Capstone powerpoint

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Marcellus shale and water quality tests.

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Capstone powerpoint

  1. 1. Craig L. Haflett Wilkes University
  2. 3. Abstract <ul><li>Solution chemistry is a fundamental topic of chemistry, with students completing problem set after problem set with no real world application of the formulas they are memorizing. The north central Pennsylvania area where my students live is undergoing rapid changes in population, economics and the environment as natural gas is extracted from Marcellus shale. </li></ul><ul><li>My students learned what Marcellus shale is, how the natural gas is extracted and its potential changes to their environment. Students collected water samples and applied the principles and techniques of solution chemistry to help monitor potential changes in their environment. </li></ul>
  3. 4. Rationale <ul><li>Our area is currently in the midst of great change as natural gas is extracted from our ground. The drilling has prompted inquiries into the potential hazards for our local environment, especially our freshwater supply. The importance was also driven home when the TV news program, 60 Minutes, aired a piece about fracking and contaminated air and water in Northern PA. </li></ul><ul><li>My students applied their solution chemistry knowledge and skills by testing water samples from wells, streams and ponds in their neighborhoods. Their results were compiled and the sample sites mapped using GPS technology and Google Earth. Gas well sites were also mapped. The students used the tools of professionals, applied chemistry to a local problem and interacted with local watchdog organizations and businesses as they learned about natural gas extraction and it’s potential impact on our environment. </li></ul>
  4. 5. Student-centered <ul><li>Students tested local water samples and mapped nearby gas wells. Information about water tests and the Marcellus shale drilling came from student internet research, their laboratory investigations and interviews with area professionals. </li></ul>
  5. 6. Learning and Doing <ul><li>Students were required to apply the information they learn about water supplies, gas drilling, mapping tools and chemistry to reach meaningful conclusions about possible contaminations at their test sites. </li></ul>
  6. 7. Using Information <ul><li>Students discovered the information they needed to analyze the impact of gas extraction on freshwater supplies on their own. The information itself was not the end goal, but the application of the information was. The information they discovered drove their investigation forward. </li></ul><ul><li>Water tests were modified as they progressed as more information was learned about chemicals in frack water. </li></ul><ul><li>Gas well status and locations also refined their search area. </li></ul>
  7. 8. Facilitator <ul><li>I needed to scaffold in specific lessons as the need arose. Solubility rules and factors as well as lessons on calculating concentrations (molarity, ppm) were needed. A brief lesson on organic chemicals was necessary when they discovered organic chemicals could be in frack fluids. I was an advisor and offered assistance as needed; the direction of the project was dependant on the students’ findings. </li></ul>
  8. 9. Multiple Instructional and Learning Modalities <ul><li>This project required a variety of skills for completion. Internet research, lab work, interviews and wiki page construction were part of the project. Students were given the options to choose tasks they prefered and were free to compile and communicate their findings in the genre they were most comfortable with. </li></ul>
  9. 10. Higher Order Thinking Skills <ul><li>Students were required to apply the information they found, analyze their data, and draw conclusions. No rote recall of information was required during this project. </li></ul>
  10. 11. Collaboration <ul><li>Students worked in small groups or as individuals during the project. They communicated and shared their information in order to complete the big picture. </li></ul><ul><li>They worked with community groups (DEP, Susquehanna River Basin Commission, and Tioga County Planning Commission) and gas drilling companies (East Resources, Inc.) as they completed their project. </li></ul>
  11. 12. Performance Based Assessments <ul><li>Student learning was assessed with the following rubrics. The rubrics addressed participation, wiki and blog pages construction and journaling. Lab reports were scored as well as the GPS activity. </li></ul>
  12. 13. Lab Report CATEGORY 4  Outstanding 3  Very Good 2  Acceptable 1  Unacceptable Introduction and Purpose A title page, and a paragraph fully explaining the objectives of your lab and complete background information. Hypothesis is stated. A title page, and a complete explaination of the purpose and adequate background information. Hypothesis is stated. A complete explanation of the purpose and very little background information. No hypothesis mentioned. No tile page. No clear objective is mentioned and the background information is missing. No hypothesis mentioned. No title page. Materials All materials and eqipment used in the experiment are clearly and accurately described. Several pictures and video clips are included. Almost all materials and equipment used in the experiment are clearly and accurately described. One video clip and one picture is included. Most of the materials and eqipment used in the experiment are accurately described. One video clip or picture is included. Many materials or eqipment are not listed. No picture or video clips included. Experimental Design Experimental design follows scientific