Evolution of student atlas design in Australia

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  • - presentation part of Masters research program looking at developing a multi-publishing framework for atlas production\n- research born from working on the 7th edition of the Jacaranda Atlas\n- design, production and publishing of a school atlas is a costly and risky venture (Sandford 1985)\n- demands on the publisher by the users (students and teachers) and the curriculum to provide quality content in an engaging and informative way is ever-present.\n- traditional print-based media, such as newspapers, magazines and books, have created complimentary digital editions for their users. At the same time, the paradigm of how the user consumes this information is changing, as too how the information can readily be incorporated into multiple delivery systems.\n
  • - presentation part of Masters research program looking at developing a multi-publishing framework for atlas production\n- research born from working on the 7th edition of the Jacaranda Atlas\n- design, production and publishing of a school atlas is a costly and risky venture (Sandford 1985)\n- demands on the publisher by the users (students and teachers) and the curriculum to provide quality content in an engaging and informative way is ever-present.\n- traditional print-based media, such as newspapers, magazines and books, have created complimentary digital editions for their users. At the same time, the paradigm of how the user consumes this information is changing, as too how the information can readily be incorporated into multiple delivery systems.\n
  • - presentation part of Masters research program looking at developing a multi-publishing framework for atlas production\n- research born from working on the 7th edition of the Jacaranda Atlas\n- design, production and publishing of a school atlas is a costly and risky venture (Sandford 1985)\n- demands on the publisher by the users (students and teachers) and the curriculum to provide quality content in an engaging and informative way is ever-present.\n- traditional print-based media, such as newspapers, magazines and books, have created complimentary digital editions for their users. At the same time, the paradigm of how the user consumes this information is changing, as too how the information can readily be incorporated into multiple delivery systems.\n
  • - presentation part of Masters research program looking at developing a multi-publishing framework for atlas production\n- research born from working on the 7th edition of the Jacaranda Atlas\n- design, production and publishing of a school atlas is a costly and risky venture (Sandford 1985)\n- demands on the publisher by the users (students and teachers) and the curriculum to provide quality content in an engaging and informative way is ever-present.\n- traditional print-based media, such as newspapers, magazines and books, have created complimentary digital editions for their users. At the same time, the paradigm of how the user consumes this information is changing, as too how the information can readily be incorporated into multiple delivery systems.\n
  • - presentation part of Masters research program looking at developing a multi-publishing framework for atlas production\n- research born from working on the 7th edition of the Jacaranda Atlas\n- design, production and publishing of a school atlas is a costly and risky venture (Sandford 1985)\n- demands on the publisher by the users (students and teachers) and the curriculum to provide quality content in an engaging and informative way is ever-present.\n- traditional print-based media, such as newspapers, magazines and books, have created complimentary digital editions for their users. At the same time, the paradigm of how the user consumes this information is changing, as too how the information can readily be incorporated into multiple delivery systems.\n
  • - goal of this initial research is how technology and research affected the design of student atlases\n- following stages will be to develop a multi-publishing framework for student atlases\n- understand the design considerations for each type of publishing and develop guidelines for each\n- create a prototype framework and develop example maps\n
  • - goal of this initial research is how technology and research affected the design of student atlases\n- following stages will be to develop a multi-publishing framework for student atlases\n- understand the design considerations for each type of publishing and develop guidelines for each\n- create a prototype framework and develop example maps\n
  • - goal of this initial research is how technology and research affected the design of student atlases\n- following stages will be to develop a multi-publishing framework for student atlases\n- understand the design considerations for each type of publishing and develop guidelines for each\n- create a prototype framework and develop example maps\n
  • - goal of this initial research is how technology and research affected the design of student atlases\n- following stages will be to develop a multi-publishing framework for student atlases\n- understand the design considerations for each type of publishing and develop guidelines for each\n- create a prototype framework and develop example maps\n
  • - goal of this initial research is how technology and research affected the design of student atlases\n- following stages will be to develop a multi-publishing framework for student atlases\n- understand the design considerations for each type of publishing and develop guidelines for each\n- create a prototype framework and develop example maps\n
  • - designs for print, web and mobile vary. Different colour spaces, screen sizes, map scales and map extents\n- choice of font style and size, the colours used and their combinations, size and orientation of maps, to name a few (Jenny et al. 2008)\n- digital products can have multi-scale seamless maps allowing pan and zoom, whilst print products can have maps in different projections and at defined scales for best presentation\n- digital products allow for user interaction with data\n- cartographers need to be mindful of the user experience when design maps with interactivity\n- ultimate desire is to have a ‘design once-publish many’ multi-publishing framework\n
  • - designs for print, web and mobile vary. Different colour spaces, screen sizes, map scales and map extents\n- choice of font style and size, the colours used and their combinations, size and orientation of maps, to name a few (Jenny et al. 2008)\n- digital products can have multi-scale seamless maps allowing pan and zoom, whilst print products can have maps in different projections and at defined scales for best presentation\n- digital products allow for user interaction with data\n- cartographers need to be mindful of the user experience when design maps with interactivity\n- ultimate desire is to have a ‘design once-publish many’ multi-publishing framework\n
  • - designs for print, web and mobile vary. Different colour spaces, screen sizes, map scales and map extents\n- choice of font style and size, the colours used and their combinations, size and orientation of maps, to name a few (Jenny et al. 2008)\n- digital products can have multi-scale seamless maps allowing pan and zoom, whilst print products can have maps in different projections and at defined scales for best presentation\n- digital products allow for user interaction with data\n- cartographers need to be mindful of the user experience when design maps with interactivity\n- ultimate desire is to have a ‘design once-publish many’ multi-publishing framework\n
  • - designs for print, web and mobile vary. Different colour spaces, screen sizes, map scales and map extents\n- choice of font style and size, the colours used and their combinations, size and orientation of maps, to name a few (Jenny et al. 2008)\n- digital products can have multi-scale seamless maps allowing pan and zoom, whilst print products can have maps in different projections and at defined scales for best presentation\n- digital products allow for user interaction with data\n- cartographers need to be mindful of the user experience when design maps with interactivity\n- ultimate desire is to have a ‘design once-publish many’ multi-publishing framework\n
  • - designs for print, web and mobile vary. Different colour spaces, screen sizes, map scales and map extents\n- choice of font style and size, the colours used and their combinations, size and orientation of maps, to name a few (Jenny et al. 2008)\n- digital products can have multi-scale seamless maps allowing pan and zoom, whilst print products can have maps in different projections and at defined scales for best presentation\n- digital products allow for user interaction with data\n- cartographers need to be mindful of the user experience when design maps with interactivity\n- ultimate desire is to have a ‘design once-publish many’ multi-publishing framework\n
  • - designs for print, web and mobile vary. Different colour spaces, screen sizes, map scales and map extents\n- choice of font style and size, the colours used and their combinations, size and orientation of maps, to name a few (Jenny et al. 2008)\n- digital products can have multi-scale seamless maps allowing pan and zoom, whilst print products can have maps in different projections and at defined scales for best presentation\n- digital products allow for user interaction with data\n- cartographers need to be mindful of the user experience when design maps with interactivity\n- ultimate desire is to have a ‘design once-publish many’ multi-publishing framework\n
  • - designs for print, web and mobile vary. Different colour spaces, screen sizes, map scales and map extents\n- choice of font style and size, the colours used and their combinations, size and orientation of maps, to name a few (Jenny et al. 2008)\n- digital products can have multi-scale seamless maps allowing pan and zoom, whilst print products can have maps in different projections and at defined scales for best presentation\n- digital products allow for user interaction with data\n- cartographers need to be mindful of the user experience when design maps with interactivity\n- ultimate desire is to have a ‘design once-publish many’ multi-publishing framework\n
  • - Let’s look at what an atlas is...\n- Definitions\n- Oxford dictionary defines an atlas as...\n- As digital atlases began to develop Koop defined an atlas as...\n- With multiple delivery methods becoming common Cartwright defined an atlas as...\n
  • - Let’s look at what an atlas is...\n- Definitions\n- Oxford dictionary defines an atlas as...\n- As digital atlases began to develop Koop defined an atlas as...\n- With multiple delivery methods becoming common Cartwright defined an atlas as...\n
  • - Let’s look at what an atlas is...\n- Definitions\n- Oxford dictionary defines an atlas as...\n- As digital atlases began to develop Koop defined an atlas as...\n- With multiple delivery methods becoming common Cartwright defined an atlas as...\n
  • - Let’s look at what an atlas is...\n- Definitions\n- Oxford dictionary defines an atlas as...\n- As digital atlases began to develop Koop defined an atlas as...\n- With multiple delivery methods becoming common Cartwright defined an atlas as...\n
  • - Let’s look at what an atlas is...\n- Definitions\n- Oxford dictionary defines an atlas as...\n- As digital atlases began to develop Koop defined an atlas as...\n- With multiple delivery methods becoming common Cartwright defined an atlas as...\n
