tell what its like to feed in homeless in downtown Cleveland”Did anyone here have anything to do with either of these or make one of your own?
  • We follow Daybreak’s newsletter online – we were privileged of working with this organization (Linda Kramer is in audience). They do a great job of telling a positive story – the encouraging style of this newsletter keeps people reading and develops a greater sense of accomplishment. I recommend you go on Daybreak’s website and review their past newsletters – great examples.Linda, would you be willing to share your process?
  • Michelle – this is the E Prep appeal letter that was highly successful . . . .
  • Begin with creating (or updating) job descriptions for each member and committeeAs a part of the ongoing strategic planning process, talk about the vision for the board and committees. To ensure that you have a positive transition to a working board, talk about your vision for the board by 2012. This will allow board members to either get to work or transition off the board. The job descriptions will also set the level of expectations that you have for the board – for areas of time, giving and participation.Develop a program to help Board members learn about your organization and grow their skills as volunteersWhat are your board members getting back from their board service. It is important to build their skills about their duties (utilize conferences, guest speakers and books). It is also vital to grow their knowledge about your organization. At every board meeting ask a staff member or service volunteer to introduce themselves and explain their role. The more they know, the more they can talk about your organization.Build their confidence - set frequent achievable goals and celebrate victoriesWe hear about many board members who leave the board feeling they are not making a difference. One or two members do all the work and everyone else feels left out of the decision making process. Develop avenues of effective participation so that everyone feels a sense of accomplishment.Build trust – would they be willing to bring you to their top relationships?One of the biggest issues that we have is in building trust. Is your board chair willing to bring you to meet with the people in their lives that are important to them? Their family members, business partners, clients?
  • Ask each Board member to develop a listing of their network Work associates, family members, Rotary club, book club, friends, neighbors, etc.This is a relationship building tactic for each board member, to bring forth a list of their friends, associates, family connections, etc. Then create an engagement plan - meet one-on-one to introduce them to your organization, have a small cocktail reception and talk about your organization’s programs, invite them to an event of yours or best of all to be a participant in your strategic planning process. Explain that prospect engagement is a lengthy process – you aren’t strong arming for gifts, but rather building a sincere relationshipMost volunteers are concerned that prospects that they bring to the table will be quickly asked for money. It is important to explain that you are friendraising and want to create a long-term relationship Any request above the traditional annual appeal should be preceded with education and personal cultivation.
  • The cultivation cycle demonstrates that solicitation is merely one activity in a multi step process.
  • As we mentioned earlier, competition has become increasingly challenging so it is important to understand who you are up against. These are examples of the day in day out requests that we all get. Where do you fit in? How can you set yourself apart? What do you do that would make a donor choose to give to you in addition or instead of one of these?
  • Let’s take a minute and consider your value to a donor. What can you give to a donor in your community?
  • Cohhio fundraising kick it up a notch michelle cramer april 21, 2010

    1. 1. 1<br />FUNDRAISING:<br />KICK IT UP A NOTCH!<br />
    2. 2. Introductions<br />Michelle Cramer, CFRE President & CEO<br /> Cramer & Associates, Inc.<br />Located in Dublin –Statewide & Regional Focus<br />22nd Years as a Fundraising Consultant <br />Giving Institute Board Member – 12 Years <br />Dean of AFP / Giving Institute Fundraising Consulting School @ the AFP International Conference<br />2<br />
    3. 3. AFP International Conference<br />3<br />Archbishop Desmond Tutu<br />April 12, 2010 <br />“Noble Calling”<br />
    4. 4. First Consulting Job<br />First consulting job was with a local homeless shelter<br />“Faith Mission”<br />“Make Room Columbus”<br />4<br />
    5. 5. Results of Survey<br />5<br />Other: Social Media, Use of Internet, Events, Cultivating Small Donors<br />
