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Summary of the innovation programmes funded by JISC's Organisational Support committee, managed by the Organisation and User Technologies team - its work area themes and key activities, dissemination ...

Summary of the innovation programmes funded by JISC's Organisational Support committee, managed by the Organisation and User Technologies team - its work area themes and key activities, dissemination agendas, and how it all fits together.

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    CW presentation to JISC Advance 26 Nov 10 v0.1 CW presentation to JISC Advance 26 Nov 10 v0.1 Presentation Transcript

    • JISC Advance briefing session26 November 2010
      JISC Organisational Support committee /
      Organisation and User Technologies innovation team
      work portfolio
      Craig Wentworth
      Director of Organisational and User Innovation
      25/11/2010| Supporting education and research | Slide 1
    • 25/11/2010| Supporting education and research | Slide 2
      Organisation and User Technologies
      • JISC’s Organisation and User Technologies (OUT) team sits within the Executive’s Innovation Group, under Sarah Porter (Head of Innovation)
      • Responsible for the portfolio overseen by the JISC Organisational Support (JOS) committee
      • Led by Craig Wentworth, (Innovation) Director for Organisation and User Innovation
      • Programme Managers: Rob Bristow, John Chapman, Myles Danson, Alex Hawker, Lawrie Phipps, Simon Whittemore
    • 26/11/2010| Supporting education and research | Slide 3
      JOS Strategic Framework
      • JOS’ portfolio delivers to JISC’s second strategic aim:
      “helping institutions to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of their corporate and business systems”
      • Primary focus is on ‘soft’ cultural change management issues; people, skills, and organisational development that helps institutions
      • save money
      • go green
      • know what the right things to do are, and how to do them better
      • staying ahead of the game
    • 26/11/2010| Supporting education and research | Slide 4
      Work areas (1)
      • Activities are themed into a layer of five ‘work areas’, grouping JOS’ core and capital programme activities to exploit synergies for programme management and evaluation impact assessment
      • Provides a means to highlight linkages and nuances which would have been lost if only grouping activities by their primary JISC Strategy themes
      • Each is led by a programme manager whose programme activities make up the bulk of the area portfolio, though most also include some legacy work owned by their colleagues
      • Intention is for each ‘work area’ to have some form of (virtual?) advisory group / consultative forum chaired by at least one JOS member ‘champion’
    • 26/11/2010| Supporting education and research | Slide 5
      Work areas (2)
      • Environmental Sustainability (Rob)
      • Organisational Capability and Efficiency (Lawrie)
      • Institutional Strategy, Agility, and Intelligence (Myles)
      • Administrative Computing and Shared Services (Alex / John)
      • External Impact (Simon)
    • 26/11/2010| Supporting education and research | Slide 6
    • 26/11/2010| Supporting education and research | Slide 7
    • 26/11/2010| Supporting education and research | Slide 8
    • 26/11/2010| Supporting education and research | Slide 9
    • 26/11/2010| Supporting education and research | Slide 10
    • 26/11/2010| Supporting education and research | Slide 11
    • 26/11/2010| Supporting education and research | Slide 12
    • 26/11/2010| Supporting education and research | Slide 13
      Environmental Sustainability (1)
      • ICT in UK HE and FE has a large carbon footprint. It is estimated that there are 1,500,000 computers, 250,000 printers and 240,000 servers in circulation which collectively produce 500,000 tonnes of CO2 a year and in 2009 cost the sector around £116m in ICT related electricity bills
      • In addition the whole lifecycle of ICT procurement and use consumes energy and resources both in manufacture and transportation to end users, and in disposal.
    • 26/11/2010| Supporting education and research | Slide 14
      Environmental Sustainability (2)
      • Key activities under this work area are helping institutions both to lower their ICT energy costs, and to exploit ICT as an enabler which facilitates greener practices in other aspects of their business (such as smarter buildings), thereby reducing their carbon footprints and developing environmentally sustainable and socially responsible campuses.
    • 26/11/2010| Supporting education and research | Slide 15
      Environmental Sustainability (3)
      • Greening ICT (Rob) – Helping institutions to reduce ICT energy costs, and to exploit ICT as an enabler that facilitates greener practices in other aspects of their business:
      • Working with the EAUC to help institutions reduce their own carbon footprintby increasing understanding of ICT energy impacts and implementing ICT energy and carbon action plans.
      • Investigating approaches to the ownership and responsibility for energy costs for ICT use within institutions..
      • Working withHEFCE’s Centre for Excellence in Sustainable Development and Procureweb to reduce the upstream burden of institutional ICT activities through the production of guidance to inform purchasing decisions around Green ICT and a portal to facilitate greater uptake of e-procurement practice.
    • 26/11/2010| Supporting education and research | Slide 16
      Environmental Sustainability (4)
      • Greening ICT (Rob) continued:
      • Rapid innovation projects solving specific technical problems in Green ICT.