  • - Since 1870 there has been over 120 student atlases published in Australia\n- The first student atlases in Australia were made up of relatively few pages. Whiteheads Australasian School Atlas of 1870 contained only 10 pages (not including covers), whilst Pearson’s Australasian School Atlas of 1890 contained only 12\n- 1920s Collins and Oxford publishing houses began producing atlases for Australian students.\n- George Philip and Son, from Great Britain, was another publisher to make their mark in the student atlas frontier in Australia. Publishing their first atlas in Australia in 1871, the George Philip and Son brand was to remain with Australian students until the late 1970s\n- The firm of H. E. C. Robinson began in 1895 by Herbert Edward Cooper Robinson. During the 1940s the Australian publisher, H. E. C. Robinson, began publishing student atlases.\n- The atlas that was to have perhaps the greatest influence in terms of design was the Jacaranda Atlas. First published in 1969 this atlas went on to dominate school book lists from the 1970s to the present day.\n- By the 1990s other scholastic publishers joined Jacaranda in the student atlas market. Names such as Longman Cheshire, Macmillan, Oxford University Press and Heinemann were vying for the educational dollar.\n- The major student atlases of today—Jacaranda, Heinemann and Oxford—have moved into the digital age. Previous editions included a CD-ROM with an interactive version of the atlas\n- The most recent publications of the Jacaranda Atlas and the Oxford Atlas 3 provide companion websites.\n
  • - Since 1870 there has been over 120 student atlases published in Australia\n- The first student atlases in Australia were made up of relatively few pages. Whiteheads Australasian School Atlas of 1870 contained only 10 pages (not including covers), whilst Pearson’s Australasian School Atlas of 1890 contained only 12\n- 1920s Collins and Oxford publishing houses began producing atlases for Australian students.\n- George Philip and Son, from Great Britain, was another publisher to make their mark in the student atlas frontier in Australia. Publishing their first atlas in Australia in 1871, the George Philip and Son brand was to remain with Australian students until the late 1970s\n- The firm of H. E. C. Robinson began in 1895 by Herbert Edward Cooper Robinson. During the 1940s the Australian publisher, H. E. C. Robinson, began publishing student atlases.\n- The atlas that was to have perhaps the greatest influence in terms of design was the Jacaranda Atlas. First published in 1969 this atlas went on to dominate school book lists from the 1970s to the present day.\n- By the 1990s other scholastic publishers joined Jacaranda in the student atlas market. Names such as Longman Cheshire, Macmillan, Oxford University Press and Heinemann were vying for the educational dollar.\n- The major student atlases of today—Jacaranda, Heinemann and Oxford—have moved into the digital age. Previous editions included a CD-ROM with an interactive version of the atlas\n- The most recent publications of the Jacaranda Atlas and the Oxford Atlas 3 provide companion websites.\n
  • - Since 1870 there has been over 120 student atlases published in Australia\n- The first student atlases in Australia were made up of relatively few pages. Whiteheads Australasian School Atlas of 1870 contained only 10 pages (not including covers), whilst Pearson’s Australasian School Atlas of 1890 contained only 12\n- 1920s Collins and Oxford publishing houses began producing atlases for Australian students.\n- George Philip and Son, from Great Britain, was another publisher to make their mark in the student atlas frontier in Australia. Publishing their first atlas in Australia in 1871, the George Philip and Son brand was to remain with Australian students until the late 1970s\n- The firm of H. E. C. Robinson began in 1895 by Herbert Edward Cooper Robinson. During the 1940s the Australian publisher, H. E. C. Robinson, began publishing student atlases.\n- The atlas that was to have perhaps the greatest influence in terms of design was the Jacaranda Atlas. First published in 1969 this atlas went on to dominate school book lists from the 1970s to the present day.\n- By the 1990s other scholastic publishers joined Jacaranda in the student atlas market. Names such as Longman Cheshire, Macmillan, Oxford University Press and Heinemann were vying for the educational dollar.\n- The major student atlases of today—Jacaranda, Heinemann and Oxford—have moved into the digital age. Previous editions included a CD-ROM with an interactive version of the atlas\n- The most recent publications of the Jacaranda Atlas and the Oxford Atlas 3 provide companion websites.\n
  • - Since 1870 there has been over 120 student atlases published in Australia\n- The first student atlases in Australia were made up of relatively few pages. Whiteheads Australasian School Atlas of 1870 contained only 10 pages (not including covers), whilst Pearson’s Australasian School Atlas of 1890 contained only 12\n- 1920s Collins and Oxford publishing houses began producing atlases for Australian students.\n- George Philip and Son, from Great Britain, was another publisher to make their mark in the student atlas frontier in Australia. Publishing their first atlas in Australia in 1871, the George Philip and Son brand was to remain with Australian students until the late 1970s\n- The firm of H. E. C. Robinson began in 1895 by Herbert Edward Cooper Robinson. During the 1940s the Australian publisher, H. E. C. Robinson, began publishing student atlases.\n- The atlas that was to have perhaps the greatest influence in terms of design was the Jacaranda Atlas. First published in 1969 this atlas went on to dominate school book lists from the 1970s to the present day.\n- By the 1990s other scholastic publishers joined Jacaranda in the student atlas market. Names such as Longman Cheshire, Macmillan, Oxford University Press and Heinemann were vying for the educational dollar.\n- The major student atlases of today—Jacaranda, Heinemann and Oxford—have moved into the digital age. Previous editions included a CD-ROM with an interactive version of the atlas\n- The most recent publications of the Jacaranda Atlas and the Oxford Atlas 3 provide companion websites.\n
  • - Since 1870 there has been over 120 student atlases published in Australia\n- The first student atlases in Australia were made up of relatively few pages. Whiteheads Australasian School Atlas of 1870 contained only 10 pages (not including covers), whilst Pearson’s Australasian School Atlas of 1890 contained only 12\n- 1920s Collins and Oxford publishing houses began producing atlases for Australian students.\n- George Philip and Son, from Great Britain, was another publisher to make their mark in the student atlas frontier in Australia. Publishing their first atlas in Australia in 1871, the George Philip and Son brand was to remain with Australian students until the late 1970s\n- The firm of H. E. C. Robinson began in 1895 by Herbert Edward Cooper Robinson. During the 1940s the Australian publisher, H. E. C. Robinson, began publishing student atlases.\n- The atlas that was to have perhaps the greatest influence in terms of design was the Jacaranda Atlas. First published in 1969 this atlas went on to dominate school book lists from the 1970s to the present day.\n- By the 1990s other scholastic publishers joined Jacaranda in the student atlas market. Names such as Longman Cheshire, Macmillan, Oxford University Press and Heinemann were vying for the educational dollar.\n- The major student atlases of today—Jacaranda, Heinemann and Oxford—have moved into the digital age. Previous editions included a CD-ROM with an interactive version of the atlas\n- The most recent publications of the Jacaranda Atlas and the Oxford Atlas 3 provide companion websites.\n
  • - Since 1870 there has been over 120 student atlases published in Australia\n- The first student atlases in Australia were made up of relatively few pages. Whiteheads Australasian School Atlas of 1870 contained only 10 pages (not including covers), whilst Pearson’s Australasian School Atlas of 1890 contained only 12\n- 1920s Collins and Oxford publishing houses began producing atlases for Australian students.\n- George Philip and Son, from Great Britain, was another publisher to make their mark in the student atlas frontier in Australia. Publishing their first atlas in Australia in 1871, the George Philip and Son brand was to remain with Australian students until the late 1970s\n- The firm of H. E. C. Robinson began in 1895 by Herbert Edward Cooper Robinson. During the 1940s the Australian publisher, H. E. C. Robinson, began publishing student atlases.\n- The atlas that was to have perhaps the greatest influence in terms of design was the Jacaranda Atlas. First published in 1969 this atlas went on to dominate school book lists from the 1970s to the present day.\n- By the 1990s other scholastic publishers joined Jacaranda in the student atlas market. Names such as Longman Cheshire, Macmillan, Oxford University Press and Heinemann were vying for the educational dollar.\n- The major student atlases of today—Jacaranda, Heinemann and Oxford—have moved into the digital age. Previous editions included a CD-ROM with an interactive version of the atlas\n- The most recent publications of the Jacaranda Atlas and the Oxford Atlas 3 provide companion websites.\n
  • - Since 1870 there has been over 120 student atlases published in Australia\n- The first student atlases in Australia were made up of relatively few pages. Whiteheads Australasian School Atlas of 1870 contained only 10 pages (not including covers), whilst Pearson’s Australasian School Atlas of 1890 contained only 12\n- 1920s Collins and Oxford publishing houses began producing atlases for Australian students.\n- George Philip and Son, from Great Britain, was another publisher to make their mark in the student atlas frontier in Australia. Publishing their first atlas in Australia in 1871, the George Philip and Son brand was to remain with Australian students until the late 1970s\n- The firm of H. E. C. Robinson began in 1895 by Herbert Edward Cooper Robinson. During the 1940s the Australian publisher, H. E. C. Robinson, began publishing student atlases.\n- The atlas that was to have perhaps the greatest influence in terms of design was the Jacaranda Atlas. First published in 1969 this atlas went on to dominate school book lists from the 1970s to the present day.\n- By the 1990s other scholastic publishers joined Jacaranda in the student atlas market. Names such as Longman Cheshire, Macmillan, Oxford University Press and Heinemann were vying for the educational dollar.\n- The major student atlases of today—Jacaranda, Heinemann and Oxford—have moved into the digital age. Previous editions included a CD-ROM with an interactive version of the atlas\n- The most recent publications of the Jacaranda Atlas and the Oxford Atlas 3 provide companion websites.\n
  • - Significant features\n1 colour printing\nadditional colour was an expensive option\nlimited data\nhand lettering, shaped text and parallel to grid\nProduction methods\ncartography done by hand, interpreted by lithographer\nlithographic printing\nResearch\nnone to that point\nfirst real research began in early 1900s\n
  • - Significant features\n1 colour printing\nadditional colour was an expensive option\nlimited data\nhand lettering, shaped text and parallel to grid\nProduction methods\ncartography done by hand, interpreted by lithographer\nlithographic printing\nResearch\nnone to that point\nfirst real research began in early 1900s\n
  • - Significant features\n1 colour printing\nadditional colour was an expensive option\nlimited data\nhand lettering, shaped text and parallel to grid\nProduction methods\ncartography done by hand, interpreted by lithographer\nlithographic printing\nResearch\nnone to that point\nfirst real research began in early 1900s\n
