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In this 10-page buyer’s guide, Computer …

In this 10-page buyer’s guide, Computer
Weekly looks at Windows 8 and the complexities of mobile working, the
benefits to the business of an enhanced user experience and the shift from the
9-to-5 office desk to IT delivered over a variety of devices, anytime, anywhere

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  • 1. computerweekly.com buyer’s guide 1HomeMixed feelingstowardsWindows 8 inenterpriseMicrosoft hasmissed a trickor two in theheartland ofits businessbut complexmobile workingremains anissue for allin the tabletmarketHow improveduser experienceyields returnson investmentTheconsequencesof poorcustomerexperienceare widelyacknowledgedbut resolvingsuch issues stilldivides opinionin businessesWorkplaceIT services influx: wherever,whenever,whateverEnterprisecomputing isin upheaval asthe emphasisshifts towardsautomationand user-deviceprovisionComputer Weekly buyer’s GuideThinkstockA Computer Weekly buyer’sguide to client computingEnterprise IT is undergoing a period of upheaval as the emphasis shifts from amature, centralised technology to a business process characterised by mobility,consumerisation and automation. In this 10-page buyer’s guide, ComputerWeekly looks at Windows 8 and the complexities of mobile working, thebenefits to the business of an enhanced user experience and the shift from the9-to-5 office desk to IT delivered over a variety of devices, anytime, anywhereThese articles wereoriginally publishedin the ComputerWeekly ezine
  • 2. computerweekly.com buyer’s guide 2HomeMixed feelingstowardsWindows 8 inenterpriseMicrosoft hasmissed a trickor two in theheartland ofits businessbut complexmobile workingremains anissue for allin the tabletmarketHow improveduser experienceyields returnson investmentTheconsequencesof poorcustomerexperienceare widelyacknowledgedbut resolvingsuch issues stilldivides opinionin businessesWorkplaceIT services influx: wherever,whenever,whateverEnterprisecomputing isin upheaval asthe emphasisshifts towardsautomationand user-deviceprovisionComputer Weekly buyer’s GuidemicrosoftZero clientvs. thin clientcomputing:Why zeroclients arebetterWindowstabletsexplained:Windows 8versus RTMixed feelings towardsWindows 8 in enterpriseMicrosoft has misseda trick or two in theheartland of its businessbut complex mobileworking remains anissue for all in thetablet market. CliveLongbottom reportsBuyer’sguideclientcomputingLooking at the different headlines around the latest version of Windows, it is forgivablefor a person to be somewhat confused. Is Windows 8 the best thing since, well, Win-dows 7, based on it selling faster than anything else Microsoft has ever put out there;or is it the biggest dead duck since Windows Vista, based on Microsoft being too lateto the market and missing the point?The answer is probably a mix of the two – and the finer points need looking at to under-stand where Windows 8 is at the moment and how other systems are affecting it.First, Windows 8 is late to the game. Apple has managed to wrest a large number of usersover to its side through well-designed devices that are so simple to use that the majority ofusers happily bought the fashion statement of the Apple iPad tablet and used it alongsidetheir company machines – the vast majority of which were and are based on Windows, evenif this is XP. According to StatCounter, XP usage is still running globally at just under 25% ofall desktop systems – and the majority of this use will be in organisations.The majority of iPad users did not desert Microsoft. The real problem lay in the fact thatalthough the iPad is a fantastic device for consuming information from the web and emails, itis pretty poor when it comes to creating usable information on the go.Yes, emails can be answered; Facebook posts can be posted; tweets can be tweeted. Thesoft keyboard is OK for ad hoc use, but it isn’t a patch on a proper keyboard. Try and create aPowerPoint-style presentation on an iPad – it isn’t easy. Try and deal with a complex spread-sheet – you’ll want your PC or laptop to be with you pretty quickly.Even with an external keyboard and a suitable support stand, the iPad does not seem to bethere for serious business content creation – and once everything starts to be added, you areback to many of the problems of old: multiple wires for connections, even if it is only to keepeverything charged up. Bluetooth connectivity has removed the need for hard connections