      • A range of small-scale research projects and demonstrators in a wide range of Green ICT areas in order to delivering innovations in tools, practices, policies and capabilities to reduce the environmental impact of ICT; some specifically focusing on the role of Estates Directors and their teams in addressing areas of Green ICT concern or in the harnessing of ICT to address estates concerns.
      • Exemplar projects showing where ICT can enable major re-engineering of the way that institutions do business to move towards a more sustainable future.
    • 26/11/2010| Supporting education and research | Slide 17
      Illustrative benefits map
    • 26/11/2010| Supporting education and research | Slide 18
      Organisational Capability and Efficiency (1)
      • Moving beyond a focus simply on ‘institutional business efficiency’, this work area acknowledges the need to build capacity, improve strategic alignments, and enhance business efficiencies across institutions to help them survive and thrive through a challenging period of change across many of the PESTLE dimensions.
      • It reflects JOS’ over-arching commitment to organisational development as a means by which ICT can be exploited as a strategic enabler to help institutions transform their business in whichever direction(s) appropriate to their mission, in order to improve effectiveness and impact.
      • It addresses the ‘soft issues’ that arise from, and the actions needed to fully exploit, institutions’ investment in technology to support the management of cultural change, and the change required to embed practice in support of enhanced missions.
    • 26/11/2010| Supporting education and research | Slide 19
      Organisational Capability and Efficiency (2)
      • Activities under this work area are designed to help institutions develop the effective organisationalcapabilities, processes and configuration which enable them (through increased agility, flexibility, and the ability to respond to new opportunities) to meet their business objectives efficiently, effectively and sustainably.
      • They are designed to help institutions share and embed new working practices that reflect the evolving nature of staff roles and relationships, and the impact of change on the institution and on the individual
    • 26/11/2010| Supporting education and research | Slide 20
      Organisational Capability and Efficiency (3)
      • Institutional Innovation (Lawrie) - Helping institutions exploit ICT to improve their effectiveness, efficiency and the quality of their core business processes. A key element of the activity is the emphasis on realising the intended benefits and synthesising the learning derived from these institutional change programmes, thereby helping to ensure that they are useful, usable and widely used.
      • Building Capacity (Lawrie) – Supporting institutions engage in significant change programmes across their organisation; providing funding for them to use the outputs from recent JISC programmes and services to address a series of strategic issues and problems.
      • Embedding BCE (Simon) – Helping institutions to integrate BCE operations within their core functions through process improvement and internal engagement.
    • 26/11/2010| Supporting education and research | Slide 21
      Organisational Capability and Efficiency (4)
      • Organisational Capacity and Efficiency for BCE (Simon) – Helping institutions improve the effectiveness and impact of their BCE activities by building on previous work identifying the organisational capabilities needed for BCE and the investigation into potential quality standards.
      • Staff Roles, Relationships and Associated Skills (Myles) - Helping institutions evolve their working practices to accommodate the adoption of new technologies and technology-enhanced working practices and embed good practices in staff development by working through a range of relevant professional bodies and associations.
      • Supporting Training, CPD and Staff Exchange for BCE Practitioners (Simon) – Supporting institutions in making the process and technological changes (driven by strategic goals) to sustain efficient, effective BCE.
    • 26/11/2010| Supporting education and research | Slide 22
      Institutional Strategy, Agility, and Intelligence (1)
      • This work area broadens JOS’ earlier focus on information strategies to encompass the role of technology more widely in enhancing the strategic management of institutions and transformation of their business.
      • Institutions can derive much value from effective management of their relationships and information / data flows with partners, students, and other stakeholders. Accurate management of student data in particular can have a serious impact on business viability if retention and completion issues go undetected.
      • This work area concerns not just the application of ICT for information management, but also what management information itself can be harnessed to enhance the quality of institutional decision making – ie, what are senior managers’ information needs, and how can they be met?
    • 26/11/2010| Supporting education and research | Slide 23
      Institutional Strategy, Agility, and Intelligence (2)
      • Activities will help institutions to exploit the information they already have, obtain relevant external data in a timely, filtered and relevant way, manage both (taking account of compliance with relevant legislation and any wider ‘ethical’ issues in the field of information governance), and provide as intelligence for business advantage.
      • They are also designed to support the development of both more technology-aware senior managers, and more business-aware ICT managers, furthering the alignment of business and technology goals to the point at which ICT becomes ‘just another facet of the business environment’ senior management teams contend with and provision is made to take account of its issues (and manage its risks) accordingly and with an appropriate level of understanding.
    • 26/11/2010| Supporting education and research | Slide 24
      Institutional Strategy, Agility, and Intelligence (3)
      • Information Management for Senior Managers (Myles) – Investigating the information requirements of senior managers to help their decision making processes and developing guidance around the application of business intelligence tools and techniques
      • Relationship Management (Myles / Simon) – Investigating enterprise-wide approaches to coherently managing the complex interactions with students at all stages of the student lifecycle – from prospective students to alumni; and with external business and community partners or customers; in order to enhance the student experience and deliver business sustainability.
      • Collaborative Tools for BCE (Simon) – Enhancing and empowering BCE collaboration among practitioners, between institutions and between institutions and external partners, through the use of web technologies.
