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CouchConf Israel Introduction to Document Databases

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  • 1850 - Atlantic cable -- taking data transmission up a notch\n1945 - As we may think - "He urges that men of science should then turn to the massive task of making more accessible our bewildering store of knowledge."\n1958 - ARPA - "prevent technological surprise like the launch of Sputnik" - "to prevent technological surprise to the US, but also to create technological surprise for its enemies"\n1969 - IMP - interface message processor (packet network)\n
  • 1850 - Atlantic cable -- taking data transmission up a notch\n1945 - As we may think - "He urges that men of science should then turn to the massive task of making more accessible our bewildering store of knowledge."\n1958 - ARPA - "prevent technological surprise like the launch of Sputnik" - "to prevent technological surprise to the US, but also to create technological surprise for its enemies"\n1969 - IMP - interface message processor (packet network)\n
  • 1850 - Atlantic cable -- taking data transmission up a notch\n1945 - As we may think - "He urges that men of science should then turn to the massive task of making more accessible our bewildering store of knowledge."\n1958 - ARPA - "prevent technological surprise like the launch of Sputnik" - "to prevent technological surprise to the US, but also to create technological surprise for its enemies"\n1969 - IMP - interface message processor (packet network)\n
  • 1850 - Atlantic cable -- taking data transmission up a notch\n1945 - As we may think - "He urges that men of science should then turn to the massive task of making more accessible our bewildering store of knowledge."\n1958 - ARPA - "prevent technological surprise like the launch of Sputnik" - "to prevent technological surprise to the US, but also to create technological surprise for its enemies"\n1969 - IMP - interface message processor (packet network)\n
  • 1850 - Atlantic cable -- taking data transmission up a notch\n1945 - As we may think - "He urges that men of science should then turn to the massive task of making more accessible our bewildering store of knowledge."\n1958 - ARPA - "prevent technological surprise like the launch of Sputnik" - "to prevent technological surprise to the US, but also to create technological surprise for its enemies"\n1969 - IMP - interface message processor (packet network)\n
  • 1850 - Atlantic cable -- taking data transmission up a notch\n1945 - As we may think - "He urges that men of science should then turn to the massive task of making more accessible our bewildering store of knowledge."\n1958 - ARPA - "prevent technological surprise like the launch of Sputnik" - "to prevent technological surprise to the US, but also to create technological surprise for its enemies"\n1969 - IMP - interface message processor (packet network)\n
  • 1965 - MUMPS - Massachusetts General Hospital Utility Multi-Programming System - It was largely adopted during the 1970s and early 1980s in healthcare and financial information systems/databases, and continues to be used by many of the same clients today. It is currently used in electronic health record systems as well as by multiple banking networks and online trading/investment services.\n