  • 3. computerweekly.com buyer’s guide 3HomeMixed feelingstowardsWindows 8 inenterpriseMicrosoft hasmissed a trickor two in theheartland ofits businessbut complexmobile workingremains anissue for allin the tabletmarketHow improveduser experienceyields returnson investmentTheconsequencesof poorcustomerexperienceare widelyacknowledgedbut resolvingsuch issues stilldivides opinionin businessesWorkplaceIT services influx: wherever,whenever,whateverEnterprisecomputing isin upheaval asthe emphasisshifts towardsautomationand user-deviceprovisionComputer Weekly buyer’s Guidein places – but power is still the main problem. Apple has made a great job of many parts ofmobility – but where does it go next?Pretenders to the throneThe first real contender to Apple’s tablet dominance came through from the Android camp.With a more open platform, Android was attractive to the person technical enough tounderstand the difference between an open platform and a walled garden – but the generalpublic was initially less impressed with the often underwhelming “me too” Apple designsand the paucity of choice of apps that could be easily downloaded.By the time the Android app store had enough (and suitable) apps, there was then theproblem of the different versions of Android that were out there. From the Gingerbreadrelease in 2010, there has since been Honeycomb, Ice Cream Sandwich and Jelly Bean.Many suppliers had designed tablets that were dependent on a specific Android release, andthis meant that newer functionality andimprovements from later releases could notbe applied to their tablets – something thatApple had managed to handle reasonablywell, even when its iPads and iPhones couldnot support later iOS releases.However, the latest versions of Android-based phones and tablets are takingmarket away from Apple – and Apple hasresponded through its patent storm, accus-ing many other suppliers of using patentsthat it owns in their devices. This seems tobe backfiring, as courts either find againstApple or are reversing findings for themon appeal, or massively reducing any finesapplied to other suppliers.Meanwhile, with the other partiesinvolved in legal shenanigans and upgradewars, Microsoft launched its Surface RTtablet. Based on a cut-down version ofWindows 8, specifically aimed at long battery life touch tablets, the Surface RT devices camewith the Modern UI (formally known as Metro) and a special set of apps written for theWindows RT environment. Surface RT could not run existing Windows applications – every-thing that it does run has to be from directly within the Modern UI.And this was a problem for Microsoft. Unlike Apple and the Android suppliers whichhad no large history of applications to support, Microsoft was issuing a tablet that was not“Microsoft” enough. It competes well with Apple on the design front; the Modern UI workswell and battery life is good. But it suffers from the same issues as the iPad – even with theincluded keyboard built in to the jacket, it is not very good at content creation – and saleswere okay, but not amazing.Microsoft also did a poor job of pushing its hardware partners to come up with interest-ing and innovative tablets themselves. It took a long while before full-blown Windows 8tablets came to market capable of running not only Modern UI apps, but also all the existingWindows applications that users already had. Finally, the likes of Dell, Lenovo, HP, Asus, Sonycame to market with Windows 8 tablets – and although some of them were innovative, theyalso had big problems.The main trouble with full Windows 8 is that it needs a “proper” CPU. Low-voltage, low-current Atom or ARM chips that are used for Windows RT cannot run Windows 8, and sofull Intel i3, i5 or i7 chips are required. The Atom Z2760 system on chip (SoC) unit as used inmany Windows RT devices has a maximum power drain of 1.7 watts. In comparison, the IntelUnlike Apple and theAndroid supplierswhich had no largehistory of applicationsto support, Microsoftwas issuing atablet that was not‘Microsoft’ enough
  • 4. computerweekly.com buyer’s guide 4HomeMixed feelingstowardsWindows 8 inenterpriseMicrosoft hasmissed a trickor two in theheartland ofits businessbut complexmobile workingremains anissue for allin the tabletmarketHow improveduser experienceyields returnson investmentTheconsequencesof poorcustomerexperienceare widelyacknowledgedbut resolvingsuch issues stilldivides opinionin businessesWorkplaceIT services influx: wherever,whenever,whateverEnterprisecomputing isin upheaval asthe emphasisshifts towardsautomationand user-deviceprovisionComputer Weekly buyer’s Guidei3 3217U CPU as used in the lowest spec Sony Duo Touch Windows 8 hybrid tablet runs at17W – 10 times as much.This means that whereas a Windows RT tablet can run for a whole working day withoutthe need to make a visit to a power source, the Windows 8 tablets tend to run out of powerhalfway through the day. And these are not like an Apple iPad – it is not just a case of a singlesmall adaptor and a USB-to-proprietary connector cable. Instead, a heavy laptop-style powerunit is required, adding around 0.5kg or more to the considerable weight of the system itself.But systems such as the Sony Duo, the Dell Inspiron Duo, the Lenovo Yoga, Lynx andTwist all come with that capability that Apple and many of the Android suppliers havemissed – they are suitable for content creation. With good keyboards and the capabilityto run full Windows applications, here aredevices which are familiar in many ways tousers and yet also have the capability to dothings in innovative and interesting ways.This is where Microsoft needs to be mak-ing its push.Android suppliers such as Asus havedone similar things with the Transformer –but this still means running non-Windowsapplications and having the risk of a lackof fidelity of content in round-trippingbetween the office-based (or even Office-based, as in Microsoft’s Office suite ofapplications) Windows systems and theAndroid-based tablets. Many can deal withthis; some cannot.Microsoft has got to sort out the heart-land of its business market. The PC is notyet ready to die and many business usersare still tethered to Windows XP-basedmachines. Windows 8 brings major capabil-ities to the fore with faster speeds, lower resource footprint and a better security system, yetMicrosoft has done little to try and encourage hardware suppliers to get suitable monitors inplace to give touchscreen support to the desktop. Only now, nearly five months down the linefrom the general availability of Windows 8, are monitors that are fully Windows 8 certifiedcoming through to market.Hardware suppliers seem to have bet the farm on all users moving to a completely newdevice – for an organisation with just 100 desktops in place, this could be an upfront cost inexcess of £70,000. This sort of cost is not possible in the current economic climate. Re-useof existing machines with only the monitors being upgradedwould make a migration far more likely.What is certain is that Microsoft no longer has an auto-matic hold on the main device for the user any longer. Appleis getting to the point where it must make more than anincremental step in innovation to remain where it is. TheAndroid suppliers are showing that they can innovate and the growing raft of apps in theGoogle Play Store is making Android tablets more appealing.Microsoft has to make its play in multiple ways. It has to be able to show the general con-sumer that it is innovative and interesting; it has to show the business-based road warriorthat it supports them in their social, information consuming activities and also in their busi-ness-focused information creation roles. And it must also provide an easy and cost-effectiveupgrade path to a full Windows 8 experience for the PC-based user – of which there willremain many hundreds of millions for the foreseeable future. nMicrosoft has got tosort out the heartlandof its business market.The PC is not yetready to die and manybusiness users are stilltethered to WindowsXP-based machines› Five steps to turn Windows 8 into Windows 7› Navigating the new end-user client landscape› Windows 8 fails to stem PC decline
  • 5. computerweekly.com buyer’s guide 5HomeMixed feelingstowardsWindows 8 inenterpriseMicrosoft hasmissed a trickor two in theheartland ofits businessbut complexmobile workingremains anissue for allin the tabletmarketHow improveduser experienceyields returnson investmentTheconsequencesof poorcustomerexperienceare widelyacknowledgedbut resolvingsuch issues stilldivides opinionin businessesWorkplaceIT services influx: wherever,whenever,whateverEnterprisecomputing isin upheaval asthe emphasisshifts towardsautomationand user-deviceprovisionComputer Weekly buyer’s GuideUser experience (UX) is most often seen as relating to e-commerce or at leastpublic-facing websites and applications. Of course it is much more than that andnot even limited to software. Physical devices of all types produce a UX and manycompanies invest a lot in it; such examples are found with Apple’s iPod and Sony’sPlayStation. One area far less talked about is UX inside the enterprise.Large organisations the world over depend on software and that software is often devel-oped internally for specific, internal purposes. The average enterprise employee will probablyuse numerous applications during the working day, all built especially for their company’sneeds. In many cases, those employees will tell you how poor those applications are to useand how that negatively affects their productivity.So why is this and why do companies with such extensive resources fail to fix it?Windows 8app updatesstreamlineuser experienceacross devicesSkills gapanalysis findsmobile userexperienceskills lackingHow improved user experienceyields returns on investmentThe consequences of poor customer experience are widely acknowledged butresolving such issues still divides opinion in businesses, writes Chris HowardBuyer’sguideclientcomputingThinkstock
  • 6. computerweekly.com buyer’s guide 6HomeMixed feelingstowardsWindows 8 inenterpriseMicrosoft hasmissed a trickor two in theheartland ofits businessbut complexmobile workingremains anissue for allin the tabletmarketHow improveduser experienceyields returnson investmentTheconsequencesof poorcustomerexperienceare widelyacknowledgedbut resolvingsuch issues stilldivides opinionin businessesWorkplaceIT services influx: wherever,whenever,whateverEnterprisecomputing isin upheaval asthe emphasisshifts towardsautomationand user-deviceprovisionComputer Weekly buyer’s GuideExposing the UX issueThe primary reason is that organisations do not understand the user experience. They viewwhat are fundamentally usability issues as problems of a specific business function. Withthe enterprise operating as a collection of almost autonomous cost centres, it is not sur-prising that this is how such problems are viewed.Here is an example: Company X has a call centre which comprises the first point of contactfor customers. The call centre uses a number of applications developed by the