  • - Significant features\n1 colour printing\nadditional colour was an expensive option\nlimited data\nhand lettering, shaped text and parallel to grid\nProduction methods\ncartography done by hand, interpreted by lithographer\nlithographic printing\nResearch\nnone to that point\nfirst real research began in early 1900s\n
  • - Significant features\n1 colour printing\nadditional colour was an expensive option\nlimited data\nhand lettering, shaped text and parallel to grid\nProduction methods\ncartography done by hand, interpreted by lithographer\nlithographic printing\nResearch\nnone to that point\nfirst real research began in early 1900s\n
  • - Significant features\n1 colour printing\nadditional colour was an expensive option\nlimited data\nhand lettering, shaped text and parallel to grid\nProduction methods\ncartography done by hand, interpreted by lithographer\nlithographic printing\nResearch\nnone to that point\nfirst real research began in early 1900s\n
  • - Significant features\n1 colour printing\nadditional colour was an expensive option\nlimited data\nhand lettering, shaped text and parallel to grid\nProduction methods\ncartography done by hand, interpreted by lithographer\nlithographic printing\nResearch\nnone to that point\nfirst real research began in early 1900s\n
  • - Significant features\n1 colour printing\nadditional colour was an expensive option\nlimited data\nhand lettering, shaped text and parallel to grid\nProduction methods\ncartography done by hand, interpreted by lithographer\nlithographic printing\nResearch\nnone to that point\nfirst real research began in early 1900s\n
  • Significant map features\n introduction of relief representation\n multi-colour maps\n typographic language\n alpha-numeric gazetteer indexes\n generalised content\n Production methods\n cartography done by hand, interpreted by lithographer \n chromo-lithography\n Research\n Eckert\n
  • Significant map features\n introduction of relief representation\n multi-colour maps\n typographic language\n alpha-numeric gazetteer indexes\n generalised content\n Production methods\n cartography done by hand, interpreted by lithographer \n chromo-lithography\n Research\n Eckert\n
  • Significant map features\n introduction of relief representation\n multi-colour maps\n typographic language\n alpha-numeric gazetteer indexes\n generalised content\n Production methods\n cartography done by hand, interpreted by lithographer \n chromo-lithography\n Research\n Eckert\n
  • Significant map features\n introduction of relief representation\n multi-colour maps\n typographic language\n alpha-numeric gazetteer indexes\n generalised content\n Production methods\n cartography done by hand, interpreted by lithographer \n chromo-lithography\n Research\n Eckert\n
  • Significant map features\n introduction of relief representation\n multi-colour maps\n typographic language\n alpha-numeric gazetteer indexes\n generalised content\n Production methods\n cartography done by hand, interpreted by lithographer \n chromo-lithography\n Research\n Eckert\n
  • Significant map features\n introduction of relief representation\n multi-colour maps\n typographic language\n alpha-numeric gazetteer indexes\n generalised content\n Production methods\n cartography done by hand, interpreted by lithographer \n chromo-lithography\n Research\n Eckert\n
  • Significant map features\n introduction of relief representation\n multi-colour maps\n typographic language\n alpha-numeric gazetteer indexes\n generalised content\n Production methods\n cartography done by hand, interpreted by lithographer \n chromo-lithography\n Research\n Eckert\n
  • Significant map features\n introduction of relief representation\n multi-colour maps\n typographic language\n alpha-numeric gazetteer indexes\n generalised content\n Production methods\n cartography done by hand, interpreted by lithographer \n chromo-lithography\n Research\n Eckert\n
  • Significant map features\n introduction of relief representation\n multi-colour maps\n typographic language\n alpha-numeric gazetteer indexes\n generalised content\n Production methods\n cartography done by hand, interpreted by lithographer \n chromo-lithography\n Research\n Eckert\n
  • Significant map features\n introduction of relief representation\n multi-colour maps\n typographic language\n alpha-numeric gazetteer indexes\n generalised content\n Production methods\n cartography done by hand, interpreted by lithographer \n chromo-lithography\n Research\n Eckert\n
  • Significant map features\nmultiple colours\nhypsometric tints\nalpha numeric grids more established\ngazetteer indexes\nProduction methods\nChromo-lithography/offset printing\nPen and ink drafting\nReprographic cameras\nResearch\nRobinson - The Look of Maps\n\n
  • Significant map features\nmultiple colours\nhypsometric tints\nalpha numeric grids more established\ngazetteer indexes\nProduction methods\nChromo-lithography/offset printing\nPen and ink drafting\nReprographic cameras\nResearch\nRobinson - The Look of Maps\n\n
  • Significant map features\nmultiple colours\nhypsometric tints\nalpha numeric grids more established\ngazetteer indexes\nProduction methods\nChromo-lithography/offset printing\nPen and ink drafting\nReprographic cameras\nResearch\nRobinson - The Look of Maps\n\n
  • Significant map features\nmultiple colours\nhypsometric tints\nalpha numeric grids more established\ngazetteer indexes\nProduction methods\nChromo-lithography/offset printing\nPen and ink drafting\nReprographic cameras\nResearch\nRobinson - The Look of Maps\n\n
  • Significant map features\nmultiple colours\nhypsometric tints\nalpha numeric grids more established\ngazetteer indexes\nProduction methods\nChromo-lithography/offset printing\nPen and ink drafting\nReprographic cameras\nResearch\nRobinson - The Look of Maps\n\n
  • Significant map features\nmultiple colours\nhypsometric tints\nalpha numeric grids more established\ngazetteer indexes\nProduction methods\nChromo-lithography/offset printing\nPen and ink drafting\nReprographic cameras\nResearch\nRobinson - The Look of Maps\n\n
  • Significant map features\nmultiple colours\nhypsometric tints\nalpha numeric grids more established\ngazetteer indexes\nProduction methods\nChromo-lithography/offset printing\nPen and ink drafting\nReprographic cameras\nResearch\nRobinson - The Look of Maps\n\n
  • Significant map features\nmultiple colours\nhypsometric tints\nalpha numeric grids more established\ngazetteer indexes\nProduction methods\nChromo-lithography/offset printing\nPen and ink drafting\nReprographic cameras\nResearch\nRobinson - The Look of Maps\n\n
  • Significant map features\nmultiple colours\nhypsometric tints\nalpha numeric grids more established\ngazetteer indexes\nProduction methods\nChromo-lithography/offset printing\nPen and ink drafting\nReprographic cameras\nResearch\nRobinson - The Look of Maps\n\n
  • Significant map features\nmultiple colours\nhypsometric tints\nalpha numeric grids more established\ngazetteer indexes\nProduction methods\nChromo-lithography/offset printing\nPen and ink drafting\nReprographic cameras\nResearch\nRobinson - The Look of Maps\n\n
  • Significant map features\nmultiple colours\nhypsometric tints\nalpha numeric grids more established\ngazetteer indexes\nProduction methods\nChromo-lithography/offset printing\nPen and ink drafting\nReprographic cameras\nResearch\nRobinson - The Look of Maps\n\n
  • Significant map features\nmultiple colours\nhypsometric tints\nalpha numeric grids more established\ngazetteer indexes\nProduction methods\nChromo-lithography/offset printing\nPen and ink drafting\nReprographic cameras\nResearch\nRobinson - The Look of Maps\n\n
  • Significant map features\nAlpha-numeric grids\nGazetteer indexes\nHypsometric tints - colour ramp changed\nText horizontal to grid\nSans serif fonts\nTypographic language\nProportional point symbols\nProduction methods\nOffset printing - improved reprographic technology—cameras, screens, etc\nResearch\nBertin - Semiology of Graphics, visual variables - eight variables that differentiate an object on a two dimensional plane. The variables—size, value, texture, colour, orientation and shape, plus its planar position and its position in a series\n Koláčný (1969), Robinson and Petchenik (1976), Freitag (1980), Board (1981) -development of communication model\nKeates, Gerber\nFlannery - proportional map symbols\n
  • Significant map features\nAlpha-numeric grids\nGazetteer indexes\nHypsometric tints - colour ramp changed\nText horizontal to grid\nSans serif fonts\nTypographic language\nProportional point symbols\nProduction methods\nOffset printing - improved reprographic technology—cameras, screens, etc\nResearch\nBertin - Semiology of Graphics, visual variables - eight variables that differentiate an object on a two dimensional plane. The variables—size, value, texture, colour, orientation and shape, plus its planar position and its position in a series\n Koláčný (1969), Robinson and Petchenik (1976), Freitag (1980), Board (1981) -development of communication model\nKeates, Gerber\nFlannery - proportional map symbols\n
  • Significant map features\nAlpha-numeric grids\nGazetteer indexes\nHypsometric tints - colour ramp changed\nText horizontal to grid\nSans serif fonts\nTypographic language\nProportional point symbols\nProduction methods\nOffset printing - improved reprographic technology—cameras, screens, etc\nResearch\nBertin - Semiology of Graphics, visual variables - eight variables that differentiate an object on a two dimensional plane. The variables—size, value, texture, colour, orientation and shape, plus its planar position and its position in a series\n Koláčný (1969), Robinson and Petchenik (1976), Freitag (1980), Board (1981) -development of communication model\nKeates, Gerber\nFlannery - proportional map symbols\n
  • Significant map features\nAlpha-numeric grids\nGazetteer indexes\nHypsometric tints - colour ramp changed\nText horizontal to grid\nSans serif fonts\nTypographic language\nProportional point symbols\nProduction methods\nOffset printing - improved reprographic technology—cameras, screens, etc\nResearch\nBertin - Semiology of Graphics, visual variables - eight variables that differentiate an object on a two dimensional plane. The variables—size, value, texture, colour, orientation and shape, plus its planar position and its position in a series\n Koláčný (1969), Robinson and Petchenik (1976), Freitag (1980), Board (1981) -development of communication model\nKeates, Gerber\nFlannery - proportional map symbols\n
  • Significant map features\nAlpha-numeric grids\nGazetteer indexes\nHypsometric tints - colour ramp changed\nText horizontal to grid\nSans serif fonts\nTypographic language\nProportional point symbols\nProduction methods\nOffset printing - improved reprographic technology—cameras, screens, etc\nResearch\nBertin - Semiology of Graphics, visual variables - eight variables that differentiate an object on a two dimensional plane. The variables—size, value, texture, colour, orientation and shape, plus its planar position and its position in a series\n Koláčný (1969), Robinson and Petchenik (1976), Freitag (1980), Board (1981) -development of communication model\nKeates, Gerber\nFlannery - proportional map symbols\n
  • Significant map features\nAlpha-numeric grids\nGazetteer indexes\nHypsometric tints - colour ramp changed\nText horizontal to grid\nSans serif fonts\nTypographic language\nProportional point symbols\nProduction methods\nOffset printing - improved reprographic technology—cameras, screens, etc\nResearch\nBertin - Semiology of Graphics, visual variables - eight variables that differentiate an object on a two dimensional plane. The variables—size, value, texture, colour, orientation and shape, plus its planar position and its position in a series\n Koláčný (1969), Robinson and Petchenik (1976), Freitag (1980), Board (1981) -development of communication model\nKeates, Gerber\nFlannery - proportional map symbols\n