  • 1965 - MUMPS - Massachusetts General Hospital Utility Multi-Programming System - It was largely adopted during the 1970s and early 1980s in healthcare and financial information systems/databases, and continues to be used by many of the same clients today. It is currently used in electronic health record systems as well as by multiple banking networks and online trading/investment services.\n
  • 1965 - MUMPS - Massachusetts General Hospital Utility Multi-Programming System - It was largely adopted during the 1970s and early 1980s in healthcare and financial information systems/databases, and continues to be used by many of the same clients today. It is currently used in electronic health record systems as well as by multiple banking networks and online trading/investment services.\n
  • 1965 - MUMPS - Massachusetts General Hospital Utility Multi-Programming System - It was largely adopted during the 1970s and early 1980s in healthcare and financial information systems/databases, and continues to be used by many of the same clients today. It is currently used in electronic health record systems as well as by multiple banking networks and online trading/investment services.\n
  • 1965 - MUMPS - Massachusetts General Hospital Utility Multi-Programming System - It was largely adopted during the 1970s and early 1980s in healthcare and financial information systems/databases, and continues to be used by many of the same clients today. It is currently used in electronic health record systems as well as by multiple banking networks and online trading/investment services.\n
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  • This application runs all the way to the edge. A billion concurrent users on this application will have the same experience as a single user.\n
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  • APIs in every language to work with your data.\n
  • Focus point: Applications tend to only care about the parts they find interesting while preserving the rest.\n
  • Focus point: Applications tend to only care about the parts they find interesting while preserving the rest.\n
  • Focus point: Applications tend to only care about the parts they find interesting while preserving the rest.\n
  • Focus point: Applications tend to only care about the parts they find interesting while preserving the rest.\n
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  • Transcript

    • 1. Introduction to Document DatabasesFrank Weigel @FrankWeig
    • 2. HOW DO WE THINK ABOUT DATA? 2
    • 3. HOW DO WE THINK ABOUT DATA? a brief history 2
    • 4. IDS IMS (IBM) “A Relational Model of Ingres Charles Bachman (GE) Vern Watts Data for Michael Stonebraker MUMPS, Large Shared (Berkeley) Pick (TRW) Data Banks” E.F. Codd (IBM) 1850 1945 1957 1958 1962 1965 1966 1968 1969 1970 1972 1973Atlantic Cable ARPACyrus W. Field (USA) IMP ARPANET "As We May Think" oNLine System (NLS) (UCLA-Stanford) Vannevar Bush Sputnik Doug Engelbart (USSR)