methods and the process is logical. Experimental design follows scientific methods and the process is mostly logical. Experimental design mostly follows scientific methods and the process is logical. Experimental design is not logical and does not follow scientific method. Data Professional looking and accurate representation of the data in tables and/or graphs. Graphs and tables are labeled and titled. Accurate representation of the data in tables and/or graphs. Graphs and tables are labeled and titled. Data is hard to find/read. Accurate representation of the data in written form, but no graphs or tables are presented. Data are not shown OR are inaccurate. Conclusion Conclusion supported by findings from the data and accurately summarizes their findings from the experiment. Conclusion supported by some findings from the data and accurately summarizes their findings from the experiment. Conclusion supported by some findings from the data and summarizes some of their findings from the experiment. No conclusion was included in the report OR shows little effort and reflection. Background Sources 4 quality resources were used and cited. 3 quality resources were used and cited. 2 quality resources were used and cited. Fewer than 2 quality resources were used and cited. Pictures/video clips All pictures and video clips are labeled and logical. One picture or video clip is not labeled or logical. A combination of any two pictures or video clips not labeled or logical. There are three or more mislabeled or illogical pictures or video clips. Safety No safety violations spotted. Lab safely carried out with only one verbal reminder of safety rules. Lab safely carried out with only two verbal reminders of safety rules. More than two reminders of safety procedures. or a serious breach in lab safety. Contract must be revisited before the next lab. Replicability Experimental design is easily replicated, with clear, detailed and logical steps. Experimental design is easily replicated, with clear and logical steps. Experimental design could be replicated with some difficulty, due to mostly clear and logical steps. Impossible to replicate due to lack of detail or logic in the steps.
  13. 14.   Co-operative group work: Self-reflective and peer review Student Name:_____________________________   Reviewer Name: ___________________________ Date: _________________ Project : GPS and Google Earth mapping activity Directions: Place a check mark in each box that applies. Scoring will consist of one point per checked box for a maximum score of 9 points. Your score will be the average score of all respondents.
  14. 15. Google Earth Mapping Natural Gas Wells and Water Sample Sites CATEGORY 4  Advanced 3  Proficient 2  Retry 1  Reteach Content Four well sites and four water sample sites (8 total) are marked correctly on the map. Six total sites (combination) are correctly marked with no more than four being of one type. Four total sites are marked correctly on the map. Fewer than four sites are marked correctly on the map. Spelling/Capitalization No misspelled words and no grammatical errors on the map or the site notes. No more than one misspelled word and no more than one grammatical error on the map or the site notes. No more than two misspelled words and no more than two grammatical errors on the map and site notes. More than two misspelled words and more than two grammatical errors on the map and site notes. Google Earth Site Notes Each water and well site has terrain and vegetation observations. Six of the eight sites have terrain and vegetation observations. Four of the eight sites have terrain and vegetation observations. Fewer than four of the eight sites have terrain and vegetation observations. Wiki page (water) Each water sample site (4) has a corresponding wiki page with detailed information about usage, status of well, and room for the water test results to be included. Three of the water sample sites have a corresponding wiki page with detailed information about usage, status of well, and room for the water test results to be included. Two of the sample sites have a corresponding wiki page with detailed information about usage, status of well, and room for the water test results to be included. Fewer than two of the sample sites have a corresponding wiki page with detailed information about usage, status of well, and room for the water test results to be included. Wiki page (gas wells) Each gas well site (4) has a corresponding wiki page with detailed information about start date for the pad, hole drilling and hole fracking, burn off dates and if it is online. Three of the gas well sites have a corresponding wiki page with detailed information about start date for the pad, hole drilling and hole fracking, burn off dates and if it is online. Two of the gas well sites have a corresponding wiki page with detailed information about start date for the pad, hole drilling and hole fracking, burn off dates and if it is online. Fewer than two of the gas well sites have a corresponding wiki page with detailed information about start date for the pad, hole drilling and hole fracking, burn off dates and if it is online . Blog entry After reviewing the map and wiki pages, student’s blog entry points out trends or commonalities within the gas well and water sample sites. Key ideas to investigate further are offered. After reviewing the map and wiki pages, student’s blog entry points out trends or commonalities within the gas well and water sample sites. No key ideas to investigate further are offered. After reviewing the map and wiki pages, student’s blog entry fails to point out trends or commonalities within the gas well and water sample sites. No key ideas to investigate further are offered. No entry made.