  • Significant map features\nAlpha-numeric grids\nGazetteer indexes\nHypsometric tints - colour ramp changed\nText horizontal to grid\nSans serif fonts\nTypographic language\nProportional point symbols\nProduction methods\nOffset printing - improved reprographic technology—cameras, screens, etc\nResearch\nBertin - Semiology of Graphics, visual variables - eight variables that differentiate an object on a two dimensional plane. The variables—size, value, texture, colour, orientation and shape, plus its planar position and its position in a series\n Koláčný (1969), Robinson and Petchenik (1976), Freitag (1980), Board (1981) -development of communication model\nKeates, Gerber\nFlannery - proportional map symbols\n
  • Significant map features\nAlpha-numeric grids\nGazetteer indexes\nHypsometric tints - colour ramp changed\nText horizontal to grid\nSans serif fonts\nTypographic language\nProportional point symbols\nProduction methods\nOffset printing - improved reprographic technology—cameras, screens, etc\nResearch\nBertin - Semiology of Graphics, visual variables - eight variables that differentiate an object on a two dimensional plane. The variables—size, value, texture, colour, orientation and shape, plus its planar position and its position in a series\n Koláčný (1969), Robinson and Petchenik (1976), Freitag (1980), Board (1981) -development of communication model\nKeates, Gerber\nFlannery - proportional map symbols\n
  • Significant map features\nCurriculum based content\nMap content created from digital data\nAtlas content delivered on CD/DVD for multimedia experience\nAlternative hypsometry and land cover representation\nAge-appropriate content\nProduction methods\nIllustrator and AutoCAD used in production\nDesktop publishing & imagesetter technology\n4 colour CMYK printing\nDirect to plate technology\nStochastic screening\nResearch\nPatrick Wiegand\nCindy Brewer - colorbrewer - colour in choroplethic mapping\n
  • Significant map features\nCurriculum based content\nMap content created from digital data\nAtlas content delivered on CD/DVD for multimedia experience\nAlternative hypsometry and land cover representation\nAge-appropriate content\nProduction methods\nIllustrator and AutoCAD used in production\nDesktop publishing & imagesetter technology\n4 colour CMYK printing\nDirect to plate technology\nStochastic screening\nResearch\nPatrick Wiegand\nCindy Brewer - colorbrewer - colour in choroplethic mapping\n
  • Significant map features\nCurriculum based content\nMap content created from digital data\nAtlas content delivered on CD/DVD for multimedia experience\nAlternative hypsometry and land cover representation\nAge-appropriate content\nProduction methods\nIllustrator and AutoCAD used in production\nDesktop publishing & imagesetter technology\n4 colour CMYK printing\nDirect to plate technology\nStochastic screening\nResearch\nPatrick Wiegand\nCindy Brewer - colorbrewer - colour in choroplethic mapping\n
  • Significant map features\nCurriculum based content\nMap content created from digital data\nAtlas content delivered on CD/DVD for multimedia experience\nAlternative hypsometry and land cover representation\nAge-appropriate content\nProduction methods\nIllustrator and AutoCAD used in production\nDesktop publishing & imagesetter technology\n4 colour CMYK printing\nDirect to plate technology\nStochastic screening\nResearch\nPatrick Wiegand\nCindy Brewer - colorbrewer - colour in choroplethic mapping\n
  • Significant map features\nCurriculum based content\nMap content created from digital data\nAtlas content delivered on CD/DVD for multimedia experience\nAlternative hypsometry and land cover representation\nAge-appropriate content\nProduction methods\nIllustrator and AutoCAD used in production\nDesktop publishing & imagesetter technology\n4 colour CMYK printing\nDirect to plate technology\nStochastic screening\nResearch\nPatrick Wiegand\nCindy Brewer - colorbrewer - colour in choroplethic mapping\n
  • Significant map features\nCurriculum based content\nMap content created from digital data\nAtlas content delivered on CD/DVD for multimedia experience\nAlternative hypsometry and land cover representation\nAge-appropriate content\nProduction methods\nIllustrator and AutoCAD used in production\nDesktop publishing & imagesetter technology\n4 colour CMYK printing\nDirect to plate technology\nStochastic screening\nResearch\nPatrick Wiegand\nCindy Brewer - colorbrewer - colour in choroplethic mapping\n
  • Significant map features\nCurriculum based content\nMap content created from digital data\nAtlas content delivered on CD/DVD for multimedia experience\nAlternative hypsometry and land cover representation\nAge-appropriate content\nProduction methods\nIllustrator and AutoCAD used in production\nDesktop publishing & imagesetter technology\n4 colour CMYK printing\nDirect to plate technology\nStochastic screening\nResearch\nPatrick Wiegand\nCindy Brewer - colorbrewer - colour in choroplethic mapping\n
  • Significant map features\nCurriculum based content\nMap content created from digital data\nAtlas content delivered on CD/DVD for multimedia experience\nAlternative hypsometry and land cover representation\nAge-appropriate content\nProduction methods\nIllustrator and AutoCAD used in production\nDesktop publishing & imagesetter technology\n4 colour CMYK printing\nDirect to plate technology\nStochastic screening\nResearch\nPatrick Wiegand\nCindy Brewer - colorbrewer - colour in choroplethic mapping\n
  • The desired publishing outcome is to create a multi-publishing workflow, whereby the cartographer can create a map design that will be consistent across three different delivery platforms—print, web and tablet devices—a ‘design once, publish many’ system.\n- today offset printing technology has improved - 6 colour presses\n- high quality global and local data is now freely available\n- software technology has improved for better visualisations and GIS technology has improved allowing for integration into publishing workflows\n- atlases have developed from purely reference sources to including curriculum based content\n- atlas content and cartographic designs are developed with the age of the user in mind - primary school atlases and secondary school atlases are separate products\n
  • The desired publishing outcome is to create a multi-publishing workflow, whereby the cartographer can create a map design that will be consistent across three different delivery platforms—print, web and tablet devices—a ‘design once, publish many’ system.\n- today offset printing technology has improved - 6 colour presses\n- high quality global and local data is now freely available\n- software technology has improved for better visualisations and GIS technology has improved allowing for integration into publishing workflows\n- atlases have developed from purely reference sources to including curriculum based content\n- atlas content and cartographic designs are developed with the age of the user in mind - primary school atlases and secondary school atlases are separate products\n
  • The desired publishing outcome is to create a multi-publishing workflow, whereby the cartographer can create a map design that will be consistent across three different delivery platforms—print, web and tablet devices—a ‘design once, publish many’ system.\n- today offset printing technology has improved - 6 colour presses\n- high quality global and local data is now freely available\n- software technology has improved for better visualisations and GIS technology has improved allowing for integration into publishing workflows\n- atlases have developed from purely reference sources to including curriculum based content\n- atlas content and cartographic designs are developed with the age of the user in mind - primary school atlases and secondary school atlases are separate products\n
  • The desired publishing outcome is to create a multi-publishing workflow, whereby the cartographer can create a map design that will be consistent across three different delivery platforms—print, web and tablet devices—a ‘design once, publish many’ system.\n- today offset printing technology has improved - 6 colour presses\n- high quality global and local data is now freely available\n- software technology has improved for better visualisations and GIS technology has improved allowing for integration into publishing workflows\n- atlases have developed from purely reference sources to including curriculum based content\n- atlas content and cartographic designs are developed with the age of the user in mind - primary school atlases and secondary school atlases are separate products\n
  • The desired publishing outcome is to create a multi-publishing workflow, whereby the cartographer can create a map design that will be consistent across three different delivery platforms—print, web and tablet devices—a ‘design once, publish many’ system.\n- today offset printing technology has improved - 6 colour presses\n- high quality global and local data is now freely available\n- software technology has improved for better visualisations and GIS technology has improved allowing for integration into publishing workflows\n- atlases have developed from purely reference sources to including curriculum based content\n- atlas content and cartographic designs are developed with the age of the user in mind - primary school atlases and secondary school atlases are separate products\n
  • The desired publishing outcome is to create a multi-publishing workflow, whereby the cartographer can create a map design that will be consistent across three different delivery platforms—print, web and tablet devices—a ‘design once, publish many’ system.\n- today offset printing technology has improved - 6 colour presses\n- high quality global and local data is now freely available\n- software technology has improved for better visualisations and GIS technology has improved allowing for integration into publishing workflows\n- atlases have developed from purely reference sources to including curriculum based content\n- atlas content and cartographic designs are developed with the age of the user in mind - primary school atlases and secondary school atlases are separate products\n
  • Since the development of Google Maps in 2005 publishers have been looking to provide an attractive and informative way of providing atlas content through the world wide web.\nAdvantage for publishers is that they can control the look and feel of the maps, making them consistent with the published atlas\n- mapping can be seamless global coverage\n- scale varies throughout the coverage. user can zoom in and out, plus panning\nDisadvantages are that students no longer understand the concepts of map projections, as there is one continuous projection covering the globe; direction is no longer important as the map always has north at the top of the screen\n- dynamic data can be added from geoRSS feeds or user created data\n- displaying tile-based mapping and large quantities of data requires high speed broadband connection. this is not always available. NBN by 2018 should reach 93% of Australians, which may overcome accessibility issues. By 2020 every school should be connected\n- not all students have access to the same technology - different operating systems, different hardware, different screen sizes and resolutions\n- suitable content needs to be created appropriate to the age of the user. can be difficult to design and display content suitable for a wide spectrum of ages\n