    • 5. IDS IMS (IBM) “A Relational Model of Ingres Charles Bachman (GE) Vern Watts Data for Michael Stonebraker MUMPS, Large Shared (Berkeley) seminal events in in internet history seminal events internet history Pick (TRW) Data Banks” E.F. Codd (IBM) 1850 1945 1957 1958 1962 1965 1966 1968 1969 1970 1972 1973Atlantic Cable ARPACyrus W. Field (USA) IMP ARPANET "As We May Think" oNLine System (NLS) (UCLA-Stanford) Vannevar Bush Sputnik Doug Engelbart (USSR)
    • 6. IDS IMS (IBM) “A Relational Model of Ingres Charles Bachman (GE) Vern Watts Data for Michael Stonebraker MUMPS, Large Shared (Berkeley) hypertext/hypermedia/web seminal events in internet history Pick (TRW) Data Banks” E.F. Codd (IBM) 1850 1945 1957 1958 1962 1965 1966 1968 1969 1970 1972 1973Atlantic Cable ARPACyrus W. Field (USA) IMP ARPANET "As We May Think" oNLine System (NLS) (UCLA-Stanford) Vannevar Bush Sputnik Doug Engelbart (USSR)
    • 7. IDS IMS (IBM) “A Relational Model of Ingres Charles Bachman (GE) Vern Watts Data for Michael Stonebraker MUMPS, Large Shared (Berkeley) Pickhypertext/hypermedia/web seminal(TRW) in internetinternet beginnings of the history events Data Banks” E.F. Codd (IBM) 1850 1945 1957 1958 1962 1965 1966 1968 1969 1970 1972 1973Atlantic Cable ARPACyrus W. Field (USA) IMP ARPANET "As We May Think" oNLine System (NLS) (UCLA-Stanford) Vannevar Bush Sputnik Doug Engelbart (USSR)
    • 8. IDS IMS (IBM) “A Relational Model of Ingres Charles Bachman (GE) Vern Watts Data for Michael Stonebraker MUMPS, Large Shared (Berkeley) Pick (TRW) Data Banks” E.F. Codd (IBM) 1850 1945 1957 1958 1962 1965 1966 1968 1969 1970 1972 1973Atlantic Cable ARPACyrus W. Field (USA) IMP ARPANET "As We May Think" oNLine System (NLS) (UCLA-Stanford) Vannevar Bush Sputnik Doug Engelbart (USSR)
    • 9. IDS IMS (IBM) “A Relational Model of Ingres Charles Bachman (GE) Vern Watts Data for Michael Stonebraker MUMPS, Large Shared (Berkeley) Pick (TRW) Data Banks” E.F. Codd (IBM) 1850 1945 1957 1958 1962 1965 1966 1968 1969 1970 1972 1973Atlantic Cable ARPAseminal events in internet history hierarchical/network databasesCyrus W. Field (USA) IMP ARPANET "As We May Think" oNLine System (NLS) (UCLA-Stanford) Vannevar Bush Sputnik Doug Engelbart (USSR)
    • 10. IDS IMS (IBM) “A Relational Model of Ingres Charles Bachman (GE) Vern Watts Data for Michael Stonebraker MUMPS, Large Shared (Berkeley) Pick (TRW) Data Banks” E.F. Codd (IBM) 1850 1945 1957 1958 1962 1965 1966 1968 1969 1970 1972 1973Atlantic Cable ARPA relational databasesCyrus W. Field (USA) IMP ARPANET "As We May Think" oNLine System (NLS) (UCLA-Stanford) Vannevar Bush Sputnik Doug Engelbart (USSR)
    • 11. IDS IMS (IBM) “A Relational Model of Ingres Charles Bachman (GE) Vern Watts Data for Michael Stonebraker MUMPS, Large Shared (Berkeley) Pick (TRW) Data Banks” E.F. Codd (IBM) 1850 1945 1957 1958 1962 1965 1966 1968 1969 1970 1972 1973Atlantic Cable ARPACyrus W. Field (USA) IMP ARPANET "As We May Think" oNLine System (NLS) (UCLA-Stanford) Vannevar Bush Sputnik Doug Engelbart (USSR)
    • 12. Pre-1960 GemStone/S (GemStone) Cache Versant Intersystems GT.M, Oracle (Versant) (MUMPS) BerkeleyDB (Larry Ellison) many MySQL Metakit MUMPS Lotus Notes (Michael WideniusSystem R other ANSI, (Lotus) and David Axmark) (IBM) ODBMSs DBM1974 1976 1977 1982 1983 1984 1985 1989 1990 1991 1994 1997 DNS line-mode browser Cello (Paul Mockapetris) (Nicola Pellow) (Tom Bruce) TCP/IP WWW Mosaic NeXT (Vint Cerf (Tim Berners-Lee) (Marc Andreeson) and ViolaWWW Bob Kahn) (Pei Wei) Hypercard (Bill Atkinson)