  15. 16. Multiple Sources of Information, Including Technology <ul><li>Students used the internet for research, Google Earth for mapping and understanding the scope of the Marcellus drilling operation. Computer probes were used in the water analysis and various software programs to develop their final presentation. East Resources, Tetras, the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, and the Pennsylvania Ground Water Association were a few of the professional and community groups students contacted for information. </li></ul>
  16. 17. Technology Fully Integrated Into the Classroom <ul><li>A wide variety of technology was used by the students to complete their project. Laptops allowed access to the internet for research, the classroom blog and wiki in order to journal, document their findings and store their data. The laptops also allowed students to email the professional organizations, analyze water samples with the computer probes and manipulate data. Students used handheld GPS units to map their sample locations and gas well data on Google Earth. </li></ul>
  17. 18. Using a Variety of Types of Information to Complete Authentic Projects <ul><li>Water quality is a concern as natural gas drilling continues to expand. Students researched information about Marcellus shale, the drilling and fracking of natural gas wells, the structure of water wells and what is involved in the testing of a water sample. They will produced their own maps, tested their water samples and monitored water quality in their sample area. Their findings were of interest to not only themselves but their community. </li></ul>
  18. 19. Students Acting As Professionals in the Discipline <ul><li>The students collected information, conducted lab tests and made conclusions in the same manner and with the same tools a scientist would. </li></ul>
  19. 20. Phase one Jig Saw background information (4 class days) <ul><li>Students break into groups, based on interest, to research aquifers, water well drilling, natural gas drilling or water testing. (2 days) </li></ul><ul><li>Students compile their data on the class wiki, read wiki pages about the other topics and respond to prompts on the classroom blog. (2 day) </li></ul>
  20. 21. Phase two GPS and Google Earth ( 3+class days) <ul><li>Pre-assessment of student GPS knowledge/ web search for GPS instruction and familiarization with handheld units (1 day). </li></ul><ul><li>Students enter way points from scavenger list and negotiate to them in Smythe Park (1 Day) </li></ul><ul><li>Students enter waypoints and enter those waypoints on google earth map. (1 day) </li></ul><ul><li>Students map their gas wells and water collection sites. (several days as an external activity). </li></ul>
  21. 22. <ul><li>GPS Pre-assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Name____________________________ </li></ul><ul><li>Please answer the following questions as best you can. </li></ul><ul><li>What does GPS stand for? </li></ul><ul><li>How many total satellites are there? </li></ul><ul><li>How many can we see at once? </li></ul><ul><li>How many does the unit need to see for accurate positioning? </li></ul><ul><li>What does WAAS mean? </li></ul><ul><li>What map datum is most commonly used? </li></ul><ul><li>What does ‘mark’ mean? </li></ul><ul><li>What is a ‘route’? </li></ul><ul><li>What is latitude? </li></ul><ul><li>What is longitude? </li></ul>
  22. 23. <ul><li>Data Collection Sheet </li></ul><ul><li>Date __/__/__ gas well ____ water sample site ____ (previous test? Yes__ No__) </li></ul><ul><li>Describe the location: </li></ul><ul><li>Vegetation- (% ground cover, types of trees, shrubs, grasses) </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Ground Slope- </li></ul><ul><li>Land Usage and Development- (if a gas well, describe previous usage) </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Dates for gas well development (may be approximate start dates) </li></ul><ul><li>Pad preparation __/__/__ Drill date __/__/__ Fracking date __/__/__ </li></ul><ul><li>Flare dates __/__/__ to __/__/__ Production date __/__/__ </li></ul>