  • Since the development of Google Maps in 2005 publishers have been looking to provide an attractive and informative way of providing atlas content through the world wide web.\nAdvantage for publishers is that they can control the look and feel of the maps, making them consistent with the published atlas\n- mapping can be seamless global coverage\n- scale varies throughout the coverage. user can zoom in and out, plus panning\nDisadvantages are that students no longer understand the concepts of map projections, as there is one continuous projection covering the globe; direction is no longer important as the map always has north at the top of the screen\n- dynamic data can be added from geoRSS feeds or user created data\n- displaying tile-based mapping and large quantities of data requires high speed broadband connection. this is not always available. NBN by 2018 should reach 93% of Australians, which may overcome accessibility issues. By 2020 every school should be connected\n- not all students have access to the same technology - different operating systems, different hardware, different screen sizes and resolutions\n- suitable content needs to be created appropriate to the age of the user. can be difficult to design and display content suitable for a wide spectrum of ages\n
  • Since the development of Google Maps in 2005 publishers have been looking to provide an attractive and informative way of providing atlas content through the world wide web.\nAdvantage for publishers is that they can control the look and feel of the maps, making them consistent with the published atlas\n- mapping can be seamless global coverage\n- scale varies throughout the coverage. user can zoom in and out, plus panning\nDisadvantages are that students no longer understand the concepts of map projections, as there is one continuous projection covering the globe; direction is no longer important as the map always has north at the top of the screen\n- dynamic data can be added from geoRSS feeds or user created data\n- displaying tile-based mapping and large quantities of data requires high speed broadband connection. this is not always available. NBN by 2018 should reach 93% of Australians, which may overcome accessibility issues. By 2020 every school should be connected\n- not all students have access to the same technology - different operating systems, different hardware, different screen sizes and resolutions\n- suitable content needs to be created appropriate to the age of the user. can be difficult to design and display content suitable for a wide spectrum of ages\n
  • Since the development of Google Maps in 2005 publishers have been looking to provide an attractive and informative way of providing atlas content through the world wide web.\nAdvantage for publishers is that they can control the look and feel of the maps, making them consistent with the published atlas\n- mapping can be seamless global coverage\n- scale varies throughout the coverage. user can zoom in and out, plus panning\nDisadvantages are that students no longer understand the concepts of map projections, as there is one continuous projection covering the globe; direction is no longer important as the map always has north at the top of the screen\n- dynamic data can be added from geoRSS feeds or user created data\n- displaying tile-based mapping and large quantities of data requires high speed broadband connection. this is not always available. NBN by 2018 should reach 93% of Australians, which may overcome accessibility issues. By 2020 every school should be connected\n- not all students have access to the same technology - different operating systems, different hardware, different screen sizes and resolutions\n- suitable content needs to be created appropriate to the age of the user. can be difficult to design and display content suitable for a wide spectrum of ages\n
  • Since the development of Google Maps in 2005 publishers have been looking to provide an attractive and informative way of providing atlas content through the world wide web.\nAdvantage for publishers is that they can control the look and feel of the maps, making them consistent with the published atlas\n- mapping can be seamless global coverage\n- scale varies throughout the coverage. user can zoom in and out, plus panning\nDisadvantages are that students no longer understand the concepts of map projections, as there is one continuous projection covering the globe; direction is no longer important as the map always has north at the top of the screen\n- dynamic data can be added from geoRSS feeds or user created data\n- displaying tile-based mapping and large quantities of data requires high speed broadband connection. this is not always available. NBN by 2018 should reach 93% of Australians, which may overcome accessibility issues. By 2020 every school should be connected\n- not all students have access to the same technology - different operating systems, different hardware, different screen sizes and resolutions\n- suitable content needs to be created appropriate to the age of the user. can be difficult to design and display content suitable for a wide spectrum of ages\n
  • Since the development of Google Maps in 2005 publishers have been looking to provide an attractive and informative way of providing atlas content through the world wide web.\nAdvantage for publishers is that they can control the look and feel of the maps, making them consistent with the published atlas\n- mapping can be seamless global coverage\n- scale varies throughout the coverage. user can zoom in and out, plus panning\nDisadvantages are that students no longer understand the concepts of map projections, as there is one continuous projection covering the globe; direction is no longer important as the map always has north at the top of the screen\n- dynamic data can be added from geoRSS feeds or user created data\n- displaying tile-based mapping and large quantities of data requires high speed broadband connection. this is not always available. NBN by 2018 should reach 93% of Australians, which may overcome accessibility issues. By 2020 every school should be connected\n- not all students have access to the same technology - different operating systems, different hardware, different screen sizes and resolutions\n- suitable content needs to be created appropriate to the age of the user. can be difficult to design and display content suitable for a wide spectrum of ages\n
  • Since the development of Google Maps in 2005 publishers have been looking to provide an attractive and informative way of providing atlas content through the world wide web.\nAdvantage for publishers is that they can control the look and feel of the maps, making them consistent with the published atlas\n- mapping can be seamless global coverage\n- scale varies throughout the coverage. user can zoom in and out, plus panning\nDisadvantages are that students no longer understand the concepts of map projections, as there is one continuous projection covering the globe; direction is no longer important as the map always has north at the top of the screen\n- dynamic data can be added from geoRSS feeds or user created data\n- displaying tile-based mapping and large quantities of data requires high speed broadband connection. this is not always available. NBN by 2018 should reach 93% of Australians, which may overcome accessibility issues. By 2020 every school should be connected\n- not all students have access to the same technology - different operating systems, different hardware, different screen sizes and resolutions\n- suitable content needs to be created appropriate to the age of the user. can be difficult to design and display content suitable for a wide spectrum of ages\n
  • Since the release of the iPad by Apple in 2010 technology companies have been clamoring to make a presence in the tablet device market. \nThis technology allows the user to remove the need for weighty textbooks and store their library on one device. \nability to access content wirelessly and through the 3G mobile phone network. \nFunctionality such as twin cameras for capturing still and video content; microphone for capturing audio and speaker for playback; digital compass and assisted GPS (wireless + 3G model only); 16GB, 32GB and 64GB storage; high resolution colour display; and accelerometer and 3D gyro for sensing the position of the tablet all provide in creating a user experience that encourages investigation and stimulates learning.\n- publishers have a choice of containing the atlas and associated data on the device, or streaming content via 3G or wifi\n- an issue in designing for tablet devices is the variations in screen dimensions. at least 4 different sizes amongst current models\n- publishers need to develop a delivery method that is platform neutral. atlas needs to operate on iOS and Android platforms as well as via the web. delivery could be browser-based, a stand-alone app, an ebook or something else\n- content needs to be delivered with an interactive element to engage users\n- the mobility of tablet devices allows for spatial and aspatial data collection in field work. Users can then share and interrogate this data to solve real world problems\n- Access to online databases allows students to search for places and features never before presented in a textbook atlas. Rather than search through cumbersome gazetteer indexes with alpha-numeric references, students can quickly type a place name and have it appear on screen.\n\n
  • Since the release of the iPad by Apple in 2010 technology companies have been clamoring to make a presence in the tablet device market. \nThis technology allows the user to remove the need for weighty textbooks and store their library on one device. \nability to access content wirelessly and through the 3G mobile phone network. \nFunctionality such as twin cameras for capturing still and video content; microphone for capturing audio and speaker for playback; digital compass and assisted GPS (wireless + 3G model only); 16GB, 32GB and 64GB storage; high resolution colour display; and accelerometer and 3D gyro for sensing the position of the tablet all provide in creating a user experience that encourages investigation and stimulates learning.\n- publishers have a choice of containing the atlas and associated data on the device, or streaming content via 3G or wifi\n- an issue in designing for tablet devices is the variations in screen dimensions. at least 4 different sizes amongst current models\n- publishers need to develop a delivery method that is platform neutral. atlas needs to operate on iOS and Android platforms as well as via the web. delivery could be browser-based, a stand-alone app, an ebook or something else\n- content needs to be delivered with an interactive element to engage users\n- the mobility of tablet devices allows for spatial and aspatial data collection in field work. Users can then share and interrogate this data to solve real world problems\n- Access to online databases allows students to search for places and features never before presented in a textbook atlas. Rather than search through cumbersome gazetteer indexes with alpha-numeric references, students can quickly type a place name and have it appear on screen.\n\n
  • Since the release of the iPad by Apple in 2010 technology companies have been clamoring to make a presence in the tablet device market. \nThis technology allows the user to remove the need for weighty textbooks and store their library on one device. \nability to access content wirelessly and through the 3G mobile phone network. \nFunctionality such as twin cameras for capturing still and video content; microphone for capturing audio and speaker for playback; digital compass and assisted GPS (wireless + 3G model only); 16GB, 32GB and 64GB storage; high resolution colour display; and accelerometer and 3D gyro for sensing the position of the tablet all provide in creating a user experience that encourages investigation and stimulates learning.\n- publishers have a choice of containing the atlas and associated data on the device, or streaming content via 3G or wifi\n- an issue in designing for tablet devices is the variations in screen dimensions. at least 4 different sizes amongst current models\n- publishers need to develop a delivery method that is platform neutral. atlas needs to operate on iOS and Android platforms as well as via the web. delivery could be browser-based, a stand-alone app, an ebook or something else\n- content needs to be delivered with an interactive element to engage users\n- the mobility of tablet devices allows for spatial and aspatial data collection in field work. Users can then share and interrogate this data to solve real world problems\n- Access to online databases allows students to search for places and features never before presented in a textbook atlas. Rather than search through cumbersome gazetteer indexes with alpha-numeric references, students can quickly type a place name and have it appear on screen.\n\n