    • 13. Pre-1960 GemStone/S (GemStone) Cache Versant Intersystems GT.M, Oracle (Versant) (MUMPS) BerkeleyDB (Larry Ellison) many MySQL Metakit MUMPS Lotus Notes (Michael WideniusSystem R other ANSI, (Lotus) and David Axmark) (IBM) hypertext/hypermedia/web beginnings of the internet ODBMSs DBM1974 1976 1977 1982 1983 1984 1985 1989 1990 1991 1994 1997 DNS line-mode browser Cello (Paul Mockapetris) (Nicola Pellow) (Tom Bruce) TCP/IP WWW Mosaic NeXT (Vint Cerf (Tim Berners-Lee) (Marc Andreeson) and ViolaWWW Bob Kahn) (Pei Wei) Hypercard (Bill Atkinson)
    • 14. Pre-1960 GemStone/S (GemStone) Cache Versant Intersystems GT.M, Oracle (Versant) (MUMPS) BerkeleyDB (Larry Ellison) many MySQL Metakit MUMPS Lotus Notes (Michael WideniusSystem R other ANSI, (Lotus) and David Axmark) hypertext/hypermedia/web (IBM) ODBMSs seminal events in internet history DBM1974 1976 1977 1982 1983 1984 1985 1989 1990 1991 1994 1997 DNS line-mode browser Cello (Paul Mockapetris) (Nicola Pellow) (Tom Bruce) TCP/IP WWW Mosaic NeXT (Vint Cerf (Tim Berners-Lee) (Marc Andreeson) and ViolaWWW Bob Kahn) (Pei Wei) Hypercard (Bill Atkinson)
    • 15. Pre-1960 GemStone/S (GemStone) Cache Versant Intersystems GT.M, Oracle (Versant) (MUMPS) BerkeleyDB (Larry Ellison) many MySQL Metakit MUMPS Lotus Notes (Michael WideniusSystem R other ANSI, (Lotus) and David Axmark) (IBM) ODBMSs DBM1974 1976 1977 1982 1983 1984 1985 1989 1990 1991 1994 1997 DNS line-mode browser Cello (Paul Mockapetris) (Nicola Pellow) (Tom Bruce) TCP/IP WWW Mosaic NeXT (Vint Cerf (Tim Berners-Lee) (Marc Andreeson) and ViolaWWW Bob Kahn) (Pei Wei) Hypercard (Bill Atkinson)
    • 16. Pre-1960 GemStone/S (GemStone) Cache Versant Intersystems GT.M, Oracle (Versant) (MUMPS) BerkeleyDB (Larry Ellison) many MySQL Metakit MUMPS Lotus Notes (Michael WideniusSystem R other ANSI, (Lotus) and David Axmark) (IBM) ODBMSs DBM1974 1976 1977 1982 1983 1984 1985 1989 1990 1991 1994 1997 DNS line-mode browser Cello (Paul Mockapetris) (Nicola Pellow) (Tom Bruce) TCP/IP WWW Mosaic NeXT (Vint Cerf (Tim Berners-Lee) (Marc Andreeson) and ViolaWWW Bob Kahn) (Pei Wei) Hypercard (Bill Atkinson)
    • 17. Pre-1960 GemStone/S (GemStone) Cache Versant Intersystems GT.M, Oracle (Versant) (MUMPS) BerkeleyDB (Larry Ellison) many MySQL Metakit MUMPS Lotus Notes (Michael WideniusSystem R other ANSI, (Lotus) and David Axmark) (IBM) ODBMSs DBM1974 1976 1977 1982 1983 1984 1985 1989 1990 1991 1994 1997relational events in seminal databases DNS line-mode browser Cello (Paul Mockapetris) (Nicola Pellow) (Tom Bruce) TCP/IP WWW Mosaic NeXT (Vint Cerf (Tim Berners-Lee) (Marc Andreeson) and ViolaWWW Bob Kahn) (Pei Wei) Hypercard (Bill Atkinson)
    • 18. Pre-1960 GemStone/S (GemStone) Cache Versant Intersystems GT.M, Oracle (Versant) (MUMPS) BerkeleyDB (Larry Ellison) many MySQL Metakit MUMPS Lotus Notes (Michael WideniusSystem R other ANSI, (Lotus) and David Axmark) (IBM) ODBMSs DBM1974 1976 1977 1982 1983 1984 1985 1989 1990 1991 1994 1997 seminalDNS MUMPS line-mode browser Cello (Paul Mockapetris) (Nicola Pellow) (Tom Bruce) TCP/IP WWW Mosaic NeXT (Vint Cerf (Tim Berners-Lee) (Marc Andreeson) and ViolaWWW Bob Kahn) (Pei Wei) Hypercard (Bill Atkinson)