company’sown development team, which produce a poor user experience. This results in slow calltimes; backlogs that leave customers waiting; custom-ers being given incorrect information; and increasedcustomer complaints.Company X recognises these problems but viewsthem as a failing in customer service. Of course cus-tomer service staff cannot solve the problem becauseonly the internal development team can do that, bychanging the applications. Customer service managersdo what they can, which is usually to employ morepeople in the call centre to handle calls, support staff tohelp the people handling calls and more training. All ofwhich costs money. You will often find in such organisa-tions a small industry built up around dealing with whatis basically a usability problem.Not only has customer service spent more money butit has not really addressed the issue. Calls are still takingtoo long, customer satisfaction is still low and theircomplaints too many. Company X has spent money todeal with the symptoms but not the root cause.Let’s look at this example further and the implicationsof poor usability. Consider the negative impact on sales,from both new and existing customers, caused by thepoor customer experience and the impact on the com-pany’s reputation or brand. Company X may put morepressure on call centre staff and that can lead to extrahead count churn with the attendant knock-on effect onhuman resources costs. Poor standards of data collec-tion by those taking calls can lead to incorrect strategicbusiness decisions taken, with long-term implicationsfor costs and profitability. The picture now is of a prob-lem that is not specific to a function of the organisationbut a problem of the organisation.IT owning UXThese problems will most likely feed back to the IT department, which is in a position toaddress them. Of course IT decision-makers need to recognise the root cause as beingpoor UX and decide to do something about it. Critical to this is the department’s under-standing of the importance of UX and the value it brings to the business.IT departments are under threat with the growth of cloud-based services and the prolifera-tion of groups in large organisations buying in such services without involving them. One ofthe key drivers for this behaviour is the UX provided by such applications. Employees are farless accepting of bad experiences now they use so much software in their personal lives– from social networks to internet banking – that provides great usability.The IT leaders must recognise this and take ownership of UX. In so doing, they can realisethe value of UX to the business and fend off the bring your own device culture. Let’s say this“IT departmentsare underthreat withthe growth ofcloud-basedservices and theproliferationof groupsin largeorganisationsbuying insuch serviceswithoutinvolving them”
  • 7. computerweekly.com buyer’s guide 7HomeMixed feelingstowardsWindows 8 inenterpriseMicrosoft hasmissed a trickor two in theheartland ofits businessbut complexmobile workingremains anissue for allin the tabletmarketHow improveduser experienceyields returnson investmentTheconsequencesof poorcustomerexperienceare widelyacknowledgedbut resolvingsuch issues stilldivides opinionin businessesWorkplaceIT services influx: wherever,whenever,whateverEnterprisecomputing isin upheaval asthe emphasisshifts towardsautomationand user-deviceprovisionComputer Weekly buyer’s Guidehappens, what is next? With each function operating as its own cost centre and with its ownbudget, who is going to pay for a UX programme? IT will claim it has built an application thatmeets the requirements set and does not want to pay for a UX programme that will raise itscosts, even if it makes customer service more profitable. This is especially the case where ITacts as a service provider to the business and must keep its provisioning costs down.The solution lies in a cross-departmental approach where cost is shared or allocatedseparately to the departmental budgets of those who will benefit from the solution. AtCompany X, customer service, sales, human resources and IT can all expect to see a positiveimpact from UX.The real value of UX: improving processesSo how does such a programme get up and running inthis environment?The first issue is typically to address how UX is viewedin the organisation. Too many people still see it as acreative service and related solely to functions such asmarketing communications. For public-facing websitesthat can be fine, as marketing communication functionsare familiar with design and creative processes and howthey benefit the business, mainly in sales and brandpromotion. UX is not design and, for the purposes ofinternal business applications, the definition is vital. UXis about making a change to software-led processes toimprove their efficiency and effectiveness (as outlinedin the usability International Standard ISO 9241-11).In the IT world, UX should be seen as providing abusiness process improvement service. The definition ofsuch a service is an approach aimed at improvements by means of elevating efficiency andeffectiveness of the processes in and across organisations, terms that should be familiar toUX