  • Since the release of the iPad by Apple in 2010 technology companies have been clamoring to make a presence in the tablet device market. \nThis technology allows the user to remove the need for weighty textbooks and store their library on one device. \nability to access content wirelessly and through the 3G mobile phone network. \nFunctionality such as twin cameras for capturing still and video content; microphone for capturing audio and speaker for playback; digital compass and assisted GPS (wireless + 3G model only); 16GB, 32GB and 64GB storage; high resolution colour display; and accelerometer and 3D gyro for sensing the position of the tablet all provide in creating a user experience that encourages investigation and stimulates learning.\n- publishers have a choice of containing the atlas and associated data on the device, or streaming content via 3G or wifi\n- an issue in designing for tablet devices is the variations in screen dimensions. at least 4 different sizes amongst current models\n- publishers need to develop a delivery method that is platform neutral. atlas needs to operate on iOS and Android platforms as well as via the web. delivery could be browser-based, a stand-alone app, an ebook or something else\n- content needs to be delivered with an interactive element to engage users\n- the mobility of tablet devices allows for spatial and aspatial data collection in field work. Users can then share and interrogate this data to solve real world problems\n- Access to online databases allows students to search for places and features never before presented in a textbook atlas. Rather than search through cumbersome gazetteer indexes with alpha-numeric references, students can quickly type a place name and have it appear on screen.\n\n
  • Since the release of the iPad by Apple in 2010 technology companies have been clamoring to make a presence in the tablet device market. \nThis technology allows the user to remove the need for weighty textbooks and store their library on one device. \nability to access content wirelessly and through the 3G mobile phone network. \nFunctionality such as twin cameras for capturing still and video content; microphone for capturing audio and speaker for playback; digital compass and assisted GPS (wireless + 3G model only); 16GB, 32GB and 64GB storage; high resolution colour display; and accelerometer and 3D gyro for sensing the position of the tablet all provide in creating a user experience that encourages investigation and stimulates learning.\n- publishers have a choice of containing the atlas and associated data on the device, or streaming content via 3G or wifi\n- an issue in designing for tablet devices is the variations in screen dimensions. at least 4 different sizes amongst current models\n- publishers need to develop a delivery method that is platform neutral. atlas needs to operate on iOS and Android platforms as well as via the web. delivery could be browser-based, a stand-alone app, an ebook or something else\n- content needs to be delivered with an interactive element to engage users\n- the mobility of tablet devices allows for spatial and aspatial data collection in field work. Users can then share and interrogate this data to solve real world problems\n- Access to online databases allows students to search for places and features never before presented in a textbook atlas. Rather than search through cumbersome gazetteer indexes with alpha-numeric references, students can quickly type a place name and have it appear on screen.\n\n
  • Since the release of the iPad by Apple in 2010 technology companies have been clamoring to make a presence in the tablet device market. \nThis technology allows the user to remove the need for weighty textbooks and store their library on one device. \nability to access content wirelessly and through the 3G mobile phone network. \nFunctionality such as twin cameras for capturing still and video content; microphone for capturing audio and speaker for playback; digital compass and assisted GPS (wireless + 3G model only); 16GB, 32GB and 64GB storage; high resolution colour display; and accelerometer and 3D gyro for sensing the position of the tablet all provide in creating a user experience that encourages investigation and stimulates learning.\n- publishers have a choice of containing the atlas and associated data on the device, or streaming content via 3G or wifi\n- an issue in designing for tablet devices is the variations in screen dimensions. at least 4 different sizes amongst current models\n- publishers need to develop a delivery method that is platform neutral. atlas needs to operate on iOS and Android platforms as well as via the web. delivery could be browser-based, a stand-alone app, an ebook or something else\n- content needs to be delivered with an interactive element to engage users\n- the mobility of tablet devices allows for spatial and aspatial data collection in field work. Users can then share and interrogate this data to solve real world problems\n- Access to online databases allows students to search for places and features never before presented in a textbook atlas. Rather than search through cumbersome gazetteer indexes with alpha-numeric references, students can quickly type a place name and have it appear on screen.\n\n
  • Since the release of the iPad by Apple in 2010 technology companies have been clamoring to make a presence in the tablet device market. \nThis technology allows the user to remove the need for weighty textbooks and store their library on one device. \nability to access content wirelessly and through the 3G mobile phone network. \nFunctionality such as twin cameras for capturing still and video content; microphone for capturing audio and speaker for playback; digital compass and assisted GPS (wireless + 3G model only); 16GB, 32GB and 64GB storage; high resolution colour display; and accelerometer and 3D gyro for sensing the position of the tablet all provide in creating a user experience that encourages investigation and stimulates learning.\n- publishers have a choice of containing the atlas and associated data on the device, or streaming content via 3G or wifi\n- an issue in designing for tablet devices is the variations in screen dimensions. at least 4 different sizes amongst current models\n- publishers need to develop a delivery method that is platform neutral. atlas needs to operate on iOS and Android platforms as well as via the web. delivery could be browser-based, a stand-alone app, an ebook or something else\n- content needs to be delivered with an interactive element to engage users\n- the mobility of tablet devices allows for spatial and aspatial data collection in field work. Users can then share and interrogate this data to solve real world problems\n- Access to online databases allows students to search for places and features never before presented in a textbook atlas. Rather than search through cumbersome gazetteer indexes with alpha-numeric references, students can quickly type a place name and have it appear on screen.\n\n
  • Atlases have moved from a teaching to a learning tool\n- atlases have evolved from a hardcopy volume to multimedia delivery where users consume information, to a creation tool where users can interact with data and create their own data for interrogation\n- the user experience of an atlas has changed from a static reference source to an immersive multimedia experience\n- new technology enables collaborative learning, where students work with classmates to solve geographic problems.\n
  • Atlases have moved from a teaching to a learning tool\n- atlases have evolved from a hardcopy volume to multimedia delivery where users consume information, to a creation tool where users can interact with data and create their own data for interrogation\n- the user experience of an atlas has changed from a static reference source to an immersive multimedia experience\n- new technology enables collaborative learning, where students work with classmates to solve geographic problems.\n
  • Atlases have moved from a teaching to a learning tool\n- atlases have evolved from a hardcopy volume to multimedia delivery where users consume information, to a creation tool where users can interact with data and create their own data for interrogation\n- the user experience of an atlas has changed from a static reference source to an immersive multimedia experience\n- new technology enables collaborative learning, where students work with classmates to solve geographic problems.\n
  • Atlases have moved from a teaching to a learning tool\n- atlases have evolved from a hardcopy volume to multimedia delivery where users consume information, to a creation tool where users can interact with data and create their own data for interrogation\n- the user experience of an atlas has changed from a static reference source to an immersive multimedia experience\n- new technology enables collaborative learning, where students work with classmates to solve geographic problems.\n
  • Production challenges for cartographers\n- creating multiple products - print, web and mobile - from one data source\n- ‘design once—publish many’ concept\n- complex data needs to be generalised for display at varying scales, as too live data\n- publishers need to determine the cost structure/business model for how the delivery of such an atlas would work. Is it subscription based or a once off fee? Can it be placed on a book list? Will it be sold through an online store (iTunes, Android market, Blackberry App World)?\n
  • Production challenges for cartographers\n- creating multiple products - print, web and mobile - from one data source\n- ‘design once—publish many’ concept\n- complex data needs to be generalised for display at varying scales, as too live data\n- publishers need to determine the cost structure/business model for how the delivery of such an atlas would work. Is it subscription based or a once off fee? Can it be placed on a book list? Will it be sold through an online store (iTunes, Android market, Blackberry App World)?\n
  • Production challenges for cartographers\n- creating multiple products - print, web and mobile - from one data source\n- ‘design once—publish many’ concept\n- complex data needs to be generalised for display at varying scales, as too live data\n- publishers need to determine the cost structure/business model for how the delivery of such an atlas would work. Is it subscription based or a once off fee? Can it be placed on a book list? Will it be sold through an online store (iTunes, Android market, Blackberry App World)?\n
  • Production challenges for cartographers\n- creating multiple products - print, web and mobile - from one data source\n- ‘design once—publish many’ concept\n- complex data needs to be generalised for display at varying scales, as too live data\n- publishers need to determine the cost structure/business model for how the delivery of such an atlas would work. Is it subscription based or a once off fee? Can it be placed on a book list? Will it be sold through an online store (iTunes, Android market, Blackberry App World)?\n