    • 19. Pre-1960 GemStone/S (GemStone) Cache Versant Intersystems GT.M, Oracle (Versant) (MUMPS) BerkeleyDB (Larry Ellison) many MySQL Metakit MUMPS Lotus Notes (Michael WideniusSystem R other ANSI, (Lotus) and David Axmark) (IBM) ODBMSs DBM1974 1976 1977 1982 1983 1984 1985 1989 1990 1991 1994 1997 DNS object databases line-mode browser Cello (Paul Mockapetris) (Nicola Pellow) (Tom Bruce) TCP/IP WWW Mosaic NeXT (Vint Cerf (Tim Berners-Lee) (Marc Andreeson) and ViolaWWW Bob Kahn) (Pei Wei) Hypercard (Bill Atkinson)
    • 20. Pre-1960 GemStone/S (GemStone) Cache Versant Intersystems GT.M, Oracle (Versant) (MUMPS) BerkeleyDB (Larry Ellison) many MySQL Metakit MUMPS Lotus Notes (Michael WideniusSystem R other ANSI, (Lotus) and David Axmark) (IBM) ODBMSs DBM1974 1976 1977 1982 1983 1984 1985 1989 1990 1991 1994 1997 DNS object databases line-mode browser Cello (Paul Mockapetris) (Nicola Pellow) (Tom Bruce) TCP/IP WWW Mosaic NeXT (Vint Cerf (Tim Berners-Lee) (Marc Andreeson) and ViolaWWW Bob Kahn) (Pei Wei) Hypercard (Bill Atkinson)
    • 21. Pre-1960 GemStone/S (GemStone) Cache Versant Intersystems GT.M, Oracle (Versant) (MUMPS) BerkeleyDB (Larry Ellison) many MySQL Metakit MUMPS Lotus Notes (Michael WideniusSystem R other ANSI, (Lotus) and David Axmark) (IBM) ODBMSs DBM1974 1976 1977 1982 1983 1984 1985 1989 1990 1991 1994 1997 DNS line-modeopen source browser Cello (Paul Mockapetris) (Nicola Pellow) (Tom Bruce) TCP/IP WWW Mosaic NeXT (Vint Cerf (Tim Berners-Lee) (Marc Andreeson) and ViolaWWW Bob Kahn) (Pei Wei) Hypercard (Bill Atkinson)
    • 22. Pre-1960 GemStone/S (GemStone) Cache Versant Intersystems GT.M, Oracle (Versant) (MUMPS) BerkeleyDB (Larry Ellison) many MySQL Metakit MUMPS Lotus Notes (Michael WideniusSystem R other ANSI, (Lotus) and David Axmark) (IBM) ODBMSs DBM1974 1976 1977 1982 1983 1984 1985 1989 1990 1991 1994 1997 DNS line-mode browser Cello (Paul Mockapetris) (Nicola Pellow) (Tom Bruce) TCP/IP WWW Mosaic NeXT (Vint Cerf (Tim Berners-Lee) (Marc Andreeson) and ViolaWWW Bob Kahn) (Pei Wei) Hypercard (Bill Atkinson)
    • 23. Terrastore, Project Voldemort, Riak db4o Cassandra Dynomite, JackRabbit, Hbase, Neo4j QDBM Tokyo Cabinet MongoDB VertexDB BigTable Amazon Couchbase Server "NoSQL" Dynamo "NoSQL" memcachedCarlo Rozzi CouchDB (paper) membase Couchbase Mobile 1998 2000 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 iOS and iPhone iPad Kindle FireOpen Source Summit CAP Theorem Steve Jobs Tim OReilly Formally Proven Android CAP Theorem Seth Gilbert, (Andy Rubin) Samsung Galaxy Eric Brewer Nancy Lynch (MIT)
    • 24. Terrastore, Project Voldemort, Riak db4o Cassandra Dynomite, JackRabbit, Hbase, Neo4j QDBM Tokyo Cabinet MongoDB VertexDB BigTable Amazon Couchbase Server "NoSQL" Dynamo "NoSQL"Carlo Rozzi seminal memcached distributed computing events in CouchDB (paper) membase Couchbase Mobile 1998 2000 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 iOS and iPhone iPad Kindle FireOpen Source Summit CAP Theorem Steve Jobs Tim OReilly Formally Proven Android CAP Theorem Seth Gilbert, (Andy Rubin) Samsung Galaxy Eric Brewer Nancy Lynch (MIT)