professionals.However, it is important to see how UX changes the way business applications and pro-cesses work, such that it brings cross-departmental benefits. UX enables change in a busi-ness transformation programme – some could even say it represents the change itself.UX-driven changeWith the current market conditions it is not unusual to find that applying the labels“change” or “business transformation” is the only way to get any new programme up andrunning. Businesses are keen to change the way they operate to push down costs andincrease profitability, given the low levels of market growthbeing experienced in most industries. UX does exactly that,through improving efficiency and effectiveness, as well asenhancing employee and customer satisfaction.From the example of Company X, it becomes clear how aninvestment in UX can realise returns across multiple busi-ness functions. With a return on investment of 6:1 or greater, it can be extremely appealingto any organisation.So as someone in enterprise IT who sees the value of UX, presenting UX as an enabler ofchange in a transformation programme will help the IT leader achieve the necessary cross-departmental buy-in from senior stakeholders. This will be vital to get a UX programmerunning and especially when, as UX matures in the organisation, you start looking to imple-ment a more holistic UX strategy. n“PresentingUX as anenabler ofchange willhelp theIT leaderachieve buy-infrom seniorstakeholders”Chris Howard is co-founder of web consultancy Howard Baines› User experience management for life sciences› User experience for mobile lifecycle teams› Deliver UX and manage BYOD successfully
  • 8. computerweekly.com buyer’s guide 8HomeMixed feelingstowardsWindows 8 inenterpriseMicrosoft hasmissed a trickor two in theheartland ofits businessbut complexmobile workingremains anissue for allin the tabletmarketHow improveduser experienceyields returnson investmentTheconsequencesof poorcustomerexperienceare widelyacknowledgedbut resolvingsuch issues stilldivides opinionin businessesWorkplaceIT services influx: wherever,whenever,whateverEnterprisecomputing isin upheaval asthe emphasisshifts towardsautomationand user-deviceprovisionComputer Weekly buyer’s GuideThe market for workplace services is evolving rapidly as a conventional and highlymature approach to desktop and desk-side management yields to a transformedworkplace services environment in which assumptions about customer preference,behaviours and even devices are up for grabs.Workplace services are increasingly associated with a mobile user and no longer linked to afixed physical location. This desire to access services wherever and whenever with whateverdevice is reshaping the evolution of workplace services.ThinkstockVMware CIO:Bringing theconsumerexperience to theenterpriseCW buyer’sguide:ConsumerisationWorkplace IT services in flux:wherever, whenever, whateverEnterprise computing is in upheaval as the emphasis shifts towards automationand user-device provision, write Bill Martorelli and Wolfgang BenkelBuyer’sguideclientcomputing
  • 9. computerweekly.com buyer’s guide 9HomeMixed feelingstowardsWindows 8 inenterpriseMicrosoft hasmissed a trickor two in theheartland ofits businessbut complexmobile workingremains anissue for allin the tabletmarketHow improveduser experienceyields returnson investmentTheconsequencesof poorcustomerexperienceare widelyacknowledgedbut resolvingsuch issues stilldivides opinionin businessesWorkplaceIT services influx: wherever,whenever,whateverEnterprisecomputing isin upheaval asthe emphasisshifts towardsautomationand user-deviceprovisionComputer Weekly buyer’s GuideUser requirements and expectations are changing in the post-desktop era. New require-ments, such as social, mobile, analytics and cloud – along with new engagement models,such as “workplace as a service” and more business value-based pricing types – are driv-ing the change from desktop to workplace services.Increasingly, users expect a consumer-grade experiencein the workplace and, as a result, IT organisations areobliged to support additional types of devices, such astablets, smartphones and other devices in the enter-prise context, while increasing the user’s autonomythrough self-service and social technologies.The focus of workplace service management is shift-ing from physical to virtual. The focus is shifting fromtraditional, physical delivery and management to virtual,remote delivery, where support functions are highlyautomated and the focus is on user self-service.A corresponding shift is reducing the emphasis ondesktop image management and application packaging,with greater prominence for delineating the personalfrom the corporate in bring your own device (BYOD)scenarios and harnessing GPS-enabled support formobile devices.This shifts the focus of workplace services delivery,allowing it greater independence from the end-devicehardware (whatever device); supports all variations ofmobility (wherever, whenever); and increases the pro-ductivity of users (whatever device), by shifting on-siteresponsibilities and efforts to the user community.Evolution of workplace servicesThe rapid inclusion of new device types, new