  23. 24. Phase three Solution chemistry/water testing/professional contacts (11 class days) <ul><li>Student groups contact professionals, test water samples, compile data about gas well and water sample sites. ( 5 days) </li></ul><ul><li>Lessons on molarity, ppm (2 days) </li></ul><ul><li>Lessons on solubility factors and rules (2 days) </li></ul><ul><li>Lesson on organics (2 days) </li></ul>
  24. 25. Phase four Presentation <ul><li>Students compile data and design a presentation for the public. (5 class days) </li></ul><ul><li>Students present to the public. (1 day) </li></ul><ul><li>Presentation pending as students have expanded the testing area, retested water sample sites and begun testing for more contaminates as information becomes available. </li></ul>
  25. 26. Inquiry <ul><li>The project is open-ended; whatever direction it takes will be dependent on what the students learn and want to learn more about. </li></ul><ul><li>None of this is in a textbook. </li></ul>
  26. 27. Projects <ul><li>In each of the 4 phases, students will be creating wiki pages, lab reports, a map or a presentation. </li></ul>
  27. 28. Technology <ul><li>Laptops </li></ul><ul><li>Internet </li></ul><ul><li>Lab probes </li></ul><ul><li>E-mail </li></ul><ul><li>Wikis </li></ul><ul><li>Blogs </li></ul><ul><li>Data software </li></ul><ul><li>GPS units </li></ul><ul><li>Google Earth </li></ul>
  28. 29. Dynamic, Flexible Grouping <ul><li>Before the start of each phase, students were free to select the group that was researching a preferred topic or was doing an activity of interest. </li></ul><ul><li>I monitored group interactions and intervened when necessary. </li></ul><ul><li>Students graded their peers within the group using the aforementioned rubrics. </li></ul>
  29. 30. Authentic Teaching and Learning experiences <ul><li>What is in my backyard? </li></ul><ul><li>What does it do? </li></ul><ul><li>Is there any danger? </li></ul><ul><li>Why did 60 Minutes do a show about our region? </li></ul><ul><li>Why are people writing letters to the editor of newspapers? </li></ul><ul><li>What is the movie “Gasland” about? </li></ul>
  30. 31. Resources <ul><li>The students had access to laptops for the internet research of their topics and to use the lab probes and run data software. </li></ul><ul><li>They used the classroom wiki and blog site to share project information and journal their thoughts about the process. </li></ul><ul><li>E-mail was utilized to communicate with professionals (East Resources and Tetras) and community groups (Pennsylvania DEP , Susquehanna River Basin and Pennsylvania Ground Water Association). </li></ul><ul><li>They had access to three handheld GPS units and Google Earth software to map out the sites of gas wells and water collection sites. </li></ul><ul><li>Some money was held in reserve to order extra reagents for the water analysis that was not already in my chemistry laboratory. </li></ul><ul><li>The auditorium or cafeteria is reserved for their presentation to the public. </li></ul>
  31. 32. Outcomes <ul><li>The following Pennsylvania anchors are addressed during the study on Marcellus shale extraction and the impact on local water quality. </li></ul><ul><li>S11.A.1 Reasoning and Analysis </li></ul><ul><li>S11.A.2 Processes, Procedures and Tools of Scientific Investigations </li></ul><ul><li>S11.A.3 Systems, Models and Patterns </li></ul><ul><li>S11.B.3 Ecological Behavior and Systems </li></ul><ul><li>S11.C.2 Forms, Sources, Conversion and Transfer of Energy </li></ul><ul><li>S11.D.1 Earth Features and Processes that Change Earth and it’s Resources </li></ul>
  32. 33. <ul><li>My students: </li></ul><ul><li>are informed and can make intelligent choices to guide their community into the future. </li></ul><ul><li>know how to research or use the scientific method to investigate a topic and come to a meaningful conclusion. </li></ul><ul><li>can calculate concentrations in molarity, % and ppm. </li></ul><ul><li>can use mapping software and GPS units. </li></ul><ul><li>understand what a solution is and the parameters of how they are formed. </li></ul><ul><li>can design wiki pages and post responses on a blog site. </li></ul>

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