    • 25. Terrastore, Project Voldemort, Riak db4o Cassandra Dynomite, JackRabbit, Hbase, Neo4j QDBM Tokyo Cabinet MongoDB VertexDB BigTable Amazon Couchbase Server "NoSQL" Dynamo "NoSQL" memcached mobile devices mobile devicesCarlo Rozzi CouchDB (paper) membase Couchbase Mobile 1998 2000 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 iOS and iPhone iPad Kindle FireOpen Source Summit CAP Theorem Steve Jobs Tim OReilly Formally Proven Android CAP Theorem Seth Gilbert, (Andy Rubin) Samsung Galaxy Eric Brewer Nancy Lynch (MIT)
    • 26. Terrastore, Project Voldemort, Riak db4o Cassandra Dynomite, JackRabbit, Hbase, Neo4j QDBM Tokyo Cabinet MongoDB VertexDB BigTable Amazon Couchbase Server "NoSQL" Dynamo "NoSQL" memcachedCarlo Rozzi CouchDB (paper) membase Couchbase Mobile 1998 2000 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 iOS and iPhone iPad Kindle FireOpen Source Summit CAP Theorem Steve Jobs Tim OReilly Formally Proven Android CAP Theorem Seth Gilbert, (Andy Rubin) Samsung Galaxy Eric Brewer Nancy Lynch (MIT)
    • 27. Terrastore, Project Voldemort, Riak db4o Cassandra Dynomite, JackRabbit, Hbase, Neo4j QDBM Tokyo Cabinet MongoDB VertexDB BigTable Amazon Couchbase Server "NoSQL" Dynamo "NoSQL" memcachedCarlo Rozzi CouchDB (paper) membase Couchbase Mobile 1998 2000 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 seminal events in OnlyiOS and iPhone NoSQL (“Not internet history SQL”) iPad Kindle FireOpen Source Summit CAP Theorem Steve Jobs Tim OReilly Formally Proven Android CAP Theorem Seth Gilbert, (Andy Rubin) Samsung Galaxy Eric Brewer Nancy Lynch (MIT)
    • 28. Terrastore, Project Voldemort, Riak db4o Cassandra Dynomite, JackRabbit, Hbase, Neo4j QDBM Tokyo Cabinet MongoDB VertexDB BigTable Amazon Couchbase Server "NoSQL" Dynamo "NoSQL" memcachedCarlo Rozzi CouchDB (paper) membase Couchbase Mobile 1998 2000 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 seminaliOS and in internet history events of Scale Issues iPhone iPad Kindle FireOpen Source Summit CAP Theorem Steve Jobs Tim OReilly Formally Proven Android CAP Theorem Seth Gilbert, (Andy Rubin) Samsung Galaxy Eric Brewer Nancy Lynch (MIT)
    • 29. Terrastore, Project Voldemort, Riak db4o Cassandra Dynomite, JackRabbit, Hbase, Neo4j QDBM Tokyo Cabinet MongoDB VertexDB BigTable Amazon Couchbase Server "NoSQL" Dynamo "NoSQL" memcachedCarlo Rozzi CouchDB (paper) membase Couchbase Mobile 1998 2000 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 iOS and iPhone iPad Kindle FireOpen Source Summit CAP Theorem Steve Jobs Tim OReilly Formally Proven Android CAP Theorem Seth Gilbert, (Andy Rubin) Samsung Galaxy Eric Brewer Nancy Lynch (MIT)
    • 30. 2011• Number of users of apps growing rapidly – Was thousands, now often millions or more• Amount of data stored in apps growing rapidly – Was GBs, now often 1000s of GBs or more• Types of data stored in apps is different – Was structured, now often unstructured & user-generated – Many apps including social features to increase engagement• Data you want to store is changing rapidly – Fixed data model was okay, now its not flexible enough• High-speed networking is inexpensive – Central computing was okay, now distributed computing better 9
    • 31. Logic Scales!
    • 32. What About Data?
    • 33. The Relational Database Solution
    • 34. RDBMS Scales ... at what cost?
