2010 second semester final exam review

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Use this for a review for the final exam

Use this for a review for the final exam

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  • 1. Second semester final exam review So what do you know already?
  • 2. High context/Low context
    • The business card exchange…
  • 3. M-time/P-time
    • Come to dinner… It’s at six o’clock…
  • 4. Physical Appearance
    • Do “clothes make the man”?
  • 5. Silence
    • When is it golden in the U.S.?
    • When is it awkward?
  • 6. Olfactics
    • What’s your favorite aroma? What does it communicate?
  • 7. Kinesics
    • Signals of assent
    • Signals of dissent
  • 8. Oculesics
    • The failure to “look me in the eye”
  • 9. Vocalics
    • Keeping the phone channels open…
  • 10. Proxemics
    • The arrangement of chairs in the classroom
  • 11. Haptics
    • Sympathy in the U.S.
  • 12. CITATIONS AND INCORPORATIONS
    • “Indeed he was a corpse.” Ivan Turgenev Fathers and Sons, page 169
    • Using a colon
    • Using a comma
    • Using no punctuation
  • 13. “ Indeed he was a corpse.” Ivan Turgenev Fathers and Sons, page 169
    • Using a colon –
    • In Fathers and Sons, Bazarov’s condition was eloquently presented: “Indeed he was a corpse” (Turgenev 169).
    • Using a comma –
    • The narrator in Fathers and Sons says, “Indeed he was a corpse” (Turgenev 169).
    • No punctuation –
    • The narrator in Fathers and Sons makes the point by saying “Indeed he was a corpse” (Turgenev 169).
  • 14. CITATIONS AND INCORPORATIONS
    • “Neither a borrower nor a lender be.” William Shakespeare, Hamlet, Act 1, scene 3, line 87
    • Using a colon
    • Using a comma
    • No punctuation
  • 15. “ Neither a borrower nor a lender be.” William Shakespeare, Hamlet, Act 1, scene 3, line 87
    • Using a colon –
    • Polonius offers his son the following advice: “Neither a borrower nor a lender be” ( Hamlet . I.3.87).
    • Using a comma –
    • Polonius says, “Neither a borrower nor a lender be” ( Hamlet . I.3.87).
    • No punctuation –
    • Polonius makes the point by saying “Neither a borrower nor a lender be” ( Hamlet . I.3.87).
  • 16. Candide
    • Lit approaches
    • Archetypal
    • Socio-historical
    • Structural
  • 17. Hamlet
    • Structures of the acts:
    • 1 – Background of story & character relationships
    • 2 – Knowledge through indirect means
    • 3 – Awareness of truth/action
    • 4 – Results of abortive revenge
    • 5 – Confrontation of opposing forces
  • 18. Hamlet
    • The traps….
  • 19. Hamlet
    • Seems versus is
  • 20. Hamlet
    • Character development
    • The foils
    • The womenfolk
  • 21. Fathers and Sons
    • The best way to live…
  • 22. Fathers and Sons
    • Irony, irony, irony
  • 23. Fathers and Sons
    • Realism—the balance
  • 24. INDIAN LIT
    • Sacred text —Bhaghvad Gita
    • Epic-- Ramayana
  • 25. JAPANESE LIT
    • Prose
    • Diary
    • Parables
  • 26. JAPANESE LIT
    • Poetry
    • Waka
    • Haiku
    • Tanka
    • Senryu
  • 27. ARABIC LIT
    • Poetry
    • Qu’ran
    • Thousand and One Nights
  • 28. PERSIAN LIT
    • Rumi poems
    • Saadi anecdotes and aphorisms
  • 29. CHINESE LIT
    • Prose
    • Analects
    • Anecdotes
  • 30. CHINESE POETRY
    • Book of Songs
    • Li Po
    • Tu Fu
  • 31. WRITING
    • Be creative in your thinking….
    • Follow the directions...
    • Provide specifics...
    • Check your work before submitting...