  • Production challenges for cartographers\n- creating multiple products - print, web and mobile - from one data source\n- ‘design once—publish many’ concept\n- complex data needs to be generalised for display at varying scales, as too live data\n- publishers need to determine the cost structure/business model for how the delivery of such an atlas would work. Is it subscription based or a once off fee? Can it be placed on a book list? Will it be sold through an online store (iTunes, Android market, Blackberry App World)?\n
  • Design considerations for a multi-publishing framework\n- static versus dynamic data. Static data can easily be designed for, but dynamic data is an unknown quantity. Data feeds from geoRSS could have a single point or thousands of points. How can this data be displayed appropriately on a multi-scale map?\n- atlas mapping may have many purposes. detailed reference map shown at multiple scales down to street level mapping, or thematic base mapping with dynamic content overlaid\n- design needs to be age-appropriate. users from varying age groups and different abilities will be accessing the same mapping \n
  • Design considerations for a multi-publishing framework\n- static versus dynamic data. Static data can easily be designed for, but dynamic data is an unknown quantity. Data feeds from geoRSS could have a single point or thousands of points. How can this data be displayed appropriately on a multi-scale map?\n- atlas mapping may have many purposes. detailed reference map shown at multiple scales down to street level mapping, or thematic base mapping with dynamic content overlaid\n- design needs to be age-appropriate. users from varying age groups and different abilities will be accessing the same mapping \n
  • Design considerations for a multi-publishing framework\n- static versus dynamic data. Static data can easily be designed for, but dynamic data is an unknown quantity. Data feeds from geoRSS could have a single point or thousands of points. How can this data be displayed appropriately on a multi-scale map?\n- atlas mapping may have many purposes. detailed reference map shown at multiple scales down to street level mapping, or thematic base mapping with dynamic content overlaid\n- design needs to be age-appropriate. users from varying age groups and different abilities will be accessing the same mapping \n
  • Design considerations for a multi-publishing framework\n- static versus dynamic data. Static data can easily be designed for, but dynamic data is an unknown quantity. Data feeds from geoRSS could have a single point or thousands of points. How can this data be displayed appropriately on a multi-scale map?\n- atlas mapping may have many purposes. detailed reference map shown at multiple scales down to street level mapping, or thematic base mapping with dynamic content overlaid\n- design needs to be age-appropriate. users from varying age groups and different abilities will be accessing the same mapping \n
  • How has the student atlas changed?\n- has moved from a reference tool to a learning tool to a creation tool\n- commercial realities and technological advances have moved publishers to adapt delivery methods.\n- eventually hardcopy atlases may go the way of the dinosaur\n- research by Robinson, Bertin, Wiegand and others still relevant. current research in web mapping still developing (Brewer, et al)\n- How will maps ‘engage’ the audience, enticing them to explore and interact to learn? Wiegand (2006) speculated about the inclusion of GIS software in the classroom and students using GPS in their studies. A functional age-appropriate atlas presented on a tablet device (with GPS) could combine these two requirements, to be an effective learning tool.\n
  • How has the student atlas changed?\n- has moved from a reference tool to a learning tool to a creation tool\n- commercial realities and technological advances have moved publishers to adapt delivery methods.\n- eventually hardcopy atlases may go the way of the dinosaur\n- research by Robinson, Bertin, Wiegand and others still relevant. current research in web mapping still developing (Brewer, et al)\n- How will maps ‘engage’ the audience, enticing them to explore and interact to learn? Wiegand (2006) speculated about the inclusion of GIS software in the classroom and students using GPS in their studies. A functional age-appropriate atlas presented on a tablet device (with GPS) could combine these two requirements, to be an effective learning tool.\n
  • How has the student atlas changed?\n- has moved from a reference tool to a learning tool to a creation tool\n- commercial realities and technological advances have moved publishers to adapt delivery methods.\n- eventually hardcopy atlases may go the way of the dinosaur\n- research by Robinson, Bertin, Wiegand and others still relevant. current research in web mapping still developing (Brewer, et al)\n- How will maps ‘engage’ the audience, enticing them to explore and interact to learn? Wiegand (2006) speculated about the inclusion of GIS software in the classroom and students using GPS in their studies. A functional age-appropriate atlas presented on a tablet device (with GPS) could combine these two requirements, to be an effective learning tool.\n
  • How has the student atlas changed?\n- has moved from a reference tool to a learning tool to a creation tool\n- commercial realities and technological advances have moved publishers to adapt delivery methods.\n- eventually hardcopy atlases may go the way of the dinosaur\n- research by Robinson, Bertin, Wiegand and others still relevant. current research in web mapping still developing (Brewer, et al)\n- How will maps ‘engage’ the audience, enticing them to explore and interact to learn? Wiegand (2006) speculated about the inclusion of GIS software in the classroom and students using GPS in their studies. A functional age-appropriate atlas presented on a tablet device (with GPS) could combine these two requirements, to be an effective learning tool.\n
  • How has the student atlas changed?\n- has moved from a reference tool to a learning tool to a creation tool\n- commercial realities and technological advances have moved publishers to adapt delivery methods.\n- eventually hardcopy atlases may go the way of the dinosaur\n- research by Robinson, Bertin, Wiegand and others still relevant. current research in web mapping still developing (Brewer, et al)\n- How will maps ‘engage’ the audience, enticing them to explore and interact to learn? Wiegand (2006) speculated about the inclusion of GIS software in the classroom and students using GPS in their studies. A functional age-appropriate atlas presented on a tablet device (with GPS) could combine these two requirements, to be an effective learning tool.\n
  • How has the student atlas changed?\n- has moved from a reference tool to a learning tool to a creation tool\n- commercial realities and technological advances have moved publishers to adapt delivery methods.\n- eventually hardcopy atlases may go the way of the dinosaur\n- research by Robinson, Bertin, Wiegand and others still relevant. current research in web mapping still developing (Brewer, et al)\n- How will maps ‘engage’ the audience, enticing them to explore and interact to learn? Wiegand (2006) speculated about the inclusion of GIS software in the classroom and students using GPS in their studies. A functional age-appropriate atlas presented on a tablet device (with GPS) could combine these two requirements, to be an effective learning tool.\n
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  • Evolution of student atlas design in Australia

    1. 1. Evolution of student atlasdesign in AustraliaCraig MolyneuxProf. William CartwrightSchool of Mathematical and Geospatial SciencesRMIT University
    2. 2. Introduction
    3. 3. Introduction Masters research
    4. 4. Introduction Masters research Jacaranda Atlas 7th edition
    5. 5. Introduction Masters research Jacaranda Atlas 7th edition Production and publishing costly and risky
    6. 6. Introduction Masters research Jacaranda Atlas 7th edition Production and publishing costly and risky High quality output
    7. 7. Introduction Masters research Jacaranda Atlas 7th edition Production and publishing costly and risky High quality output Complimentary digital editions
    8. 8. Introduction
    9. 9. Introduction Stages of research
    10. 10. Introduction Stages of research How technology and research affected the design of student atlases
    11. 11. Introduction Stages of research How technology and research affected the design of student atlases Development of a multi-publishing framework for student atlases
    12. 12. Introduction Stages of research How technology and research affected the design of student atlases Development of a multi-publishing framework for student atlases Design considerations for multi-publishing framework
    13. 13. Introduction Stages of research How technology and research affected the design of student atlases Development of a multi-publishing framework for student atlases Design considerations for multi-publishing framework Develop a prototype framework with examples
    14. 14. Introduction
    15. 15. Introduction Multi-publishing design considerations
    16. 16. Introduction Multi-publishing design considerations print, web, mobile
    17. 17. Introduction Multi-publishing design considerations print, web, mobile choice of font style and size for multiple products
    18. 18. Introduction Multi-publishing design considerations print, web, mobile choice of font style and size for multiple products multi-scale seamless v individual scale and projection
    19. 19. Introduction Multi-publishing design considerations print, web, mobile choice of font style and size for multiple products multi-scale seamless v individual scale and projection interactive thematic maps and data
    20. 20. Introduction Multi-publishing design considerations print, web, mobile choice of font style and size for multiple products multi-scale seamless v individual scale and projection interactive thematic maps and data user experience
    21. 21. Introduction Multi-publishing design considerations print, web, mobile choice of font style and size for multiple products multi-scale seamless v individual scale and projection interactive thematic maps and data user experience ‘design once—publish many’
    22. 22. Introduction Definitions
    23. 23. Introduction Definitions “book of maps or charts” Sykes (1976)
    24. 24. Introduction Definitions “a systematic and coherent collection of geographical data in analogue or digital form, representing a particular area and/ or one or more geographical themes, together with tools for information retrieval, analysis and presentation.” Koop (1995)
    25. 25. Introduction Definitions “...the basis for how people conceive the world in which they live,” and “...it is an inclusive form of cartography that invites the user to explore the world through maps,” Cartwright & Peterson (2006)
    26. 26. History/Timeline Major atlases produced
    27. 27. History/Timeline Major atlases produced 1890s 1920s 1940s 1970s 1990s 2000s Source: National Library of Australia & Alfred Deakin Prime Ministerial Library, Deakin University, 2011
    28. 28. History/Timeline
    29. 29. History/Timeline 1890s Source: Pearson’s Australasian School Atlas, 1890
    30. 30. History/Timeline 1890s Significant map features Source: Pearson’s Australasian School Atlas, 1890
    31. 31. History/Timeline 1890s Significant map features Production methods Source: Pearson’s Australasian School Atlas, 1890
    32. 32. History/Timeline 1890s Significant map features Production methods Research Source: Pearson’s Australasian School Atlas, 1890
    33. 33. History/Timeline
    34. 34. History/Timeline 1920s Source: Collins’ Australasian Clear School Atlas, 1920?