    • 35. The NoSQL Solution
    • 36. The NoSQL Solution
    • 37. DATABASE TAXONOMY JAMES HAMILTON, AMAZONFeatures-First Oracle, SQL Server, DB2, MySQL, PostgreSQL, Amazon RDS 17
    • 38. DATABASE TAXONOMY JAMES HAMILTON, AMAZONFeatures-First Oracle, SQL Server, DB2, MySQL, PostgreSQL, Amazon RDSScale-First Couchbase Server, CouchDB, Project Voldemort, Riak, Scalaris, Kai, Dynomite, MemcacheDB, ThruDB, Cassandra, HBase and Hypertable 17
    • 39. DATABASE TAXONOMY JAMES HAMILTON, AMAZONFeatures-First Oracle, SQL Server, DB2, MySQL, PostgreSQL, Amazon RDSScale-First Couchbase Server, CouchDB, Project Voldemort, Riak, Scalaris, Kai, Dynomite, MemcacheDB, ThruDB, Cassandra, HBase and HypertableSimple Structured Storage Amazon SimpleDB, Berkeley DB 17
    • 40. DATABASE TAXONOMY JAMES HAMILTON, AMAZONFeatures-First Oracle, SQL Server, DB2, MySQL, PostgreSQL, Amazon RDSScale-First Couchbase Server, CouchDB, Project Voldemort, Riak, Scalaris, Kai, Dynomite, MemcacheDB, ThruDB, Cassandra, HBase and HypertableSimple Structured Storage Amazon SimpleDB, Berkeley DBPurpose-Optimized Stores StreamBase, Vertica, Aster Data, Netezza, Greenplum, VoltDB 17
    • 41. NOSQL TAXONOMY STEVEN YEN, COUCHBASE 18
    • 42. NOSQL TAXONOMY STEVEN YEN, COUCHBASEkey-value-cachekey-value-storeeventually-consistent key-value-storeordered-key-value-storedata-structures servertuple-storeobject databasedocument databasewide columnar store 18
    • 43. WHO WILL WIN? 19
    • 44.  THE MOSTAPPROACHABLE API WITHENOUGH POWER WILL WIN 20
    • 45. NOSQL TAXONOMYkey-value-cachekey-value-storeeventually-consistent key-value-storeordered-key-value-storedata-structures servertuple-storeobject databasedocument databasewide columnar store 21
    • 46. WHY DOCUMENT DATABASES? 22
    • 47. DOCUMENT DATABASE APIS ARE ‘APPROACHABLE’ 23
    • 48. DOCUMENT DATABASE APIS ARE ‘APPROACHABLE’ Simple API GET, SET, DELETE, ADD, REPLACE, ... Intuitive Data No Fixed Schema No more “ALTER TABLE” Easy Sharding De-normalized data 23
    • 49. Everyone Understands
    • 50. Everyone Understands
    • 51. Documents are Flexible
    • 52. Documents are Flexible
    • 53. Documents are Flexible
    • 54. Documents are Flexible
    • 55. Documents are Flexible
    • 56. Document Databases Have Low Latency Response Time (μs)• Latency test example on 10GigE – http://10gigabitethernet.typepad.com/network_stack/2011/09/couchbase-goes-faster-with- openonload.html• <90 us [!] latency with kernel networking – <20us latency with OpenOnload optimized networking stack (bypassing kernel)
    • 57. Document Databases Scale Out
    • 58. Document Databases Distribute Indexing
    • 59. Document Databases Are Developer Friendly
    • 60. Q&A GET COUCHBASE SERVER:HTTP://WWW.COUCHBASE.ORG/GET/ COUCHBASE/2.0.0 30
    • 61. “THE ROADS AND CROSSROADS OF INTERNET HISTORY”HTTP://WWW.NETVALLEY.COM/INTVAL1.HTML“A BRIEF HISTORY OF NOSQL”HTTP://BLOG.KNUTHAUGEN.NO/2010/03/A-BRIEF-HISTORY-OF-NOSQL.HTML“HISTORY OF THE ATLANTIC CABLE AND UNDERSEA COMMUNICATIONS”HTTP://ATLANTIC-CABLE.COM/FIELD/INDEX.HTM“A LITTLE HISTORY OF THE WORLD WIDE WEB”HTTP://WWW.W3.ORG/HISTORY.HTML“DAN PRITCHETT ON ARCHITECTURE AT EBAY”HTTP://WWW.INFOQ.COM/INTERVIEWS/DAN-PRITCHETT-EBAY-ARCHITECTURE“NOSQL IS A HORSELESS CARRIAGE” BY STEVEN YENHTTP://DL.DROPBOX.COM/U/2075876/NOSQL-STEVE-YEN.PDF 31