    6. 6. Today’s Agenda<br />Your Time Has Come!<br />The Philanthropic Environment<br />Donor Strategies <br />WOW! Capital Campaigns<br />Power of Social Media <br />Board Development<br />Best Event Idea!<br />6<br />
    7. 7. Your Time Has Come!<br />You and Your Organization / Agency Are At The TOP of The Philanthropic Radar Screen <br />“Basic Human Needs. . . Food, Shelter, Clothing & Healthcare”<br />7<br />
    8. 8. Your Time Has Come!<br />8<br />Your Time Has Come!<br />Now Capitalize <br />& <br />Take Advantage Of It!<br />
    9. 9. A Look Back at the Decade<br />9<br />2000<br />2008<br />2009<br />2010<br />Funding levels improve. Donor interests are reset and new patterns of communication, participation and funding are emerging. <br />Traditional donor pyramid fundraising. Giving is strong on all levels – annual, capital and planned. Organizations independently engage issues and donors. <br />Financial Crisis. Fundraising is focused on basic human needs. Giving is more localized. Only the strongest of cases were supported. <br />
    10. 10. Today’s Environment<br />“The average donor” no longer exists!<br />Successful organizations are diversifying sources of revenue<br />Donors want outcomes – prove that their gift will result in a measureable solution<br />Donors want to see others at the table – lead donors are no longer willing to be alone out front <br />10<br />
    11. 11. Today’s Environment<br />Organizations can not afford mistakes or mixed messages <br />Duplication of services no longer acceptable– donors expect collaboration and partnerships <br />Entrepreneurial strategies most successful – funding to help generate new revenue for the organization to become more self sustaining<br />11<br />
    12. 12. 12<br />What Are You Experiencing InToday’s Environment?<br />
    13. 13. Finding & Cultivating New Donors<br />An “Effective” Way to Engage Your Board Members and In The Process, Build Your Donor Base . . . Thus Sustainability!<br />“Brown Bag Lunch Tours”<br />13<br />
    14. 14. How It Works<br />Dates are set for on-site tours or presentation at downtown location<br />Board members send email blast to friends to invite (see email copy)<br />Board members attend with guests<br />Presentation is made & two requests are made<br />14<br />
    15. 15. The Two Requests Made<br />To Come & Tour our Facility / Site (only if presentation is at downtown location)<br />Bring One or Two More People with You to Next Scheduled “Brown Bag Lunch” <br />15<br />
    16. 16. Keys to Being Successful<br />The Presentation Itself Must Be <br />Emotional – Personal Stories<br />Powerful Information & Statistics<br />Demonstrate How Important Your Agency Is To Change Lives!<br />16<br />
    17. 17. Draft Agenda<br />Takes place on site (preferably)<br />Last approximately 60 – 90 minutes<br />Executive Director introduces organization / agency via multi-media (i.e. PowerPoint, Video, etc.) that overviews the organization / agency – the “WOW” Factor<br />Executive Director invites agency employees to share stories about individuals served<br />Q&A Session<br />Executive Director requests two things from guests:<br />Invite 2 people to attend next “Brown Bag” tour<br />Tour facility <br />17<br />
    18. 18. QUESTIONS?<br />18<br />
    19. 19. Donors<br />Finding new donors<br />Appeal to many donors for a small amount<br />Utilize your Board’s network <br />Be visible – participate in community activities, other groups events and take the time to promote your presence (work the room!)<br />Be proactive – call on community leaders, businesses and foundations – ask for input, provide updates, learn about them – and afterwards, if appropriate, make a request<br />19<br />
    20. 20. Donors<br />Retaining existing donors<br />Thank donors and make them feel special<br />Phone call or a personal note to explain how they are impacting your organization<br />Communicate how their gift made a difference<br />With your gift of $_____ we were able to do ______ <br />Find ways to engage other than cash - expand their role beyond funding - events, communicator, volunteer, etc.<br />20<br />
    21. 21. Strategic Planning<br />Every organization should have a strategic plan that addresses short-term needs and long-range goals – Does not have to be 30 pages long<br />Key is to engage your donors (and potential donors) in the process so that they feel vested and have a sense of ownership to the vision<br />Utilize the process to meet new leaders, reacquaint with old and bring new ideas<br />21<br />Reaching Donors & Volunteers<br />
    22. 22. 22<br />
    23. 23. 23<br />What a WOW! Capital Campaign Is not<br /><ul><li>Traditional – Honorary Chair, Chair, Co-Chair. . . . .