    35. 35. History/Timeline 1920s Significant map features Source: Collins’ Australasian Clear School Atlas, 1920?
    36. 36. History/Timeline 1920s Significant map features Source: Collins’ Australasian Clear School Atlas, 1920?
    37. 37. History/Timeline 1920s Significant map features Source: Collins’ Australasian Clear School Atlas, 1920?
    38. 38. History/Timeline 1920s Significant map features Production methods Source: Collins’ Australasian Clear School Atlas, 1920?
    39. 39. History/Timeline 1920s Significant map features Production methods Research Source: Collins’ Australasian Clear School Atlas, 1920?
    40. 40. History/Timeline
    41. 41. History/Timeline 1940s and 1950sSource: Robinson’s Modern School Atlas of the World, 1940
    42. 42. History/Timeline 1940s and 1950s Significant map features
    43. 43. History/Timeline 1940s and 1950s Significant map features Production methodsSource: Philip’s New Comparative Commonwealth Atlas, 1950
    44. 44. History/Timeline 1940s and 1950s Significant map features Production methodsSource: Philip’s New Comparative Commonwealth Atlas, 1950
    45. 45. History/Timeline 1940s and 1950s Significant map features Production methods ResearchSource: Philip’s New Comparative Commonwealth Atlas, 1950
    46. 46. History/Timeline
    47. 47. History/Timeline 1970s and 1980s
    48. 48. History/Timeline 1970s and 1980s Source: Jacaranda Atlas, 1969
    49. 49. History/Timeline 1970s and 1980s Significant map features Source: Jacaranda Atlas, 1969
    50. 50. History/Timeline 1970s and 1980s Significant map features Production methods Source: Jacaranda Atlas, 1969
    51. 51. History/Timeline 1970s and 1980s Significant map features Production methods Research Source: Jacaranda Atlas, 1969
    52. 52. History/Timeline
    53. 53. History/Timeline 1990s and 2000s Significant map features Source: Oxford Atlas Project 3, 2008
    54. 54. History/Timeline 1990s and 2000s Significant map features Source: Oxford Atlas Project 3, 2008
    55. 55. History/Timeline 1990s and 2000s Significant map features Production methods Source: Oxford Atlas Project 3, 2008
    56. 56. History/Timeline 1990s and 2000s Significant map features Production methods Research Source: Oxford Atlas Project 3, 2008
    57. 57. Future Publishing Outcomes
    58. 58. Future Publishing OutcomesPrint-based products
    59. 59. Future Publishing OutcomesPrint-based products 6 colour printing presses
    60. 60. Future Publishing OutcomesPrint-based products 6 colour printing presses high quality freely available data
    61. 61. Future Publishing OutcomesPrint-based products 6 colour printing presses high quality freely available data scientific visualisation software/GIS
    62. 62. Future Publishing OutcomesPrint-based products 6 colour printing presses high quality freely available data scientific visualisation software/GIS curriculum-based content
    63. 63. Future Publishing OutcomesPrint-based products 6 colour printing presses high quality freely available data scientific visualisation software/GIS curriculum-based content age-appropriate content
    64. 64. Future Publishing Outcomes
    65. 65. Future Publishing OutcomesWeb-based products
    66. 66. Future Publishing OutcomesWeb-based products seamless mapping
    67. 67. Future Publishing OutcomesWeb-based products seamless mapping multi-scale
    68. 68. Future Publishing OutcomesWeb-based products seamless mapping multi-scale dynamic data
    69. 69. Future Publishing OutcomesWeb-based products seamless mapping multi-scale dynamic data high-speed broadband for data delivery
    70. 70. Future Publishing OutcomesWeb-based products seamless mapping multi-scale dynamic data high-speed broadband for data delivery software and hardware user requirements
    71. 71. Future Publishing OutcomesWeb-based products seamless mapping multi-scale dynamic data high-speed broadband for data delivery software and hardware user requirements appropriate for all age levels
    72. 72. Future Publishing Outcomes
    73. 73. Future Publishing OutcomesTablet computing devices
    74. 74. Future Publishing OutcomesTablet computing devices offline data or streamed data
    75. 75. Future Publishing OutcomesTablet computing devices offline data or streamed data screen size for delivery (various)
    76. 76. Future Publishing OutcomesTablet computing devices offline data or streamed data screen size for delivery (various) delivery method—browser-based, app, ebook, other
    77. 77. Future Publishing OutcomesTablet computing devices offline data or streamed data screen size for delivery (various) delivery method—browser-based, app, ebook, other interactive content
    78. 78. Future Publishing OutcomesTablet computing devices offline data or streamed data screen size for delivery (various) delivery method—browser-based, app, ebook, other interactive content data collection and interrogation
    79. 79. Future Publishing OutcomesTablet computing devices offline data or streamed data screen size for delivery (various) delivery method—browser-based, app, ebook, other interactive content data collection and interrogation search functionality
    80. 80. Reflection
    81. 81. ReflectionMove from teaching to learning
    82. 82. ReflectionMove from teaching to learning hardcopy > multimedia > creation tool
    83. 83. ReflectionMove from teaching to learning hardcopy > multimedia > creation tool user experience
    84. 84. ReflectionMove from teaching to learning hardcopy > multimedia > creation tool user experience collaborative learning
    85. 85. Reflection
    86. 86. ReflectionProduction challenges
    87. 87. ReflectionProduction challenges creating multiple products from one data source
    88. 88. ReflectionProduction challenges creating multiple products from one data source design once—publish many
    89. 89. ReflectionProduction challenges creating multiple products from one data source design once—publish many generalisation of complex data
    90. 90. ReflectionProduction challenges creating multiple products from one data source design once—publish many generalisation of complex data cost structure/business model
    91. 91. Reflection
    92. 92. ReflectionDesign considerations
    93. 93. ReflectionDesign considerations static v dynamic data
    94. 94. ReflectionDesign considerations static v dynamic data multi-purpose mapping
    95. 95. ReflectionDesign considerations static v dynamic data multi-purpose mapping age-appropriateness of design
    96. 96. Conclusion
    97. 97. ConclusionHow has the student atlas changed?
    98. 98. ConclusionHow has the student atlas changed? reference > learning > creation
    99. 99. ConclusionHow has the student atlas changed? reference > learning > creation commercial realities and technological advances
    100. 100. ConclusionHow has the student atlas changed? reference > learning > creation commercial realities and technological advances hardcopy atlases may disappear
    101. 101. ConclusionHow has the student atlas changed? reference > learning > creation commercial realities and technological advances hardcopy atlases may disappear foundations of cartographic design still relevant
    102. 102. ConclusionHow has the student atlas changed? reference > learning > creation commercial realities and technological advances hardcopy atlases may disappear foundations of cartographic design still relevant how will maps ‘engage’ the audience?
    103. 103. Conclusion
    104. 104. ConclusionFurther research
    105. 105. ConclusionFurther research how do multi-published products support learning outcomes?
    106. 106. ConclusionFurther research how do multi-published products support learning outcomes? Victorian government researching tablet devices
    107. 107. ConclusionFurther research how do multi-published products support learning outcomes? Victorian government researching tablet devices http://www.ipadsforeducation.vic.edu.au/

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