    • 26/11/2010| Supporting education and research | Slide 25
      Institutional Strategy, Agility, and Intelligence (4)
      • Strategy, Planning and Implementation (Myles) – Supporting the strategic management and planning within institutions in the sectorthrough the development of a Strategic Planning and Implementation toolkit.
      • Technology and Institutional Strategies (Myles) – Working in partnership with the Leadership Foundation for Higher Education (LFHE) to help senior managers understand the strategic value of technology and its relevance to their planning. The production of a self evaluation framework will enable institutions to assess their levels of maturity in ICT governance; pilot projects will utilise the framework and inform its future development.
    • 26/11/2010| Supporting education and research | Slide 26
      Administrative Computing and Shared Services (1)
      • The way in which institutions deliver their corporate ICT functions is changing. Investment in open standards and Service Oriented Approaches (soa) to systems integration is bringing the administrative computing marketplace to a state where informed, ‘intelligent’ customers can pick and mix to design end-to-end solutions that best suit their particular business needs.
      • Driven by the demands of these intelligent customers, vendors are beginning to open up their software suites and disaggregate them into affordable component parts. This disaggregation affords the opportunity for niche players to compete on more equal terms and provide best-of-breed functionality in key areas.
      • Institutional customers in this mixed economy are concerned only that the end-to-end service these components provides does the job, solves their problems, and just works.
    • 26/11/2010| Supporting education and research | Slide 27
      Administrative Computing and Shared Services (2)
      • Activities under this work area are designed to help institutions improve their business processes, better understand their system architectures and ICT governance structures, and become better prepared overall to exploit such new business models for the delivery of their administrative and other corporate information functions through a seamlessly integrated and aggregated array of in-house systems (proprietary and open source) and off-campus services.
    • 26/11/2010| Supporting education and research | Slide 28
      Administrative Computing and Shared Services (3)
      • Enterprise Architectures (Alex) – Helping senior managers achieve a Flexible Service Delivery environment through business process change and improved ICT governance.
      • e-Framework (Alex) – Support for the e-Framework Partnership for Education and Research, enabling a number of participating international agencies to share approaches to a range of similar challenges and issues and to enable strategic cooperation in pursuit of more widespread adoption of Service Oriented Approaches (soa).
      • Flexible Service Delivery (Alex); including University Modernisation Fund – Establishing Shared Services in the Admin Domain (John) – Helping the sector to exploit a mixed economy, where retained in-house systems integrate with off-campus services (whether through shared services amongst institutions, from a trusted single partner, or in ‘the cloud’).
    • 26/11/2010| Supporting education and research | Slide 29
      External Impact (1)
      • This work area maintains a perspective on institutions’ external focus (including their impact on the UK’s economy and society, and consideration of their global position and relationships), as well as how institutions can grow their business, rather than simply running their business.
       
    • 26/11/2010| Supporting education and research | Slide 30
      External Impact (2)
      • Activities concern institutional knowledge exchange, access to resources, and support for open innovation paradigms; institutions’ relationships with SMEs and other businesses as both co-development partners and as employers with a significant stake in the education of their local workforces, and wider a engagement agenda with business and social communities in pursuit of public and civic value.
    • 26/11/2010| Supporting education and research | Slide 31
      External Impact (3)
      • SME Empowerment and Engagement (Simon)– Helping institutions engage with SMEs more efficiently and effectively through the use of technology and enhanced processes.
      • Access toResources (Simon) – Enabling SMEs and other external organisations and individuals, as well as BCE practitioners, to engage with institutions and to access and utilise the institutions’ business information knowledge assets and data.
      • Open Innovation (Simon) – Widening access to institutional applied knowledge in-development; opening up institutional ideas and services for co-development with collaborating external groups.
      • BCE Awareness and Education (Simon) – Enhancing the knowledge and capability in JISC and the wider JISC community in order to support institutions in their BCE activities.
    • 25/11/2010| Supporting education and research | Slide 32
      Dissemination agendas (1)
      • Programmes outputs are collated under ‘dissemination agendas’ – internal comms themes to help group findings and messages from all JOS programmes (potentially scaling to other committee’s work) according to themes derived from analysis of institutions missions and published aspirations
      • These ‘agendas’ are not designed to be exposed externally; they’re a knowledge management tool
      • They map onto JISC’s corporate comms themes (and ‘impact pots’)
      • Each is led by a programme manager, with support from colleagues with an interest in the agenda, who has responsibility (working with JISC Comms) to develop comms plans on an agenda basis rather than by individual programme
    • 26/11/2010| Supporting education and research | Slide 33
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    • 25/11/2010| Supporting education and research | Slide 39
      Dissemination agendas (2)
      • X
    • 25/11/2010| Supporting education and research | Slide 40
      Dissemination agendas (3)
      • X
    • 25/11/2010| Supporting education and research | Slide 41
      Dissemination agendas (4)
      • X
    • 26/11/2010| Supporting education and research | Slide 42
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