    24. 24. Boring – Volunteers disappear, not engaged
    25. 25. Long and drawn out
    26. 26. Do not blend in with other campaigns </li></li></ul><li>24<br />What A WOW! Capital Campaign Is<br /><ul><li>Unique & customized
    27. 27. Instills a sense of excitement & energy
    28. 28. Creates a ‘buzz’ in your community & grabs their attention
    29. 29. Stands out from other campaigns
    30. 30. Reflection of your organization and what makes it special</li></li></ul><li>25<br />Examples of WOW! Capital Campaigns<br />Leadership & Volunteers<br />Columbus YWCA <br /><ul><li>First Capital Campaign
    31. 31. Building Owned & Operated by Women
    32. 32. Focus: Eliminating Racism & Empowering Women
    33. 33. Created Cabinet of 50 Women Leaders</li></ul>Franklin Park Conservatory<br /><ul><li>First Capital Campaign
    34. 34. Sense of Ownership & Pride by the Neighborhood
    35. 35. Created ‘Leadership Team’ Made Up of 10 Leaders
    36. 36. No Honorary Chairs or Co-Chairs </li></li></ul><li>26<br />Benefits of WOW! Capital Campaign<br /><ul><li>Instills sense of pride among Board, volunteers, donors & staff
    37. 37. Gain even more respect from the community
    38. 38. Positively impacts other fundraising efforts
    39. 39. Educates the community on mission, programs & services
    40. 40. Puts you on the map!</li></li></ul><li>27<br />How to Begin Preparing for YourWOW! Capital Campaign<br /><ul><li>Look within at what ‘differentiates you’ from other not-for-profits
    41. 41. Position and leverage your uniqueness
    42. 42. Begin the identification & cultivation process
    43. 43. Board members
    44. 44. Community Leaders
    45. 45. Key Donors
    46. 46. People you train & serve
    47. 47. Engage the community: Feasibility Study </li></li></ul><li>THE POWER OF SOCIAL MEDIA<br />28<br />
    48. 48. 29<br />Social Media<br /><ul><li>Donors are on the web
    49. 49. It’s like a puppy, needs to be:
    50. 50. Walked
    51. 51. Fed
    52. 52. Exercised, etc.
    53. 53. Content – How much, daily, weekly, etc.
    54. 54. Who internally contributes – EVERYONE!
    55. 55. Short Term Goals – Awareness / “Friend” Raising
    56. 56. Long Term Goals – Donors!</li></li></ul><li>New Forms of Communication<br />30<br />
    57. 57. New Forms of Communication<br />31<br />
    58. 58. New Forms of Communication<br />32<br />
    59. 59. Tell a story<br />33<br />Daybreak Horizons Newsletter November 2009<br />
    60. 60. Be Creative<br />34<br />
    61. 61. Board Development<br />Begin with first assessing your “Board Talent”, i.e. accounting, legal and seek out entrepreneurs <br />Begin with creating (or updating) job descriptions for each member and committee<br />Develop a program to help Board members learn about your organization and grow their skills as volunteers - Orientation<br />Build their confidence - set frequent achievable goals and celebrate victories – include them on prospective cultivation, luncheon, meetings, etc.<br />35<br />
    62. 62. Board Development<br />36<br />Ask each Board member to develop a listing of their network <br />Work associates, family members, Rotary club, book club, friends, neighbors, etc.<br />Explain that prospect engagement is a lengthy process – you aren’t strong arming for gifts, but rather building a sincere relationship<br />Provide training for your Board Members and keep in mind there is no “school” that trains individuals on what is expected of them as a Board member<br />
    63. 63. Board Development<br />37<br />The Cultivation Cycle<br />Identify Prospects<br />Inform / Educate<br />(Communication)<br />Evaluate<br />For Progress<br />Stewardship<br />Develop Interest<br />(Activities, Tours)<br />Recognition- <br />Thank you <br />Involve<br />(Events, Groups,<br />Committee)<br />Solicit to Appropriate Level<br />Evaluate <br />for Progress<br />
    64. 64. Best Way To Develop A Relationship Is<br />38<br />“Pick Up The Phone & Set An Appointment”<br />
    65. 65. 39<br />The Competitive Environment<br />Cure Cancer<br />Save the Environment<br />Girl Scout Cookies<br />Disaster Assistance<br />Grant a Wish<br />Rescue Puppies<br />Send a kid to camp<br />Historical Society<br />Parks & Recreation<br />Performing Arts<br />Hospital <br />Support your University<br />Eternal Salvation<br />PTO & Booster Clubs<br />
    66. 66. Remember . . . <br />40<br />Your Cause Is Relative, Being Talked About & In The Lime Light<br />
    67. 67. 41<br />ENGAGING DONORS<br />What Are Others Doing To Engage Donors?<br />
    68. 68. 42<br />EVENTS<br />Share Your Best Event Idea!<br />
    69. 69. Summary and Conclusion<br />Thank You!614.766.GIVE (4483)877.926.GIVE (4483)www.CramerFundraising.comMichelle@CramerFundraising.com<br />

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