deliverymethods – such as the app store – and BYOD modelsmay still be young in the context of workplace ser-vices, but are maturing rapidly and are increasinglyprominent in today’s workplace.Beyond that, more firms are providing a wider array ofworkplace devices such as tablets to their employeesand increased access to mobile applications. Growth innumbers, through the proliferation of devices, may serveWorkplace servicesn Mandatory elements: Service desk, field support (on-site support, managed desktop services);service provisioning (order management, asset management); and workplace software manage-ment (application packaging, image creation, patch management, antivirus, security, softwaredistribution).n Optional elements: Desktop infrastructure services including Active Directory, file and printservices, email and collaboration services, LAN services, voice services, mobile device manage-ment (MDM), user administration services, terminal server and virtual desktop services anddesktop as a service.n Additional elements: Consulting services around workplace management such as assess-ments, improvements and activities for innovation.“Suppliercapabilitiesin geographicpresence,ecosystemparticipationand propensityto participatein multisourcedscenarios arevaried, so aconsistentuser experienceacrossgeographicregions cannotbe taken forgranted”
  • 10. computerweekly.com buyer’s guide 10HomeMixed feelingstowardsWindows 8 inenterpriseMicrosoft hasmissed a trickor two in theheartland ofits businessbut complexmobile workingremains anissue for allin the tabletmarketHow improveduser experienceyields returnson investmentTheconsequencesof poorcustomerexperienceare widelyacknowledgedbut resolvingsuch issues stilldivides opinionin businessesWorkplaceIT services influx: wherever,whenever,whateverEnterprisecomputing isin upheaval asthe emphasisshifts towardsautomationand user-deviceprovisionComputer Weekly buyer’s Guideto compensate suppliers who are seeing their revenueper device decrease. But most suppliers recognise thatnew delivery models eliminate cost-intensive, low-mar-gin, on-site activities and provide the basis for managingfuture changes effectively and efficiently, with shared(cost-efficient) delivery models.The importance of local flavourThe global workplace delivery model remains a work inprogress. Many IT professionals understand that work-place services must be delivered consistently acrossgeographic regions but with local flavour, such as locallanguage support.In response, most workplace services providers areoptimising their global delivery models through processstandardisation, tool standardisation and integration,and expanded geographic presence and alliances withlocal suppliers.While consumerisation, automation and self-serviceall tend to reduce the amount of on-site work required,some local support capability is still needed. Suppliercapabilities in geographic presence, ecosystem partici-pation and propensity to participate in multisourcedscenarios are varied, so a consistent user experienceacross geographic regions cannot be taken for granted.Customer satisfaction hinges on the user experi-ence, not service level agreements (SLAs). Outsourcinguser computing activities — especially the help desk— has disillusioned users. But today’s users expect aconsumer-grade experience. “Green SLAs are no longerenough,” one supplier observed.To address this, suppliers are pursuing customer satis-faction improvements as never before. They are employing a number of alternative researchmethodologies to measure customer satisfaction, as well as harnessing customer experiencemodels – such as personas and analytics – to improve the performance of service desks andall user activities.Suppliers and customers have recognised that customer satisfaction is one key elementindicating how well service provisioning from the IT organisation and external providers isaligned with users’ demands and expectations. More importantly, the high visibility of work-place services contributes a lot to the success or failure of outsourcing. This means that cus-tomers who consider outsourcing workplace services activitieswill now need to keep customer satisfaction first and foremostin their plans.Customers must actively manage their suppliers for inno-vation. Because of the rapid change in technology and userexpectations, suppliers must be prepared to innovate to remaincompetitive. Yet, paradoxically, customers do not believe workplace services suppliers arehighly innovative in the customer environment. “Innovation is clearly an area they have notmastered,” one client said of their services provider, a common refrain among the client refer-ence interviews conducted. n“Suppliers andcustomers haverecognisedthat customersatisfaction isone key elementindicating howwell serviceprovisioningfrom the ITorganisationand externalprovidersis alignedwith users’demands andexpectations”This is an extract from The Forrester Wave™: Global Workplace Services, Q1 2013, (March 2013)by Forrester principal analysts, sourcing and vendor management, Bill Martorelli and Wolfgang Benkel› MDM is no BYOD silver bullet› Photo story: BYOD with VMware› BYOD 2.0: Moving beyond MDM