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EPIC CONVENTIONS and the marks of Homer’s style and ideas
(quick aside)  arete v. hubris—the battle! <ul><li>Hubris—overweening pride—the surest way to a downfall </li></ul><ul><li...
1. The hero’s adventure <ul><li>So who is the hero in this epic? </li></ul><ul><li>Achilles? </li></ul><ul><li>Agamemnon? ...
2. Invocation to the muse Calliope <ul><li>“Anger be now your song, immortal one” </li></ul><ul><li>Asking for inspiration...
3. In medias res <ul><li>Starts in the middle of the action </li></ul><ul><li>Only refers to the first book of an epic </l...
4. Stock epithets <ul><li>A descriptive adjective or phrase that is repeatedly used with—or in place of a noun or proper n...
5. Epic simile <ul><li>Extended comparison using “like” or “as” </li></ul><ul><li>Usually from nature </li></ul><ul><li>De...
6. Extensive use of monologues <ul><li>Allows for flashback  </li></ul><ul><li>Allows for character development </li></ul>
7. Intervention of the gods <ul><li>The war is fought on two levels: on earth and in the heavens </li></ul><ul><li>This re...
8. Dactylic hexameter <ul><li>Meter only found in original Greek </li></ul><ul><li>Our translation: blank verse </li></ul>...
Example <ul><li>An ger be now your song, im mor tal one </li></ul><ul><li>A chil les an ger doomed and ru in ous </li></ul...
How to read this translation: <ul><li>Pay close attention to enjambment </li></ul><ul><li>Pay close attention to quotation...
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Homer Powerpoint

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Here are the notes on the epic (Homeric) conventions.

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Transcript of "Homer Powerpoint"

  1. 1. EPIC CONVENTIONS and the marks of Homer’s style and ideas
  2. 2. (quick aside) arete v. hubris—the battle! <ul><li>Hubris—overweening pride—the surest way to a downfall </li></ul><ul><li>Arete—personal excellence—being the best that you can be—the surest way to glory </li></ul>
  3. 3. 1. The hero’s adventure <ul><li>So who is the hero in this epic? </li></ul><ul><li>Achilles? </li></ul><ul><li>Agamemnon? </li></ul><ul><li>Hector? </li></ul>
  4. 4. 2. Invocation to the muse Calliope <ul><li>“Anger be now your song, immortal one” </li></ul><ul><li>Asking for inspiration from the spirit </li></ul><ul><li>States epic’s subject and theme </li></ul>
  5. 5. 3. In medias res <ul><li>Starts in the middle of the action </li></ul><ul><li>Only refers to the first book of an epic </li></ul><ul><li>Necessitates flashback </li></ul>
  6. 6. 4. Stock epithets <ul><li>A descriptive adjective or phrase that is repeatedly used with—or in place of a noun or proper name” “Andromache of the ivory-white arms.” </li></ul><ul><li>Allowed for audience to get a sense of the many characters </li></ul>
  7. 7. 5. Epic simile <ul><li>Extended comparison using “like” or “as” </li></ul><ul><li>Usually from nature </li></ul><ul><li>Designed to let us picture what is happening by comparing heroic events to simple, everyday ones </li></ul>
  8. 8. 6. Extensive use of monologues <ul><li>Allows for flashback </li></ul><ul><li>Allows for character development </li></ul>
  9. 9. 7. Intervention of the gods <ul><li>The war is fought on two levels: on earth and in the heavens </li></ul><ul><li>This reveals a cultural perspective—what type of deities did the Greeks have? </li></ul>
  10. 10. 8. Dactylic hexameter <ul><li>Meter only found in original Greek </li></ul><ul><li>Our translation: blank verse </li></ul><ul><li>unrhymed lines of 10 syllables each </li></ul><ul><li>iambic pentameter </li></ul>
  11. 11. Example <ul><li>An ger be now your song, im mor tal one </li></ul><ul><li>A chil les an ger doomed and ru in ous </li></ul><ul><li>That caused A cha ena loss on bit ter loss </li></ul><ul><li>And crowded brave souls in to the un der gloom </li></ul>
  12. 12. How to read this translation: <ul><li>Pay close attention to enjambment </li></ul><ul><li>Pay close attention to quotation marks which let you know that dialogue is occurring </li></ul><ul><li>Figure out who is speaking! </li></ul><ul><li>Read aloud with a friend </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t give up—use post-it notes to help you </li></ul>
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